Brightlight City – Our Future’s Not Dead

Having impressed with debut EP, Adventures in 2015, British rockers Brightlight City now reveal the blossoming invention and increasing maturity in their sound with successor Our Future’s Not Dead. Hinted at by a pair of singles last year, the new release is evidence of a band building on an impressive start and potential with stylish adventure whilst nurturing a whole new promise for continued growth.

Surrey bred, Brightlight City weave in inspirations from the likes of Hundred Reasons, Million Dead, Yourcodenameis:milo, At the Drive-In, Biffy Clyro, and Jimmy Eat World into their sound; indeed sparking comparisons to the former and others such as Thursday and Hell Is For Heroes with their melody rich and harmonically honed songs. Equally there is a fresh and potent catchiness and steel to Our Future’s Not Dead which as suggested was first glimpsed within last year’s singles Gravity and Thieves. It is a growth in sound which has come with an increasing reputation and praise for their live shows through the quintet sharing stages with Max Raptor, Fizzy Blood, Bad Sign, and Blood Youth and playing alongside Rise Against and Millencolin at Envol et Macadam Festival in Canada in 2015as well as their own shows.

Recorded with Matt Hyde (Funeral For A Friend, Bullet For My Valentine, Slipknot), Our Future’s Not Dead is likely to spark another bout of attention and hunger for Brightlight City, setting out its persuasive strength with opener It Depends On You. Skittish beats alongside vocal and guitar offered temptation bring the song into focus; their low key yet agitated attitude soon a full roar as vocalist Jamie Giarraputo heads a web of melodic enterprise from guitarists Jonathan Staunton and Justin Giarraputo, the latter adding his own potent vocal expression to the mix. Anthemic in heart, imposing in rhythm as the hefty jabs of drummer Ben Bell court the brooding lines of bassist Tom Stock, the track roars with energy and passion.

With a mellower air Leave A Light On follows, wiry melodies swimming round a throaty bassline as emotive vocals entice with distinctive expression. Once again there is an instinctive catchiness at work, never wavering as fiery textures evolve and unite in a livelier blaze of sound and emotion. In some ways it is a less intricate proposition than its predecessor but only to its strength as each element is a flame of craft and drama before making way for Heart Stops. The third track comes coated in the infectiousness of the opener, its swinging body almost pop punk like and relentlessly coaxing listener involvement with its vocal harmonies and controlled but boisterous swing; a tenacious essence just as open in the calmer moments of a song taking best track honours.

The EP is brought to an end by Past/Future, a track epitomising the evolution in the Brightlight City sound with its rounded fusion of melody and energy amidst a new depth of contagiousness and invention. As all the songs within Our Future’s Not Dead it is a memorable and lingering encounter going to make a thoroughly enjoyable and impressing release. The Brightlight City sound has yet to become something truly unique but as the EP shows, it is well on the way and providing some rather tasty encounters along the way.

Our Future’s Not Dead is out now through Undead Collective Records.

https://www.brightlightcityofficial.co.uk/   https://www.facebook.com/brightlightcityofficial   https://twitter.com/blcband

Pete RingMaster 12/04/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Kilkovec – Plunge

kilkovec-promo-shot_RingMasterReview

Following up their eagerly praised EP, Sick Of This, British trio Kilkovec make an even louder knock on real attention with its successor Plunge. Again built on the band’s feisty mix of alternative and punk rock, the new EP takes the band’s sound, imagination, and presence to a new level, one demanding that people take notice.

Consisting of vocalist/guitarist Daniel Wilson, bassist/vocalist Matt Stroud, and drummer Tom Longwater, Hampshire hailing Kilkovec emerged in 2012. Hitting the local live scene with relish, they released debut EP Name Your Place to good reactions in the underground scene though it was Sick Of This last year which sparked critical and broader fan acclaim the way of the threesome. As Plunge roars and twists around in ears it is easy to suggest and suspect even greater plaudits hitting the band’s creative shores, praise to match the rich reputation earned by their live prowess which over the years has seen the sharing of stages with the likes of Yearbook, Seething Akira, Flood of Red, Bad Sign, Press to Meco, Black Foxxes, and The Red Jumpsuit Apparatus.

The EP’s brief title track kicks things off, its atmospheric instrumental setting a schizophrenic scene from which the following Change whips out an initial provocative guitar groove swiftly joined by portentous beats and in turn predatory bassline. As much as it carries dark danger, the coaxing has spicy warmth drawing the imagination further into its depths and the potent waiting tones of Wilson. As it develops, raw infectiousness brews and blossoms within the track’s tempestuous punk ‘n’ roll making its irritable charms even more compelling and its unpredictable enterprise pure magnetism.

kilkovec-cover-artwork_RingMasterReviewIt is a great start to the release setting the agenda for the adventure and invention shaping Plunge and next up Just Get Better. Rolling in on great rhythmic agitation with just as alluring tides of riffery, the track quickly grips ears and appetite, throwing itself rhythmically around with muscle and attitude as vocals roar and grooves entangle the senses. Its fiery rock ‘n’ roll takes no prisoners though again its virulent catchiness perfectly tempers the raw aggression.

Somerset Cottage brings a mellower proposal straight after though it’s underlying steel and angst is soon flowing through the song’s creative veins as both sides of its character interact with imagination around the impassioned vocals of Wilson. Again there is nothing predictable about the song and its twists; even if the chorus has a familiar feel ensuring participation with it is easy. Littered with groaning grooves, the track is an increasingly captivating spectacle matched by the more straightforward punk infused rock of 40,000 Leagues and Counting. It may not have the boldness of its predecessors but the track only satisfies with its growling nature, anthemic heart, and melodic acidity.

Constructive Criticism is another short instrumental, creative doodling before the outstanding Go On (and on and on) brings its Fatima Mansions meets letlive. like creative drama to bear on ears and thoughts. At times it is a suggestive croon, in others a caustic brawl and increasingly an inescapable lure for the imagination leaving Here’s to You to close things off with its tenacious mix of engaging melodies, rousing vocals, and barbarous rhythms.

It is a thoroughly enjoyable end to a similarly agreeable release suggesting that Kilkovec are not too far away from getting their hooks into nationwide recognition, if not even bigger spotlights.

Plunge is released 27th January.

https://www.facebook.com/Kilkovec/    https://twitter.com/kilkovec

Pete RingMaster 25/02/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

I Cried Wolf – Hollow Heart

Lamp Shade Press Shot _RingMaster Review

Real uniqueness in music is a long sought after and if we are honest rarely found aspect in the current music scene. But there are always a few exceptions and many more which come pretty close to finding that clear originality, and one such incitement is UK post-hardcore/punk ‘n’ rollers I Cried Wolf. The band is poised to release their new EP Hollow Heart, and it is a rousing roar of fierce invention and raw intimacy which sets the case for the Banbury quintet being the next big thing in certainly the British hardcore scene, if not its rock ‘n’ roll landscape, whilst creating an incitement which sets ears aflame and the band well away from the crowd.

Hollow Heart is a diverse and unpredictable encounter which you can at times reference to the likes of Dillinger Escape Plan and Every Time I Die as well as others such as Pantera and Reuben in certain moments and aspects, but an invigorating trespass on the senses and imagination which has a character and invention of its very own. The EP is the work of a band formed in 2012 and becoming quickly renowned for their ferocious live presence which has in turn garnered an increasingly potent and loyal following. The past couple of years or so has seen I Cried Wolf share stages with the likes of Bleed From Within, Hacktivist, Create To Inspire, Let’s Talk Daggers, Red Seas Fire, Bad Sign, and Surrender The Coast around the UK. Recorded with producer Sam Winfield (Bring Me The Horizon, Dry The River), Hollow Heart is the band’s broadest wake-up call for the country yet and one hard to imagine being ignored by very many.

Lyrically relating to the life of vocalist Harry Davies, “his reluctance to let go of the past….Of loss, lust, and betrayal”, Hollow Heart opens up with Scratching My Head With Ink and a scratching of riffs before exploding in a howl of sonic turbulence and vocal angst. To that though, is an immediate swing and volatile stroll bursting with imagination and quickly gripping hooks. The guitars of Louie Hodgson and Alex Gibbons cast raw smog of irritable riffs and gripping grooves whilst the drums of Oli Hampshire ransack the senses with their rugged yet rousing incitement. It is a thrilling and bracing proposal enhanced by the roaming throaty bassline spread by Jacob Rudman and the impassioned squalls from the lungs of Davies. That alone would be enough to provide potent bait for the appetite but it is the unpredictable nature of the song which makes a great song something special. The grooves just get heavier and spicier whilst Davies as he digs deeper into his emotions discovers a gripping Anselmo like grizzle to his delivery, whilst the song, well that just bristles punk attitude and heavy rock tenacity as it twists and turns.

ICW_Hollowheart_EP_RingMaster Review     The outstanding start is not let down by its successor, Massokiss Me an agitated swarm of toxic riffs and rhythmic rumbling from the off only breeding keener grooves, greater vocal diversity, and serious invention as it explores a host of flavours all bred in rock ‘n’ roll of some design. That subsequently leads into an impassioned post-hardcore seeded outpouring of melodic and vocal emotion, the track evolving within ears with broader and bolder enterprise before making way for the enthralling It Takes A Slave. It starts with a swing which is best described as blues meets ska punk meets jazz rock where Davies uncovers a dusty growl to his tones as the guitars weave a sultry enticing and the bass a funky lure behind him. It is an entrance which eventually expands into another fascinating and exciting entwining merger of diverse flavours, Faith No More a suggested hint to the ingenuity at play. Each song in a way is ordered bedlam, a vat of individual textures and styles twisted and aligned for songs which, as here, smash expectations and leaves a lingering and inescapable intrigue which simply draws ears keenly and swiftly back into its midst for more exploration.

Kensopia is a spiral of melodic revelry and suggestion from the off next, guitars almost duelling with their individual exploits as rhythms tenderise ears ready for the vocal prowess of Davies and band. Jagged riffs bring another new shade to the sound and release whilst an air of bands like Bring Me The Horizon comes forward briefly as the track moves on to pastures new and old in the strike of a chord or swing of a stick. It is another enjoyable aspect to the I Cried Wolf sound, it never stands still, always in creative motion meaning ears and thoughts have to be lively and willing to rerun the bruising fun again, and again to grasp all the rewards.

Sharkfeet brings Hollow Heart to its close, the track another cauldron of emotion and mouth-watering revelry in songwriting and a tenaciously uncaged tempest. Sonically burning, rhythmically intimidating, and consistently engrossing, the song simply boils over in adventure and almost psychotic invention yet, as all songs, manages to find a coherent and fluid passage across the whole of its explosive passage.

Impressive on the first listen and increasingly impacting and thrilling thereafter, there is only one word for Hollow Heart…remarkable!

Hollow Heart is digitally available from September 11th via Crooked Noise Records.

Pete RingMaster 11/09/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Forever Can Wait – Beauty & Grace EP

FCW promo

Though their sound is not yet burning new grooves in the walls of melodic rock, UK band Forever Can Wait have something about them which suggests that there is a richly promising and even greater presence within the Southampton quintet which will only accelerate on from and build from their impressive debut EP. Beauty & Grace is an enthralling magnet of a release, six fascinating merges of melodic rock and post hardcore which seduces at every twist of its inventive encounter. It does not ignite raging fires in the passions it is fair to say but undoubtedly with a craft and melodic instinctiveness which only persuades strongly, the EP has emotions and satisfaction burning brightly and hungrily for the band and their future horizons.

Formed in 2009, Forever Can Wait has earned a strong reputation for their live performances which has seen them share stages with numerous higher profiled bands and over 2013 with the likes of Press To Meco, Out For Tomorrow, Bad Sign, and Villains. Equally the year has found the band drawing acclaim for their sets at the Butserfest, Takedown, and Download Festivals, the last coming about from the band winning this year’s Red Bull Studios Live At Download competition. With good airplay also following recent singles, it is not hard to imagine and suspect that the Beauty & Grace EP will register the band within a nationwide awareness and spark an even greater ascent for the creative band.

The title track sets things in riveting motion, guitars scoring the air with emotive tones over a firm rhythmic beckoning. It is not a Beauty&Grace Artworkdramatic entrance but one with a potency to light keen appetite for how things will evolve, which they do in fine style with the vocals of Tash Crump taking control. From within a reserved and teasing passage, the lady’s tones make a strong and pleasing caress which only impresses across the song as they more than hold their own as the guitars of Liam Baker and Will Wilson turn in a snarling enticement and heat to the song. As the EP, the track does not quite get the heart fluttering and gasping for breath but definitely awakens keen eager attention.

The following P&Q brings the intensity and contagion which is only simmering within its predecessor and takes little time in securing a rampant greed for its presence. The guitars initially churn up the air with expertise and temptation before stepping in restraint to allow the jabbing beats of drummer Toby Leonard to build a formidable frame which the rapacious growling basslines of Luke Gould deliciously prowl. With caustic hooks and clean grooves weaving within the scorched energy, the song is a feisty encounter if one which never fully ignites as it hints at or one hopes. As in the first, Crump makes for a richly appealing narrator and makes the perfect temper for when the track does unleash a sonic scourge which teases bedlam but pulls away before crossing the lip of tempting chaos.

Rest is a smouldering seduction from its first breath but one stalked wonderfully by the grouchy throat of the bass. With great backing vocals from the guitarists, something arguably there is not enough of on the release, and a brooding atmosphere to the reflection tackling track as well as the ever convincing expression of Crump, the song takes its time but emerges as one of the strongest highlights of the EP alongside its predecessor.

The brief and decent enough piano crafted instrumental Release makes an evocative interruption before leading into the equally emotive Excuses. With a female fronted band like Forever Can Wait, Paramore comparisons always seem second nature but over the length of Beauty & Grace, this track is the one which really only sparks that thought. The track does not match the heights of the previous songs but still holds the listener in a tender but firm grip which the closing Hopes & Dreams matches with an emotionally hued flame of melodic craft and intensive enterprise.

The first half of the EP is certainly the strongest but Forever Can Wait has a strength and potency which makes Beauty & Grace something to enjoy and hanker for from start to finish. There is massive potential within the five piece and using their debut as an impressive base you can only see them becoming a familiar and sought after name on the rock bred lips of the country.

https://www.facebook.com/forevercanwait

8/10

RingMaster 27/11/2013

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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