Symphonies in sound and imagination: exploring Sahona with Charly Sahona

Charly Sahona_RingMasterReview

2016 received one of its early treats just a few weeks back with the release of the self-titled Sahona album. It was the debut release from the new melodic rock project of vocalist/guitarist/keyboardist Charly Sahona of progressive metallers Venturia. It is a release which is, in our own words “a rousing drama of sound and imagination.” Offered the chance to find out more with Charly, we grabbed a hefty chunk of his time to explore the creation of the band and its first album, and simply the creative heart of the man…

Hi Charly, many thanks for sharing time with us. How are things in the Sahona area of the world?

Hello, thanks for the invitation. Well, things are fine here. The album is out and so far, reviews have been very positive about it . We’re about to release a new music video and shoot a new one. I’m working like crazy in order to perform these songs live as soon as possible . So, I can say I have a good life .

Before we look at your excellent debut album, would you tell us about the first days of Sahona. It was originally meant as a solo project for you?

Oh thanks, I’m glad you like it !!! Sure, you’re right , at first, the album was meant to be a solo project and more precisely, the follow-up of Naked thoughts from a silent chaos released in 2010 but the songs are quite different and so are the musical arrangements and the line-up. So, the first days of Sahona as a full band are recent but the writing of the songs began in 2013. Oh It actually took a lot of time before we recorded and released it .

What sparked the creation of the project; what was it you wanted to explore different to your music in progressive metallers Venturia

I really wanted to do something different with this one. I like my musical-making to be in a constant motion. At the same time It’s necessary to stand back with the last thing you released and start something new with fresh ideas and enthusiasm. For this project, I wanted to write something without any heavy riff played on a 7-string and focus on different musical textures, guitar sounds and new grooves.

You touched on it earlier, so you had a collection of ideas and songs already in the works before you invited fellow musicians to help out?

Yes, after I finished the first 4 demo-songs, things were clear in my mind and I knew who I wanted to work with. I like to make music with talented people of course but it’s always better when you do it with your friends. So I first asked drummer Stéphane Cavanez to join me , I’ve known him for a long time, he’s a brilliant musician, very enthusiastic about things. After hearing the demo version of On this winter night , he said he would agree to play on all the songs . Same thing with my long-time friends Fabien Paraillac and Cédric Artaxet; I don’t remember exactly if I sent them the first four demos before asking them to join me but anyway, both of them agreed. I was very glad and happy they all said yes to join me for this project. I knew they would sound great together and that my songs would have been transcended thanks to them .

sahona_RingMasterReviewSo what was the catalyst to changing the idea of guest musicians to a full band?

It was something I had in mind for a while , as the songs have a different sound compared to the things I did before. As we were recording, there was an obvious musical chemistry going on and it reinforced me to think about having a band name for this project. So I talked about it with Chris from Dooweet agency and to my buddies. We all thought that the idea of the band was obvious and as the name Sahona sounds cool for a band too, the choice was done, easy to make and I didn’t have to scratch my head during days in order to find a new name . The other thing is: as the musicians are my friends, the idea of having a band together was something natural. More, I really like to immortalize music with talented friends.

Was it an easy to decision to ‘share’ your songs with I am guessing musicians with their own adventurous ideas when creating music?

Sure, it was very easy as we’re all professional musicians . There was no ego thing that could have been hard to deal with . I wanted a more organic sound and a sophisticated modern rock approach and I knew what my band mates were able to do .

For example, the drums I programmed were done in a prog-metal style and Stéphane brought a more refined  rock groove, I let him do his stuff as everything was matching .

As I’m the lead singer and as there are many guitar layers on these songs it was obvious to ask for help and some back-up . I couldn’t imagine another guy than Fabien to play the guitar with me on this album.  We have the same guitar approach but he’s more rock than me.

We recorded a lot of different guitar takes and during the mix, we chose what was best for the song no matter if it was him or me playing….

He did an amazing job on the mix too. Just like his guitar sound, all the songs sound powerful and organic.

Regarding the bass, there was a couple of things I asked Cédric to play the exact same way I did on the demos. But as my bass programming was voluntary basic most of the time, he added his own personality and groove that matched perfectly Stéphane’s drumming . He even changed some root notes that at first surprised me, and the more I listened to it, the more I liked it.

In the end, everything felt easy and natural.

Did their input mean your songs changed or evolved from their original characters once the band was a full involvement of all?

No, not really but I guess things will evolve when we’ll perform live. It’s a natural process and it’s important for us to make slightly different things when we play the same songs over and over.

When writing songs, do you come at them from different angles or have a general way of bringing them to life from idea to sound?Album cover_RingMasterReview

I usually have a precise idea of how the album or a song will sound like even though the root of all songs is based on a guitar or keyboard chords progression and a simple hummed melody . Then, I’ll program a midi file of what I just did. If the melody sounds good with a bad flute midi sound and a midi bass line, I keep the idea and will have a clearer vision of how it will sound like with all the instruments. Then I’m thinking about what kind of drum beat, bass line, guitar riff, and keyboards texture would fit with the idea of the song and at this moment, the creative process is growing fast. Or, not that fast actually because getting the right keyboard sounds or guitar effects takes me a while very often. When I’m programming , I have in mind how my band mates would play it and that’s the reason why I’m never really surprised (although I’m always amazed) when they bring the songs to life with their style and their sound. It sounds obvious to my ears and at the same time I’m so excited to hear what they bring to a song and to discover how it takes the song to a higher level.

Tell us about the lyrical themes behind the album.

Sure ! I decided to do something I never really done in the past.  I wrote about the most widely expected subject in the world: Love !!! But not the way girls like it though (no offence intended girls, I’m just kidding !!!) .

Reading and writing romantic and soppy stuff are not my thing at all as I’m a cynical and rational guy . So the majority of these lyrics are about love and its frustrations and turbulences . It’s way more interesting, true and realistic in my opinion. But when I say “love”, It doesn’t only mean the feelings you have for your girlfriend or your boyfriend,  I use it for the passion you have for your art or whatever that excites you too, it can be painting, sport, your beliefs and then we’re slightly get into the spiritual aspect and themes I like to write about as well.

Most of my lyrics are not explicit, this way people can identify with them and make their own story.

I usually prefer to describe impressions than reality.

What about the recording of your self-titled debut? How long was it in the making?

It’s funny because it took a long time to finish it (something like two years !!!) but the writing and the recording were actually very fast and easy to do. As we’re used to record in studio, we know how it works and we’re getting more and more efficient and good at it. But as we didn’t have any deadline or expectations,  we took our time to record it. The rule was to get together when we were able to do it only. It was: job, touring with cover bands, tasks and family priorities first. This way, we were in a very relaxed state of mind and every time we forgathered, it was for fun.

Ok, the album was supposed to be released in late 2015 but for commercial and administrative reasons it got more delayed .

Did you approach its recording differently to creating releases with your other projects?

Yes and no … As it’s the 5th album I’m producing , I’ve learned through the years with amazing people and  I’ve also learned from my mistakes. Today, I know the importance for everybody of being prepared and how to record the best way possible taking into consideration the people you work with as every musician has his own preferences and personality. And that’s how a recording session can be different from the ones you experienced in the past: it depends on your line-up as well. So I asked my band mates about the way they wanted to record and I just let them do it their way as it’s extremely important for artists to work the more relaxed and efficient way possible.

But the thing that changed a lot for me was to share the guitar parts with Fabien but it was so exciting to hear him play with a different strumming and sound than mine and then mixing our guitar tracks together. I really enjoyed it .

Oh, and there was another great thing : My vocal takes were recorded home with a very cool equipment a friend of mine lend me.

This way, I took my time…I was recording one full song a day and the day after, if something was not exactly the way I wanted to be, I just had to press the « rec » button again and it was done. I don’t like the feeling of recording in a studio with time passing, all the money you know you’ll have to spend, the people around you even if it’s your friends. I did it many times in the past and I can tell you how relieved I am to work and to record alone at home, it gives me so more freedom and offers you more possibilities.

sahona_RingMasterReviewHave you found there has been an instinctive urge to do things with Sahona and the album differently to your other ventures elsewhere, just out of the want to try different things?

Yes, as I told you, I wanted to have a different musical approach, a different sound, a different line-up. But on the top of that I really wanted to express myself to another level, and the best way possible as a singer and I’ve been working hard to achieve that. Maybe, being the singer of your own songs reinforces the introspection aspect of the creation. This is not to say that this album sounds more like “me” than the previous ones I did with another lead singer, it’s just different . But as you give more of yourself as a performer, it makes the thing more introspective and maybe more intense and that’s what I wanted to achieve too.

I always imagine a debut album breeds new ideas and opportunities to try and explore further in its successors. Elements not imagined and expected when composing that first encounter. Were there any which arose for you in the making of Sahona’s debut?

I’m always excited to explore new territories, new sounds, new chords progression, new ways of making music. Having a more or less precise idea will always push you to go further in order to create something new and interesting. Listening to different music, going to the theatres, reading books, talking with people, playing with musicians…All this things are inspiring and maybe it if it’s not always a conscious thing, it will incite you to evolve as a human being and inexorably in your art and in your life indeed. This is something I like to be aware of and thankful to.

What comes next for Sahona and its individuals?

We have to play live as soon as possible and we have to work hard for that. We intend to begin a tour in our country in September. Then we will focus on the next album as we’re all really happy about this debut one.

My thanks again Charly for talking with us; Anything you would like to add?

Thanks for having me !!! Congrats to the readers for reading this interview so far and thank you Pete for spreading the word about the music you like whether it’s mainstream or underground .

And finally, give us an insight into the records and artists which could be claimed to have most inspired your own life and creativity.

Oh my god, they are so many . But let’s try to do it fast. I’ve always been a fan of classical music but the one from the early 1900 with composers like Ravel, Bartok, Debussy, Prokofiev, Rachmaninoff. As a guitar player I’m a huge fan of guitar heroes like Steve Vaï, Ron “Bumblefoot” Thal, John Petrucci. I’ve always been into progressive music with bands like Genesis, Rush, Yes, Dream Theater, Frost, Opeth and I’m really into their contemporaries with the young prog underground scene like Destiny Potato, Disperse and especially with the metal djent scenes with bands like Periphery, Tesseract, Monuments who took progressive music to a new level. I like rock and pop music too with bands like Muse, Radiohead, Keane, Dead Letter Circus.

All these bands and musicians have inspired me in many ways indeed.

Check out our review of the Sahona album @ https://ringmasterreviewintroduces.wordpress.com/2016/03/02/sahona-self-titled/

https://www.facebook.com/sahonamusic/

Pete RingMaster

The RingMaster Review 21/03/2016

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Stranger than brutality, bloodier than fiction: an interview with Morgue Orgy

Morgue Orgy Dispose-of-the-evidence

If you have not come across UK metallers Morgue Orgy yet, then you have missed out on one scintillating violation of your psyche and person. But it is never too late to catch up on the brutal beatings especially as the Birmingham sextet has just released their debut album The Last Man On Earth, to savage the senses and all for free. Creating a malevolent pestilence of inventive and melodically blackened death metal, the band is one of the rising forces in British metal, a mischievous scourge to tempt the deepest passions. Offered the chance to delve deeper into the mayhem and creative bloodshed, we greedily gathered up questions to feed Carter, Tris, and Ben from the band, subsequently learning about the beginnings of Morgue Orgy, the new album, live exploits, a passion for a certain American punk rock band and much more…

Welcome Gentlemen and many thanks for taking time away from the mayhem and brutality to talk with us.

Tell us about the history of you guys pre- Morgue Orgy through to the early days of the band.

Carter – Gray, Prok, Ben and I were in a thrash/punk horror band before Morgue Orgy. Gray and Prok asked me to join the band in 2000 and Ben joined in 2005. We got a large following in Birmingham, but we only played a handful of shows outside our hometown. The band was a lot of fun, but when our drummer quit in 2007 we decided to start something new. Gray wrote a couple of songs (that would end up as The Black of Hearts and The Arkham Waltz from The River & I EP) and suggested we name the new band Morgue Orgy. Gray used to sing and play bass in the previous band, but he wanted to concentrate solely on vocals with Morgue Orgy, so he asked Tris to join on bass. It took us a year to find a new drummer and when we auditioned Tom we knew immediately he was the man for the job.

What was the spark or intent in the band at the beginning and has that original ‘purpose’ of the band remained the same or evolved over the past five years?

Carter – The main intention for us is to have fun, and I think we’re enjoying being in the band more than ever! When we started Morgue Orgy, we wanted to write heavier music than we’d done before, and just focus on metal, instead of the endless genres (including ska, drum & bass and funk rock) we’d bounce between with our old band. Our sound has definitely evolved as we didn’t really know what we were doing when we wrote The River & I, we were experimenting and learning.

What are the inspirations you have taken into the band musically and lyrically?

Carter – We all listen to a wide spectrum of genres, none of us are metalheads, as such. We are inspired by a lot of different artists, for example Gray takes a lot of influence from rap artists, as he tends to write quickly-bellowed lines with a shit-load of syllables to fit in. Of course we take a lot of inspiration from bands such as At The Gates, Anaal Nathrakh and Dissection, but we also influenced by the likes of Queen, Rancid and Bartok.

Am I right in thinking some of or the band as a whole has a bit of a passion for Bad Religion?

Carter – HAHA yeah they’re fucking awesome! We give free merch to anyone that comes to our gig in a Bad Religion shirt.

Musically you are tagged as melodic death metal but as the new album shows there is much more in your maelstrom of invention Morgue Orgy 1and sound. How would you describe it to newcomers to give the closest representation?

Tris – I don’t think we can tag ourselves specifically as melodic death metal, we end up with all sorts of sub-genres in there but maybe because of ignorance of these ridiculously specific sub-genres on my part I have no idea how to even class it. People seem to think we genre hop a lot and don’t seem to be able to comprehend what they’re listening to sometimes but we’re not exactly Mr Bungle! There’s shouting, d-beats, blast beats, minor bar chords, shredding, keyboard melodies, the odd proggy(ish) bit and if you listen closely enough – I got my bass to sound satisfyingly like the bass tone on the recent Sick of it all re-recordings album! The album is free on our website anyway – download it and make up a genre for it!

Your first pair of EPs The River & I and Murders Most Foul made a potent statement musically for the band and were seemingly greedily received; with your debut album freshly unleashed this month how do look back at them in comparison to The Last Man On Earth?

Carter – We think the River and I is a bit shit now, to be honest. Maybe it’s because they are our oldest songs and we’re bored of them. As I’ve mentioned, the first couple of years for the band was a learning period and there’s a massive difference in quality between The River and I and The Last Man On Earth. I still enjoy Murders Most Foul and I especially love playing 70 Dead and Scared To Death Of My Own Face, I think they’re great songs. Our new album though is much better in my opinion. Each member has improved vastly over the last couple of years and our progress is evident when you listen through our discography.

So how has your sound and presence changed then in the period between your first release and the new album in your eyes/ears?

Tris – We’re still kind of the same band but we’ve improved so much at playing our instruments that we’ve basically ended up a lot faster and heavier. A constant evolution in music taste also plays an effect without you even necessarily realising. We’re all getting back into punk now which I know I haven’t really listened to in a good few years. Just wait for the next album we’re going to end up sounding like the Descendents.

The Last Man On Earth as we mentioned has just been released, an album we said was ‘a toxic torrent of maliciousness fuelled by a rabid expanse of intensively magnetic flavours and styles from within a brutally predatory imagination’. You must be proud of its invention and impact as well as what seems to be a full on soak of acclaim from fans and media alike?

Carter – We are immensely proud of this record. We worked long and hard to create this beast but we never imagined it would be so well received. It has filled us with confidence and justified our direction.

Please give us some insight into the evolution of the album from its first seeds to the final impressive scourge?

Carter – We definitely took our time with putting the album together; the first song that was written for the album was 4 Days, which Tris wrote shortly after recording Murders Most Foul. We used Guitar Pro to demo the riff ideas and would upload them to SoundCloud for the rest of the band to listen and give feedback. Once a song had a rough structure, we’d take that track into the practice room and go from there. We recorded with Ow Davies of Loud Noises Production, who recorded our previous EPs too. We love working with Ow because he gets the most out of us in the studio and he enjoys a good laugh too! He’s got better and better over time and you can hear that on this record, the production quality is outstanding and that is all down to Ow.

1535704_454685597971479_1209997831_nDid the album emerge from the studio exactly how you envisaged going into its recording?

Ben – YES! We had nailed each song from start to finish in the recording studio and as a rhythm section knew exactly how the songs were to sound. The synth/keys were put down later on and tied it together in the way that Carter wanted them to, and it works!

So you are a band which has songs as good as finished before their recording or still prefer to let them develop in the studio?

Carter – The bulk of the songs were fully written before going into the studio, but some vocal deliveries from Gray were altered at times, and he’d improvise recording random noises to add atmosphere/comedy. The sound effects were all put down in the studio once the instruments were tracked. Our guest sax-player, Colin Mills, came in and improvised on Barnum & 399 and the title track, which was fucking awesome. Dunc from Fukpig co-wrote the lyrics for Castle Freak, but we hadn’t heard his vocals for the song until he recorded them.

The Last Man On Earth can be described as psychotic, schizophrenic, and masterfully vicious; three traits you were aiming for or simply the natural emergence of the band’s characters? 😉

Ben – We were all really really angry. Not really! We don’t actually know why our music comes out so brutal. We are all stupid idiots who go out dancing to 90s pop and listen to Bad Religion so why we are even a metal band is beyond any of us. It seems to work though!

You released the album initially as a free download before Christmas, what was the thinking behind the decision and giving what is sure to be a top contender for best of year lists in twelve months so generously away?

Ben – When an audience of people don’t even want to part with £2 for your 5 track EP’s you know you are in a fickle scene. So when that happened several times it was time to think outside the box.

 Carter – Free music is so easily accessible now it seems naive to fight against it. If you can’t beat them, join them. Our main focus during this release is to gain awareness of the band, and charging for the album would have been a limitation.

We also mentioned in our review a mischievous or maybe that should be rascality to the band and the album in our review, this is a major part of your intentions as a band to have fun and grin in the sonic bloodshed?

Tris – Absolutely! Basically we’re a bunch of idiot mates who decided to form a ridiculous metal band with a bit of inspiration from the horror films that we (well actually just Gray) watch. Somehow I think we’ve managed to put that across in our music. People seem to think us pricking about is a gimmick but it’s just what we’re like. We recently released a dildo because we thought it would be funny – If anyone gets irritated and thinks we’re not metal enough for doing so…that is also funny. If you come and see us play a gig we definitely don’t take ourselves too seriously. You’re more likely to see me do squats at 220BPM with a smile plastered on my face than headbang, act like a serious rock star and pretend I’m not enjoying myself.

Tell us about your live shows then and why people need to join the orgy.Morgue Orgy We-play-in-a-band

Carter – Our live shows are all about letting loose and having a good time. We act like idiots on stage and encourage the crowd to do the same. If everyone is smiling by the end of the show, we’re happy.

What has been your stage highlights so far as a band and personally?

Carter – It would have to be playing Bloodstock Festival in 2010, we worked really hard to win the ‘Metal To The Masses’ competition in order to play the festival and the turnout for our set was amazing. I really enjoy playing hometown shows, in front of friends and fans that have watched us for years. We’ve played a couple of really fun gigs in Rugby, Leeds, and Torquay, but I don’t think there are many stand-out shows for me… as long as the audience are enjoying themselves and the sound guy isn’t a prick, I have a great time!

Your bio describes the band as ‘the UK metal scene’s last hope for melodic death metal.’ Do you feel that it is as that suggests on its last legs or maybe it just has not really erupted from a relatively sleepy state?

Ben – We do tend to be one of few bands in this scene who actually think of melody as being important. Perhaps the trend to revolve a song around a beat down has killed off peoples’ brains. We come from the Pantera/Bad Religion/Take That end of the musical scale, where melody is as important as crush!

2014 looks like being a busy and major year for the band, what is next for Morgue Orgy?

Ben – We hope to push our album out to labels and to find a good booking agent to push us further than we could possibly do ourselves.

Once again big thanks for putting aside the bodies for us, any thoughts you would like to leave the listeners contemplating?

Carter – A female bed bug doesn’t have a sexual orifice, so the male has to traumatically inseminate the female by piercing her abdomen with his penis. So if you ever feel depressed remember it could be worse, you could be a female bed bug being fucked in the belly.

Ben – Bad Religion

Morgue Orgy Little-shit-dogAnd finally give us your top five ways in the disposal of bodies.

Now we’re guessing in this scenario you’re assuming we’ve done the killing? Because if you just happen to stumble across a dead body you should probably alert the authorities who can launch a full investigation into what has transpired. Also, we are not actually morticians and couldn’t give you advice on disposal if you are looking to start your own morgue. Again you should alert the professionals who will be able to give you proper advice. But if you’re asking for actual murder tips I suppose we can take a guess but don’t take this as an excuse to start doing it…

Carter – 1. Grind them up and mix them in with the kebab meat 2. Use their bones to make a go-kart and their skin to make a nice coat, throw the rest in the bin 3. Leave them outside a hospital with a note saying ‘for science’. They’ll be grateful for it, honestly 4. Drill them into the sea 5. Package them and label it with any address, Royal Mail will just lose it in the post!

 Ben – 1. Feed them to the ducks 2. Kill them twice 3. Horses 4. Find a keen worm 5. Sit on them until they hatch

 Tris – 1. Drill it over the fence 2. Drill it into the sea 3. Leave it out with the dirty dishes in the kitchen and eventually someone will get annoyed enough to clean it up for you 4. Seal it within a mattress and leave it on the drive for your local council to fail to collect 5. Get Prok to discuss his guitar solos with it and it should get up and leave of its own accord.

Get Morgue Orgy’s debut album The Last Man On Earth @ www.morgueorgy.com and read the review @ https://ringmasterreviewintroduces.wordpress.com/2014/01/13/morgue-orgy-the-last-man-on-earth/

Pete Ringmaster

The RingMaster Review 11/02/2014

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Stephan Forte: The Shadows Compendium

© Perrine Perez Fuentes.

To be honest The RR is not one to offer up time for indulgence and music that ultimately is just showing off no matter the skill and undoubted talent on show.  No matter the ability and sound guitar led instrument rock generally seems to end up long winded and over played to levels that has lost our focus long before. Now that is our preference and possible lost but that is how the land and personal taste lies. Just sometimes though to reinforce the ethic of still checking things out before assuming there is a release that steps away from past history to offer something different and intriguing. Such is the case with The Shadows Compendium from French guitar maestro Stéphan Forté. The album still steps into areas that push our limits but it is impossible to deny the stunning and impressive sounds and creativity within its vibrant walls.

Stéphan Forté first drew attention his way with his first instrumental demo Visions of 1997, the neoclassical-oriented sounds soon bringing him to the notice of the guitar community. The following year saw him opening for Yngwie Malmsteen and more sponsors, endorsements and industry attention accumulating. 2001 saw the first Adagio album, a band of musicians he recruited to help realise his compositions. Sanctus Ignis drew further acclaim in his homeland and further afield as did the following darker and orchestral/ choral powered Underworld of 2003. After a further two albums Dominate and Archangels In Black and well received concerts and tours, Forté decided to stretch and push his own musical limits which has become the solo project The Shadows Compendium. Three years in the making the album is an intense, diverse and deep exploration that is musically astonishing.

Forté takes influences ranging from Bartok to Meshuggah, twisting his play and sounds in ways and into shapes no lesser mortal can imagine let alone produce. It really is hard to state how powerful and uniquely distinct the music and ability within the compositions are; only the ear can give true representation. From the opening title track and its dark atmospheric intro the album never ventures into predictable even if at times the expected rears its lengthy head. With tower high riffs and melodies that scorch the ear Forté mesmerises with his string play and caresses with wonderful piano expertise. The piece buzzes around the ear at times constantly insistent and eager before making way for truly inspired work from the composer. An array of guests feature on the album with Jeff Loomis of Nevermore aiding here though for these ears which parts he or the others add elude against the mastery of Forté, and these are talented guys.

The aggressive intense metal fuelled elements connect the deepest with these tastes but there is no doubting there is plenty for rock fans of all preferences on The Shadows Compendium. Tracks like the senses twisting De Praestigiis Daemonu with guest Mattias IA Eklundh of Freak Kitchen and the provocative probing of Duat with Glen Drover of Megadeth leave the ear and beyond happy but exhausted. These are power driven though never are the intricacies and elaborate melodies and ideas left to the side. Spiritual Bliss and Prophecies Of Loki XXI dazzle with a lighter but no less staggering manipulation and control of notes, harmonies and any other musical aspect you can imagine from Forté.

The Shadows Compendium is immense and any musician and especially guitarists will have wet dreams over the album. Personal taste stops it being an album to return to often, at times parts are still overblown and overlong, and dare one say even Forté treads the fine line of indulgence. Then again should it not be that way, the man is a genius whom very few can touch, and it would be crazy to keep such flair and ability restrained. If you want to hear an artist make his guitar squeal and sing with a technique and skill that any woman would pay to feel then Stéphan Forté is your first destination.

RingMaster 21/02/2012

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