Steaming Satellites – Self Titled

Steaming Satellites_RingMaster Review

Steaming Satellites is an Austrian band that for the past ten years has been a major lure and adventure in their country’s music scene, underground and within stronger spotlights. The fact that it has taken their new and third album to find, like for so many others, our attention shows how little of the vast music world anyone has a hold on at any given time. We can only be thankful that the Salzburg band’s new self-titled release has found its way through to thrill ears and ignite the imagination though because it is simply bewitching.

Consisting of Max Borchardt (vocals/guitar), Emanuel Krimplstätter (keys/bass), Matthäus Weber (drums, programming, keys), and the recently joined Manfred Mader (bass), Steaming Satellites casts a sound bred from indie rock but welcoming to an array of flavours from blues, funk, soul, and electronic enterprise. Their previous pair of albums were strongly acclaimed propositions whilst live, with shows alongside bands such as Thin Lizzy, The Ravonettes, and Portugal. The Man amongst a great many, the band has earned a potent reputation for sound and performance. Now it is the turn of album three to stir things up and as for the umpteenth time the release lights our ears and revitalises emotions, the thought of Steaming Satellites becoming a ‘household’ name across numerous territories seems a thick possibility.

It opens with Together and a caress of acoustic guitar; a gentle coaxing aided by the immediately enticing and expressive tones of Borchardt. Soon stringed tempting wraps around ears and in turn a dark moody bassline strolls through the emerging colourful and creative landscape of the song. As keys jab and harmonies unite, the song blossoms into an infectious romance for the imagination and a swiftly open appetite for the release. As catchiness and shadow kissed drama similarly grows within the fascinating proposal, feet and hips become eager whilst thoughts only greedily consume the impressive entrance of the album.

cover_RingMaster Review   Its indie rock swing is emulated in the following Rocket, though electro tempting is the first bait to engage ears to lead them into the military funk of the rhythms and the fiery dance of the guitar. Its air becomes a sultry breath at certain points, always returning to its lively endeavour though as varied spices burst from the festive heart of the track, again with feet and voice in eager involvement. Like The Flaming Lips trying on the psych rock of The Doors and the creative intimacy of Billy Momo, the song excites before departing, leaving lingering trails behind it though the fuzzy revelry of Unreal soon has attention all to itself thanks to jangly hooks and a deliciously roaming, slightly grouchy bassline which toys with the melodic radiance of the keys and harmonies. At its heart, the track is a funk bred romp but as already shown, Steaming Satellites never leave anything to settle into predictability, always keeping invention and surprises potently shimmering.

Both Honey and Restless Robot keep pleasure high and enterprise blooming, the first with its tangy Arctic Monkeys/Kings of Leon shuffle within a flirtatious smile and the second through a rhythmically dark and sonically sultry Portugal. The Man meets Futureheads tango. There are many other slithers of spice bringing a whisper of varied bands to the song, and album, but in the hands of Steaming Satellites all get turned inside out and honed into something unique and as here forcibly captivating.

Door is a heavier emotive croon which, without matching the successes before it, enthrals with its evocative textures and instinctive bounce aligning perfectly with the song’s moodier atmosphere and vocal heart whilst Circles slips into a bluesy Black Keys-esque character with stomping riffs, crisp rhythms, and spicy grooving. It too pleases without tapping up the lustier reactions found by earlier songs and definitely ignited by the outstanding Unfold straight after. The track is pure magnetism, a resourceful serenade of intimate vocals and emotive smouldering which just gets bigger and more persuasively spellbinding with every passing chord and melodic spice. It is as much an anthem as any raucous sing-a-long rocker, a compelling contagion of sixties keys, seventies melodic drama, and indie imagination.

Through the raunchier funk ‘n’ roll of Back And Forth, the feisty post punk meets indie/electro rock of Phone, and the dark White Stripes rock ‘n’ roll of Fill The Cup, album and listener continue to be fully involved in each other whilst Secret Desire employs a more restrained stride and melodic haze to its crystalline sparkle of keys and guitar to further engage the imagination. Tempered by the earthier tones of the bass and the grounded delivery of Borchardt, the track is the perfect blend of dark and light; maybe a slower burn on the passions than other treats within the album but another leaving long term hooks in its wake.

The album is completed by Move On, a gorgeous slice of lively balladry cored by ever impressing vocals and coloured by a virulent and imaginative tapestry of melodic and sonic colour. The track is a tremendous end to an outstanding release, an encounter which gets more commanding with every listen. It is hard to imagine Steaming Satellites being a relative secret from now on, but then as we said music is so big that the ease with which one can miss things is inescapable. Our suggestion is that band and album, is not another you allow to pass you by though.

The Steaming Satellites album is out from October 30th

https://www.facebook.com/steamingsatellites   http://www.steamingsatellites.com/

Pete Ringmaster 29/10/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Old House Playground – The Great Escape EP

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Listening to The Great Escape EP, thoughts wondered whether if Edgar Allan Poe was around today creating dark literary masterpieces, would he be listening to and most likely involving the music of UK based Old House Playground somewhere. Four tracks of dark rock ‘n’ roll bred with provocative blues climates and gothic imagination, all “with roots in the songwriting culture of traditional Greek folk music”; the band’s new seriously compelling EP suggests quite possibly yes as it thrills with its ripe bewitching drama and imposing atmospheres.

It was in 2009 that Old House Playground moved from Athens to Manchester to, in the words of their bio, “experiment with new musical paths and forms of expression.” Vocalist/guitarist Tryfon Lazos, drummer Andreas Venetantes, and bassist Conor Loughran were soon weaving inspirations from the likes of Tom Waits, Django Reinhardt, Nick Cave and Greek artists Psarantonis, and Marcos Vamvakaris into their own unique vision of an alternative rock/blues sound. The departure of Loughran before its recording saw debut album God Damn That Gold the creation of the remaining duo overseen by producer/musician Chris Evans. Its 2013 release via Evening Economies/Fat Bob Records was keenly received and praised, as too a UK tour in support of its unveiling. The band also ignited the attention of Vini Reilly through the band linking up with Sugar House production, leading to a subsequent collaboration seeing Old House Playground and Durutti Column together for the latter’s first Manchester performance for five years and Lazos singing onstage alongside Reilly that night. With bassist Jago Furnas enlisted last September, Old House Playground now release the magnificent tempting of The Great Escape, an encounter to inspire the imagination and feed a greedy appetite for dark treats.

Picture 47_Reputation Radio/RingMaster Review   Opener Polite Fiction immediately has ears and attention sparked with its initial psychobilly coated groove, and gripped with the quickly joining blend of vocals and spicy guitar enterprise. The tones of Lazos are a rich enticing and attention grabber, even as the song becomes a perpetual awakening of new sounds and textures sparking ears with embraces of fiery sax and brooding basslines amongst many things. An unbridled captivation with a predatory stride, the song blossoms into a sultry, jazz kissed seduction of Bernaccia and Tom Waits like essences courting the warped swagger of Eighties B-Line Train Disaster and the raw croon of Nick Cave. It is a delicious web of temptation, ears and thoughts embroiled in the swinging lures and smouldering drama cast by the openly inventive and descriptive craft of the band.

The exhilarating start is followed by Stardance, a similarly potent slavery of blues intoxication and rhythmic devilry bound in tangy grooves and vocal enterprise. Like its predecessor, the song has a flirtatious devilry to its sauntering gait and swinging energy, and like the first track provides an irresistible tapestry of darkly cultured hues entangled in delta bred blues persuasion. It is the devil’s music for sure and even more ridiculously addictive when exploring off kilter twists of sonic and melodic ingenuity aligned to the perpetual noir lit jazziness fuelling its inventive breath.

A western twang creeps in with the inviting caress of guitar bringing All Day Today into view next, the song’s country-esque acoustic folk charm enhanced further by the ever potent and alluring vocals of Lazos. Reminding in some ways of Swedish band Billy Momo and in others of Milton Star, the song is three minutes of dark seduction sparking ears and thoughts further before making way for the EP’s closing title track. Sweltering with sultry melodies and heated sonic mystique, the song is pure aural alchemy conjuring a majestic tapestry of wiry chords and acidic grooves within a suggestive landscape as intimate as it is evocatively expansive.

The track is a brilliant end to a seriously thrilling release. Old House Playground may have been in the shadows for many before the release of The Great Escape EP but it is easy to suggest the only dark hues around them will be those they seed, blossom, and embrace their music with from hereon in.

The Great Escape EP is available via Horus Music from 22th June @ http://oldhouseplayground.bandcamp.com/album/the-great-escape, digitally and as Limited Edition 10″ vinyl with 2 bonus tracks!

http://www.oldhouseplayground.net/   https://www.facebook.com/oldhouseplayground

RingMaster 22/06//2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Rosenthal – Heart EP

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Managing to sound invitingly nostalgic and refreshingly new, the Heart EP is a captivating full introduction to Rosenthal, a Danish band already drawing a healthy buzz around themselves. Consisting of five tracks which can be described as being bred from a merger of new wave, dream pop, and shoegaze with a psychedelic colouring, the band’s debut EP is an intriguing and increasingly enjoyable embrace for ears and imagination.

Rosenthal is the brainchild and project of Copenhagen-based songwriter and producer Jeppe Kiel Revsbech. Last year saw the release of two singles, both Lashes and Afraid of Stairs sparking keen attention and enthused reactions to the band’s presence and sound. Now fresh off their successful first UK tour, the band is set to reinforce and push forward again their emerging presence in a wider arena with the Magnus Vad produced Heart EP, and with Ask Kjærgaard (guitars) and Kasper Nyhus Janssen (drums) alongside Jeppe Kiel Revsbech (guitar, keyboards, vocals), Rosenthal is continuing 2015 in fine style.

The EP’s title track starts things off and sets an early pinnacle for the encounter. The resonating yet earthy bass tone which opens the track is alone an instant irresistible persuasion. It has the same dark flavouring which gave depth and potent shadows to the early sounds of The Cure and equally Joy Division. In no time guitars add their minimalistic but expressive colour too whilst the floating vocals of Kiel Revsbech glance over ears like Green Gartside of Scritti Politti. The emerging melodic elegance of the song is a radiant hue, uniting with the mellow and sizeably infectious air of the song to incite an eager appetite in response. It is a fabulous start to the release, mesmeric yet holding a slight agitation which only adds to its compelling presence.

The following April Eyes has a lighter and airier breath to its bouncy energy and presence. From the off melodies are caressing ears whilst the bass toning again carries a dark shade to its otherwise less heavy tempting, both courted by an imagination and unpredictability throughout which sees the song easily slip from its energetic stroll into a reflective calm. This peaceful passage though is soon at the centre of a brewing emotive and sonic tempest, a brooding climate which never erupts but certainly brings an edge and drama to its landscape.

The acoustic charm of the brief instrumental An End to the Trial comes next, the stringed caresses of guitars an evocative spark for the imagination before Void wistfully seeps into ears and thoughts, again guitar expression the leading colour. Its folkish, provocative simplicity makes the perfect canvas for the similarly reserved yet vibrant vocals. It is a simmering sunset of sound and emotion but as darker hues add their tints it evolves into a tempestuous atmosphere of dark alternative pop. From a potent start it grows into a bewitching proposal for ears and thoughts, spicy hooks and tangy melodies expelling mouth-watering noir bred temptation. The song is an enjoyable slow burner but grows even more thrilling in its latter climatic stages.

The closing A Dream is like the first song, one seeded in the post punk and dark pop of previous days whilst casting its own fresh character of sound. Resourcefully bred from a New Order/Bauhaus seeding, dark wave shadows ignite the passions instantly whilst the emerging Billy Momo like folk charm and Cocteau Twins like ethereal melodies, simply absorb and accentuate the whole unique adventure. Keys also add suggestiveness to the mix, an OMD spicing working within their poetic ambience. It is a tremendous song and end to the EP, Heart bookended by its best two tracks but with plenty to eagerly embrace in between.

As the final song slowly drifts away it leaves ears and thoughts keen to immerse once again in the Rosenthal sound. Heart is not exactly going to bowl you over with listen one but it lingers, luring the listener back time and time again, a rich success in any one’s book.

The Heart EP is available now via Afterimages via most digital stores.

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RingMaster 10/03/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Billy Momo – Drunktalk (album)

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With the first two breath-taking singles taken from their new album providing spicy and diversely flavoursome appetisers, Swedish urban-folk collective Billy Momo faced not only eager anticipation but greedily demanding expectations here, and most likely everywhere, in regard to Drunktalk. Of course it and the seven-piece from Stockholm swiftly fed all those wants, unsurprisingly but thrillingly casting fifteen songs which croon, seduce, and romance ears and imagination. Admittedly still those early tracks, I’ve Got You and the album’s title track, remain as the pinnacles of the release and enjoyment but every caress and twist of Drunktalk leaves the richest transfixing experience and pleasure.

Originally a duo brought to life by Tomas Juto and Oskar Hovell, and now a riveting septet with Tony Lind, Mårten Forssman, Oscar Harryson, Christopher Anderzon, and Andreas Prybil alongside the founders, Billy Momo has persistently sparked attention and potent support since the self-release of debut album Ordinary Men in the closing shadows of 2011. It is fair to say though that the past few months, especially around those previously mentioned singles has seen the band become a keenly sought presence further afield, the UK and US especially. it Is easy to expect that Drunktalk will only accentuate and accelerate that spotlight and hunger, such its emotional and inventive charm alongside mouth-watering variety and adventure.

The album opens with the first single taken from its fascinating body, I’ve Got You providing an irresistible introduction and scene setter for the album. Gentle and endearing melodies from guitar and keys embrace ears and thoughts first, their romance soon coloured and reinforced by an emotive caress of strings as the musical narrative slowly broadens. The start alone is inescapably bewitching but once the strings reveal a thicker drama with the deep throated croon of the cello adding its voice, the song is sheer majesty. Their scything strokes of orchestral incitement provide exhilarating bait to which gripping harmonic vocals and the melodic theatre of the song unveil new virulent temptation. The baroque aired song is quite glorious, as on its first unveiling last year still one of the most striking and compelling songs heard anywhere.

Wishing Ain’t No Sin leaps on ears with the same attention grabbing quality straight after, its banjo twang and devilish enterprise a unique mix of seemingly dark country and Nordic folk. The song strolls with a creative and melodic swagger, a strong lure which, with again impressive vocal combination and colour, becomes an instant addictive lure for the feet and voice of the listener. It is a potency virtually all songs upon Drunktalk possess, especially the album’s following title track. Once more the opening of the song ensures body and mind are gripped before it fully reveals itself, here resonating ticking and clunky chain swipes startling before a wonderfully dark melodic and the ever outstanding vocal union emerge around them. The song is pure intoxication, voice and keys as infectiously seductive as strings and harmonica, and like the opener but in its own deceptively contagious way, infests and enthrals the psyche and heart. Think Nick Cave and Helldorado with a splash of Dennis Hopper Choppers, and you have an inkling of the alchemy at work.

The high bar set by the album continues with the catchy It’s Mine, a song starting with mischief in its melodic tempting and an increasing vaudevillian nature to its gypsy folk revelry. Once more it is impossible for body, voice, and emotions not to be enlisted in the enticement of the irrepressibly magnetic adventure, its enticement the appetiser for further unpredictable variety with firstly the soulful Keep It Unreal and straight after the fascinating proposition of Shine Like The Devil. The first of the pair also offers a blues and pop colouring to its warmly swaying and again contagious proposal whilst the second weaves in emotive shadows and haunting ambiences into its tapestry of golden harmonies and radiant melodic twists.

The sultry seventies psych kissed climate of Keep Dreaming comes next. It bursts from an almost melancholic bordering on portentous intro into a feisty stride of beats and guitar invention within delicious harmonies and emotional reflection, musically and lyrically. Maybe more of a slow burner than previous tracks it still has ears and thoughts bound before letting the country spiced Oh Lord and the following La La Land to have their moment. The first of the pair is an easy listen with plenty to intrigue and provoke the imagination but fails to find that final spark to inflame the passions, though again it is a constantly welcome companion for time and ears. Its successor as you might suspect has plenty of la-las to its romp but also a web of fleet footed beats and heated melodies which with the equally ripe vocals, provides an anthemic lure.

Setting things up with the western bar room quaintness of Drifting Away, the album hits party time with The Weekend, its blues rock/ jazz folk dance just as eagerly spiced by a country rock liveliness, a mix soon having feet tapping heartily and without inhibition. The two tracks continue the striking landscape of new flavours and ideation within Drunktalk, a quality continued through the two ballad bred encounters of the cinematically aired and emotionally provocative Headlights, and the haunted elegance of Waiting for Walls. The latter of the two ventures back into that earlier vaudeville like spicing, this time though staying in more emotionally shadowed and darkly mellow corners. They are two more tracks which may not manage to live up to the early heights of the album, but each offers something engrossing and spellbinding in their own distinct ways.

New Grounds provides the meatiest moment of the album, keys and energy having a muscular edge to their commanding lures whilst another country seeded spicing colludes with tangy melodic drama and a different vocal offering, in a pulsating stomp. The track never slips its reins but is the perfect tease because of it, relishing its moments of lively quickstepping to raise the temptation to even greater potency.

The acoustic croon of Let’s Make The Night Last Long brings the magnificent Drunktalk to a close, the album everything hoped for after the band’s previous singles but so much more too. Every song has its own identity and character in sound and intent but all sit seamlessly in the whole romance of the must investigate album. Just be warned though that once a song like I’ve Got You has its seeds fermenting inside, there is no escape.

Drunktalk is available on Hype Music from February 2nd

https://www.facebook.com/billymomomusic

RingMaster 02/02/2105

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard from http://www.thereputationlabel.today

 

Billy Momo – Drunktalk

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Following the acclaimed success of the single I’ve Got You, Swedish urban-folk collective Billy Momo unveil the title track of their upcoming second album Drunktalk. The band’s new song is a riveting and dramatically seductive embrace of folk intimacy and country ambience with a rhythmic and invention which is almost De Staat like in its imagination and Helldorado in its atmospheric ingenuity. Also seemingly drawing on the melodic richness of Broken Bells, the single is an engrossing treat to start off 2015 and simply ignites even greater anticipation for the band’s impending album.

Billy Momo is the brainchild of Tomas Juto and Oskar Hovell. Initially just the duo, the band swiftly drew potent attention and praise with the release of debut album Ordinary Men on Christmas Eve 2011 through their own Mobetter Music label, the record eventually getting a re-release via Hype Music in 2013 to greater success. The pair soon realised they needed to bring in 10881589_10152485803824071_4577033260872051476_nlike-minded musicians to take their music into the live arena with the addition of Tony Lind, Mårten Forssman, Oscar Harryson, Christopher Anderzon, and Andreas Prybil eventually completing the creative line-up which has already seduced their homeland and is working quietly but potently away on the UK scene thanks to the last single and live shows. Drunktalk is another inescapable temptation destined to light ears and appetites ready for the February release of its full-length namesake.

Drunktalk opens on a clunky ticking and heavy swipe of chains, a portentous almost industrial incitement which immediately teases the imagination before a winy twang of guitar and sultry vocal union cast their embrace on ears and attention. The startling and imposing presence of that opening ‘clang’ continues its baiting from within the brooding and provocatively melodic and expanding landscape draping the equally enthralling narrative. With strings adding broader and deeper shadows to the texture of the song and radiant harmonies aligned to evocative keys thickening its emotional drama and colour, Drunktalk provides an intoxication of senses and thoughts whilst creating a rich tapestry of vocal and musical expression.

The single is a temptation which lingers and worms into the psyche with increasing potency, building on the impressive presence of its predecessor but exploring a greater inventive aural theatre. Quite simply it is a glorious taster for an album which cannot come soon enough.

Drunktalk is available digitally via Hype Music from January 5th.

https://www.facebook.com/billymomomusic

RingMaster 03/01/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Billy Momo – I’ve Got You

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Making a rather tasty teaser for their forthcoming album Drunktalk, which is scheduled for release next February, Swedish urban-folk collective Billy Momo are releasing new single I’ve Got You to whet the appetite. The song is a magnetic flight of modern folk pop wrapped in melodic expression and rhythmic tenacity which in turn courts a vocal vivacity and creative fascination; simply it is a song which swiftly grips the imagination. The Stockholm band has brewed healthy attention and fervour in their homeland and with I Got You and live shows as bait, it is easy to expect the septet of Tomas Juto, Oskar Hovell, Tony Lind, Mårten Forssman, Oscar Harryson, Christopher Anderzon, and Andreas Prybil to start stirring up UK emotions for the arrival of their full-length.

Keys and guitars entangle their melodic enterprise straight away as the single opens its warm embrace. Strings are soon joining the elegant and evocative caress as the song’s landscape broadens and finds an emotive colour to its potent lure. It is an imagination awakening start but catches fire once it slips into a pungent shadow and light clasped stroll. Scything strings and dual vocals provide a rich colour of sound and expression to the emerging adventure, whilst keys and melodies add their own climate of drama and creative theatre as the track increasingly seduces second by second.

There is a baroque pop air to the song alongside its folkish revelry and orchestral elegance which only adds to the contagion upon ears and thoughts, whilst a persistent swirl of strings and notes under the Juto led vocals just mesmeric and tantalising in equal measure. The song is glorious and impresses more and more with every listen as its invention and melody enriched charm captures body and emotions.

Written by Juto and Hovell, the band’s founding members when it emerged as a duo, I’ve Got You is a striking and compelling introduction to British ears and the world in general to a band you are likely to hear plenty more of and from, especially when Billy Momo unveils Drunktalk next year.

I’ve Got You is available from November 10th

https://www.facebook.com/billymomomusic

RingMaster 10/11/2014

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