MountainJam – EP

MJ_RingMaster Review

UK rockers MountainJam first got in touch with their double A-sided debut single around a month ago, the release just one moment in a busy time since the band emerged in March of this year. Since then the Hinckley based band has released another track, those three subsequently making up part of a self-titled EP released just a matter of days ago. All songs have introduced to ears a band with experience in their blood, craft in their hands, and passion in their hearts, and also some rather juicy songs.

The seeds of MountainJam pretty much began when vocalist/rhythm guitarist Dean Dovey met lead guitarist Andy Varden and bassist Nick Roberts as part of Midlands rock band The Silent Union in late 2013. Early 2015 the trio left that band, linked up with drummer Pez, a long-time friend of Varden and Roberts, and stepped forward as MountainJam. In no time a clutch of demos were written and recorded, with live shows just as rapid a move with their first being at The Soundhouse in Leicester. July saw the Jealous Of Me/Lust single unveiled to eager responses with third track The Lord of My Hours revealed soon after to more positive responses. As August closes its eyes, the band have now released their first EP made up of those three songs and two more quietly but firmly imposing incitements.

cover_RingMaster Review     Musically the band finds hues in the inspirations of bands such as The Who, The Doors, Cream, Small Faces, The Charlatans, and Stone Roses to colour and inflame a sound which has a potent air of nostalgia but equally a real freshness and vitality to its energy and invention. Lust is a perfect example, its romps with ears and appetite with a blend of sixties and nineties guitar rock yet creates a presence which if not quite unique is recognisably individual. Its early caresses of guitar are soon veined by a spicy melodic acidity cast by Varden, this in turn leading to the addition of crisp rhythms and the mellow but fiery tones of Dovey. The stroll of the track is controlled and at times reserved but the sultry lacing of melodies are bewitching and the middle section when its chorus is as inescapable a hook as you could wish, magnetism.

Jealous Of Me has an even stronger feel of sixties/seventies rock, its first breath and spread of riffs carrying hints of bands like Small Faces and occasionally Bad Company. Continuing to swing more rigorous rhythmic hips and flirtatious riffs and grooves, the track has body and appetite fully involved in no time. Again it has a familiarity to it which only works in its favour and a tenacity which just rouses the energies of the listener and a want for more.

The Lord of My Hours is cut from the same feisty cloth, a healthily energetic encounter infusing even richer bluesy spices into its winding grooves, dancing melodies, and engaging vocals. Rhythmically the song is a festival, Pez never quite uncaging a full-on stomp of beats and percussion but providing an addictive shuffle which the thick bass lures of Roberts court with relish and enterprise. The track is irresistible to feet and appetite, rich enjoyment which is found again in the emotively and resourcefully lively Maybe Next Time. One of the other two songs making up the EP, it has a grip which is more of a nineties guitar escapade but again comes thick with essences and textures bred in earlier decades to grab the imagination and further keen involvement.

MountainJam also show they are adept at serenading the senses with the sultry shimmer that is Shadows of your Mind. The guitars glow with melodic, almost surf rock like charm whilst Dovey provides a similarly enticing croon to the gentle canter of a song, whilst the additional keys adding the cream to the flavoursome treat. The influences of psych rock come through vibrantly across the song and though, as the last one mentioned, it fails to quite match up to the success of the other three songs for personal tastes, it leaves a warm glow and oozing satisfaction in its place.

Looking at songs in the order we came across them instead of the track order on the EP, they all unite to provide a very pleasing potential loaded introduction to MountainJam. They are a band hard not to see luring greater spotlights and success upon them as they evolve and simply gets more time and experience under their young belts as a band.

The MountainJam EP is available now at the band’s Bandcamp profile.

Pete Ringmaster 02/09/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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B.D. Gottfried – Sociopathic Traffic

b.d Gottfried - Sociopathic Traffic artwork_RingMaster Review

Hailing from Canada and creating bright flames of sound from within his Ontario studio, BD Gottfried has just released his seventh album MotionFever and as a rather tasty little teaser for it, also new single Sociopathic Traffic. The song is a vibrant wind of melodic rock with one foot in the eighties and another in something refreshingly individual to the artist himself. It is one of those songs which almost creeps up on emotions in its depth of quality whilst being an easily accessible and enjoyable introduction on first contact.

B.D. Gottfried has been a touring musician and session player for many years, before and alongside his solo endeavours. He has worked with the likes of Pino Palladino (Pete Townsend, John Mayer Trio), Breen Laboeuf (Celinebio, and April’ Greg Dec ert (Bad Company, and David Gilmour) to just scratch the surface of his CV and played within a dozen plus countries. Latest album MotionFever, as mentioned, is his latest acclaim gathering album, a release produced by Seigfried Meier (Kittie) and mastered by Howie Weinberg (Nirvana, Smashing Pumpkins).

Taken from it, Sociopathic Traffic offers a “humorous look at a self-indulgent artist looking to get her claws into a non-confrontational guy and how he tries to escape!” It also provides a quickly persuasive blend of melodic keys and guitars which soon embrace the alluring vocals of Gottfried. It is a swift enticement which only grows as progressive tenacity and at times funk lined grooves broaden the song’s creative landscape. That earlier suggested eighties feel is an open colour which dances with thoughts though Gottfried equally explores varied sonic enterprise and melodic imagination to entangle ears.

The track potently reminds of Irish/Italian musician David J Caron, both artists managing to create eighties hued accessible flights of bold sound which easily grab attention. As increasingly enjoyable as it is, Sociopathic Traffic might not quite be the song to set your year and personal playlists alight, though of course it might, but it is one to persistently enjoy as it leads intrigue into potentially as rich and possibly richer exploits within Gottfried’s new album.

Sociopathic Traffic is out now!

Pete RingMaster 03/09/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

For more exploration of the independent check out http://www.zykotika.com/

United Highs – Talk About Us

United Highs band pic_RingMaster Review

Talk About Us, the new single from indie rock band United Highs, is as smooth and flavoursome as Cornish ice-cream, and just as easy to grow a keen appetite for. The band itself is also Cornwall bred with a sound which is not seemingly as worried about sculpting its own distinctive character yet as it is in providing a great time for band and listener. It is an intent successfully fulfilled by Talk About Us, one of those songs which just linger to please and entice long after physically has leaving the building.

Unighted highs - Talk About Us - Single artwork_RingMaster Review     United Highs is the creation of Falmouth hailing brothers Luke and Kristian Good, the sons of one of Cornwall’s most respected guitarists, the late Rod Good. Once they began experimenting with musical ideas and it became obvious that the guitar was “in the DNA” of Luke and vocalist Kristian had the flare for words, the pair and band’s musical journey was in motion. Drummer Ben Nankervis was brought into the creative fold after he came to the rescue of one of the band’s show at London’s Half Moon which was under threat due to illness. Soon recruited full-time, he was soon recording the United High’s debut album Over the Influence with the band at the legendary Sawmills Studios in Cornwall. The current line-up was completed when bassist/backing vocalist Ian Henderson joined the band, his CV at that point already including session work with Bad Company, a tour with Twisted Sister, and work with the likes of Steve Marriott and Larry Wallis as well as a host of former bands including Panik, The Love Affair, and Turbo.

Also recorded at Sawmills Studios, Talk About Us is the band’s new temptation and features the guest vocals of Abby Miles. Originally asked to provide backing vocals on the song after being heard singing at a party, Abby’s contribution is a far more potent aspect to the lively encounter than just that, her part evolving as the song grew as it was recorded to become a full union between guest and band.

The single quickly grips ears with heady beats and a dose of riffs not too far removed from the punkish air of early Sex Pistols offerings. The song soon blossoms a melodic and dramatic nature though, guitars casting a spicy web which the strong tones of Kristian and subsequently Abby harmonically explore with their swiftly riveting union.

There is something familiar to the song, different aspects hinting at an array of bands yet combining for an easy persuasion that, as suggested earlier, hangs around teasing and tempting thoughts and emotions, especially through the fiery chorus and outstanding blend of vocals which often come in waves to seduce ears.

Talk About Us is one of those songs which may not become a personal classic but we would suggest a proposition which will persistently put a smile on the face every time it steps forward, whilst United Highs is a band we should all go checkout a little closer, Abby Miles too after this.

Talk About Us is available now via the band’s Bandcamp page as a “pay what you like” download.

RingMaster 14/08/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Dirty Thrills – Self-Titled

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It is fair to say that the release of the Growing Young EP easily put UK blues rock band Dirty Thrills on the landscape of emerging potential soaked propositions. The band’s 2013 debut was a richly enjoyable slice of dirt clad rock ‘n’ roll with only the lack of a truly distinct voice the issue. It was a potent base though from which the London quartet has impressively blossomed and matured, the band realising the promise of that moment and then some as evidenced by their new self-titled album. Stretching all the richness of the previous release and unveiling even more depth in songwriting and sound to be explored ahead, Dirty Thrills has evolved from an emerging prospect into a rigorously compelling incitement.

Formed in 2012, last year was a potent year for the band, Dirty Thrills drawing strong acclaim and attention with not only the Growing Young EP but a live presence which has left venues like London’s 100 Club, O2 Academy Liverpool, and Shepherd’s Bush Empire sweaty and rocking. Consisting of vocalist Louis James (the son of ex-Moody Blues singer Nicky James), guitarist Jack Fawdry, bassist Aaron Plows, and drummer Stevo Corrigan, each bringing experience and open craft with youthful tenacity, Dirty Thrills have bred a sound which merges blues and heavy rock for an incendiary stomp of old school and modern, dirt encrusted rock ‘n’ roll. It was an intriguing temptation on the band’s first release but now a roaring blaze on their self-released album.

As soon as the first flame of guitar winds its lures around ears in opener No Resolve, there is a sense of something spicy and flavoursome in store, a prospect soon brought to fruition as the deep bass lure hailing from Plows adds its Dirty_Thrills_Coverflirtation to the crisp beckoning of Corrigan’s swings whilst Fawdry’s magnetic designs only broaden their persuasion. It is a thick weave of blues soaked sound brought further to life by the impressive tones of James, his voice a fire all on its own. The song proceeds to swing with a slow stride, its pungent sounds somewhere between The Black Keys and Bad Company with a healthy dose of Rival Sons, a suggestion fitting the whole album. The impressive start is swiftly surpassed by the outstanding Burning Bridges, a song tempting with salacious grooves from its first breath before finding a melodic and suggestive swagger to a contagious stride of resourceful enterprise and magnetic revelry. As elsewhere, it is a track which is unafraid to switch around its pace and creative gait, a fluid invention which brings fascinating unpredictability yet easily accessible twists. The familiarity which was rife in the previous EP is still hanging around on song and album but now has an indefinable source and a fresh adventure with every recognisable and suggestive moment.

From one major peak on the album another strolls in straight away with the lively stomp of Rock n Roll, a track more than living up to its title. Bouncing with virulent infectiousness and raw melodic temptation, the song becomes a saucy temptress within seconds as rhythmic bait with anthemic potency and the inflammatory craft of the guitar enslaves imagination and passions, all lorded over by the increasingly stunning voice and delivery of James. The tempestuous revelry is given a slight breather with the easier going but certainly just as pleasing Resume Regret, a song with a less imposing style and an eighties hard rock flavouring offering plenty to be enticed by, adventurous grooves and hooks laying down a captivating invitation for ears too.

The gentle croon of Is This Home adds another varied flavour to the release, vocals an expressive protagonist over precise melodies and sultry emotion before the song erupts into a hazy and impassioned smoulder. It does not ignite ears as previous songs but has thoughts alive and involved with every emotive note and syllable shared, before being followed by the raw energy and instinctive dynamics of Reign where again grooves and riffs come clad in blues rock humidity and vocal vivacity. It is further proof of Dirty Thrills’ strength at writing and letting loose pure rock ‘n’ roll, here a straight forward yet creatively inflamed encounter and in tracks like the next up Wolf In Sheeps Clothing, a more aggressively inventive and hungry proposition. Driven by the riveting agitated rhythms of Corrigan, matched by the heavy and hearty voice of Plows’ bass, the track feverishly romps with sinews stretched and sonic enterprise afire, harmonies an additional irresistible spice to the glorious festival of sound and passion.

     The Man Who Lost His Way is a similarly sculpted encounter, its muscles flexing with eager intent whilst the guitar of Fawdry brews up a sizzling tapestry of sonic intrigue and temptation. It has relaxed moments around the vocal roar of James which lack some of the fire of the song’s imposing twists but still add to the blistering enticement which thrills ears in its company though it fails to linger around like other songs on the album once departed.

The release is completed by the conflagrant charm and craft of Follow Me Home and lastly the Southern rock grooved and blues aired Sigh, both songs further climactic spicery to the album with especially the final song an inescapable enticement warranting further plays before putting a close on the album for the day.

Dirty Thrills set down a potent marker and base with their last encounter, one sprung from in impressive and distinctive style by their album. As suggested you still feel there is more to come from in imagination and uniqueness from the band but they seem to be heading right to the forefront of European blues rock.

The self-released Dirty Thrills is available now digitally @ https://itunes.apple.com/gb/album/dirty-thrills/id907284883 and on CD via http://dirtythrillsclothing.bigcartel.com/

http://www.dirty-thrills.com/

RingMaster 19/11/2014

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

 

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard from

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The Milestones – Higher Mountain-Closer Sun

Photo by Pasi Rytkonen Photography

Photo by Pasi Rytkonen Photography

We cannot say we have a natural appetite for southern and classic rock, nor an over attentive interest, but occasionally something hits the right spot and sparks a thorough investigation. The recent impressive album from Norwegian blues rockers Electric Woodland has been one and the legendary Bad Company in the past another to light a fire of interest and pleasure. Now with new album Higher Mountain-Closer Sun, Finnish southern rockers The Milestones have lit another potent appetite with their hot sultry sounds. Another reason for mentioning the first two bands is that this album comes with a healthy soak of blues/hard rock to its southern sonic climate which brings potent comparisons in many ways to the enticing sounds of those two bands. Higher Mountain-Closer Sun seems to soak up those essences and many more flavoursome spices to create its own feistily simmering proposition, an offering which seduces even our more aggression wanting tastes.

Twenty years since taking its first steps and with now four albums under the belt, The Milestones has earned a strong presence within world hard rock since the release of their debut album Vol. 1 in 1996, an album seeing a re-release later this year. Acclaimed and drawing strong interest in the States, its success and the band’s live presence led to them traveling to New York to record second album Souvenirs of 1999. This proved to be nowhere near as successful in sound and impact as its predecessor and as the promo sheet accompanying the new album states, “Ultimately it would take ten years for The Milestones to heal the wounds.”

That was when album three emerged, Devil In Men in 2009 pushing the Helsinki quintet back to the stature and acclaimed attention enjoyed before on a global scale. It was followed by tours around Scandinavia, Central Europe, and the US the band supporting the likes of Whitesnake, Deep Purple, Black Stone Cherry, Gary Moore, Raging Slab, and D.A.D. along the way. Now they uncage Higher Mountain-Closer Sun through Listenable Records, a magnetic and fiery romp of instinctive rock ‘n’ roll taking body and passions on a fevered stomp.

From the first track the album seems to have a hook deep into thoughts and emotions, the opening Walking Trouble instantly smothering ears in a blaze of sonic and melodic haze with the guitars of Tomi Julkunen and Marko 10301540_10152415122872560_6266331794037874146_nKiviluoma a seductive graze on the senses whilst the bass of Veli Palevaara roams with equally captivating enterprise and swagger. Completed by the firm beats of drummer Tommi Manninen and the dusty vocals of Olavi Tikka, whose harmonica flair also ignites a twinge of hunger, the track is a storming romp to start things off and get the listener to their feet.

Both the smouldering heat of Shalalalovers and the tarmac stomping Drivin’ Wheel keep the impressive start heading along the same plateau. The first of the two merges a great sultry climate over verses with an almost too easily accessible chorus, its lure predictable and over familiar yet irrepressibly addictive. The union works a treat with a soft spot for the harmonica well fed again before the song’s successor pulls on a Stones like blues colouring to wrap its southern bred adventure. Again there is a simple but inescapable virulence to the chorus which makes a great contrast to the more intensive creative tenacity before and after their expulsions. Both tracks incite full engagement physically and emotionally before allowing a breath to be taken with the evocative southern rock heated scenery of Oh My Soul. With a breath of gospel passion and ‘red neck’ causticity, the track is a sizzling temptation which increases its strength with every listen.

The acoustic ballad Grateful is a pleasing encounter but lacks the spark of previous songs, though that is probably more down to personal preferences for feet sparking revelry. To be fair it is a vocally and musically accomplished song which at times sounds like a mix of Elvis Costello in his country era and Bon Jovi. The following Sweet Sounds does have the body moving with intent next and again apart from its stirring chorus is another enjoyable but underwhelming offering when up against songs like the brilliant It’s All Right. The track is an insatiable rocker from start to finish, grooves and hooks as eagerly tenacious as the increasingly impressive vocals of Tikka and the addictive rhythmic bait. As with all the songs on the album, you feel you already know this bruiser of rock ‘n’ roll devilry which only adds to its invigorating and refreshing presence.

Such the strength and tremendous pull of the track it gives the likes of the energetically fevered You and the melodically and vocally reflective Looking Back For Yesterday a stiffer task to match up to, but both without quite lighting the same fire still treats ears and imagination to exciting endeavour and enflamed melodic sounds. Their success is taken to a new level by the raw and gripping drama of Damn. Again ridiculously compelling hooks and grooves vein what is a darker and sonically fevered canvas to the song. It makes a slow initial impression but emerges as another evolving into a big highlight within the album.

The scintillating Fool Me brings the main body of the album to a tremendous close, the guitars of Julkunen and Kiviluoma bordering on sonic eroticism such the potency and spellbinding strength of their grooves whilst vocals and rhythms dance with impassioned devilry around them. It is a stunning track, a show stealer on any other album.

The CD version of Higher Mountain – Closer Sun is finished by a couple of bonus tracks in Call Of The Wild and Quicksilver which sadly our promo did not contain but such the quality of the rest of the album it is easy to assume they only add to the fun. The Milestones may have taken ‘ten years to heal the wounds’ but there is little to stop them now with releases like this.

Higher Mountain – Closer Sun is available now via Listenable Records @ http://www.amazon.co.uk/Higher-Mountain-Closer-The-Milestones/dp/B00ILWB4VS and http://www.levykauppax.fi/artist/milestones/higher_mountain_closer_sun/#cd

https://www.themilestonesmusic.com

RingMaster 30/09/2014

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard from

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Gorilla Punch Radio – Self Titled

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Embracing a wealth of rock spices and varied flavours, Gorilla Punch Radio on the evidence of their self-titled debut album, tries and succeeds in making every song a slice of impacting revelry whether they are crooning the emotions or making irresistible incitements to feet. Offering ten tracks which leave lingering impressions with their tenaciously crafted and presented exploits, band and album makes for one attention grabbing, ear pleasing introduction.

Hailing from Leeds, the quartet of vocalist James, guitarist Boothy, bassist Sam, and drummer Paul, from the little you can find out about the band online, formed the band at least three years ago and have certainly honed their sound over time to a thoroughly magnetic proposition. Taking inspirations from the likes of Kasabian, Red Hot Chili Peppers, Foo Fighters, Coldplay, James Brown, Radiohead, Green Day, Muse, Nirvana, and Michael Jackson and more, many which can be heard as spices within the album, Gorilla Punch Radio parade a maturity of musicianship and songwriting which suggests experience and definitely imagination is ripe in the band.

The album opens with the single Bragging Rights, a storming stomp of a song which alone has sparked an eager interest in the band. Fiery riffs warm ears right away before the equally appealing vocals join firm rhythms in building up 884477_505528759557315_2743931573666742889_oan attention awakening start to the song. In full swagger, the track finds a blues breath to its melodic endeavour and garage rock urgency to its stride, infecting the imagination and emotions like a horny mix of The Stones and The Killers. It is a richly contagious start to the album ensuring appetite and satisfaction is at a high ready for the following adventures.

Pick Yourself Up, the second single from the album, comes next and instantly swings a mellow tone over the senses, acoustic enticing and again the impressive vocals of James caressing ears with reflective expression. The song soon lifts its feet for the feistier engagement of the chorus whilst the earthy yet elegant croon of the song continues to embrace thoughts. The song is a gripping proposition which gains strength with every listen, much like the album. With bulging beats and group harmonies pushing its climax to greater potency, the excellent track makes way for the melodic rock stroll of I’ve Got Your Back. Though the song does not quite match its predecessors in presence and magnetism, it is a lively proposition blessed with a jazz funk jangle and sultry flames of guitar but it is it’s the rousing quality which the band instil in all their tracks, even the ballads, which steals the imagination.

Starting with a burst of sixties garage rock, thoughts of The Monkees swiftly hinting, Burn this City to the Ground erupts in a blaze of raw rock ‘n’ roll with hooks and riffs creating a scintillating tapestry. The track stands like a union between the more mod like rock of The Who and Secret Affair and the stronger blues bred enterprise of a Bad Company. The track continues to twist and turn with relish in its invention and passion in its expressive colour. The bass provides its own sublime throaty temptation whilst the magnetic guitar craft of Boothy simply ignites the track further for another major moment of the album.

Both Shadows and Follow You wind things down a little, certainly against the previous treat, but each immerses the listener into scenery of down to earth life and emotion. The first of the two glides with another impressive acoustic seduction aligned to reserved yet pungent rhythms which punctuate the evocative vocals and their lyrical narrative. There is an intimacy to the track, as many on the release, which draws in thoughts and connections. The second of the pair has that same charm as it bewitches from the start with a slow brooding expression and sound before erupting in a folk seeded romp which swiftly has feet and emotions waltzing with its punchy persuasion. A song which you could not dislike if you tried, it adds another string to the creative bow of Gorilla Punch Radio and texture to the album.

As does the excellent funk festivity of Tease, a sultry boogie primed for personal and dance-floor use. With a gnarly tone to the bass as flirtatious as the melodic vivacity and Red Hot Chili Peppers like rhythmic agitation, the track is an addiction waiting to prey on body and soul. It is a powerful weapon for the album emulated by the smouldering melodic flight of Breathe, its glowing melodies and enticing vocal harmonies absorbing hues in a riveting weave of emotional and sonic exploration.

The album is brought to a close by firstly the climactic power of Song for the Underdog, a track with thumping rhythms courting a compelling anthem of strenuous riffs and incendiary hooks. It is a glorious call to ears and passions, the best track on the album and incredibly virulent in every individual casting of the band’s lines as well as their combined explosive ingenuity. It epitomises the band’s songwriting, huge hooks and binding grooves locked into expressive and intricate invention. It is followed by Jane, the song another mesmeric ballad where vocals and guitar simply shine. To be honest the big sinew busting songs from the band have the edge for personal tastes but there is no escaping the elegance and beauty of their balladry or its persistent suasion.

Gorilla Punch Radio is a band you are destined to come across time and time again, as they can only get even better which is a truly exciting prospect after the impressive triumph of their album.

Gorilla Punch Radio is available now @ https://itunes.apple.com/gb/album/gorilla-punch-radio/id888458114?ls=1

https://www.facebook.com/pages/Gorilla-Punch-Radio/126158307494364?ref=h

9/10

RingMaster 28/08/2014

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard from

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Dead Shed Jokers – Peculiar Pastimes EP

Dead Shed Jokers 2

If the impossibly magnetic lures of Dead Shed Jokers have yet to make a play for your passions then the Welsh quintet has made the opportunity very easy with their latest EP Peculiar Pastimes. Available as a free download via their Bandcamp profile, the band has made one of those invitations only a fool would not go and investigate before greedily accept the rewards offered. Consisting of six contagion lit tracks, five of which are taken from a live session at BRFM Radio the band undertook this past July, the release is an enthralling explosive heat of sound with more dramatic spices than an Indian restaurant kitchen.

The title track opens up the richly satisfying encounter and immediately has a healthy appetite for its offering licking lips and coverattention rigidly in its hands. From an intriguing and haunting distant teasing the song erupts with intensive riffs and punchy rhythms rampaging through the ear whilst a guitar unleashes tendrils of melodic tempting which wrap tenderly yet rapaciously around the senses. It is a riotous fusion of noise and stoner clad rock, an instantly irresistible bait for the passions given extra toxicity with the strong vocals which add their urgent enthusiasm to the mix. Like a mix of The Dropper’s Neck and Queens Of The Stone Age but not, the track twists and turns like a wanton belly dancer, its sinews rippling within the energy and passions expelled by the outstanding storm of invention. Seduction and causticity go hand in hand as the track rages and draws the strongest, keenness submission from thoughts and emotions to its exceptional persuasion.

The next five tracks are live takes of songs, four of which appear in their original form on the band’s well-received and acclaimed album Peyote Smile which came out at the tail of 2011. Monkey Song is first and like its predecessor soon has the imagination lured into its embrace as a drifting blues temperance cast by guitar, harmonica, and a deep slow bass drawl coax the ears. Rhythms also take a restrained approach to the introduction, it all building up to the striking full stride of the track which takes little time to alternatively stomp forcibly or unwind a smouldering acidic tendril of enticement across the air. There is a classic rock and psychedelic essence to the fiery encounter, further evidence of the wealth of flavours the band take as inspiration and employ in their invention. The track as the subsequent ones reveal just how potent sound and band is live, something we should all indulge in at some point.

Interesting Point, But… follows next and like its predecessor takes a provocative and gentle hold on the ears at first before slipping up numerous gears and degrees of temperature to brew an incendiary and inciting stroll of sonic adventure. The entwining of restraint and full on rampancy again frequents this track making for a presence which has limbs treating the dirt to a rigorous thumping  and lungs taking deep breaths in between the outbursts. It is an adrenaline fuelled and coaxing treat which is soon matched by The Memoirs of Mr Bryant, a shimmering sonic flame of evocative textures and fire bred melodic flames brought with a craft and passion which only impresses. There is a seemingly taunting like intent to the riffs and drum jabs tempered by the potent expression of the vocals and deeply hued colour of the melodies which raise the passions further, a combination which makes the song a heavy duty irresistible temptation.

The live cut of the title track is next and no cigar on guessing it too is an odds-on winner in securing total slavery of the heart, the track genius live or studio embraced. Its raucous presence is replaced by the sultriness of Magic Teatime, a song which leaves you basking in melodies which entrance and a passion which sears the imagination. There is a kind of formula to certainly a majority of songs presented on the EP, persistently twisting slow burns of suasion with crescendos of almost antagonistic energy and brawling intensity laid side by side. Equipped with a breath of The Doors and Bad Company the song is simply a lingering joy to end an invigorating release.

The Peculiar Pastimes EP and sound of Dead Shed Jokers come to that, has an open familiarity to it but simultaneously manages to sound unique in presence and effect. It is a refreshing and exciting experience which leaves the listener with only one option, go check out and grab the band’s album, better late than never.

http://deadshedjokers.bandcamp.com/

https://www.facebook.com/DeadShedJokers

8.5/10

RingMaster 22/11/2013

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard from

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