Betraying The Martyrs – Phantom

BTM Picture HD

As undeniably compelling as it is, Phantom the new album from Betraying The Martyrs is also a bit of an odd beast to digest and get excited about. At times it roars with an invention which sends tingles down the spine and in other moments inspires sighs of disappointment, yet for those lesser moments where its persuasion flounders, they are more often than not swiftly followed and consumed by twists and ideation which leaves the passions ablaze once again. It is a release which maybe too often leaves thoughts unconvinced but it also provides a deeply intriguing and insatiable satisfaction in its turbulent wake which is impossible to ignore or dismiss.

The Paris based sextet of vocalist Aaron Matts, guitarists Baptiste Vigier and Lucas D’angelo, bassist Valentin Hauser, drummer Mark Mironov, and keyboardist/vocalist Victor Guillet forge a sound reaped from the strenuous depths of extreme metal, djent, Metalcore, hardcore, and progressive metal, though that is still only a hint of their tempestuous creativity and sound. The success of debut album Breathe In Life pushed the band into an intensive spotlight especially in North America which you can only see Phantom fuelling further and to a greater spread across the metal scene. Released via Sumerian Records, the album is in many ways summed up by opening track title Jigsaw, not only in sound but in that tracks feel like their elements and ideas are slotted together, generally seamlessly but with the occasional piece in the wrong slot.

Phantom is also an open progression from its predecessor, reaching deeper into and expanding the essences found upon Breathe In Life whilst infusing new twists and imagination. Jigsaw instantly descends on ears with antagonistic rhythms and jagged riffs, their attack predatory and controlled within a brewing sonic rapacity. The song is soon releasing the handbrake though as guitars tear way at the senses with snarling riffs and scything hooks bleeding death metal malevolence and metalcore vitriol. It is a quick contagion which flourishes further with gutturally spawned vocals aligned to a cleaner suasion of voice. It is not a startling start to the album and though certain aspects like the coarse vocals and melodic respite is strained at times, the track is a thoroughly captivating encounter with flirtatious temptations within its smothering wall of sound and aggression.

The following Where The World Ends opens with a classically seeded piano caress aided by clean vocals and a dramatic ambience which is as suggestive as it is enveloping. It is an outstanding start which rises in weight and intensity Coverwith rolling heavy footed rhythms and the evolving growling vocals of Matts, already showing himself to be a formidable vocalist. In no time the seductive start is a maelstrom of viciously flung rhythms and sonic fever equipped with splinters of sonic spite and djent spawned hostility. Again, with a demonic tone to the vocals which easily slip into a cleaner lilt at times, the track ignites the imagination and senses potently as the album continues to grow and increasingly impress, though the fade-out is annoying and for personal tastes always lazy.

Walk Away swaggers in next with an agitated gait within evocative keys to make a strong and potent start, guitars and bass again unleashing their volatile sinews to skilled and resourceful effect. The soaring harmonies and orchestrated climb which emerges from the ravenous entrance of the track soon defuses the striking impact, leaving thoughts lost and unsure in the unexpected turn of the song. Though perfectly and fluidly infused, there is an unsatisfactory feel to the move with the returning animosity of sound eagerly welcomed, especially with its twisted hooks and senses scorching vocal causticity. It is undeniably a powerful track but one almost trying too hard to be different and exploratory which leaves it prone to an unconvincing offering just as with next up Let It Go. The band’s latest single is cover of the song from the movie Frozen, and epitomises the album in many ways. Its melodic start is soon under a carnivorous swamp of metalcore ingenuity and savagery which leaves ears and passions ablaze yet then proceeds with admittedly great clean vocals to temper its assault with a melodic balladry to which the hoarse vocals lose their potency. The track has proven a fan favourite it seems but left us cold and totally underwhelmed, though there were still elements which enthralled.

Both the atmospherically haunting instrumental L’abysse Des Anges with its beautifully sculpted melodies and grooves within a rising climactic breath, and the incendiary storm of Phantom (Fly Away) bring appetite and emotions back into the sturdy lure of the album. Featuring Gus Farias of Volumes, the second of the two is a bestial predator of a track, leering at and gnawing over the senses with uncompromising rhythms and ferocious riffery, both aspects sharp and antagonistic beneath the spread of vocals. There is also a maturity and in places a reserve to the song which sets it apart from most others on the release, and proves the depth of potential within the band.

What’s Left of You is another to stir up the imagination and a fresh breath of hunger for the proposition, its barbarous presence underpinned by a great swinging yet understated groove. Keys provide a delicious drama and adventure to the adversarial climate of the track, merging in the creative rabidity with radiant enterprise and unpredictability. Whereas the mix of extremes failed to impress within the likes of Walk Away and Let It Go, here everything fuses gloriously proving that when Betraying The Martyrs get it right they have the potential to set new standards.

From the ok instrumental Afterlife with its epic nature and melodic poise, the pinnacle of the album erupts. Legends Never Die is a monster of a track, crippling riffs and viciously swiping rhythms bringing body and senses to their knees whilst grooves wind tenaciously around the inhospitable spine of the savaging. The thrilling keys of Guillet provide misaligned colour to the fury at times whilst in other moments flowing, as the clean vocals, magnetically through the voracious predation of the track. It is a masterful brute of a song though it is another, and far too many on the album, which simply fades away as if the band do not know how to end its design.

The final quartet of songs on Phantom, ebb and flow in their success with firstly Lighthouse a track which alone thrills and deflates across its barbarous terrain though it is more the former to be fair. The following brief instrumental Your Throne leads into the sadistic and enthralling landscape of Our Kingdom, a full on tempest which at times loses its definition of elements such its corrosive assault but matches that with some rich flights of melodic and inventive textures to chain thoughts and attention rigidly. It is a track which leaves you wanting more which the final song Closure Found is happy to provide with its similarly structured and uniquely flavoured tsunami of intent and voracity. As mentioned earlier when the band gets it right they excel, and to be fair on Phantom they do more often than not come up with richly pleasing successes.

It is not a classic album or one to set the passions blazing consistently but Betraying The Martyrs is not a band to short change on imagination and brave exploration which makes Phantom for all its ‘issues’ an easy to devour and recommend encounter.

Phantom is available now via Summerian Records @ http://www.merchconnectioninc.com/collections/betraying-the-martyrs

https://www.facebook.com/WeAreBetrayingTheMartyrs

7.5/10

RingMaster 31/07/2014

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard from

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The Betrayer’s Judgement – Philosopher

tbj promo philosopher

Engulfed in plenty of acclaim and promise, French hardcore/djent quintet The Betrayer’s Judgement unleashes their next slice of carnivorous invention with the Philosopher EP. It is a rampant and predacious force of imagination and enterprise with a hungry energy to match and though it does not always tempt to the same consistent heights across its antagonistic body, the release is an engrossing and excitingly promising encounter.

Formed in 2009, The Betrayer’s Judgement were soon taking a swipe at attention with firstly The Worst Sickness demo of 2010, a metalcore bred encounter, and even more so with debut album Run Out Of Fuel the following year. Shows and festivals have only increased and accelerated the band’s reputation and ascent, the five piece sharing stages with the likes of Caliban, The A.R.R.S, and Betraying the Martyrs along the way. The Twin Peak Records released Philosopher is the next potent and formidable step in their rise, a six track ravishment of the senses and imagination to raise a very healthy appetite for the band’s explosive and bold sound.

Broken Mirrors instantly sets ears and release off in incendiary style, the orchestral sculpted dawning of the song an epic and EP_coverrigorously persuasive invitation which finds greater potency as the intensive riffing and rhythmic barracking explodes into action. It is a breath stealing blast to the senses, the towering rhythmic punches and predatory riffing rabid and the technical craft riveting. With equally rapacious snarling vocals from Cyril Szczepaniak, his delivery a grouchy scowling pleasure, the track is a bestial provocation with an open evolution just waiting to prey on the impressive canvas already cast. The returning stringed emotive flight is a returning temptation which constantly enhances the pleasure whilst the clean vocals of guitarist Jean-Aimé Leclercq make a tempering addition to the storm. His smooth tones are strong and hard to dismiss but for personal tastes the slight defusing of the firestorm of intensity is not as successful as an anticipated all-out ravaging but still enjoyably imaginative.

Both Lights Out and Elapsed Time: Real Life rage against the senses with a skilled and uncompromising enterprise, the first of the two dragging its guttural toxicity to stalk the emotions within a rabid maelstrom of rhythms from drummer Arnaud Lefebvre and the voracious air scorching riffs and sonic pestilence crafted by Leclercq and fellow guitarist Flavian Dutoit. Again the barbarous delivery of Szczepaniak reigns over the clean but the mix is a much stronger and impression union though the outstanding track lacks the spark to match the opening pinnacle. The second of the two features Ryan Kirby from Fit For a King and instantly unleashes a vocal tsunami of malevolent intensity and passion. Strings coax the passions as potently as in the first song and the bass of Raphaël Darras finds a dark resonance which as across all songs just seduces the passions. With great classical and melodic teasing from the keys and a constant oppression aggression to drool over the track is a thunderous furnace of sonic causticity and inventive fire, though again the clean vocals as accomplished and flawless as they are do not really enhance or sell the track, though as mentioned this is just a preference rather than a criticism of Leclercq’s ability.

The title track makes for a dramatic and blustery oppression on the ears, the track a labour intensive listen which rewards with some inspiring intrigue and invention to its design beneath and immersed into its brutal touch and craft which leaves the senses shell-shocked. There are no clean vocals on show and it works a treat, the band and sound suggesting they would benefit by a reduction of its use which is reinforced at times again by the destructively sculpted track The Journey. The track employs spoken vocals aligned to the raucous bile soaked growls alongside a mouth-watering blaze of disorientating rhythms, melodic searing, and a delicious melodramatic discord kissed wantonness to the keys. It is another impressive and intrusively persuasive assault to inspire real suspicion and anticipation that The Betrayer’s Judgement is a potential major force of the future.

Completed by a decent enough remix of Broken Mirrors by The Algorithm, though it is not a patch on the original as it dissipates virtually all of the brutality and rapturous voraciousness, the Philosopher EP is an outstanding violent goading of the passions and a striking marker on the rise of The Betrayer’s Judgement.

Download the Philosopher EP as a buy now name your price release @ http://thebetrayersjudgement.bandcamp.com/

http://www.facebook.com/thebetrayersjudgement

8/10

RingMaster 29/11/2013

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=x0OBY0gJhMM

 

Engulfed in plenty of acclaim and promise, French hardcore/djent quintet The Betrayer’s Judgement unleashes their next slice of carnivorous invention with the Philosopher EP. It is a rampant and predacious force of imagination and enterprise with a hungry energy to match and though it does not always tempt to the same consistent heights across its antagonistic body, the release is an engrossing and excitingly promising encounter.

Formed in 2009, The Betrayer’s Judgement were soon taking a swipe at attention with firstly The Worst Sickness demo of 2010, a metalcore bred encounter, and even more so with debut album Run Out Of Fuel the following year. Shows and festivals have only increased and accelerated the band’s reputation and ascent, the five piece sharing stages with the likes of Caliban, The A.R.R.S, and Betraying the Martyrs along the way. The Twin Peak Records released Philosopher is the next potent and formidable step in their rise, a six track ravishment of the senses and imagination to raise a very healthy appetite for the band’s explosive and bold sound.

Broken Mirrors instantly sets ears and release off in incendiary style, the orchestral sculpted dawning of the song an epic and rigorously persuasive invitation which finds greater potency as the intensive riffing and rhythmic barracking explodes into action. It is a breath stealing blast to the senses, the towering rhythmic punches and predatory riffing rabid and the technical craft riveting. With equally rapacious snarling vocals from Cyril Szczepaniak, his delivery a grouchy scowling pleasure, the track is a bestial provocation with an open evolution just waiting to prey on the impressive canvas already cast. The returning stringed emotive flight is a returning temptation which constantly enhances the pleasure whilst the clean vocals of guitarist Jean-Aimé Leclercq make a tempering addition to the storm. His smooth tones are strong and hard to dismiss but for personal tastes the slight defusing of the firestorm of intensity is not as successful as an anticipated all-out ravaging but still enjoyably imaginative.

Both Lights Out and Elapsed Time: Real Life rage against the senses with a skilled and uncompromising enterprise, the first of the two dragging its guttural toxicity to stalk the emotions within a rabid maelstrom of rhythms from drummer Arnaud Lefebvre and the voracious air scorching riffs and sonic pestilence crafted by Leclercq and fellow guitarist Flavian Dutoit. Again the barbarous delivery of Szczepaniak reigns over the clean but the mix is a much stronger and impression union though the outstanding track lacks the spark to match the opening pinnacle. The second of the two features Ryan Kirby from Fit For a King and instantly unleashes a vocal tsunami of malevolent intensity and passion. Strings coax the passions as potently as in the first song and the bass of Raphaël Darras finds a dark resonance which as across all songs just seduces the passions. With great classical and melodic teasing from the keys and a constant oppression aggression to drool over the track is a thunderous furnace of sonic causticity and inventive fire, though again the clean vocals as accomplished and flawless as they are do not really enhance or sell the track, though as mentioned this is just a preference rather than a criticism of Leclercq’s ability.

The title track makes for a dramatic and blustery oppression on the ears, the track a labour intensive listen which rewards with some inspiring intrigue and invention to its design beneath and immersed into its brutal touch and craft which leaves the senses shell-shocked. There are no clean vocals on show and it works a treat, the band and sound suggesting they would benefit by a reduction of its use which is reinforced at times again by the destructively sculpted track The Journey. The track employs spoken vocals aligned to the raucous bile soaked growls alongside a mouth-watering blaze of disorientating rhythms, melodic searing, and a delicious melodramatic discord kissed wantonness to the keys. It is another impressive and intrusively persuasive assault to inspire real suspicion and anticipation that The Betrayer’s Judgement is a potential major force of the future.

Completed by a decent enough remix of Broken Mirrors by The Algorithm, though it is not a patch on the original as it dissipates virtually all of the brutality and rapturous voraciousness, the Philosopher EP is an outstanding violent goading of the passions and a striking marker on the rise of The Betrayer’s Judgement.

Download the Philosopher EP as a buy now name your price release @ http://thebetrayersjudgement.bandcamp.com/

http://www.facebook.com/thebetrayersjudgement

8/10

RingMaster 29/11/2013

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=x0OBY0gJhMM

 

Engulfed in plenty of acclaim and promise, French hardcore/djent quintet The Betrayer’s Judgement unleashes their next slice of carnivorous invention with the Philosopher EP. It is a rampant and predacious force of imagination and enterprise with a hungry energy to match and though it does not always tempt to the same consistent heights across its antagonistic body, the release is an engrossing and excitingly promising encounter.

Formed in 2009, The Betrayer’s Judgement were soon taking a swipe at attention with firstly The Worst Sickness demo of 2010, a metalcore bred encounter, and even more so with debut album Run Out Of Fuel the following year. Shows and festivals have only increased and accelerated the band’s reputation and ascent, the five piece sharing stages with the likes of Caliban, The A.R.R.S, and Betraying the Martyrs along the way. The Twin Peak Records released Philosopher is the next potent and formidable step in their rise, a six track ravishment of the senses and imagination to raise a very healthy appetite for the band’s explosive and bold sound.

Broken Mirrors instantly sets ears and release off in incendiary style, the orchestral sculpted dawning of the song an epic and rigorously persuasive invitation which finds greater potency as the intensive riffing and rhythmic barracking explodes into action. It is a breath stealing blast to the senses, the towering rhythmic punches and predatory riffing rabid and the technical craft riveting. With equally rapacious snarling vocals from Cyril Szczepaniak, his delivery a grouchy scowling pleasure, the track is a bestial provocation with an open evolution just waiting to prey on the impressive canvas already cast. The returning stringed emotive flight is a returning temptation which constantly enhances the pleasure whilst the clean vocals of guitarist Jean-Aimé Leclercq make a tempering addition to the storm. His smooth tones are strong and hard to dismiss but for personal tastes the slight defusing of the firestorm of intensity is not as successful as an anticipated all-out ravaging but still enjoyably imaginative.

Both Lights Out and Elapsed Time: Real Life rage against the senses with a skilled and uncompromising enterprise, the first of the two dragging its guttural toxicity to stalk the emotions within a rabid maelstrom of rhythms from drummer Arnaud Lefebvre and the voracious air scorching riffs and sonic pestilence crafted by Leclercq and fellow guitarist Flavian Dutoit. Again the barbarous delivery of Szczepaniak reigns over the clean but the mix is a much stronger and impression union though the outstanding track lacks the spark to match the opening pinnacle. The second of the two features Ryan Kirby from Fit For a King and instantly unleashes a vocal tsunami of malevolent intensity and passion. Strings coax the passions as potently as in the first song and the bass of Raphaël Darras finds a dark resonance which as across all songs just seduces the passions. With great classical and melodic teasing from the keys and a constant oppression aggression to drool over the track is a thunderous furnace of sonic causticity and inventive fire, though again the clean vocals as accomplished and flawless as they are do not really enhance or sell the track, though as mentioned this is just a preference rather than a criticism of Leclercq’s ability.

The title track makes for a dramatic and blustery oppression on the ears, the track a labour intensive listen which rewards with some inspiring intrigue and invention to its design beneath and immersed into its brutal touch and craft which leaves the senses shell-shocked. There are no clean vocals on show and it works a treat, the band and sound suggesting they would benefit by a reduction of its use which is reinforced at times again by the destructively sculpted track The Journey. The track employs spoken vocals aligned to the raucous bile soaked growls alongside a mouth-watering blaze of disorientating rhythms, melodic searing, and a delicious melodramatic discord kissed wantonness to the keys. It is another impressive and intrusively persuasive assault to inspire real suspicion and anticipation that The Betrayer’s Judgement is a potential major force of the future.

Completed by a decent enough remix of Broken Mirrors by The Algorithm, though it is not a patch on the original as it dissipates virtually all of the brutality and rapturous voraciousness, the Philosopher EP is an outstanding violent goading of the passions and a striking marker on the rise of The Betrayer’s Judgement.

Download the Philosopher EP as a buy now name your price release @ http://thebetrayersjudgement.bandcamp.com/

http://www.facebook.com/thebetrayersjudgement

8/10

RingMaster 29/11/2013

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard from

http://www.audioburger.com

Red XIII – Perceptions

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Whether UK metalcore annihilators Red XIII have realised the immense promise which brewed within their debut album of 2010 with their new EP Perceptions is questionable but certainly the enthralling six track release is going in the right direction whilst easily placing the Blackpool quartet as already one of the more original and refreshing emerging breaths, or should that be roar, in the genre not only in Europe but possibly worldwide.

Riding roughshod over audiences since 2006 with their uncompromising yet adventurous sound, Red XIII has earned intense attention from fans and acclaimed responses from the media through the aforementioned album Better Safe Than Sorry, as well as impressive passionate performances alongside the likes of Sylosis, Liferuiner, Heights, Betraying The Martyrs, Texas In July, Heights, and The Arusha Accord to name just a handful. The new release shows the band at its most destructive and creative to date and though the leap has not been as potent as anticipation imagined going by their already high standards it is a big step forward for the band with Perceptions easily standing out amongst similarly engineered sounds in the genre and a great many metal releases in general.

Released via Transcend Music Label Services, the EP opens with the immediately intriguing Sleeping Giants, its initial progressiveRED XIII - Perceptions wind loaded to a brooding bass and twisted riffs accompaniment. Installing a groove which whips head and passions from their slumber, the track unleashes rhythms from drummer Tim Clark which cage, poke, and explore the senses the further into the song you go whilst the bass of Ivan Coulburn offers a rapacious presence from first note to last, its presence a predatory link between the drum incitement, the flames sonic class of guitarist Jason Dean and the excellently continually shifting vocals of Sean Donovan. His delivery stalks a range of squalling provocation and malice dripping growls to ride the extensive grooves and invention of Dean like a tempestuous beast.  The fact that the song and release as a whole does not always push the envelope and limits of its most potent elements is really the only ‘flaw’ you can lay at their doors, the track walking the lip of full adoration and addiction causing might but never quite taking that last leap of faith. Despite that the opener is an immense introduction which the rest of the songs only qualify in their individual and richly pleasing stances.

The following General Disarray takes a mere second to bombard the ear with another delicious groove and even hungrier rhythms within an earnest and rebellious intensity. Into its stride the track is a storm of ferocious rhythmic punishment and persistently encroaching and thrillingly evolving guitar abrasion built on impressive sonic invention and acidic melodic persuasion. As before the vocals of Donovan come in multi-brewed venom, at times almost touching a clean gait whilst cruising the full gamut of scolding malevolence. It is a monster of a song with a craft which leaves one magnetised during and after its confrontation.

Trainwreck explores the senses with a sonic web of enterprise before allowing a ridiculously addictive bass lure to escape its flame and the vocals to score the now mesmerised senses with primal spite. It takes no time though for the track to unleash an exhausting corrosive breath and unrelenting caustic hardcore rough handedness. With a gait as unbridled in its assault as the unique vindictiveness the track, it taunts and erodes the defences with energy every bit as violent as a derailment but with more purposeful and direct targets. Without reaching the heights of its predecessors the track easily leaves a hunger for more of the abusive thrills offered whilst suggesting there is still much more to come from the band, again a comment which can be levelled at Perceptions as a whole.

Next track The Bitch grabs top honours on the EP, its emergence from a dawning raptorial charge and bone splintering rhythmic beckoning into a tsunami of deeply coloured sonic endeavour and rabid intensity guided by the heavy fisted great vocals of Donovan and matching bass snarl exceptional. In some ways the track seems unsure of its direction yet everything it entwines around its impressive body and the ventures brutally explored only lead the passions to erupt with greed and want for more of its unpredictable foraging of the senses and emotions, especially its progressively sculpted and wholly seductive climax.

The final pair of songs, Illuminate and Exploding Pet, expose the listener to more creative fire in songwriting and its unreserved barbarous realisation, the first of the two a fusion of hardcore and metal savagery carved into a compelling slab of excellence almost as equal to the previously mentioned gem and the closing song which lives up to its outstanding title by whipping the senses with industrial strength lashes of barbed riffs and similarly vicious rhythmic intrusion. It is a mighty conclusion to a formidable and wholly impressive release. Ok Perceptions still loudly hints that the band has some way to go before unearthing their full potential but it still stands above most other metalcore releases with ease and ignites a sure anticipation of a real classic in their future.

https://www.facebook.com/redxiiiband

8/10

RingMaster 07/05/2013

 

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard from

http://www.audioburger.com