The Summoned – Sessions

“Sessions is a concept album about a man who wakes up from a coma and is sent straight into a psychiatric hospital where he begins a series of tests against his will. In the process he meets a doctor who remains with him every step of the way. During these sessions, with the guidance of the doctor, he is transported into the outer reaches of his own mind to confront the insecurities and demons that plague him.”

Resembling the premise behind the new album from ferocious US technical metallers The Summoned is the listening experience of Sessions. The nine track exploration is a kaleidoscope of sound and technical craft which barely gives a moment for a breath within its often infernal tempest taking the listener into the darkest, deepest recesses of their psyche. It is a demanding and intensive journey across story and album but ultimately one seriously rewarding one.

Formed in 2007 and drawing on the inspiration of bands such as Death, Between The Buried And Me, Decapitated, The Faceless, Behemoth, The Dillinger Escape Plan and others, the Boston, Massachusetts hailing quartet pretty soon revealed their own individual character of sound. Since then they have relentlessly pushed theirs and in turn metal’s assumed boundaries to find a strain of uniqueness really having its head in the band’s latest encounter.  After the Harvest EP in their first year, the 2011 released debut album If Only Minds Could Paint Pictures garnered a wealth of critical acclaim, its success supported and followed by the band successfully undertaking a 23-day headline tour spanning the U.S. and Canada as well as being part of 2012 Summer Slaughter Tour with Cannibal Corpse, Between The Buried and Me, The Faceless and more. From the winter of 2013, The Summoned began working on their second album, entering the studio with long-time friend Evan Sammons of Last Chance To Reason to begin the recording process. The next three years were concentrated on the creation of Sessions, time and intensive attention showing all its qualities in a release even more enthralling as well as bolder and more accomplished, technically and emotionally, than its impressive predecessor.

Within seconds, opener The Pendulum Swing has the senses twisted and imagination askew, the guitars of Shaun Murphy and Jarred Sullivan spinning a web of disorientating metal aligned to post punk discordance as bass and drums grumble and impose their psychosis. Vocalist Stephen Thompson supported by the equally rawer tones of Murphy, is a venomous scourge, words and emotions a primal yet composed assault as blurry as precise in their invasively relentless suggestiveness.  The determined, unyielding nagging is a constant across sound and album, every aspect and texture a ruthless persistence in its moment within a just as eagerly evolving unpredictable tapestry.

The track is an absorbing, thrilling start; a rabid introduction but eclipsed in ferocity by the following Faradic. As the rhythms of drummer Sam Hang ravage the senses yet still manage to be an anthemic enticement, guitars dance provocatively and psychotically on the imagination. Flavours and styles proceed to flicker with enthusiastic dexterity and boldness across the song, jazzy and progressive turns colluding with extreme and technical metal tenacity as vocals flow with a toxic essence. As in the first and next up Fractal Patterns, there is a real virulence to everything too; an infectiousness veining every fury and creative twist with the third track a debilitating but equally magnetic carousel of sound and invention. Melodies spawn from ravenous hostility, deranged trespasses from atmospheric caresses; every second a cauldron of intrigue and harsh drama.

Through the possibly even more primal and savage The Grave Mistake and the dark climate of Built of Glass there is no lessening of the resolute examination of senses and imagination; both tracks a flight of startling adventure and striking craft with the first a spiral into disturbing calm from cyclonic agitation, and back again, while the second aligns melancholy and sonic savagery within its dramatic almost cinematic theatre.

Both Vertiginous with its whirling melodies and rotating spine of far more carnal strains and the unbridled ferocity of the equally multi-flavoured Primogenial Birth keep ears and imagination gripped and consumed, the latter at times as primal as it is in other moments elegant and jazzily bewitching. Again neither leave a second free for the body to relax or expectations to try and rear their head, Recollection similarly a storm of sonic transgression and off-kilter progressive enterprise which, as all tracks, really is impossible to truly represent in word and suggestion.

Closing up with the initially melodically charming, hope embraced Satori, the album is simply one uncompromisingly compelling proposition. Shadows soon crowd and invade the listener as the final track hits its creatively hungry stride; pretty much epitomising the whole of Sessions with its capricious yet intensely woven and nurtured web.

Certainly Sessions is an imposing listen to match its presence and hard to take all in over a few let alone a single listen but rewards with every quest taken. Equally at times due to Thompson’s fine but exacting raw delivery lyrically the album shares moments lyrically which remain a mystery in the tale but are potently compensated by the clear emotion of the sounds and his presence; in saying that though a thicker use of the clean touches provided by Murphy within both Fractal Patterns and Built of Glass would make for another intriguing dynamic ahead. Nothing though defuses the potency and pleasure of sharing time with the album, or the calm to contemplate after its outstanding tempest.

Sessions is out now @ http://store.thesummoned.com/album/sessions

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Pete RingMaster 21/06/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Triverse Massacre – Hades

Taking the listener by the throat down the five rivers encircling its underworld, Hades is the new EP from British metallers Triverse Massacre and the hellacious outpouring of the potential first bred in their previous releases. Back in 2014, the With Bared Teeth And Truths EP suggested that the band had the wares to make a potent impact on the British metal scene; Hades is that mighty trespass but one still hinting of greater things yet to come.

Bursting from the depths of Carlisle in 2010, Triverse Massacre quickly stirred up local support and in turn within the metal underground crowd with the release of debut EP In The Jaws Of Deceit. It was a growing reputation equally fuelled by their ferocious live presence which has gone on to see the band earn strong praise and share stages since with the likes of Skindred, Raging Speedhorn, Aliases, The Sun Explodes, The Colour Line, Reign Of Fury, and Anihilated and play Bloodstock Open Air last year alongside Slayer, Behemoth, Mastodon, and Gojira. With Bared Teeth and Truths provoked more concentrated attention and awareness of the band and their ravenous fusion of death, groove, and thrash metal; an incendiary mix now truly igniting within Hades.

The release opens up with Cocytus, an instrumental of imposing grandeur and looming shadows creating the climate you would expect surrounding the domain and god of the underworld. Guitars eventually encroach on the deceitful grace of the air creating a link to waiting venomous jaws as the track flows into the predacious animosity and corrosive depths of Styx. As the guitars of James Graham and Chris Kelsall gnaw and taunt the senses with riffs and grooves, vocalist Liam Stark descends and invades with his raw and potent mix of attacks, the frontman as the sound around him openly showing a growth in snarl and dexterity since that last EP. The guitars continue to weave a web of creative deceit, lures of infectious and seductive design woven to violate while the biting beats of Mike Collins and the tenebrific lines of bassist Jason McEwan have nothing in mind except merciless trespass.

It is a mighty and increasingly gripping track still slightly outshone though by next up Acheron. With grooves swinging from its first breath and contagious irritability coating every note and raw throated expulsion, the track unleashes the most virulent strain of toxic rock ‘n’ roll. The band’s sound has fully escaped any confines of extreme metal tagging, the third track epitomising its adventure and maturity and especially its rudely addictive quality forcing full submission to its rancor.

Lethe is simply bestial; a vicious harrying of the senses. Every element of its twisted body and intent is delicious harassment, grooves swarming through ears as rhythms advance with horde like barbarity. Within the tempest though, as across all tracks, there is a melodic prowess which accentuates rather than tempers the pernicious infestation but equally spotlights the instinctive craft breeding the envenomed imagination and onslaught on offer.

The EP closes with Phelegethon, arguably the biggest intrusive nagging of the senses of them all and quite possibly our favourite though that honour is consistently shared with its two predecessors. It is a stirring end though with the guitars a viperish incursion and rhythms a bold and numbing incitement as Stark crawls and lurches over the senses and psyche with vocal glands spilling malevolence in varying shades.

With Hades, Triverse Massacre has presented itself to the main table of extreme metal but as the EP thrills you still get the sense that the band is nowhere close to depleting its creative depths. That suggests very potent horizons for the quintet and for our beleaguered ears alongside them.

The Hades EP is released May 26th @ https://triversemassacre.bandcamp.com/ or http://triversemassacre.bigcartel.com/

http://www.triversemassacre.com/    https://www.facebook.com/TriverseMassacre%20/    https://twitter.com/TriverseM

Pete RingMaster 25/05/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Carnivora – The Vision EP

mkramer_Reputation Radio/RingMaster Review

Boston metallers Carnivora first caught our attention with an appearance on the excellent Bluntface Records compilation Operation: Underground. It featured a track from the band’s debut album Eternal, which after investigation turned out to equally be a stirring and attention exciting proposal. Now the band returns with the vicious exploits and temptations of The Vision EP, a ravenous and thrilling declaration of all the band’s skills and even bolder creative enmity.

Everything about The Vision is a step up from their impressive and acclaimed 2013 debut, the EP’s four tracks a cauldron of fierce imagination and volatile invention cast in maelstroms of diversely sculpted extreme metal. Groove and melodic metal enterprise colludes with death and thrash animosity in slabs of unpredictable and brutally irritable incitements, but furies ripe with captivating sonic adventure and melodic expression. Its release follows a successful couple of years which saw the band tearing up festivals such as the New England Metal & Hardcore Festival, Rockstar Energy Mayhem Festival, The Summer Slaughter Tour, and Rock And Shock Festival, all last year, with their merciless sound and share stages with the likes of Cannibal Corpse, Behemoth, Overkill, Trivium, Job For A Cowboy, Avenged Sevenfold, Morbid Angel, Shadows Fall, and many more. The Vision is Carnivora now snarling viciously at broader and more intensive spotlights and a global awakening to their presence sure to be on the cards such the EP’s dramatic persuasion.

CARNIVORA_VisionCover_jpegReputation Radio/RingMaster Review     It opens with A Vision In Red, a song venomously driving through ears straight away, swiftly getting under the skin and invading into the psyche. Riffs and grooves from Cody Michaud and Mike Meehan swarm maliciously over the senses, their addictive presence and prowess addictive bait to which the raw vocal squalls of M. Scott Lentine unleash a diversely delivered and magnetic hostility. It is a gripping proposition, the barbarous swings of drummer Dan DeLucia and serpentine tones cast by the bass of Cam Hunt, an addictive spine around which the guitars blossom and expand rich acidic textures bred in sonic imagination. As unpredictable as it is fascinatingly virulent, increasing in both the further it evolves its creative landscape, the song provides a tremendous start to the release.

Its success is quickly matched by Pessimist’s Tongue, its opening suggestive ambience subsequently whipped up into a tempestuous climate of blistering and rancorous intensity. The guitars lay out a melodic invitation even in the stormy climate of the song, a beckoning impossible to resist despite rhythms hailing down on them and the senses. The vocals, singularly and as the band, soon bring another shade to the encounter, offering a cancerous trespass and rally cry for thoughts and emotions. The song is a glorious violation with underlying temptations such as an understated but seductive lure of keys, solidly backed by Razors & Rust. Arguably more restrained than its predecessors, well slightly more merciful, the track stands toe to toe with the listener raging vocally and emotionally whilst guitars again entangle their enterprise around body and imagination. It does not quite have the spark of the first two tracks but easily entices ears and thoughts into exploring its rich depths and textures to a success similar to that found by those before it.

With a thrilling end to its creative ire, the track departs for EP closer The Reek Of Defeat to provide a final bracing and abrasive ravishing. It carries an almost mischievous flirtation to its melodic design and adventurous gait yet there is little about the song which not predatory or fuelled by bad blood. Its consuming maliciousness leaves ears ringing and emotions high and enjoyably completes a thrilling onslaught of a release.

Carnivora has climbed to new plateaus with The Vision EP yet you can only feel it is just the start of new and greater creative grudges, which in turn is a thought and anticipation to savour.

The Vision EP is available from 23rd June via Manshark Entertainment @ http://carnivora.bandcamp.com/ and http://carnivora.bigcartel.com/

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RingMaster 23/06/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard on Reputation Radio @ http://www.reputationradio.net

 

XUL – Extinction Necromance

Photo Credit – Jenna Hindley, Midnyte-Sun Photography

Photo Credit – Jenna Hindley, Midnyte-Sun Photography

Extinction Necromance is a release which wholly captivates whilst hitting the listener with a tsunami of malevolent sound and intent. Consisting of four tracks covering thirty minutes, the EP is a barbarous affair which at times defuses or certainly overshadows the invention and diverse textures within its depths through a continual tirade of vocal and emotional hostility. There is no hiding place from the encounter either, except the off button, but its creators Canadian metallers XUL, ensure that is never an option with their craft and fascinating enterprise.

XUL hails from Vernon, British Columbia and cast a merciless trespass of blackened death metal upon the senses. Influences to their intent include the likes of Behemoth, Dissection, Immortal, Emperor, and Watain, strong flavours noticeable in the band’s sound but without leaping miles away from such inspirations XUL has woven the spices into a sonic narrative built on the sole character of their imagination. Formed in 2008, the quintet released debut album Malignance four years later, a well-received encounter stirring up Canadian extreme metal especially across the Western side of the scene country, a recognition reinforced forcibly by the band’s live presence which has seen them share stages with the likes of Obscura, Exhumed, Vreid, Kampfar, Woods of Ypres, Macabre, Withered, Cephalic Carnage, Archspire, and 3 Inches of Blood. New EP Extinction Necromance sees the band explore their darkest depths and most malevolent emotions, filtering all into intensive examinations of ears and psyche.

It begins with Frozen, We Drown, an immediate consumption of the senses through prowling riffs and grooves punctuated by lurking rhythms. There is also an underlying swing to the opening baiting of ears, a trait which is regular bait whether in a gentle melodic persuasion, a rugged rampage, or an unbridled savaging. There is also thrash bred virulence at the start which with the rabid sonic intensity subsequently evolves into a melodically scenic landscape of constantly developing climates and unpredictable intent. The track continues to shift and switch its attack and sound, merging murderous sonic and rhythmic affairs with almost seductive hugs of calm and evocative suggestiveness. XUL’s sound, as each song upon the EP, is not suitable for a lightweight consumption. It is with continual examination that the busy terrains and almost insidious nature of the aural tapestries unravel for increasingly dramatic and impressive proposals. That is not to say it is not a potent first introduction made, just a matter of almost too much to digest and get a handle on initially.

Album Artwork done by Remy C. of Headsplit Design

Album Artwork done by Remy C. of Headsplit Design

It does ensure every listen is a slightly different and fresh adventure too, epitomised by the following Orbit of Nemesis. It rises from the release with a heralding fanfare of horns and celestial harmonies, the epic air suggested in the orchestral hints of its predecessor in full regalia here. Like a majestic bird soaring into an expansive and thickly coloured atmosphere the track sparks the imagination but like the same being swallowed by the jaws of a violent storm, the expressive opening of the track is devoured by a bestial sonic explosion. The band surges over the senses from within that assault; volleys of violent beats from Lowell Winters the spearhead of a hellacious onslaught brought by the bass predation of Marlow Deiter and rabid guitar causticity from Wallace Huffman and Bill Ferguson. With the raw primal tones of vocalist Levi Meyers leaving their own inhospitable residues in ears too, it is a gripping fury taken to greater heights by the toxic but sonically invigorating grooves and shards of melodic imagination spilled by the fingers of Huffman.

As the first track, though maybe not as openly tangible, there is an evolving aspect to the raging and another swing to its vicious stroll, an ingredient which marks each song in varying ways and degrees as shown by third song Chaos Requiem. Rolling in on a ‘gentler’ gait and intent than its excellent predecessor, the song is soon sledgehammering the senses as guitars weave a tempting lure of melodic intrigue and expression. The turmoil is exhausting, ensuring that the brief respites when they emerge feel like oases in the merciless storm. It is increasingly gripping and an intensive incitement which as mentioned needs time to fully explore but more than rewards the effort.

Final track Summon the Swarm coaxes with the calm of water and a reflective melody before unleashing sonic and rhythmic carnage, but a tempest openly and precisely sculpted by each element of the band. It also delivers a thick anthemic lure alongside its punishing tirade of sound and voice, the track at times as intoxicating as it is corrosive as it frees a maelstrom of emotion and musical drama, especially in the closing ravishing of ears.

The more time Extinction Necromance is given the more it impresses, an undeniable success which marks XUL out as a band to watch closely as they surely start luring in a more global attention, starting right here. It might not quite be the best blackened death metal protagonist you will meet this year but it will be the one of those enticing the most repeats plays.

Extinction Necromance is available from May 19th @ https://xulmetal.bandcamp.com/album/extinction-necromance

http://xulofficial.ca/   https://www.facebook.com/Xulband

RingMaster 19/05/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard on Reputation Radio @ http://www.reputationradio.net

 

The Dead – Deathsteps to Oblivion

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Unleashing their third album, Australian death metallers The Dead confront the senses with an energy sapping, senses consuming slavering beast and that is just the first track upon Deathsteps to Oblivion. The title perfectly sums up the corrosive and emotionally damaging journey the band drags the listener upon. It is an intensive examination of thoughts and emotions traversing a quintet of excruciatingly heavy and intensive soundscapes soaked in a pestilential fusion of death and sludge metal filtered through the darkest doom laded climate imaginable. It is a sound which belongs to all three styles yet is uneasy settling in any, creating its own domain of raw originality which is familiar but more so innovative. It is a harsh and demanding proposition but also one unafraid to melodically and sonically explore its imagination and providing potent evidence as to why the band is so revered in many quarters.

Formed in 2005 with a line-up which included members of Obfuscate Mass and Misery, the Brisbane band swiftly released a demo followed by the Armoured Assassin single in 2006. Following a second demo the band’s self-titled debut album was unveiled the following year, an encounter making an instant and imposing impression on the underground scene. With the Nocturnal Funeral EP subsequently under their belt, as well as increasing their live reputation with shows over the years alongside bands such as Behemoth, Obituary, Kataklysm, Psycroptic, and Ulcerate, The Dead gripped greater attention with second full-length Ritual Executions. Widely acclaimed through its independent release and a reboot through Diabolical Conquest Webzine which evolved into Transcending Obscurity and release the new ravenous exploit from the band, the album lured the broadest attention and spotlights, yet as Deathsteps to Oblivion infests the psyche you sense it was nothing compared to the response the new encounter has the potential to trigger. The line-up of vocalist Mike Yee, guitarist/bassist Adam Keleher, and drummer Chris Morse consume and immerse the listener with an aural suffocation which is as inhospitable as it is inescapably captivating, an incitement stirring up shadows and intimidations which seduce as they savage the senses.

Opener Maze of Fire immediately confronts and surrounds ears with a web of threatening sinister voices, their demonic roars the lure into a wall of debilitating heavy handed riffs and equally destructive rhythms. Within that trap though there is a melodic coaxing from the guitar which sparks the imagination as still varied and intimidating vocals prowl over thoughts with their intrusive narrative and tones. It is a fascinating entanglement to be lost in, especially with the slip into haunting melodic scenery which is as visually potent as the visceral sounds and vocals which soon share its passage in time threatening. It is a track which inspires different feelings and explorations in the imagination with every listen, something apply to all songs on the album, but a perpetually gripping and challenging persuasion.

The following Disturbing the Dead is just as carnivorous in presence and tone, arguably even more predatory as it crawls with torment laden intent over the senses. Its first half is an unrelenting scourge of doom empowered angst and intensity, a thoroughly appetising violation but from there it without losing funereal despair and malevolence, a sonic and creative enterprise is agitated to lure like a beacon in the thick sludgy tar of the song’s insatiable heart. It is an intriguing and suggestive offering which as its last note lingers in the ear, seems like another world to the one dawning on a rally of gunfire and with destructive and blackened voracity, emerges as The God Beyond. It is the rawest assault imaginable, a caustic sonic haze frequented by hate and fury, but temporary as the battle field returns to provoke a richer and clearer, but no less torturous tempest of sound and exploration. A constant test and provocation, the track is a maelstrom which is uneasy on the ear but wholly seductive upon thoughts and emotions. It is a song which it is hard to get a full handle on in sound and narrative but one inspiring a hunger to find the answers within its cavernous despair.

Terminus swerves in on a rhythmic seduction next, tribal and suggestive beats from Morse transfixing with exotic persuasion whilst bass and guitar flirt with their own sonic teasing. This is again just the doorway into the harshest shadows and challenging depths of the band’s creative rabidity, a serpentine breath accompanying the emerging vocal scarring and ruinous air of the track. Of course it is only part of the picture, melodic intrigue and clean vocal tenacity adding their twists to the sonic mystique and imagination which evolves within the black fog of sound. The track sends shivers down the spine as it seduces and gnaws on the psyche, taking best track award though the closing title track seriously challenges there. It too is a smothering tapestry of threat and invitational suggestion, extremes colluding and toying with each other within a cavern of uncompromising and ravenous aural profanation.

The five years between albums has only seen The Dead find new fears to exploit and nuances to discover in listener and their music respectively. Deathsteps to Oblivion is not for the faint hearted or emotionally sensitive, but to challenge and reward the corners of mind and soul it is maybe the most essential must investigate release of the year.

Deathsteps to Oblivion is available digitally or on limited edition CD now via Transcending Obscurity @ Transcending Obscurity https://transcendingobscurity.bandcamp.com/album/deathsteps-to-oblivion-death-metal-sludge

https://www.facebook.com/lordofthelivingdead

RingMaster 19/11/2014

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Black Crown Initiate – The Wreckage of Stars

shot

Never have open hostility and uncompromising brutality been as elegantly seductive and radiantly fascinating as within The Wreckage of Stars, the debut album from US progressive extreme metallers Black Crown Initiate. Actually that is not quite true as the band’s previous and extraordinary Song of the Crippled Bull EP offered such imaginative daring too but within the album it has bred a new bulk and exploration which is as fearsome as it is gloriously mesmeric. Their entrance was dramatic and startling and now with The Wreckage of Stars, the Pennsylvanian quintet’s emergence is complete, placing them right there side by side with the likes of Between The Buried And Me, The Ocean, and Opeth.

Formed in 2012, the Reading hailing Black Crown Initiate was soon drawing on experiences, individual inspirations, and a vast web of styles to create what is a maelstrom of gripping ingenuity and vicious enterprise. The evidence was immediately audible with the unleashing of Song of the Crippled Bull, an introduction which was as drenched in acclaim as it was in enthralling and unique inventive personality. Its attention grabbing success led to the band securing a coveted spot on the Metal Alliance Tour alongside Goatwhore and Behemoth, as well as the sharing of stages with bands such as Septicflesh, Fleshgod Apocalypse, and Rivers of Nihil. Earlier this year Black Crown Initiate signed with eOne and now in tandem go for the psychological jugular and lustful passions with The Wreckage of Stars.

The release opens with Great Mistake and an instantly seducing enticing of melodies. It is an inviting coaxing by the guitars which only gains weight and potency as imposing rhythms and aggressive riffs join its bait. Continuing to warmly lure within the brewing tempest, the song leads the senses into the bestial tones of vocalist James Dorton, every syllable expelled loaded with malice and guttural intensity. Still the song is a seductive persuasion though and intriguingly, it is when the superb clean vocals of guitarist Andy Thomas grasps ears that the track finds itself at its most threatening as the music flares up around him. It is a delicious and surprising outcome, alone revealing so much about the skill and songwriting personality of the band. Across its extensive landscape, the track boils, squalls, and explores mellow intent, every second and twist of the song a new surprise and magnetic contagion, especially the Eastern veining which colours its engrossing finale.

The outstanding start places the album on an early plateau which subsequent tracks either stalk as boldly or certainly flirt with in presence and invention. The following The Fractured One is one hitting similar heights, its immediate BCI_coveragitated predation of tempestuous beats from drummer Jesse Beahler and throaty tempting from the bass of Nick Shaw, an enslaving death metal spiced frame within which the guitars of Thomas and Rik Stelzpflug cast tenaciously imaginative and hostile enterprise. One of the shorter songs on the album, it is an incessant and virulently contagious torrent of barbarous and sonically scorching savagery.

A breather of sorts after the inhospitable onslaught of the previous tack comes with Malignant, its opening of classically honed guitar a caress of calm within the established storm of the album. Guitars nestle creatively up to the imagination straight away though that suggested respite is eventually smothered by the serpentine venom of Dorton’s vocals and a pestilential tsunami of corrosive rhythms and caustic riffery. Of course nothing can be assumed with a Black Crown Initiate track, something learned early on the last EP, and soon the increasingly impressive warm voice of Thomas breaks the wall of maliciousness, aligning itself eventually with a similarly engrossing and graceful weave of melodic design and expression. Though it is restless to return to savaging the senses, the track courts this peace as long and creatively as possible, ensuring the song again leaves expectations a lost cause.

Both the carnivorous ferocity of The Human Lie Manifest and the exhausting technicality of Withering Waves leave senses cowering and imagination basking in majestic aural warfare; the pair, as all songs, parading more of the craft and inventive depths of the band. The second of the two is especially scintillating as extremes of light and dark, animosity and melodic beauty come together in one spellbinding emprise, a mouth-watering adventure matched by the primal and ruinous presence of To The Eye That Leads You. This erupts with a tornado of vocal enmity, the assault at times an inaudible suffocation of intent and lyrical intimidation which in allowing a coarsely veiled clarity to emerge intimidates further. Around it though there is a swing and swagger to the sounds which is no less vicious but does provides an inescapable infectiousness. It is a vat of bad blood and the thrilling dark-side to the climactic and forcibly elegant beauty of the album’s title track. Predominantly instrumental it closes with a vocal union of all sides shown so far on the album, to provoke a new hunger in appetite and thoughts.

There is no escaping the relentless battering and sonic violation uncaged by Shapes Collapse next, the track as so many, no matter how harmful and fierce it impacts on body and senses casting an addictive and seriously enticing infection. It is a constant lure throughout the tempest but especially pungent in the glade of melodic reflection ventured by song and guitars before climbing back into the outskirts of the initial storm.

The album closes with firstly the arresting terrain of Purge, a track which entwines imaginative charm and melodic beauty with voracious and vehement fuelled hostility for a mutually unsettling and seductive examination of ears and emotions. It is succeeded by Linear, a sensational final encounter where under persistent hellacious provocation, the lighter side of the band has full and irresistible rein.

     The Wreckage of Stars is a major triumph proving that the last EP was no flash in the pan but instead just the appetiser to greater sonic alchemy and brutal expression from Black Crown Initiate. Now is the time to explore their brilliant fury, though you can only feel as with their music, there will be no escaping their presence and touch from hereon in anyway.

The Wreckage of Stars is available now via eOne Heavy / Good Fight

http://www.facebook.com/BlackCrownInitiate

RingMaster 29/10/2014

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Burning Flesh – New Chaos Order

BF

Unleashing an irresistible nagging persistence through every track within its voracious body, New Chaos Order from extreme metallers Burning Flesh is a thoroughly captivating and exhaustingly invigorating beast. It is may be not the most original encounter but that is offset by the sheer weight and creative fire within the ravenous provocation, ensuring that its presence is a long-term and frequently explored incitement.

Consisting of members from both France and Switzerland, Burning Flesh took its first breath in 2005. The honing of their sound, with inspirations coming from the likes of Napalm Death, Behemoth, Severe Torture, and Blood Red Throne, and live performances followed before the band got down to making debut album Unconscious deformity in 2009. Recorded with Bruno Burel, the well-received album was uncaged in early 2010. Personnel changes ensued before by the latter part of 2011 the line-up of founders Lionel Fontana (vocals) and Anthony Martin (guitar) with Diego Graham (guitars), Guilluame Lagger (bass), and Paul Sordet (drums) was in place. New Chaos Order is the band’s full assault on world metal and it is very easy to expect Burning Flesh becoming under a rich spotlight if not quite with this certainly through future exploits.

The release rages against ears first with Rage, its opening sample soon quashed by the vehemence of riffs and brutality of rhythms which BF coverfollow. With raw uncompromising vocals unleashing the equally hostile narrative, the track is a destructive pleasure. A delicious spiteful grooving adds spice to the irrepressible temptation on offer whilst guitars and rhythms spare no degree of mercy in their malicious hostility. The tremendous ravaging is swiftly emulated by Corruption Of All Kings, another furnace of thrilling unrelenting provocation which violates and seduces simultaneously for welcomed wounds and raw senses. Switches of pace and intensity grinds intensively away just as devastatingly as the flailing riffs and rhythms across the demanding track continuing the impressive surge of the album.

Both Lies and Beginning’s End rip at the jugular with a torrential predation of carnivorous riffs and cruel rhythms next, the first arguably reining in its aggressive intensity for a more riveting web of melodic and sonic intrigue. To be fair as it is tearing the senses into strips it is a negligible difference but one which adds a new and needed flavour and design to the album. Across the album there is at times a close certainly surface familiarity to tracks and their attacking structures, and with a thick skin to the spite it very often needs a deep push into the heart of songs to split their animosity apart. The second of the two also brings an individual hook of rapacious intent to its corrosive quarrel but lacks the spark of its predecessors in many ways to stand as similarly virulent.

The insidiously hornet like lure of the title track comes next, its niggling groove a sweet sore you just have to push further for its antagonistic nectar. Once more rhythms and the intensity of the track are barbarous and with everything combined the proposition is a murderously compelling storm of whiplashing inducing endeavour and emotion savaging enmity.

New Chaos Order continues to do nothing but impress as the contagious rancor of Death Place and the predatory stalking of Total Hate next torments psyche and imagination, the first especially riveting and both leaving passions and hunger further aflame. The same can be said of the totally hypnotic Here And Beyond, which from an ok start evolves into a ferocious creative and rabid enticement, and the similarly malicious feud that is Injection. Admittedly the last of those songs is another where it fails to ignite the same ardour as others but casts a net of imagination and technically skilled incitement that you cannot avoid being impressed by.

Scums and In Hell We Trust unleash their creative savagery as the album comes towards its end with fine and hateful effect whilst bonus track Retch provides one final malignant pestilence for ears and emotions to be bruised intensively by. It concludes an impressive and thoroughly enjoyable release. Yes it is not breaking new boundaries and suffers that occasional lack of surface definition but it more than makes up for it with contagious enterprise and irritable persistence.

New Chaos Order is available via Great Dane Records now!

http://www.burning-flesh.com/

9/10

RingMaster 06/06/2014

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