Colours of the blues: exploring King Colobus with vocalist/guitarist Stewart MacPherson

kc_RingMasterReview

2017 has started with a bang, certainly in regard to introductions to and debut releases from fresh and truly striking bands. One of those making the biggest impressive impact is UK rockers King Colobus. Recently their self-titled first EP was rebooted into national attention, a release to steal one of the lines in our own review providing a “four-track theatre of blues and alternative rock [which] trespassed and seduced the imagination and passions.”

With thanks to Garry at SaN PR we leapt on the chance to learn more about the EP and its creators with King Colobus vocalist/guitarist Stewart MacPherson also touching on their beginnings and other aspects of being in a band…

Hi, thanks for sharing time to talk with us.

Your bio says the band officially began in 2015 but I believe its origins and seeds began long before then. Tell us about its beginnings and lead up to stepping out as King Colobus.

The first ideas started in a 3 piece band called BIBLE JOHN AND THE REPTILES, which included me (Stewart), GRIFTER bassist Phil Harris and former BROTHERHOOD OF THE LAKE drummer Rich Robinson. We spent months rehearsing and just before taking things live, Rich started to have back problems. The whole thing capitulated until James Bailes moved back to the South West. He and I had jammed out demos and worked together on various projects when we both lived in London. We got together and started to share ideas that we thought really deserved a life…and so KING COLOBUS was born.

The re-location to Devon of yourself and James from London seems to have been one of the sparks to the birth of King Colobus. Was that just coincidence or there was something you found down there, apart from meeting Gavin and Simon, which instigated the band?

The main thing that changed for both James and I was fatherhood. We both wanted our kids to grow up in a better environment and having both come from the South West, I guess this felt like the best option. There is also a great opportunity down here to create an alternative music scene. It has been blighted for far too long with tribute bands and folk music and venues like THE JUNCTION are starting to put alternative music firmly on the map again. There’s a lot of talent down here, but it just needs to get its fair share of the opportunities.

kc2_RingMasterReviewIs there a specific meaning or inspiration to the band’s name?

A King Colobus is a monkey that changes colour when coming out of childhood. I found this intriguing.

It is fair to say that your sound is a tapestry woven from a variety of musical textures and styles. How would you describe it to newcomers?

I would say that it is very much rooted to blues, with a heavy dose of trucker rock and grunge. There are so many pleasant, yet sometimes surprising comments we get from people regarding what they can hear in us, we encourage you to listen and draw your own conclusions!

Is there any particular inspiration you would say has helped shape your music as a band and individually?

I think if you heard 3 or 4 of our tracks, you would hear elements of Sabbath, Alice in Chains, Queens of the Stone Age, Clutch, Rage Against The Machine, Soundgarden, Interpol, and Johnny Cash…but to name a few. The likes of Bowie, Radiohead, and Morrissey have always provided a lot of lyrical inspiration, as they tend to tell stories that interest and make you dig a bit deeper into what is being said.

You recently re-released your self-titled EP to swift acclaim it has to be said. How did you approach its uncaging this time around compared to its first outing?

When it was first released, we did it just so that people could have something to take home at gigs if they liked us. After a while, it started to get a great response and people started getting in touch to order it online. It was at this point where we thought that it should be given broader exposure.

Can you personally put your finger on why it has caught the imagination of press and fans alike with great force?king-colobus-promo-shot_RingMasterReview

I think PR has a lot to do with it! You can have the best EP in the world, but it needs PR to get heard…then it needs to sound good for people to talk about it!

As broad as its songs in many ways are in sound there is an intimacy at the heart of the EP which suggests certainly lyrically personal experiences provides their seeds. Where do you draw inspiration most often for your tracks?

Everything I sing about is personal, or it is based upon something I know about. Sometimes looking at personal experiences of those who are closest to me provides for a better story. There’s no point in talking about California if you get me.

How does the songwriting predominantly work within the band?

Most songs are written acoustically at first. I perform solo acoustic gigs around the South West and ‘test’ things out before approaching the band with the idea. It’s a great way to test out the dynamics of a song, without the frills. I think it also helps us all to look at each track from a different perspective, without some massive riff dominating the landscape.

Can you give us some background to the tracks within the EP and their themes? king-colobus-cover-artwork_RingMasterReview

GET UP was actually written around the time of the 2012 Olympics. I lived in Hackney Wick at the time, so it was right on my doorstep. The track was based on the idea of it being used for Olympic Games footage. Needless to say, it didn’t, but it still made for a good track!

The self-titled KING COLOBUS track is based on my teenage years in Plymouth, so it’s a very personal outlook on my experiences throughout the nineties.

TITS AND TEETH is generally about how disposable the music industry has become and how we find ourselves absorbed by TV judging panels, who apparently know what they are doing.

WAIT is borne from a political platform. We keep on telling ourselves that if we vote a different way, things are going to change for the better. We need to believe this to keep going, but it’s far from the truth.

Live you have shared stages with the likes of with Sea Sick Steve, Band Of Skulls, Crazy Arm, and one of our favourites De Staat and that alone shows the diverse appeal of your sound. What is it you think about the band in sound and live which tempts such an array of artists and their fans into the world of King Colobus?

I think good music will always be just that and hopefully we have gained some new fans through doing our best to put on a good show when we play live. All of these bands are genuine, as are we.

Talking of Sea Sick Steve, the last time we saw him highlighted the trend it seems of people going to shows not so much to watch the artist but to socialise, certainly at higher profile events and venues. The sound of chatting often intruded on the music. If you have come across this, how as a band do you mentally deal with it on stage?

I think it’s our job to try and capture the audience’s attention. If we don’t, we need to do something about that! Sea Sick Steve was a really nice guy to talk to and he gave us so much great advice; I wish I brought a notepad! At the end of the day, you are in a bubble when you are in a band, so audience chatter really doesn’t bother me if it happens…but it rarely does!

What is next for King Colobus live and release wise?

We are just starting to branch out of the South West, as we are really keen to get involved in other musical pockets around the country. We’ve been busy scheduling this, as well as festival dates. As we deal with this ourselves, it is quite challenging. We also go into the studio again this Summer to record another 4 track EP, so this will be out way before the end of the year.

Big thanks again for talking with us. Anything you would like to add?

If there are any towns/cities which would like to see King Colobus, let us know!

Check out our review of the debut King Colobus EP @ https://ringmasterreviewintroduces.wordpress.com/2017/02/07/king-colobus-self-titled-ep/

http://www.kingcolobus.com/    https://www.facebook.com/kingcolobus/

Pete RingMaster

The RingMaster Review

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King Colobus – Self Titled EP

king-colobus-promo-shot_RingMasterReview

There are times when something just clicks with ears and imagination, instincts instantly seizing the day and directing responses with almost lustful energy. That is what happened to The RR when facing the self-titled debut EP from UK rockers King Colobus. From virtually its first breath on the opening listen, the four-track theatre of blues and alternative rock trespassed and seduced the imagination and passions. It is pure drama, creative adventure as bold and ballsy as it is imaginatively intricate and sinisterly persuasive.

With its seeds sown in 2013, King Colobus officially stepped forward two years later. Vocalist/guitarist Stewart MacPherson and bassist James Bailes had already collaborated on ideas and songs for a future project when independently they both relocated to Devon. There they linked up with Plymouth based guitarist Gavin Huck and drummer Simon Marsh, uniting as King Colobus.

There is no escaping inspirations found in the likes of Queens Of The Stone Age, Soundgarden, Johnny Cash, and Interpol in the band’s sound but equally they have a personality and character to their music and songwriting which is sure to intrigue fans of others like Japanese Fighting Fish, Damn Vandals, and Inca Babies. There is uniqueness to their sound though which is most vocal and suggests why the quartet has already earned a potent live reputation whilst taking in shows supporting artists such as Sea Sick Steve, Band Of Skulls, De Staat, and Crazy Arm.

king-colobus-cover-artwork_RingMasterReviewRe-released this past week, the first King Colobus EP is a majestic introduction to the band and needs mere seconds to grip attention and appetite through opener Get Up. From its initial dark minatory melody, its texture wiry and tone ominous yet pure enticement, the track bounds in with swinging rhythms and a growling bassline supported by just as primal riffs. MacPherson instantly engages and recruits already persuaded ears, the song itself bluesy in air but pure virulent rock ‘n’ roll with an underlying punk snarl. It is a controlled web though, teasing and taunting rather than assaulting and only increasing its grip as a shimmer of guitar around alluring vocals breaks the tenacious trespass before breaking into an even bolder compelling incitement.

It is a stunning start swiftly reinforced by the song King Colobus, it too opening with a juicy lure before uncaging its heavy blues rock saunter. Bass and vocals stand individual in tone but equal in temptation as beats jab with relish at the senses, the song’s flames waiting to erupt in a sizzling blaze before settling down again until further incendiary expulsions throughout its compelling body. Showing an array of flavours making up their sound, at times the track reminds thoughts of Josh Homme and co and indeed The Doors but again the result is individual to the foursome.

Tits and Teeth steals its fine share of the passions next, its dark vaudevillian devilry carrying an air of sadly demised circus punks The Shanklin Freak Show, further evidence of the host of spices in the King Colobus invention. The song as good as stalks its victim but relishing its creative invasion of ears and imagination with energy eager to consume its prey whilst, with virulent catchiness, recruiting their participation.

Final track Wait immediately reminds of nineties band Skyscraper, having their instinctive rock ‘n’ roll infectiousness and tenacity to command attention; invention and imagination blossoming in its success. Grooves and hooks tangle the senses as rhythms ground out an easily given submission to their insistent prowess, vocals leading it all with their own rousing presence.

It is a glorious end to a must hear release not only bringing King Colobus to wider attention for the first time but suggesting there is really something major brewing down on the south coast.

The King Colobus EP is out now through all stores.

http://www.kingcolobus.com/    https://www.facebook.com/kingcolobus/

Pete RingMaster 07/02/2017

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Hercules Morse – Equine Size Comparison

hercules-morse-online-promo-shot_RingMasterReview

Last December saw British alternative rock quartet Hercules Morse impress and grab attention with the release of debut EP Edge Of Life. It was a vigorously infectious collection of songs seeded in the rousing rock ‘n’ roll of bands such as Foo Fighters and Queens Of The Stone Age. There was also an unmistakable individuality in sound and character of songwriting to the release which suggested the Southampton hailing band had something fresh to share with the British rock scene. Its successor Equine Size Comparison confirms that thought and more, offering five tracks which grab ears with their invention and again mercilessly catchy prowess. It continues from where its predecessor left off, inciting the listener in spirit and body while revelling in another step forward in the imagination of Hercules Morse.

With shows alongside the likes of Turbowolf, Band of Skulls, Brant Bjork, Tiger Cub, Orange Goblin, Black Peaks, Blaze Bayley, and Dinosaur Pile Up under their belts since forming in 2014, Hercules Morse have earned the praise and support of various UK magazines, music sites, and radio shows through their energetic live presence and that impressive first EP. As the quintet of virulence posing as songs grips ears here, it is easy to expect the same kind reactions for Equine Size Comparison but in greater eagerness and across broader spotlights.

As with previous songs, the new EP mixes the familiar with new imagination resulting in encounters which instantly feel like existing friends while venturing into fresh pastures. It all starts with Asleep At The Wheel, a proposition entangling ears in bluesy grooves and swinging rhythms from its first breath. Riffs and hooks are as quickly in the mix, all inviting the listener to take notice as melodies and the potent vocals of rhythm guitarist Steve George stroll the weave of persuasion. The growl from the bass of Paul Shott colludes devilishly with the scything swings of drummer Guillaume Redonnet-Brown, both driving the energy and heart of the song as lead guitarist Harry Gardner spins imaginative melodies while vocally backing George.

hercules_morse_-_cover_artwork-jpg_RingMasterReviewIt a powerfully infectious and anthemic start which simply continues through The Boss, a song with as many similar lures to its body as new twists and turns to get the teeth into. There is a swagger to the track which borders mischievous, rhythms at the core as it flirts and the band roars musically and vocally. As with the last EP, there is no escaping Josh Homme/ Dave Grohl led influences across Equine Size Comparison and especially this second song though at times it equally reminds of nineties UK band Skyscraper while simultaneously exploring its own adventure.

Nobody’s Fool has a slightly mellower energy though rhythmically it still has a bite and imposing charm driven by the naturally infectious craft of the band. Caressing ears with its lively melodic enterprise, the track easily captivates, if without sparking the spirit as mightily as those around it, before Do It Right strolls in on a dark almost predacious bassline aligned to matching riffs. In no time though, the band uncages another virulent saunter; hooks and grooves equipped to seduce and rhythms loaded with fiercely enticing bait as vocals swing from lure to lure with matching energy and character. Rock ‘n roll does not get much more contagious than this song and indeed the EP in general as proven by its final treat.

Offering an opening prowl of riffs and tempestuous eruptions reminding of Billy Talent, Chemical Lullabies proceeds to blend its own calmer melodic moments with fiery exploits; the Canadian band continuing to be a suitable reference to a thoroughly enjoyable and increasingly gripping proposition. It is a mighty end to a powerfully engaging and enjoyable next step from Hercules Morse, a band heading in the right direction to awakening the hungriest spotlights.

Equine Size Comparison is out now @ https://herculesmorseuk.bandcamp.com/album/equine-size-comparison

http://herculesmorse.co.uk/   https://www.facebook.com/herculesmorseuk   https://twitter.com/herculesmorseuk

Pete RingMaster 08/09/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Hercules Morse – Edge Of Life

Hercules Morse_RingMaster Review

Creating a great blend of familiarity and predominantly fresh invention distinct to the band, UK alternative rockers Hercules Morse re-unleash their debut EP, Edge Of Life, a repackaged version of their 2014 three track encounter offering a trio of additional new tracks to get enthusiastically greedy over. The band has been compared to bands like the Foo Fighters and Queens Of The Stone Age, understandably so at times, but as Edge Of Life reveals, there is much more in adventurous sound and texture to the band rousing rock ‘n’ roll.

Rising from the demise of their previous guise, The Blue Screen Of Death, the Southampton hailing Hercules Morse emerged in 2014, quickly uncaging the original version of the Edge Of Life EP to potent reactions. In their earlier incarnation, the band had shared stages with bands such as Turbowolf, Band of Skulls, Brant Bjork, Zico Chain, Orange Goblin, and Dinosaur Pile Up; a success and live hunger just as rampant with Hercules Morse as the south of England can testify since the band stepped forward. Now national attention is getting a firm and impressive nudge with the bulkier invigorating return of Edge Of Life.

That creative poke begins with The Education, an incitement throwing thick riffs, biting rhythms, and spicy grooves at ears from its first breath. The equally potent vocal prowess of rhythm guitarist Steve George quickly joins the virulent tempting, his lead tones well supported by those of lead guitarist Harry Gardner. Already those earlier mentioned comparison make a tasty hue to the encounter but spices in a fiery and tenacious romp finding its own identity with every swinging rhythms and sonic hook.

Hercules Morse Cover Artwork_RingMaster Review   The great start is continued and eclipsed by the EP’s excellent title track, it too straight to the point with anthemic beats from drummer Guillaume Redonnet-Brown eagerly rolling in as the guitars cast a web of melodic enterprise around the again highly alluring vocals. There is a mellower air to the track even with its robust rhythmic boisterousness and the great carnivorous tone of Paul Shott’s bass, and a flavouring drawing on the melody rich essences of classic and alternative rock over past decades. For personal tastes it does ultimately lack the bite of its predecessor but more than makes up for it with a contagion of flowing melodies and harmonies tempered by an underlying tempestuousness.

Good Old Days steps up next, uncaging a bluesy groove from its first touch and an increasingly magnetic web of hooks and juicy sonic craft thereon in. Bouncing around with sinews as blatantly bold and insatiable as the melodic catchiness skilfully nurtured, the track offers a thrilling and inescapable Super Happy Fun Club meets Feud meets Squeeze proposal that has body and emotions on board within its first half minute.

That Difford and Tilbrook like essence is an on-going spicing, lighting up the previous pair of songs and again All About Me, if in a subtler way as a more Josh Homme inspired hug of sound wraps ears from within the wiry sonic and punchy rhythmic resourcefulness of the song. More reserved but no less potent in its persuasion and lingering seduction of the imagination and appetite, the song entangles its gentler incitement with fiery blues seeded guitar whilst its grunge heart simply becomes more vocal and engagingly volatile over time.

The EP comes to a close through firstly the pulsating and lively rock ‘n’ roll canter of Nowhere Left To Go and lastly the weighty energy and eventful landscape of How Do You Love Me. They are both songs which spring no major surprises in originality but defy solid comparisons to others as they sculpt more enjoyment to acclaim Hercules Morse for. The second of the two especially grips ears with its inventive twists and surging infectiousness, ensuring the EP ends on a high.

Edge of Life is one of those yet to be discovered friends that instinctively offers new fun crafted from somewhat recognisable exploits. It also reveals a brew of individuality though which comes with the potential of greater uniqueness ahead; reason enough to get involved with the band right now.

The Edge Of Life EP is available through all stores from 4th December and https://herculesmorseuk.bandcamp.com/

https://www.facebook.com/herculesmorseuk   http://herculesmorse.co.uk/   https://twitter.com/herculesmorseuk

Pete RingMaster 04/12/215

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Desert Ships – Skyliner

Desert Ships press image 2014

Four mesmeric flights flooded with celestial hauntings and shoegaze fascination, the Skyliner EP from UK band Desert Ships is as both band and release names suggest, an expansive and sultrily aired adventure. A release which is cinematic in its touch on the imagination and warmly sensuous in its lure on the senses, Skyliner shimmers and radiates like a mix of The Horrors, House Of Love, and Brian Jonestown Massacre with just a tinge of Inspiral Carpets for spicy measure. To be honest that is still a loose description of the psychedelic fuelled exploration found within the release but a good starting point for something distinct to Desert Ships.

Formed in 2012, the London trio of Mikey (vocals/guitar), Daniel (bass/vocals), and Claude (drums/vocals) swiftly sparked attention and acclaim with the release of their debut album that same year. The Mark Gardener (ex- Ride) produced Doll Skin Flag soon drew regular comparisons to the likes of Brian Jonestown Massacre, The Flaming Lips, Tame Impala, and occasionally the film scores of John Barry. Its success was backed by the band’s equally praised live presence which saw them tour with bands such as The Prodigy, Band of Skulls, The Rifles, and Babyshambles as well as play numerous festivals over the past couple of years. Reuniting with Gardener again in the studio, Desert Ships now unveil their new EP, a release taking its predecessor as a launch pad for broader and more expressive aurally visual experiences.

The release opens with its epic title track, a seven minute plus excursion into magnetic harmonies, sonic exploration, and fuzzy show gaze seducing. From its first breath there is a fresh and smouldering temptation at work, guitar coaxing Desert Ships-Skyliner-artwork -Final-HRthe lead into a weave of vocal harmonies and expression from across the band. That in turn is cradled by a tapestry of keys bred elegance and enterprise. The song emerges as a gentle maelstrom of gripping ideation and aural fascination, the vocals as varied and riveting as the spatial grooves and rhythmic shuffle courting their narrative whilst every immersive note is an exotic kiss upon the senses. Like soaring through a refreshingly muggy landscape, the track is enthralling leaving body and emotions submerged in blissful exploration.

The slightly slimmer length of Shell Shock is no less eventful next, embracing ears with a synth pop spiced temptation straight away. Laying down an eighties flavoured yet modern canvas of melodic hues, bands like China Crisis, Modern English, and The Flaming Lips coming to mind, the track croons with cosmic lustre and psychedelic colour. Again the imagination is sparked by and emotions immersed in an ethereal tapestry of sound and voice, the song the perfect pop proposition. It is a description which almost applies to the following Heart Beats and it’s more grounded but no less transfixing splendour too, though the magnetic offering does not quite have the infectious glow and compelling grandeur of its predecessor. All the same the feistier track is a masterfully and enticingly grooved invitation which is hard to resist as it reveals further shades and turns in the band’s creativity.

Skyliner is concluded by another epic holding of ears with its longest and relentlessly suggestive track, Ausgang. Somewhere between cheerfully funereal and livelily meditative, the persistent breeze of sonic and melodic enticing is a vibrantly repetitive affair which probably outstays its welcome but still provides an instrumental soundscape to create imaginative tales within. Though the EP is not one of two halves, like the previous track the closer lacks something of the first pair of songs but has plenty to entice and feed an already keen appetite for release and band.

Desert Ships has provided a treat of an encounter which is at its stunning best at the start and whilst slipping a level of persuasion or two in its latter part, perpetually leaves expectations and anticipation of big things from and for the band ahead rife. Ultimately Skyliner is a gorgeous flight which more than deserves a full investigation.

The Skyliner EP is available now @ http://desertships.bandcamp.com/

http://www.desertships.com

RingMaster 11/11/2014

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Two-Bit Sister – The Jackal EP

Two Bit Sister Online Promo shot

Whilst not setting burning fires with their debut EP, UK alternative rockers Two-Bit Sister make a sizeable and lingering impression with the very enjoyable release. The Jackal EP consists of four rock/pop songs infused with valid essences of blues, grunge, and punk. It is a mix which took a little time to entrench its seeds into the imagination but once there blossomed into a rather pleasing and accomplished endeavour.

The band is the union of Leon Peskett (guitar and lead vocals) and Connor Bluemel (drums and backing vocals), two musicians from Margate who from knowing each other at school and jamming together over previous years united last year for Two-Bit Sister. It was not long before the pair had a clutch of songs and was lighting up shows across the summer of 2013 and beyond. Taking influences from the likes of Nirvana, Jack White, Arctic Monkeys, Blink-182, Led Zeppelin, The Beatles, Queens Of The Stone Age, and Band Of Skulls into their stripped down yet full sound, the band then set about creating this their first release. The Jackal provides a rich insight into the open potential and imagination of the band, not a release to send the passions on a fevered rapture but certainly one to ignite an eager appetite for them and their future.

The title track opens up the release and despite its vibrant sound and bouncy stride is a little bit of an underwhelming proposition. Though Two Bit Sister Cover Artworkwarming to the song over time it never really hits the spot, its folk touching presence lacking the creative and impacting spark which lights up the other tracks. Nevertheless with crisp beats and strolling guitar suasion, the song does swing along with the sound of summer and an engaging melodic prowess matched by the smiling vocals of Peskett. As with all the tracks there is a familiarity to the song, the band’s inspirations an open colour, but it only goes to give this and subsequent offerings an extra contagious element to their adventures.

It is a decent start holding attention but it is the remaining trio of tracks which wake up a keen appetite starting with Turbulence. A shadowed guitar coaxing lures in thoughts first before a wider weave of enterprise from the strings of Peskett allied to the rhythmic temptation of Bluemel increase the temptation. Vocally the tones of Peskett also find a darker lilt whilst the backing of Bluemel brings a mixed weave of croons and harmonies to continue to keep things interesting. A Nirvana-esque expression erupts around the eager chorus whilst the tempered canters in between them explore a more Audioslave like premise. The track is a riveting encounter which seduces more and more over time, potent hooks and grooves persistently marking its passage, and at times reminds a little of fellow British band Feud though it forges its own identity for Two-Bit Sister.

The following Wanna Know has an immediate punk feel to its rawer sound, opening hooks coming with a spice of the Sex Pistols whilst once into its stride the track has a feel of early Buzzcocks to it. With its uncluttered presence and unfussy intent there is also a flavour of Television Personalities to the song, it all adding rich hues to another compelling slice of rock pop from the band. Once more riffs and rhythms combine to offer fully magnetic bait whilst vocally the pair provides a solid and expressive swagger to the stroll of the persuasion. This and its predecessor are the pinnacles of the release, tracks drenched in exciting endeavour and rich promise revealing much more about the songwriting and band than the opening song.

The closing track Times also stands tall, its decent opening caress of guitar and vocals giving no hint of the Weezer styled romp to follow. Though the song never bursts into an over energetic urgency it undeniably strides vivaciously through ears with grooves making gentle persuasions and rhythms providing a sinewy frame. A blues expression breaks out inventively midway, vocals and sounds soaking it up, to further spark up a keen attentiveness towards track and EP. As it entices and romps with the senses, an understanding of why Queens Of The Stone Age references, which have been kindled about the band opens up, though the band again provide a not exactly distinct but a certain individual presence for themselves.

The Jackal EP is a richly satisfying introduction to Two-Bit Sister; a very appetising and enjoyable base for the duo to build and spring from. Creating songs which truly linger long after departure is a craft many bands take time or fail to master, but Peskett and Bluemel do it with ease on their debut which makes them a proposition to watch closely.

The self-released The Jackal EP is available from Monday 21st April from http://two-bitsister.bandcamp.com/

http://www.twobitsister.co.uk/

8/10

RingMaster 20/04/2014

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The Howling Tongues – Keep The Dust Down

The Howling Tongues pic

If you have an appetite for some old school rock n roll with vibrant resonance musically and passionately dripping from every note and element then Atlanta rockers The Howling Tongues is the band for you. Taking rich influences from the likes of Led Zeppelin, The Who, The Raconteurs, Band of Skulls, and Black Keys into their own distinctive ideas and adventure, the quintet leave thoughts and emotions aflame with their ‘Southern Rock & Roll Revivalist Movement’. This is a band on a rapid rise since forming two years ago and their EP Keep The Dust Down giving all the evidence as to why.

Ignited into action as a band in 2011 by guitarist Nick Magliochetti, vocalist Taylor Harlow, and drummer Tylor James, they soon recruited bassist Zach Smith and keyboardist Thomas Wainwright as the project instantly took off. An early EP and their live performances garnered a hungry and rapidly growing fanbase for their sound as they filled and lit up notable venues such as The Vinyl and The Hard Rock, their sound, self-termed as “no regret rock-n-roll”, igniting a greedy appetite in fans for more. Keep The Dust Down is their response, a six track burst of insatiable rock with loud guitars, thumping drums, and fiery melodics primed to ignite the passions. Recorded with top producer Tom Tapley, the release easily backs up the claim of a great many that the band is destined to be a household name in the very near future, as well as sparking the mightiest anticipation for their debut album currently being recorded and mixed for a release later this year.

The EP opens with a song whose title says it all, Party. Swaggering into view with stick beats and a lone beckoning guitar, the trackhowling tongues explodes into a muscular stroll of scuzz lined riffs and throaty bass calls within a cage of rhythmic sinews and acid warm keys. Taking a breath for the vocals of Harlow to start their lyrical declaration with an effect coating to his expressive delivery, the song stomps its rhythmic feet and waves a welcoming sonic finger at the emotions which is irresistible. There is wantonness to the stirring and sturdy spine of the song whilst the keys and melodic caresses within the riotous breath bring virulently infectious sultry temptation.  The track dances like a combination of The Black Keys, Kings Of Leon, and Eighteen Nightmares At The Lux, leaving no passion and primal urge untouched.

The single from the release Makes You Tick  walks up to the ear with bulging beats from James offering a hypnotic lure to trigger instant intrigue before the guitar flashes its singular persuasion.  Once the outstanding vocals of Harlow and the keys of Wainwright bring their flames to the surface of the song the seduction is in full swing and reinforced by the outstanding bass invention of Smith, his dark grizzly notes prowling and enticing the senses with imagination and devilment. Like its predecessor the song has a confidence which recruits full captivation of ear and thoughts whilst the inventive textures and shifting gait of the track are incendiary temptations to fall hungrily before.

Both Nagasaki and One-Eye’d Barber induce further glee with their thrilling enterprise and imaginative blues enriched escapades, the first a track bringing stronger ripples of vintage breath, its engrossing melodic theatrics and again inciting swagger offering thoughts of the likes of Led Zeppelin and The Black Keys as well as in lesser strength other such as The Doors and Kyuss, whilst the second of the two is a slower emotive heat of intent and passion. It is as all the songs, locked in a mesh of formidable and enslaving rhythmic strength which entraps the listener so the potently expressive outpouring of the vocal and melodic narrative from the heart of the offering can seize the fullest focus and welcome.

The bass of Smith leaves more gravelly paws on the ear as next up Alibi sizes up the listener before strutting straight on through to the emotions with the guitar of Magliochetti scoring with impressive riffs and inventive teasing hand in hand with the continually outstanding bass taunting. Once the great vocal harmonies slip into play with scintillating variation to court the equally magnetic keys, the track stands to its full height with compelling and contagious grandeur consequently inducing a large sigh of bliss between its departure and final song José No Sé, yet another to induce predator strong greed for much more.

Keep The Dust Down is an exceptional release which makes the wait for the album impatient and probably irritable for you can never get enough of a good thing and that is certainly what The Howling Tongues bring. That idea of the band being a household name has certainly got impressive legs to its charge after this.

Get the album Keep the Dust Down for FREE @ www.noisetrade.com/thehowlingtongues/keep-the-dust-down

www.thehowlingtongues.com

9.5/10

RingMaster 10/05/2013

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