The Scaners – Self Titled

Create a sonic kaleidoscope made up of particles from The Ramones, Devo, The Dickies, and The Screamers with essences of others such as Brainiac, Useless Eaters, and Acid Baby Jesus and you get the glorious garage synth punk sound fuelling a release which surely will be announced one of the year’s best moments come its annual awards. The cause of such thoughts is the self-titled debut album from French punksters The Scaners which despite those references at the beginning, or because of them, is one unique and quickly addictive incitement of sound and mischief.

Hailing from Lyon, The Scaners proudly and openly embrace their inspirations in their music; influences which from their label, Dirty Water Records, to reviewers and fans are universally recognised within something as individual as you could wish for. A four track 7” hinted at and teased ears with its inimitable antics last year, lures and revelry now in full roar and enterprise within the band’s first full-length.

Recorded with Lo Spider at Swampland in Toulouse, the album sets off on its sci-fi fuelled flight of fun with opener Abduction. Like a dance party in Area 51, the song swings its rhythmic hips to its own sonic infestation of devilry, vocalist Pav Scaner vocally hot-footing across the strands of temptation like a dervish as the keys of his organ dance. Hooks fly as beats bounce, seventies punk flirting with its synth punk/garage rock tenacity as ears and appetite are instantly baited and trapped.

The cosmos wraps the imagination next as Spacecraft lifts off with a punk rumble; bassist Tama Scaner and drummer BX Scaner rousingly fuelling its brief but irresistible surge before I Don’t Want To Go swaggers in on addictive beats and vocal dissonance. Pav’s keys again entice like sonic liquor as his voice wonderfully trespasses the shuffle; a riveting incitement matched and escalated by the spatial theremin gas and raw guitar prowess of Dédé Scaner. As the first, both tracks simply infest the imagination, getting under the skin like an infernal but exciting itch which you want to scratch but never lose.

Checkpoint Planet is a slightly calmer waltz which just as easily has the hips swinging and appetite devouring with its virulent infectiousness. As throughout the album, Pav’s lead vocal explorations are just as magnetically supported by the rest of the band’s throats, though it is the animated throb of Tama’s bass which steals the biggest portion of the passions before The Dries bursts in on a The Dickies bred lure to uncage its own voracious stomp. A fusion of sixties, seventies and current punk ‘n’ roll, the song is simply irresistible; manna to the devil in us all.

Darker and heavier textures line the B52’s hued aeronautics of Enjoy Your Flight; a trespassing bounce of a track which masters limbs and spirit like a cosmic puppeteer while No Place In Space steals best track honours with its post punk/garage punk saunter with a healthy essence of The Horrors to its reined but open diablerie. The first single from the album, the band apparently has two versions of the song; this the “slow” shadow accompanied drift through space; we cannot wait to hear the fast flight.

The pop virulence of the following We Want To Talk To Your Leader has the body romping within a breath or two, its new wave flaunt of sound and enterprise pure addiction which teases with nods to The Ramones; flavouring simply grabbed full-on by Video Tape next with again simply contagious results. Both tracks, though to be honest as all songs, leave the body breathless and greedy for more, a hunger quickly fed with great relish by the irritable sonic escapade of Flying Fuck and the flirtatious parade of Modern Fissure. The first is a furious surge of boisterous sound and brazen seduction and its successor a calmer but no less instinctively raw and rapacious slice of synth pop and both quite delicious to the ears.

The album ends with Levitation Train 2077, a swirling maelstrom of electronic punk as controlled as it is feral creating one glorious finale. All bands should have a theme tune to our thoughts, something recognisable and addictive announcing their arrival, like all the best TV shows, and this is undoubtedly the one for The Scaners.

Everything about the album was liquor to our intoxication and as the introduction of The Scaners to our ears, the spark to a lusty following hereon in; there is the feeling we will not be alone.

The Scaners album is out now via Dirty Water Records, Dirty Water Records USA, Adrenalin Fix Music, Casbah Records, Dangerhouse Skylab, Teenage Hate Records, Strycknine Recordz, and Trokson Records and available at https://www.dirtywaterrecords.co.uk/shop/#!/The-Scaners/c/27034946/offset=0&sort=normal and https://thescaners.bandcamp.com/

https://www.facebook.com/thescaners/

 Pete RingMaster 27/02/2018

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

The Dollyrots – Whiplash Splash

There are inescapable feel-good encounters and there are others which lead you into lustfully energetic engagements but there are very few which has the body and spirit engaged in a full on party of endless physical endeavour equipped with mischievous behaviour.  Whiplash Splash is one of the few, a feverish riot of sound and inhibition squashing incitement virtually tattooing a broad smile on face and mood.

Uncaged by Californian duo The Dollyrots, the band’s sixth studio album is a new wave of their bubblegum flavoured pop infested punk ‘n’ roll. A year ago, the pair invaded a new plateau in their sound with the Mama’s Gonna Knock You Out EP, itself continuing the new bloom of growth started by previous album Barefoot and Pregnant two years before that. Now the ‘invader’ has become the conqueror, Whiplash Splash owning the new level of creative maturity and instinctive contagion in the pair’s sound leaving the body exhausted and emotions flying in its wake.

If last year was a truly busy time for the couple of vocalist/bassist Kelly Ogden and vocalist/guitarist Luis Cabezas, with the release of the EP and a sold out UK tour with Bowling For Soup backing up the birth of their child, 2017 has the potential of being even hungrier on their time and virulent revelry with Whiplash Splash leading the way. As Mama’s Gonna Knock You Out, the crowd funded album was produced by John Fields with the duo and immediately has ears and attention enslaved with a proposition maybe best described as The Donnas and The Crystals meets Australian band Valentiine infused with Bowling For Soup mischief, a hint which covers all the album though really it is all best pinned down as simply The Dollyrots.

With the album’s title, imagery, and writing spun from Ogden’s passion for and longing to be a mermaid, as well as working as a metaphor for the band’s spilt time living in downtown Los Angeles and coastal Florida, Whiplash Splash just rips itself from the speakers with opener I Do. A squeal and coaxing beats hit ears before a swaggering stroll of Ramones like riffs and further tenacious rhythmic exploit punk instincts led by the catchy vocal lures of Ogden and the equally enticing throb of her bass. Feet and hips are just as quickly involved as too voice and appetite, the song simply punk pop devilry refusing to be ignored.

The following Babbling Idiot is just as virulent, Ogden’s harmonic romancing warming the angular surge of guitar and the sparking of solitary rhythmic seduction before it all boils up into another seriously addictive and physically persuasive chorus. The song has a slim seventies/eighties scent to it, occasionally bringing thoughts of bands like The Photos and The Waitresses, but roars with a punk ‘n’ roll zeal borne of today’s agitation and energy.

Next up is Mermaid, the song pure seduction from its harmonic caresses and flirtatious hooks to a sonic blaze fuelled by just as forceful bait. It is a creative collusion built for the listener’s slavish captivation, success captured within a handful of breaths with similar rewards sought and found by Just Because I’m Blonde straight after. With Cabezas’ guitar jangle the first chain of temptation, Ogden’s probing bassline the second, the track quickly prowls the senses with a lively confident swagger and a throbbing almost salacious backbone. Again hooks escape from each creative twist with B52s inspired keys just adding to the imagination igniting drama.

From its first breath, the album is a puppeteer to body and spirit, continuing its manipulation in fine style with Squeeze Me. Its initial rockabilly hued bass groove is alone enough to tempt submission, an almost taunting tempting soon fondled by sonic invention and subsequently joined by Ogden’s vocal saunter.  As words and song make an increasingly pop punk proposal no red blooded rocker can refuse, kinetic dynamics ensure class ‘A’ catchiness before This Addiction serenades ears with its own boisterously infectious swing and harmonic invention; its croon sliding melodic caresses across the senses like a sultry lover inflamed with lust borne energy.

Dance Like a Maniac more than lives up to its title as a persuasion, its bold and bruising punk rock a bully for feet and body swerves driving song and listener into zealous union while Saturday Morning with a great opening bass groan offers its own headstrong physical temptation. Riffs and rhythms alone are sparks for instinctive compliance and only assisted by the blend of hard and pop rock surging through the song’s imaginative tapestry of sound and ideation.

Both tracks leave lungs gasping for breath and pleasure over flowing, yet still get slightly eclipsed by the hip swinging incitement that is City of Angels; imagine The Runaways and Bikini Kill mixing with The Go-Gos and you have a sense of its mighty romp before things mellow out with the graceful Jump Start This Heart, a song lined with an electro pop shimmer and bound in melancholic beauty as a sonic fire burns in its heart.

The rawer pop ‘n’ roll of Pack of Smokes steps forward next, bouncing along as a caustic air hugs its fiercely catchy enterprise and energy, and though it does not quite match those before it, the song leaves satisfaction pumped before the outstanding Other Trucker with its reggae hinted, attitude soaked summer canter again has pleasure brimming over. As throughout, Cabezas’ vocal backing and unity with Ogden’s is superb, often understated but always a complimentary hue to her almost siren-esque presence, especially on this treat.

The album closes with Walking on Sunshine, The Dollyrots giving the Katrina and the Waves classic their distinctive craft and energy. To be honest, it is a song which has never lit our fires but that does not stop the twosome causing bodies to bounce in the office as the album ends in fine style.

Ogden and Cabezas have hit another high with Whiplash Splash, their loftiest yet in all aspects and fair to say, when put together by The Dollyrots pop and punk has never been more tempting.

Whiplash Splash is out now through Arrested Youth Records and is available digitally and physically @ https://thedollyrots.bandcamp.com/

Upcoming Live Dates

Mar 28 The Rebel Lounge Phoenix, AZ

Mar 29 The Hideout San Diego, CA

Mar 31 The Hi Hat Los Angeles, CA

Apr 01 The Slidebar Rock-n-Roll Kitchen Fullerton, CA

May 11 The Saint Asbury Park, NJ

May 12 Firehouse 13 Providence, RI

May 15 Cafe Nine New Haven, CT

May 16 Ottobar Baltimore, MD

May 17 Kung Fu Necktie Philadelphia, PA

May 19 Sunnyvale – Brooklyn Brooklyn, NY

http://www.dollyrots.com/    https://www.facebook.com/thedollyrots/    https://twitter.com/thedollyrots

Pete RingMaster 25/03/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Big Boy Bloater and The Limits – Luxury Hobo

BBB_RingMaster Review

Fancy a rich dose of spice to your rock ‘n’ roll then the new album from Big Boy Bloater & The Limits is a must. Luxury Hobo offers nine rich blues tinged slices of contagious rock ’n’ roll which relentlessly infests body and emotions like a sonic viral complaint to which no cure is available or wanted.

Guitarist, singer, songwriter, and radio presenter, Big Boy Bloater is an artist to which hungry ears and acclaim seem to flock to. His career and unique style in songwriting, playing, and sound has seen him the feast of the blues and roots scenes, playing numerous major festivals across the US and Europe, and tour across Europe, the Middle-East, the USA, and Canada. Equally he has played behind and with the likes of Imelda May, Paloma Faith, and Wanda Jackson and been invited by Sir Paul McCartney to record with him at Abbey Road. He is a wanted man and easy to see why from Luxury Hobo alone.

Forming latest band Big Boy Bloater & The Limits in 2011, Big Boy Bloater defies the description of being a bluesman as predominantly tagged by a great many. As proven by Luxury Hobo, he creates fusions of flavours which no-one else seems to have the notion of casting. For the new album R&B is at times entangled with swamp and delta blues, seventies rock ‘n’ roll merged with old school rockabilly and fifties garage rock, and…

Reality is that the fusions are rich and plenty resulting in songs which play like old friends yet are like few other companions you may have come across, certainly outside of the man’s own creative psyche. Luxury Hobo is Big Boy Bloater’s darkest collection of songs too; its themes bred from a bout of depression in 2013. Talking of the time and release, Big Boy Bloater openly said “I had a breakdown, the album centres around that we’ve got all these great things but are still pissed off and medicate ourselves to be normal,” further adding that “The basic idea of the title is we are all luxury hobos these days, we get to go here, there and everywhere but no one has it the hard way now do they? We all have our luxuries, it’s that juxtaposition; I think the whole album is about the modern day life and society.

artwork_RingMaster ReviewAs evidenced in the album’s opener alone it does not mean there is an absence of the flirtatious hooks and unpredictable twists, as well as the energy driven virulence fans have become so enamoured by in his music. Devils Not Angels is an irresistible start to the adventure; a flirtatious romp from its first guitar flame quickly breaking into a feisty swagger with a seriously catchy attitude and incitement of sound. From the smiling keys of Dan Edwards to the rousing rhythms of bassist Steven Oats and drummer Matt Cowley, the song has body and soul pumped with raw pleasure taken further care of by the gravelly voice and fiery guitar craft of Big Boy Bloater.

It is a superb start which still gets eclipsed straight away by the following and quite brilliant It Came Out Of The Swamp. It too bounces along with a contagious air to get swiftly involved with but its climate and textures are far more dark, sinister, and invasive. The bass borders on a carnal predation whilst the grooves are dirt encrusted flirtation as swamp blues get tainted with psych rock mischief and rockabilly devilry. Sea Sick Steve meets Th’ Legendary Shack Shakers is the best clue we have to describe the glorious infestation of the senses and imagination on offer, with hooks and melodies courtesy of a warped mix of B52’s and The Dirt Daubers.

I Love You (But I Can’t Stand Your Friends) rolls in with its pop ‘n’ rock charms next, tasty melodies cupping ears as vocals offer an opening romance with a sting in the tail. Both traits continue to entice and arouse ears as well as passions as the song strolls along with a grin on its face and rock flirtation in its heart. As its predecessors, the listener’s physical involvement is a quick success and equally drawn by the blues twang soaked seduction of The Devil’s Tail. Hips are soon swaying to its swerving body of grooves and alluring harmonies, ears there before them in submission to its sultry tempting before I Got The Feeling Someone’s Watching Me has the imagination engulfed in dark rock ‘n’ roll intrigue and salacious seduction. The outstanding song crawls over the senses, smooching with ears as the grainy tone of Big Boy Bloater’s vocals lays the seeds to dark deeds from unrelenting prying eyes whether in the noir lit streets of shadow thick towns, the bright romance of Parisian walkways, or more intimate surroundings.

From one immense highlight to another as the sexy swing of Luxury Hobo Blues takes centre stage with one wonderful nag of a tasty hook through a net of catchy rock ‘n’ roll. Potent harmonies and a web of sultry grooves only add to the riveting trap of a song before Robot Girlfriend offers futuristic love in a magnetic rockabilly/garage/blues rock shuffle. As all songs before it, even the dark crawls of It Came Out Of The Swamp and I Got The Feeling Someone’s Watching Me, it has a swing and vibrant energy which has the body tapping or indeed rocking in full allegiance, something All Things Considered decides to go against, though it too only see a sway take the body. Its soulful croon is wrapped in the smoulder of keys, that alone a simmering heat of temptation enhanced by the emotive cry of Big Boy Bloater and the spirals of melancholic yet invigorating guitar.

The album returns to tearing up the dance-floor with closer Not Cool Man, rhythms and riffs colluding to lay a canvas of energetic incitement whilst the bass flirts and grooves flare up above it. Rock ‘n’ roll to get close and personal with, the track perfectly concludes an album which has ears blissful and the body exhausted. Luxury Hobo is pure manna for the soul and if a better example of diversity loaded rock ‘n’ roll arrives this year, it will go down in history as a major classic, much as we suspect this treat from Big Boy Bloater & The Limits.

Luxury Hobo is released 11th March via Provogue/ Mascot Label Group through most online stores and @ http://www.mascotlabelgroup.com/big-boy-bloater-luxury-hobo-cd.html

http://www.bigboybloater.com   http://www.facebook.com/thebigboybloaterpage

Pete RingMaster 25/02/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

For more exploration of the independent and promotional services check out http://www.zykotika.com/

Delicate Holly – Love • Hate • Control

Delicate Holly Online Promo Shot_RingMaster Review

   Love • Hate • Control is a release which has you nodding in acknowledgement of its strong initial introduction but over time one which increasingly impresses whilst sparking the licking of lips at certain potent moments. Whether the debut EP from UK alternative rockers Delicate Holly has enough to shake the UK rock scene into attention time will tell but certainly it is a thoroughly enjoyable entrance from a band with the potential of a big future in their creative hands.

Hailing from Cheltenham, the seeds of the 2013 forming Delicate Holly began with a trio of school friends in vocalist/bassist Reuben Lovett and guitar/backing vocalists Alec Hopkins and Dougie Stokes. Already jamming together for a while, the three eventually met and enlisted drummer Toby Jones, with Delicate Holly soon blossoming in songwriting and songs, subsequently making a striking presence on the local scene in swift time. Since then the band has played numerous shows and festivals as well as supported bands such as The Subways and Coasts. Taking inspirations from the likes of The Clash, Arctic Monkeys, Royal Blood, and Nirvana into their own invention, Delicate Holly has increasingly lured attention which the release of Love • Hate • Control through Paper Label Records can only reinforce. As suggested it may not be the break-through proposition for the band but still in their early days, the band make a tasty nudge to their presence with the EP.

Delicate Holly Cover Artwork_RingMaster Review   First track is Full Body Cast, a song quickly revealing the potent union of guitar and vocal enterprise which fuels all songs. Coaxing around a rhythmic and melodic swing, feet and neck muscles are soon involved with the track’s flirtatious canter with the bass just as vocal in luring a swerve of hips and courting of the imagination. As it continues to persuade with its catchy character and the expressive and greatly alluring vocal delivery of Lovett, the song reveals no real big surprises but quite a few almost cheeky twists, a momentary hook almost echoing The B52s’ Rock Lobster one flavoursome moment. The song’s body is lean but busy, the bass of Lovett alone an increasing drama of ear courting adventure, and all elements across the song combined, it makes a strongly engaging first look at band and EP.

The following Jaws infuses even juicier melodic enterprise into a similarly cultured canvas of sound and invention but does lack the livelier spark of its predecessor. Nevertheless with its infectious guitar jangle and broody bassline, the song leaves ears content and thoughts thickly engaged before making way for the EP’s best offering, Rain-O-Rack. From the first caustic caress of guitar there is open attitude to the song, one which lines the choppy riffs, belligerent bass sound, and tenacious vocals. Simply the track has a snarl; a punk bred carriage and psychosis which lifts it above the rest with ease. There is a feel of Mojo Fury to the encounter too; a volatile air sparked by the unpredictability and aggressive flame which sizzles in ears through the song.

Lemon Man completes the line-up with its warm melodic seducing and temptation, as well as a healthy whisper of R.E.M. in its verses and bluesy tempting to its broader landscape. The track is a fiery but composed croon of rock ‘n’ roll revealing another flavour to the Delicate Holly songwriting and sound and, as the EP itself, growing bigger and more persuasive with every listen.

With the CD treating ears to a clutch of live tracks too, Love • Hate • Control is an accomplished and alluring start from the band and the anticipated beginnings of highly enjoyable times with them.

The Love • Hate • Control EP is available from August 17th via Paper Label Records.

RingMaster 17/08/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Mr. Strange – The Wonderful World Of Weird

Mr. Strange promo

Just to prove that insanity can be the sweetest potent seduction The Wonderful World Of Weird is here to exploit and uncover the darkest secrets of your mind whilst travelling the exotic and dangerous mental halls of its creator Mr. Strange. The former frontman of the UK’s greatest still to be truly discovered musical mutants The Shanklin Freak Show, though he is still healthily involved in the band, Mr. Strange voraciously stalks the senses and emotions with his fourth album. It is a release which soundtracks a bedlam of sound and adventure from a quite maniacal imagination.

The Isle Of Wight hailing songwriter/producer/vocalist/musician began his musical exploration as ‘The Mad DJ’ in 1998 before emerging as Mr. Strange in 2006. He founded circus rock/steampunk band The Shanklin Freak Show in 2003, guiding the band as songwriter and vocalist up until starting an extended break from performing live at the end of 2011. Alongside The Shanklin Freak Show albums including Act II – The Light Fantastic of 2009 and Welcome To The Show of 2011, a few other projects, and producing a couple of albums by Global Citizen, Mr. Strange unleashed his solo musical rapaciousness. Sounds From The Asylum came first to be followed in 2011 by the releases of The Fall and Freakshow, the last a 38 track retrospective album chronicling the songs that he wrote under the Shanklin Freak Show name  which included new, unreleased, and re-recorded or re-mixed tracks. Now the sanity puppeteer steps forward again with the magnificent temptation of The Wonderful World Of Weird, the finest Mr. Strange musical and mental examination yet.

With more flavours than a giant box of Jelly Bellies, the album is a dramatic and exhilarating flight through the darkest yet 555928_584429381594861_1695733989_nmagnetically and vibrantly compelling mind of the fictional character of its creator, employing everything and anything from industrial and steampunk to gothic rock and progressive metal, and that is just scratching the surface. With many of the tracks co-written with Gary ‘Stench’ Mason, The Shanklin Freak Show guitarist and provider of the majority of the guitar invention across the release, the album immediately lures in senses and imagination with the opening spoken narrative leading in the title track. It instantly intrigues as the scene setting premise strolls into the irresistible stomp of the song. Rhythms bounce around with a heavy mischievous gait matched by the electro and bass taunting whilst the guitar casts lines of sonic and melodic bait which is pure infectious toxicity. Best described as Dr. Jekyll meets ICP as early Marilyn Mansion helps Victor Frankenstein create aural life for them to toy with upon a set designed by Willy Wonka, the track is a delicious fascination and the first irresistible hint of the lunacy to come.

Creating the World is an expansion to the landscape previously crafted with a gentle psychedelic ambience washing the dawning scenery. It is a mesmeric, almost meditative soaring of harmonies and guitar elegance with rubs of dub and scratching teasing the riveting flight. The seducing continues right up to the doorway into the Psycho Surfing-A-Go-Go, one of the major pinnacles upon the album. Again as between numerous songs, the narrator lays down an invitation before the surf rock contagion drops its shoulders and swerves through the ear with irrepressible virulence. The grooves enslave the passions within seconds whilst the rhythmic dance only builds a cage for rapture to breed within as fire kissed keys add smouldering lures to the hot and epidemically addictive romp of sonic lava. The song is one of the best heard anywhere this year; a beach party in the mind of Hunter S. Thompson hosted by The Cramps and The Bomboras with Two Wounded Birds, B52s, and The Revillos adding extra entertainment.

From the dark sinister realm of The World’s Dark Heart, Mr. Strange lurks in the steampunk/industrial graced world of Metropolis 2984, a track which equally extends some classic metal and psyche sculpted imagination to its captivating persuasion. There is a swing and energy to the track which infects feet and emotions but equally an underlying dark tone beneath the celestially soaring harmonies which suggest more 1984 than Fritz Lang. Again the album and artist has the listener in a tight grip of pleasure and suasion, though it never slipped from the first breath of the album to be fair, which tightens with firstly Clockwork Man and explodes through Fire. The first of the two stalks the ears with the drama and theatre of a Tim Burton vision sculpted by the melodic ingenuity of Danny Elfman, though it has to be noted that every song despite the references sound like no one but Mr. Strange. This masterful manipulation of the senses and passions is soon left in the shade by its successor, the track another major peak in nothing but highs. The song is the closest to a Shanklin Freak Show tune that the album gets, its sexy tango pulsating mouth-watering foreplay for the beats and funk bred keys to add intoxicating spice to. There is something familiar to the hooks and stomp of the song aside from the earlier comparison, but it is indefinable and wholly galvanic.

Through the noir shadows of Don’t Stay (Where the Dead Ones Lay) with its jazz smooching funk lined temptation and the excellent gothic majesty of White Rabbit, the song reminding of The Damned at times, The Wonderful World Of Weird intensifies its resistance free toxin whilst the electro swing heart of Exile and the psychedelia soaked gothic tempting of Anti-Christ only spark further flames of lustful submission to the call of the release and its psychotic beauty. Every song is a wanton temptress in whatever guise and sonic clothing they frequent, and though admittedly hopes and expectations were of big things from Mr. Strange on past successes, the album left those assumptions insultingly short of the brilliant reality.

Completed by the classically crafted Journeys End, an enchanting epilogue if not to the levels of what came before, The Wonderful World Of Weird is pure certifiable aural manna. The CD version also has a track exclusive to its version, a very enjoyable cover of the Dr. Steel track We Decide. The able shows that there is only one Mr. Strange and his form of weird, one you can charter a sensational cruise through via our favourite album of the year, The Wonderful World Of Weird, that is if you are brave or eccentric enough.

http://www.mrstrangemedia.com/

10/10

RingMaster 28/11/2013

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard from

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Whisky Smile – The Eagle Has Landed

whiskey smile

    Whisky Smile is a mischievous lot, a band who likes to toy with your expectations and ears whilst treating them to some of the best heavyweight riffs and cantankerous rhythms you would wish to be accosted by. Their debut EP The Eagle Has Landed is a thumping confrontation which reaps the best essences of heavy rock and metal and sculpts them into a riotous brawl of contagious enterprise and that wicked fun. It is certainly not a release stretching existing boundaries but for thrills, spills, and downright devilment you could not wish for a better companion.

Hailing from Penrith, Western Sydney, Whisky Smile is a quintet on the march, a band with bar room fumes rising above their heads and passionate rock ‘n roll oozing from every inventive pore. Their sound is uncompromising, hard, and the instigator of sonic brawls which leave you invigorated and ready to take on all-comers, though equally at times it just ignites the biggest grin in the best possible way to have you wholly defenceless to their Aussie charm.

Self-released, The Eagle Has Landed was recorded at BearClaw Productions with the duo Chris Blancato and Jono Peters. 485498_594197923933295_314993657_nConsisting of five tracks which snarl at and ravage the passions with irresistible rhythmic incitement, air stretching grooves, and scarring riffs, it is the kind of release which only makes you hungrier minute by minute and never allows a lull in the intensity and pleasure to play for one second, though the very first breath of the release did certainly the first time leave doubts. As mentioned Whisky Smile is a band which seemingly likes to tease and the opening of Cheap And Easy certainly does that even if maybe it was not the band’s intent, only they know. The start of the first song is a progressively inspired piece of music which suggests we are entering into another post-hardcore effort, and though that is not a bad thing the intro is rather uninspiring. We soon learn to know better and make no assumptions with this band as mountainous rhythms enter to herald the start of a brewing intensity and epic laced melodic exploits. This is still not the truth of it though and it is not until the band groups all its riffs into a chug fest ridden by the wonderful grizzly vocal exploits of Mick Palmer that clarity is achieved and emotions lifted to new heights. His lyrical description of the song’s central character never fails to raise a chuckle and hold attention as equally riveting grooves wind around the senses from guitarist Glen Soper, their sonic spines gripping deep whilst the riffs of rhythm guitarist Nathan ‘Skitz’ Gittoes carnivorously devour any remaining doubts. The track is an impressive introduction to the band, but one soon matched by the following provocations.

Ernie Dingo’s Got My Baby instantly slaps its sinews on the ear as sonic flames and dark bass tones from Kurt Wilson give no time for a breath of air to be swallowed. Assumingly inspired by Ernie Dingo, an Indigenous Australian actor who was accused of having affairs in a few controversies, the track rumbles along with a hard rock urgency and uncomplicated but potently efficient riffs  whilst the rhythms of drummer Gareth Jones are an intensive instigator of greedy relish as they steer  the song through the ear. As blues lit guitar fire graces the surface of the song towards its anthemic climax, the track raises another notch to secure its place to the fore of the EP alongside its predecessor, but it is a busy place as right after A Shallow Grave stakes out its pitch too. There is only one thing you can say about the song as a description, Motorhead like. It is a dirty insatiable slab of rock ‘n’ roll, vocals taking on a grittier Lemmy like grazing and riffs burning the flesh of ear and body. With grooves that dance with a virulently tempting swagger through it all and an attitude that will not take no as a reply to its rugged enticement, the song is a towering treat, one rife with sonic seduction and wonderfully bad aural behaviour.

     Green Eagle also stares down on the listener from the loftiest heights, sending shards of acidic sonics and rabid rhythmic bombs cascading down on to the senses whilst the terse riffs soften up the ear for easy access. It is another piece of aggressive stimulation leaving only the call for more in the passions.

It has to be said that the closing song took us by surprise but emerges as maybe the biggest treat of the release and that is no detriment to the rest of the glorious assaults. The track is a version of the B-52s classic Rock Lobster and it is up there with one of the best covers ever. The band make it their own by using all the irrepressible essences of the original and twisting them within a stunning explosion of incendiary rock and metal passion. Whisky Smile retain all the rascality from its creators too but have taken it into devil mode whilst simultaneously creating an intense and seriously crafted triumph. It is a brilliant piece of thought and interpretation complete with a loudly announced breakdown which is any head bangers dream.

    The Eagle Has Landed is just exhilarating and the start of something major for Whisky Smile hopefully. Ok the EP musically makes no real demands on breaking the back of originality but when it sounds as exciting and galvanic, let alone superbly crafted, as this there are no complaints here.

https://www.facebook.com/whiskysmile

9/10

RingMaster 24/07/2013

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard from

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Trioxin Cherry: Hell To Pay EP

Trioxin Cherry

The Hell To Pay EP is a release to have every graveyard rocking and monster, mythical or real, adopting as their personal soundtrack. It is a malevolent infestation of the senses leading to a full consumption of the heart whilst igniting a furnace of passion with its horror punk glories. The release comes from Nottingham, UK band Trioxin Cherry, a band made up by a trio of insatiable ghouls who grab your soul with irresistible hooks and venom drenched riffs born of the darkest pit of punk, psychobilly, and garage. Raw and hungry, band and EP just leave one a carcass of blissful satisfaction.

Consisting of guitarist/vocalist Rebecca Campbell, bassist/vocalist Pete Grady, and Ryan Murphy on drums, Trioxin Cherry go for coverthe jugular from the very first second of Hell To Pay and do not let go until they have chewed and ripped a hole out of the throat by last snarling note of the release. The title track is the first confrontation and without concern unleashes a flesh scorching groove and flurry of rising rhythmic aggression. The initial persistent hook continues as the bass riffs of Grady leers menacingly from within the bruising guitar scraping and forceful beats of Murphy. Campbell all the while is lighting up the air with her potent vocals and sounding like an English Fay Fife , front lady of Rezillos/Revillos; the first of those bands also being reminded of as the psychobilly drenched track exhilarates the senses. It is a riotous encounter brought with bruising intensity and superbly crafted intrigue conjured by skill and imagination.

The terrific start is flowed up by the equally compelling Children Of The Damned, a track with an enticing throaty bass lure and the sultry vocals of Campbell. Well into its stride the track unleashes a bassline which is a very close cousin to that from The B52’s track Rock Lobster. It is a mischievous but very pleasing addition to a song which leaves one drooling over its wanton presence. Vocally Campbell this time has an attitude and tone which brings to mind Lesley Woods of eighties band Au Pairs, her delivery melodic but with a bite which intimidates beautifully.

Two songs in and the release has already won the heart over to be honest, and with following triumphs in Bad Company and Sideshow Molly leaving their own distinct infection to douse the passions in further thrills, one can only wax lyrical about the release. The first of the two rising from a subdued yet threatening prowling stomp to an antagonistic storm of raucous group harmonies and vocal spite thrust on a caustic onslaught of energy, raises the temperature further, the almost anthemic brawling crescendos wonderfully acidic on the ear. The other song opens with a garage punk breath and that dark texture The Cramps spawn so long ago soaking the bass and the backing vocals of Grady. It is a contagious Lycan themed rumble with a surf wind whipping up extra wantonness to the already virulent entrapment at play.

The release closes with yet another distinct rage of sound, the band continually able to offer a different flavour and texture to every aural recip. Hit Me is a tempest of punk n roll, a compelling rockabilly growl from the bass joined by a fire of punk aggression in sound and attitude with Campbell bring a rage born of Polystyrene of X-Ray Spex. It is a quarrelling slab of contention and insatiable noise and quite delicious.

If any of the genres or artists mention make things happen which your mother would not like to know about then the Hell To Pay EP and especially Trioxin Cherry  is a must have treat to devour with greed. The release is an eclectically spiced joy and without doubt, one of the highlights of the year. Watch out for band and release on The Bone Orchard podcast.

https://www.facebook.com/trioxincherry

RingMaster 05/12/2012

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