Shriekback – Why Anything? Why This?

In music it is so easy to be adulterous to one’s first love; to gather a harem of lustful attractions just as fevered though the one is always the prime affection. For us XTC was and is that irreplaceable ardour but the years obviously have seen hordes of infidelities seducing across a multitude of sounds and styles. One of the earliest sprung from that virgin ardour and one of its former members Barry Andrews. It was Shriekback which following one of its founder’s ear grabbing solo sounds teased with its debut EP, baited with the singles My Spine (Is The Bassline) and Lined Up, and enslaved through their first two albums in Care and Jam Science. Admittedly over the following three and a half decades we have dipped into their creative escapades more than been relentlessly attentive but never shy to explore. That initial hunger for their sound has just been truly re-ignited now though with the release of new album Why Anything? Why This?; one of their finest encounters ever.

Shriekback was formed in 1980 by vocalist/ keyboardist Andrews and ex- Gang Of Four bassist Dave Allen, the pair quickly enlisting guitarist Carl Marsh from Out On Blue Six into the fold. The ear grabbing Tench EP and those aforementioned singles introduced the band’s unique sound which blossomed further upon the 1982 released Care. The next year saw drummer Martyn Barker (King Swamp, Billy Bragg) brought into the band’s line-up with Jam Silence coming in 1984 followed by a move to Arista Records and the release of their acclaimed third album Oil & Gold. The band’s next couple of albums over the subsequent two years or so centred around Andrews with Allen and Barker linking back up with him for the 1992 full-length Sacred City, a release which appeared to be the band’s last breath. They returned though in 2000 with Naked Apes and Pond Life, following it three years later with Having a Moment, the album seeing the band’s original line-up in place again with Barker, and Lu Edmonds alongside. Four more albums over a decade, seeing numerous musicians involved, leads us up to Why Anything? Why This? the band’s 14th studio album coming three years after its predecessor and what can only be suggested as one of the band’s most compelling adventures.

Around the core prowess and imagination of Andrews, Barker, and Marsh, the album also features bassist Scott Firth of P.i.L and regular Shriekback backing vocalists Wendy and Sarah Partridge. Instantly it had its fingers in ears and appetite, teasing and tempting as opener Shovelheads inserts a heavy infectious lure led by deceptively flirtatious rhythms. The vocals stand just as magnetic upon the strands of sound and words, electronic currents lapping the sizzling threads of guitar as the rhythms continue to throb. It is a great start, an imposing hint of things to come which rather than hungrily infesting ears and imagination inescapably nags them.

The band’s latest single And The Rain follows, a virulent slice of dark rock with atmospheric seduction and manipulative rhythmic shadows. It is a tenebrific contagion matched in voice and word; an intrigue loaded proposal getting under the skin like Tone on Tails meeting The Filthy Tongues. The track is superb, drama and deviously catchy enterprise colluding in dark temptation before the equally tantalising Catmandu preens its own darkly nurtured theatre with melodic elegance and revelry amidst electronic and rhythmic devilment.

Such, Such Are The Joys is a serene yet tenacious  funk ‘n’ roll croon, its slow swing hypnotic to hips and darksome air pure intimation to the imagination only aided by lyrics, tone, and the siren call of the backing vocals. Pure seduction with the beauty of danger in its lining, the song just bewitched while Wriggle And Drone swiftly showed itself a puppeteer with its rhythmic suggestion and percussive scenery alone. The song took us back to those early tracks of the band which had us hook, line and sinker; infusing that instinctive bait with fresh ingenuity.

Next up The Painter Paints is just poetry from start to finish in sound and lyrical invention, conjuring just as its protagonists might with every fibre,  its captivation more than matched by the brooding post punk kissed sway and raw dark folk balladry of Useless Treasure. Even so, their major allure is only eclipsed by the album’s final trio; each creative alchemy.

The Church Of The Louder Light is first, rising from distant mists with vocal enticement and in turn rhythmic and sonic flirtation. Its hearty roar grows from a simmer to full voice in no time, its spirit and passion uncaged to inspire the same in the listener. It is a glorious trespass which after a momentary breath just returns bigger and bolder and more influential as Sons Of The Dirt also shows itself to be, it too building its energy and infection with increasing boisterousness as its predacious rock ‘n’ roll sizzles and blazes.

The album concludes with Thirty Seven, our favourite moment within Why Anything? Why This? with its gothic glaze over dark folk intimation and post/garage punk drama. The track is simply total fascination, aural witchery as seductively claustrophobic as it is mercurially radiant.

Since day one Shriekback has been pretty much a magnet for our ears, as for so many others, and to high praise from fans and media alike; perpetually a source of captivation but it is hard to say they have been any more compelling and essential than right now with Why Anything? Why This?.

Why Anything? Why This? is out now across most digital stores and @ https://www.shriekback.com/store

https://www.shriekback.com/   https://www.facebook.com/shriekback    https://twitter.com/shriekbackmusic

Pete RingMaster 28/05/2018

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Nish Goyal – In Our Parents Eyes

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If a song has you ‘doo doo be dooing’ within seconds on the very first listen, you know it is doing something right. In Our Parents Eyes does that and more, the new single from singer/songwriter Nish Goyal one boisterously and seriously magnetic slice of indie/folk revelry. There is also a scent of punk to the song’s highly flavoursome stroll which again simply adds to its rousing prowess.

Hailing from Chester and of Indian heritage, Goyal graduated in law and briefly worked in The City as a legal advisor before moving to Frankfurt to take up a stockbroking job. From his early years though, music was a major part of his life and in 2011, Goyal quit his day job and immersed himself in his music. Initially mastering the piano, over time he navigated to the guitar and bass with art_RingMasterReviewhis music breeding fresh textures and avenues to explore. A debut album called A Little Validation was followed by The Hedonist EP before last year the eight-track EP, The Rage was released to great responses. A pair of singles in Get Started and Save the Day only enticed more attention alongside a live presence which has seen Goyal play the likes of The Jacaranda, The Cavern, and appear at 2000 Trees Festival in Gloucestershire last summer; that followed by a tour across America where he played eleven shows in eight states.

Recently signing with the Portsmouth based indie label Coffee Jingle Records for his next album, scheduled for early this year, Goyal unveils its first rich temptation for it in the thrilling shape of In Our Parents Eyes. As mentioned, within less than a handful of breaths the song has voice and hips involved in its anthemic doo doos. A first strum of guitar provides the spark before becoming a persistent companion to a growing flirtation of rhythms and a net of spicy, slightly bluesy melodic enterprise which follows.

In voice Goyal is just as welcoming; his snappy delivery like an old mate ready to re-ignite fun whilst sharing the songwriter’s own experiences of growing up in the UK with Indian parents and the conflict rising within trying to be a musician whilst trying to please his family with a more academic career.

Like a mix of Glenn Hodge, Flogging Molly, and Billy Bragg, the track is a spirit raising, thought sparking romp which has all the qualities to nudge the name Nish Goyal towards bigger spotlights.

In Our Parents Eyes is released March 11th via Coffee Jingle Records.

http://www.nishgoyal.com/    https://www.facebook.com/nishgoyalmusic     https://twitter.com/nishyseagull

Upcoming Live Dates:

11th March – Single launch, The Jacaranda, Liverpool

16th March – Nambucca, London

23rd March – King Billy, Northampton

27th March – Joe Perks & Co, Oxford

1st April – Clash Bar, London

6th April – The Four Horsemen, Bournemouth

10th April – Rebellion Club, Manchester

Pete RingMaster 10/03/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Glenn Hodge Banned – Family Man

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Awoken to the punk folk, to give it a name, prowess of Glenn Hodge Banned through the outstanding Iconoclast EP last year, it is fair to say we had a tingle of excitement going into the London based musician’s new single Family Man. Carrying on the infectious adventure crafted by the previous release, the new song is an equally irresistible stroll of lyrical and creative revelry taking another honest and striking look at a slither of life.

Originally from Ashford in Kent, Hodge was brought up in East Anglia but it was once moving to the capital that his musical adventure really began. Surrounded by inspirations to breed his catchy and often mischievous folk seeded songs, the singer songwriter soon built a potent reputation on the city’s live scene before releasing the well-received single Faces on Tables in February of last year. Its success led to keen anticipation of the acclaimed Iconoclast EP, a collection of magnetic songs from Hodge looking at city life and personal relationships with honest social commentary, an exploration as mentioned continuing in Family Man.

cover     The single opens with a strum of guitar which quickly becomes a constant coaxing as Hodge begins his magnetic narrative. It is a lively acoustic start with voice and lyrics easily the focal point but wrapped perfectly in the lean sounds around them. Things expand and reveal greater colour when harmonies caress a moment of calm with their enticing presence whilst after another inviting passage like at the start, the rigorous chorus adds a moment of boisterous energy to the already gripping persuasion. Things continue to ebb and flow in energy but not in magnetism, the song musically and lyrically taking an increasingly tighter hold on ears and imagination as it explores the protagonist of its title and dark secrets.

Family Man just lights up the senses, reinforcing the impact of the last EP and confirming Hodge as one of UK’s brightest and resourceful songwriters/musicians. If the likes of Billy Bragg, Ste McCabe, and Frank Turner catch your ears then Glenn Hodge Banned is an exciting must.

Family Man is available now @ https://itunes.apple.com/gb/album/id990246719

http://www.glennhodge.com/   https://www.facebook.com/GlennHodgeBanned

Upcoming live shows:

11th June      Upstairs at the Ritzy, Brixton, London
4th July        The Spice of Life, Soho, London
17th July      Brentwood Festival, Brentwood, Essex
23rd July     Ambition Festival, Matthews Yard, Croydon, supporting Beans on Toast
23rd August Beautiful Days Festival, Devon

RingMaster 06/05/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Ste McCabe – Brains of Britain

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Punk rock for body, imagination, and the passions to relish and parade their wanton sides, the vivacious sound of singer-songwriter Ste McCabe has been a constant source of acerbic lyrical prowess and salacious musical enterprise since his emergence. His virulently contagious and biting political pop songs have provoked and thrilled across three absorbing and acclaimed albums, and his unrelenting hunger to gig, but with his new full- length Brains of Britain, McCabe has brewed up a new pinnacle in his creatively mischievous and lyrically striking assault on thoughts and emotions. It is a glorious stomp of punk, art-pop, and electronic devilry, an incitement which never gives the senses and imagination time to lay dormant.

With the vocal magnetism and melodic flair of Pete Shelley, the inventive agitation and social snarl of Mark E Smith, and the infection spewing invention of Pete Wylie, McCabe brews up a presence and sound which is individual yet carries a familiarity to gloriously feast upon. There is an inescapable charm and raw honesty to his confrontations, an almost anthemic call which finds even greater irresistibility and strength within the Maneki-Neko Music released Brains of Britain.

It is fair to say as that as soon as the big bulging electro pulse of opener Fool hits ears a lustful twinge shot through thoughts and emotions, its resonating call pungent bait reminding of Blancmange. It is a forceful and vibrant lure which is lifted further by the distinctive tones of McCabe, his expressive toning as always an easy liking to the Buzzcocks frontman. The initial electro beats soon break into a thumping stride beneath the vocals whilst synths spread a melodic breath and glaze over the brewing abrasion of punk guitars, it all creating an irresistible blaze of electro punk loaded with lyrical causticity.

The thrilling start is continued by Cockroach, a darkly shadowed, post punk spiced slab of provocative expression which features Billy Bragg who superbly alternates his equally distinctive presence and lyrical antagonism with that of McCabe. It is a song which crawls over senses and psyche, bass a lingering toxicity upon which light but scarring riffs and the outstanding vocal mix flourish. There is no avoiding the fallout of the exceptional song, its heavy radiance and gripping drama a lingering spark in thoughts and passions from the very first infestation.

Mantos ’99 moves in next with dark electro flirtation aligned to slight but potent scythes of guitar. It is another song with a minimally dressed landscape and intensive attraction, though it just misses the heights of its predecessors, even a2655639157_2with the increasing confrontation of its manner and energy. Again a post punk tempting ingrains the electronic wind of the song for a fulfilling helping of sonic bewitching around vocal devilry but it is soon left in the shadows of The Family Values Song. Imagine Swell Maps in league with Buzzcocks for a far too brief and exhausting but most of all scintillating blast, and you get sense of this riotous treat.

The pair of Chinless Wonders and Don’t We Have Nice Hair spark ears and imagination on new thrilling escapades next, the first a flight across an exotic climate of synth melodies and an evocative narrative painted by vocal variation, both aspects around a spine of heavy pulsation. Glistening before and creeping over the senses it is a magnetic prowl and seduction setting up an already greedy appetite for the second of the two. The track is a punk growl coated in a post punk chill of melodic melancholia. Barely two minutes long but flying by within a blink of the eye, the track croons and infects like a delicious mix of Television Personalities and Magazine with an OMD emotional discharge.

The spiky I’ll Do It sets up its contagion next, again a short burst of electro punk irreverence immediately irresistible to feet and emotions but no more so than the gripping PiL like sonic tempest of Go Polski Boy! Thrusting that caustic sonic radiance into a voracious electro and ravenous trance bred stomping, the track flexes and pulsates with creative gluttony and glorious insatiability. It sets another plateau for the album but itself is surpassed by the brilliant Them There Different People, the most potent art punk song you could wish to be seduced by. With a more than passing whisper of The Vibrators to it and the rawer agitation of 999, the track stomps and swaggers with an almost primal persuasion, leaving ears through to the heart enslaved.

The album finishes with the equally epidemic temptation of What Are You Worth, a track which has control of body and soul from its first predatory bass hook and electro niggling. Also expelling a moment of corrosive energy and sonic causticity, the song is a repetitive and merciless baiting which leaves the release on a high and fingers eager to press start and set in motion the whole thrilling adventure again.

Brains of Britain is easily one of our favourite albums of 2014 but also one of its best. Venomous and naughty, challenging and irrepressibly addictive, Ste McCabe has cast punk alchemy in its most creative and inspirational form. If there is one album you get before the year closes its eyes, it is easy to recommend that it is this one.

Brains of Britain is available from October 20th via Maneki-Neko Music @ http://www.amazon.co.uk/Brains-Britain-Ste-McCabe/dp/B00MU9374A or http://stemccabe.bandcamp.com/album/brains-of-britain

http://www.ste-mccabe.co.uk/

RingMaster 13/10/2014

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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parker BOMBSHELL – The Hours Down EP

parker BOMBSHELL The Hours Down

Ahead of a new EP due towards the end of June, we catch up with its predecessor The Hours Down EP which came out just three or so weeks ago. Consisting of five magnetic encounters from the individual imagination of Canadian band parker BOMBSHELL, the release is a captivating eighties bred dance which leaves feet eagerly agitated and thoughts thoroughly engaged. The band has evolved dramatically since its early days as just Parker, but has always reaped the richest essences of original synth pop and modern indie pop for a contagious enticement, which easily sums up The Hours Down EP.

The adventure of Toronto duo singer/songwriter Tom McNeil (also renowned for his podcast Addictions & Other Vices at Audioburger.com) and songwriter/singer/producer Thomas Ryder Payne, parker BOMBSHELL bring inspirations of the likes of Peter Gabriel, Elvis Costello, R.E.M., Billy Bragg, The Cure, The Smiths, Squeeze, Blondie and many more into their own elegant offerings. The latest release is the first in a series of four EPs which will make up debut album The Hours Down, each examining the five steps of recovery from depression and trauma. On the evidence of The Hours Down EP its full-length namesake promises to be an intriguing and absorbing experience.

Latest single Dust opens up the EP, and immediately casts a celestial sparkling of key spawned notes. The enchanted air is soon thickened with coaxing melodies and welcoming harmonies as a brewing energy builds behind the temptation. The track is soon settles into a slow but purposeful stroll, McNeil laying down his rich baritone yet mellow tones upon the musicianship of Payne to great effect and success but it is when the mesmeric voice of guest Rebekah Higgs comes into view that the song truly catches the imagination. With echoing harmonies and robust pulsating beats accompanying her entrance, tingles are sent down the spine as a seductive tempting spreads its bait before being embraced by the full weight and enterprise of the encounter again. The song as potent as it is initially is also a slow burner which just gets stronger and more welcomingly intrusive over each taking of its riveting creative emprise.

The following Long Drawn Out Goodbyes has a task indeed to follow the impressive start and it does itself no harm with an initial jangle of China Crisis like guitar amidst expressive breath of keys. The song moves into a potent stride soon after led by again punchy beats under an umbrella of evocative melodic expression sculpted by keys and synths. As expected that eighties spice is a prevalent enticement, elements of OMD and again eighties synth pop seeping into the colour of the song. Like a few of the tracks on the EP it does not explode or erupt as expected, and at times hoped, but gently smoulders with a melancholic like allure until reaching its more pungently enriched climax, a finale soaked in an enthralling drama and intensity.

Another Great Depression sweeps in next, a dark resonance the breeding ground for shadowed keys and great niggling guitar to beckon over which synths tantalise and tempt. Through the heart of it the vocals of McNeill smoothly unveil the narrative and emotive shadows of the song, his voice holding sway against the evolving textures and enterprise of Payne, whose darker throated tones add a menacing depth to the emerging landscape of the song. Like the first track it is a proposition which only grows and impresses more over time, and even though its initial encounter is not as impacting as that of Dust, it eventually puts that right to add another rich aspect to the release.

The brief but decent ballad Stuck Here comes next; voice and keys primarily casting emotive hues for thoughts to run with. It does not spark the same appetite as other songs, feeling like it is either unfinished or an intro to a song, though not its successor on the EP I would suggest. It is strong and appealing but out of place where it is, neither working as an interlude nor as mentioned as a lead into the last track Sucking Retail. The closer is a mixed bag of irresistible magnetism and towering temptation, but an offering which ebbs and flows in potency and success at times. Its crescendos are magnificent, contagious enticements which enslave the passions with nostalgic but fresh enterprise and vivacity but the moments in between, whilst laying out engaging bait, lack the dynamics and sheer drama of its better moments.

Nevertheless it is a fine end to a very appetising release which fans of organic synth pop will find plenty to enjoy in. It is a strong start to the emerging debut album from parker BOMBSHELL; time will tell if it is sustained but right now it is easy to be confident about that.

The Hours Down EP is available now @ http://parkerbombshell.com

7.5/10

RingMaster 18/06/2014

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard from

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Helene Greenwood – The Break EP

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Like a fresh breeze across a sultry summer embrace, the vocals and debut EP from Helene Greenwood bring seductive joy on a smouldering emotive landscape. The Break is a five track evocative kiss on senses and thoughts from an artist who enchants and seduces with a craft of songwriting and vocal persuasion which leaves the richest warmth inside as it evokes reflection and imagination.

Hailing from Dover and now Camden, London based, Greenwood initially began her musical career as a contemporary composer studying at The Royal Academy. The birth of her daughter in 2005 led her to exploring her songwriting and more narrative based lyrical music. With a music degree from Royal Holloway under her belt she studied singing with internationally acclaimed singers Nia Lynn and Anita Wardell as well as songwriting with Gretchen Parlato in 2011 at Stanford University. Taking inspiration from the likes of Ella Fitzgerald, Björk and Feist as well as jazz singing, Greenwood finally is at the point, ahead of her full-length debut Collectable You, where she is introducing her music to the greater world building on her brewing recognition across venues in London, the lady regularly performing at Proud Galleries in Camden and also at Stanford University Coffee House.

Released on her own label Washaway Records, The Break is a riveting emotional sun of elegance and melodic grandeur brought Screen-Shot-2013-05-22-at-19.14.05in the gentle caress of honest observation lyrically and unfussy beauty musically. Produced by band-member Calum MacColl (son of folk legends Ewan MacColl and Peggy Seeger) and featuring James Hallawell of The Waterboys on keyboards, as well as Martyn Brabbins (Billy Bragg/Beth Gibbons) on drums and Arnulf Lindler (KT Tunstall) on bass, the five song spark of aural light marks the emergence of a remarkably promising artist.

Opening song Break In Break Out makes a play for the emotions instantly, the vocals of Greenwood a radiating sunspot against a wonderful cello croon from Lindler. It is a melancholic yet vibrant invitation with the keys of Hallawell crafting a classical emotive elegance within the already enthralling hug. Once the song erupts into a full wind of melodic passion the song looks to the skies with colour soaked beauty, the trombone of Jonathan Enright another impacting suasion on thoughts and feelings. It is a wonderful mesmeric start matched more often than not across the rest of the release.

Certainly second song In Between Days stands side by side with its predecessor in potency and glory. A cover of The Cure classic, Greenwood strips down the song to make it her own, so much so that it took more than a few moments to realise what it was. She brings a new strain of melancholia to the songs enthralling glide through the ear with the keys weaving a sensitive and provocative ambience to add to the emotive depth and the guitar of MacColl sculpting its own emotional shelter. The song sways and calls the heart like a courtly temptress but it is the majestic vocals which guides the listener into the richest beauteous climate. The keys are also exceptional as they paint another narrative to share further the heart of the song whilst the drums of Brabbins bring a climatic swell to proceedings as its finale brews in riveting fashion before calming before the last touch of the song, a last gentle brush of its melodic lips.

In The Sunshine and After the Fire continue the aural and perceptive fascination, the first a soulful melodic drift across reflective horizons and equally creative thoughts whilst its successor, an initial duet of vocals and keys, blooms into a jazz lit flame of almost noir shadowed life and inspirational enterprise. It is a stunning song which could soundtrack any life at some point in time, revealing its hope, dark, and reality.

Closing song is another cover, this time of the Johnny Mercer and Rube Bloom written Fools Rush In (Where Angels Fear to Tread). One of our all-time favourite songs we set high demands on any version and though it is arguably the least successful song on the EP, Greenwood again gives it a new fire and bed of sentiment which is impossible to resist, as is the smouldering melodic wrap of her again mouthwatering voice.

The Break EP is one of the most startling introductions of any artist in a long time and Helene Greenwood at the start of what you can only suspect will be a swift ascent of melodic and creative passion spawned innovation. We suggest all hitch a ride now and stand ready to enjoy the forthcoming rewards of the first album Collectable You; we have a feeling it is going to be something special.

http://www.helenegreenwood.com/

9/10

RingMaster 11/07/2013

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Rodney Branigan: Muddy Jesus

When first reading of the unique guitar style of Rodney Branigan, and especially his ability to play two guitars at the same time or guitar and piano simultaneously, one has to wonder how much is show and gimmick. Upon listening to his new single Muddy Jesus though you just know there is an abundance of imaginative substance to his songwriting and play, the song an absorbing and inviting piece of musical storytelling to dispel any of those rogue thoughts.

Raised in Texas and now based in London, Branigan since making his debut at Hampton Court Palace in 2007 has shared stages with the likes of Billy Bragg and Jethro Tull, toured with double award winning Show of Hands, and collaborating with Seth Lakeman and Steve Knightley at Glastonbury, to name a few of his highlights. Alongside his music Branigan also spends time and focus on encouraging young people through his part of the Access to Music ‘Band Factory’ team, a project encouraging children to learn directly from the professionals themselves and discover ‘how to be in a band’. His distinct musicianship and skill as well as impressively crafted songs though, has continually drawn growing attention and strong acclaim his way which the new single can only increase.

Muddy Jesus starts with a pulsating bass sound and simple inciteful beats, both aspects resonating within the senses immediately, waking them up fully for the following excellent voice of Branigan. Expressive and openly inviting, his tones bring a flavour and emotive edge to the strong lyrical content, the words easily evoking thoughts and imagery. His guitar play like his vocals, drifts through the ear with firmness and instant engagement, and all these stirring warm steely elements together just makes for a song as a whole a grooved treat to savour. It is a blues/folk delight which with its acoustic atmosphere and warm breath one can only invite deeply inside.

Taken from his forthcoming album, Muddy Jesus is a delicious piece of provocative and finely imagined rock n roll which perfectly shows why Rodney Branigan has become the growing whisper on the lips of so many.

https://www.facebook.com/dbroken1

RingMaster 15/09/2012

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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