Night Dials – I’ve Done More Things/I’ll Sleep When I Die

Picture 55_Reputation Radio/RingMaster Review

From psych to garage rock, beat to pop; all the flavours of sixties rock ‘n’ roll are woven into the blend of nostalgia and modern invention crafted by UK band Night Dials and makes their debut single one feistily captivating proposition. A double A-sided offering from the West London based quintet, the encounter reeks of vintage influences and passions yet sits perfectly in the tapestry of modern music with a constant appetite for the old in its imagination. It might not be an entrance and release by Night Dials to set the UK music scene ablaze but with a thoroughly enjoyable presence it does insist that the band is firmly put on the radar.

Apparently leading up to the creation of the tracks making up the single, Night Dials recorded their first song I’ve Done More Things with Liam Watson at his legendary Toe Rag Studios, an environment decked out with pre-1969 equipment. A lack of money caused the recordings to be abandoned but led the band to a dingy cellar in a London pub where in a surrounding of “rattling wine bottles and kegs” they experimented, cultured, and subsequently recorded their first release. Cavernous and soaked in evocative reverb, the two songs emerging and making up the band’s first single thrust the imagination into decades past and the potent swing of current explorations and inventiveness. Recorded in the underground of London, the release is indeed pure underground rock ‘n’ roll, a proposition which captivates and lingers with organic potency.

Picture 51_Reputation Radio/RingMaster Review     I’ve Done More Things instantly offers a thick fuzzy persuasion as jangly guitars collude with punchy beats within fizzy smog of sonic temptation. The vocals also make a quickly convincing entrance; their mellower effect wrapped tones an eager dance on ears whipping up imagination and appetite as easily as the more raucous sounds around them. The raw and sparse production only adds to the success and character of the song, its touch as much recalling the essence of sixties music and its recordings as the psychedelic breeze encasing the minimal but dramatic rhythms and the unfussy pop fuelling infectious melodies and the endeavour of the guitars.

It is a rich lure matched by the briefer but no less stirring adventure of I’ll Sleep When I Die. It opens with a magnetic embrace of echoing vocal harmonies and slim guitar enticing, their union building into a flirtatious stroll as new textures and sound join the almost nursery rhyme like charm of the song. The surf coated imagination of the guitars soon brings a richer climate and invention, the song even more irresistibly enthralling as it brews new hues in a senses inciting persuasion which is just a devilish mix of old and new spawned from a heart for the past.

Both songs leave an urge to know more about Night Dials and explore a sound which maybe can be best described as a union of The Yardbirds, The Sonics, Jesus and Mary Chain, and 13th Floor Elevators, but in the hands of Night Dials is something fresh and different again.

I’ve Done More Things/I’ll Sleep When I Die is available from June 22nd digitally and on 7” vinyl via Ciao Ketchup Recordings @ https://ciaoketchuprecordings.bandcamp.com/album/ive-done-more-things-ill-sleep-when-i-die

http://nightdials.com/ https://www.facebook.com/nightdials

RingMaster 22/06/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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The Loons – Miss Clara Regrets

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Ahead of their new album on the legendary Bomp Records, San Diego quintet The Loons have released a two track single on Dirty Water Records. The songs, Miss Clara Regrets and Alexander, the latter a cover of the Pretty Things classic, were recorded exclusively for the label and alone reveal that over the twenty years or so that the band has been treating ears they seem to get more potent and essential.

Consisting of vocalist Mike Stax who is equally known for Ugly Things magazine which he runs, bassist Anja Stax, guitarists Marc Schroeder and Chris Marsteller, and drummer/producer Mike Kamoo, The Loons again bring the sixties psyche beat/pop invention which seems to run through their veins with their own modern pop tone to the single. And once more the band captivates with a slice of raw pop majesty.

Miss Clara Regrets instantly has ears engrossed and the appetite licking its lips as a deliciously throaty bass hook aligns with pungently anthemic beats, they both in turn wrapped by a flowing wine of sonic enterprise. Feet and indeed body are soon pumped up and bouncing to the swing of the song, its contagion inescapable as is the melodic acidity soaking every magnetic second of the incitement. It is one of those songs which simply tap into the wants of any pop rock fan, of any era, whilst merging nostalgia and modern instincts into a slice of addictive rock ‘n’ roll.

The Loons do not fiddle too much with Alexander, staying close to the original character of the version from the band which Mike makes no secret of adoring and constantly champions their cause. They do give it that Loons snarl though, vocally and musically which brings another hue to the set in stone classic. It is a great company to Miss Clara Regrets, though it is the lead song which ultimately steals the plaudits and lures these ears back time and time again.

If Miss Clara Regrets is a hint to what the band’s new album has in store for us all, expect nothing less than unbridled fun and enjoyment from that too.

Miss Clara Regrets is available now via Dirty water Records on 7” vinyl and download @ http://www.dirtywaterrecords.co.uk/shop/#!/The-Loons-Miss-Clara-Regrets-b-w-Alexander-download/p/47051206/category=2749844

https://www.facebook.com/TheLoons.SD

RingMaster 02/05/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard on Reputation Radio @ http://www.reputationradio.net

The Mobbs – Garage Punk For Boys

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Ever wondered what would happen when you mixed ’77 bred punk rock with garage rock? UK rockers The Mobbs obviously did and with additional doses of sixties beat and R&B have crafted a sound which insatiably infests body and soul. In the mischievous shape of their third album Garage Punk For Boys, this adventure it is fair to say also provides one of the releases of the year. The accompanying promo sheet for the album suggests that “The Mobbs play a Wilko Johnson infused Billy Childish explosion”, an accurately pungent description of their sound but to that we would add the unreserved devilry of Radio Stars, the raw charm of Television Personalities, and the bracing fever of Thee Exciters in its armoury. The concoction is a riveting and exhilarating stomp with a hunger as shown by Garage Punk For Boys, which infects the listener from head to toe.

Formed in 2008, the trio from Northampton has persistently lit up stages, earning a rich reputation for energy strewn live performances, a stirring presence backed up and spread further by their greedily received full-length It’s… The Mobbs of 2011 and its acclaimed successor Stiff Upper Lip & Trousers To Match last year. With a couple of singles equally stirring the passions, the band has been a live spark in the European garage rock scene, though it is easy to expect Garage Punk For Boys being the trigger to a far more ferocious spotlight upon the inimitable uniqueness of The Mobbs.

The trio of vocalist/guitarist Joe B. Humbled, drummer Cheadle, and bassist The Bishop, who is making his recording debut with the band on the album, unleash an instantly grabbing eighteen second punk brawl through Gpfb to set GPFB-FRONT-COVERthings off, following it with the magnetic grooving of Get Your Hair Cut. Bass and guitar cast the first spicy lure on the second track, before snipping scissors unlock a feisty stomp littered with a wholly seductive bassline and similarly alluring hooks. Matching the devilment of the sounds, Humbled incites ears and imagination with his raw and unfussy delivery, a boisterous and infectious enticing to misbehave or conform depending how you want to take the exceptional track.

Its bewitching bounce is followed by the tangy presence of I Am the Anticlimax, clanging riffs an easy enslavement from the first breath. With The Bishop adding another delicious velvety tempting on the bass within the crisp rhythms of Cheadle, the track entwines beat and vintage punk rock, kind of like The Rockin’ Vickers meets Leyton Buzzards. Striding with attitude and sonic enterprise, the song is an instant anthem, as so much of the album, an almost concussive and certainly inescapable treat whipped up by scything guitar and punchy rhythmic enterprise, everything lorded over by the compelling tones of Humbled.

Do the Bishop! comes next and is just the wickedest instrumental baiting possible. The skills of The Bishop seduce and rumble throughout whilst Humbled’s guitar launches its own virulent seducing as Cheadle smashes anything in arms-length resourcefully. With a tang of blues sweetness to its epidemic waltz, the song sets up further hunger in the appetite for the album before making way for the melodic causticity and intriguing narrative of Demobbed. The track is primarily garage rock but at times you can almost swear there is an element of The Undertones in its slim but impossibly potent sonic endeavour.

The hungrily vivacious ride of the album is taken to another level with We Don’t Need a God, a brilliant furnace of searing grooves and greedy hooks ridden by the punk honesty of the vocals. It is pure addictiveness, every twist and tenacious slither of bait soaked in infectiousness and anthemic irreverence, leaving feet, body, and soul blissfully exhausted and thoughts rebellious. Imagine The Masonics flirting voraciously with The Adicts and you get not only the heart of the song but arguably of the whole release.

The title track is next, romping with ears and nostalgia through jabbing beats and jangly hooks, its title summing up song, sound, and the whole garage premise which fuelled punk and garage rock at their outsets. It also has thrilling melodic warmth to its gentle uprising, everything aligning for an irresistible rousing of pleasure, taken on again by the blink and you miss shortness of second instrumental Chicken Run. Its enticing strut is swiftly pushed aside by the exceptional sonic commentary of Where’s the Punk Rock!?, angst and fury as much a part of its gripping clang and garage punk fever as creative relish.

Photo 1   It is not exaggerating to say that every song on Garage Punk for Boys is devious rascality, all instinctively and simultaneously appealing to the styles it weaves its propositions from, One Erotic Thought another fine example with its sixties spawned beat infused garage rock tromp. As here, they all keep feet and limbs as busy as ears and imagination, and whilst thoughts may not be erotic as the song reveals of itself, they are nevertheless keen to indulge in knavish practices after each encounter.

Put It in Your Pipe clunks and swings in next, riffs bulky lures courted by compelling bass craft and vocal devilment, everything framed by precise and eagerly wicked beats. Stepping out with a punk seeded swagger, the track also wears the mischief breeding charm and adventure of King Salami and the Cumberland 3 and the aforementioned Billy Childish, drawing out more lust for the album from the passions.

The final stretch sees the blues rock induced R&B stamp of Just as Bad as You light up air and ears first before the exotic swing of Mk II immerses senses and imagination in a sultry dance of the seven salacious temptresses, well in my dreams anyway. Both songs leave appetite as greedy as ever whilst closing riot of Mad! is an aggressively spirited and ferociously contagious garage punk assault, and oh so scintillating.

It is impossible not to drool from start to finish over Garage Punk for Boys, a release which if anything from punk to garage rock, beat to flirty rock ‘n’ roll gets the juices flowing, is a must. The thing with The Mobbs is they not only create sensational stomps but do it with a presence and flavour like no other, this simply makes them one of the UKs seriously exciting and innovative bands.

Garage Punk for Boys is available digitally and on CD now via Cravat Records @ http://themobbsuk.bandcamp.com/album/garage-punk-for-boys

http://www.themobbs.co.uk/

RingMaster 21/11/2014

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard from

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The Teamsters – Play Along With…The Teamsters

Photo by Mark Shackleton ©

Photo by Mark Shackleton ©

    A blend of sixties pop, indie, beat rock, and punk rock sounds an intriguing concept just on paper alone but in the hands of a band like British rockers The Teamsters it emerges as a frighteningly compelling recipe. The proof comes with the North London hailing trio’s new EP Play Along With…The Teamsters, a four track riotous encounter which enslaves feet and emotions to do its devilish bidding. The release is a tremendous party of precise yet organically bred sounds driven by imagination and unbridled passion, a mix which transfers its energy and incitement easily into its recipient. Simply it is one of the most exciting introductions to come along over recent years.

    Consisting of guitarist/vocalist Tom H. Wing, drummer/vocalist Bret Bolton, and bassist David Peter Jorgensen for the EP, The Teamsters grabbed the attention of Hamburg based label Moody Monkey who leapt in to release their debut. Play Along With… needs only a few seconds to steal attention and maybe a minute to fully ignite imagination and passions. From start to finish it has a wealth of enterprise to satisfy and excite fans of punk, mod, R’n’B, garage rock and plenty more. It is an excitable and insatiable stomp but one with a control which ensures it has a simultaneously clean and raucous impact.

     Diggin´ An Early Grave starts things off with a hefty roll of drums triggering a stroll through dramatically jangling riffs, a 1607057_233699483469843_267368660_nswaggering bassline, and instantly enticing vocals. The track dances across the senses with an unrelenting spring to its keen gait and near on wanton adventure to its guitar sculpted persuasion. There is a familiarity to the song too bringing forward the catchiness of sixties pop but just as strongly the track holds a modern raw causticity which only intensifies the stirring prowess of the song.

   From the excellent start, the similarly impressive Girl (How Could Ya?) takes things up a notch, its initial stabbing rhythms and guitar scythes an immediate incendiary fire for body and emotions. Like its predecessor the song has a contagiousness which flirts with the senses like a brewing epidemic, stroking and imposing upon them through two minutes of sixties beat meets rock pop, in a way like the Kinks meets Supergrass.

    The second half of the EP is even more invigorating and emotionally inflammatory. Don´t Come Back Home leaps at the ears with beats and guitars creating a magnetic web of lustful endeavour ridden by the vocals and harmonies. It is a spicy ball of voracious energy and senses searing sonic rowdiness bound to a tempest of flailing rebellion and eye balling contention. As mighty as it is, the track is surpassed by the closing A Girl Named Linda, the best song on the release. Imagine the R&B revelry of Bo Diddley in league with the garage punk rascality of The Hives aligned to that of Thee Exciters. Add a little Rocket From The Crypt in there and you edge even closer to the unique romp but still leave plenty of ingenious adventure to be imagined and discovered in song and ultimately the EP.

     Ensuring feet never have a moment to relax or emotions to settle into mere appreciation for its scintillating celebration the track is an irresistible infection on psyche and passions, a final triumph of a sensational debut. Expect to hear a lot more of and from The Teamsters, as shown by Play Along With…The Teamsters, one of the most exciting and ridiculously addictive bands to emerge so far this decade.

https://www.facebook.com/TeamstersMusic

10/10

RingMaster 18/03/2014

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

The Teamsters – Digging An Early Grave

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Beat Seeking Missiles – ‘Break My Fall’/’Dr. Strangelove’

Warm, enthusiastic and completely magnetic, the debut single from Beat Seeking Missiles jumps all over the ear to offer riotous beats, melodically curved grooves, and insistent energy.  ‘Break My Fall’/’Dr. Strangelove’ knows what it has and is unashamed in bringing it directly and openly to one’s senses. It has irrepressible blends of beat and surf rock coupled with garage and heartfelt rock ‘n’ roll to merge into a sound that brings sixties vaunt alongside punk attitude and garage rock honesty, it has unbridled dirty charisma.

Released on Dirty Water Records the single brings elements of the likes of The Stones, Bo Diddley, Link Wray and in some ways The Modern Lovers. For all the artists their music does remind of the Beat Seeking Missiles as evident on the single, has a distinctive rugged sound of their own, offering influences as spices to their thick spirited creations. The band is comprised of a pedigree many bands would drool for. There is Sir Bald Diddley (from the Wig Outs/Big Wigs/Alopecia Records), Mick Quinn (dB Band and founding member of Supergrass), Kid Wig (of the Wig Outs/Big Wigs), and Bruce Brand (Pop Rivets/Milkshakes/Thee Headcoats/Masonics), a collective that certainly with this first single combine their experience and attributes into a stimulating and very exciting proposition.

Lead track is ‘Break My Fall’, a sixties lined slice of electrified raw pop. Combining a feel of the Who and the Troggs with The Stooges and The Ramones, the track flows with spiky melodies, soaring Beatlesque harmonies and tenacious riffs. The song openly wants the ear captivated, thrusting a simple but eager driven riff through its centre to allow the guitars to bring scorched diversions and enterprise to the track. The song is an excellent introduction to the band but soon left in the shade by its partner track.

Dr. Strangelove’ or to give it the full title on the single sleeve, ‘Doctor Strangelove, or How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Beat Seeking Missiles’, is a rumble upon the senses. Part rock ‘n’ roll, part rockabilly, and part sixties enthused blues, the track is monstrous. Its persistent beats are hypnotic and the vocals dogged, the mix recalling the likes of Reverend Horton Heat, Link Wray and at times Ray Campi, plus the punk essences of a Rocket From the Crypt, It is wonderful stuff that gets better with the explosive melodic crashes and cascades within the song. The track plays with an arrogance and self belief that is irresistible and easily confirms that this is a band one needs to hear more of and go see live.

Beat Seeking Missiles are an instinctive need for your musical day, simple as that. Just trust and go listen to this single for your proof.

RingMaster 08/02/2012

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