Jesu – Everyday I Get Closer To The Light From Which I Came

JESU_AREC027_FRONT

     Everyday I Get Closer To The Light From Which I Came, the new album from Jesu has been over two years In the making, partly for the passionate intent and adventure explored upon it and equally for the creative vehicles band main man Justin K Broadrick has been involved with. As always the musician has been heavily engaged with numerous projects since the release of previous album Ascension, most notably with the reunion of Godflesh as well as masterminding remixes for the likes of Mogwai and Cult Of Luna. The new album reveals that Broadrick has been no slouch with his own solo project and its evolution though, the Avalanche released Everyday I Get Closer To The Light From Which I Came seemingly with a fresh appetite for the exploration of even darker intensive emotive depths but transferring that somber flight into a magnetically reassuring and potently hued closer to home provocation which initiates self-appraisal and reflective thought in experiences and shadowed corners of the psyche.

The dark adventure starts with Homesick, a rapaciously draining expanse soaked in melancholic intensity, where from within gnawing away behind the melodic temptation, riffs soak the ear and thoughts in drone spawned predation. It is an enthralling mix of raw yet measured rabidity and shoegaze mesmerism which intimidates and seduces simultaneously whilst its consuming breath ridden by the mellow coated vocals of Broadrick, permeates every pore of thought and imagination. As across the whole album there is plenty going on within the riveting textures and depths of the song; a wealth of open shadows and secretive light which unveil their presence with further ventures through the magnificent opener.

Comforter is a thick almost tempestuous flame of ethereal enslavement, though with hungry intensity and a snarling touch to its meditative brawl of warmth. Like its predecessor the track is an evolving exploration with a shifting emotional narrative and sirenesque presence, and at times as menacing within its smouldering discord wrapped ingenuity. The invention of the track is startling and in many ways such its uncompromising twists and ideas should not flow as magnificently and poetically as it does. As the track takes the mind deep into its provocative crevices the suggestion that this is the finest Jesu moment to date is loud and as the album continues to impress it is hard to raise much in the way of argument.

The moody resonating bass croon and metronomic beats which open up Everyday immediately seduce, a deepening of that hook secured with the post punk seeded guitar sonic colouring which adds its bewitching voice soon after to the wonderfully repetitive stroll of the rhythmic inducement. It is more of a stalking really which vocals and guitar taunt and skirt with their My Bloody Valentine/Joy Division like acidic beauty. It is a masterful entrapment for the passions with every hue and flavour of bait needed to solicit the imagination and ardour.

Exceeding seventeen minutes in length, The Great Leveller is an epic passage in its own right within the colossal emotional examination of Everyday I Get Closer To The Light From Which I Came. Also featuring the bewitching skills of Nicola Manzan who provides a powerful stringed narrative across what seems a close and personal exploration for Broadrick, the orchestral guided evocation of emotionally immersive tides is a breath-taking landscape and sludge entrenched journey which only rewards as in a sense it suffocates the mind and soul into deep thought and investigation. The song is arguably overlong though it feels like its presence is far less than it actually is, but that is down to personal reactions rather than the track labouring at any point, a preference which would have conversely preferred Homesick to have stayed around longer. The extensive track is ultimately a masterful experience, in craft and effect which only elevates the album to another exhausting plateau of satisfaction.

Closing with the entrancing yet menacing Grey Is The Colour, another irresistible search of thoughts and emotions, Everyday I Get Closer To The Light From Which I Came is a sensational encounter which only time and numerous travels fully reveals all its remarkable depths and incitement. Broadrick maybe be back with Godflesh to stir up the psyche but right now there is here a more eager appetite for Jesu.

https://www.facebook.com/pages/Justin-K-Broadrick/

9/10

RingMaster 23/09/2013

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The Inner Road – Ascension

Ascension promo

Taking the listener on a compelling and expansive journey through soundscapes which evoke and provoke thought and imagination, Ascension the new album from The Inner Road, is a vibrant and classy adventure which incites personal invention and interpretation to its narrative whilst equally creatively directing thoughts into a proposed direction. It is an enveloping kaleidoscope of instrumental progressive rock with each movement and moment drenched in a full blaze of sonic colour and inspirational craft from its creators for the deepest pleasure.

The Inner Road is a project founded by keyboardist/multi-instrumentalist/ songwriter/producer Steve Gresswell as an outlet for

Steve Gresswell

Steve Gresswell

his more symphonic style of  instrumental progressive rock, sounds and ideas which do not find a place within the creativity of his other band Coalition. The Inner Road also finds Gresswell collaborating with other musicians who bring something special to fit the need of the music. 2011 saw the release of debut album Visions, a record made with renowned guitarist Phil Braithwaite which was met with strong acclaim, and here for Ascension the musician has teamed up with one of the UK’s finest guitarists and rock songwriters to emerge in recent years, Jay Parmar. Fresh from the release of his own stunning album Circle of Fire via Steve Vai’s Digital Nations label, Parmar brings a style to the new album which sets tracks on fire with passion and evocative invention, his striking style drawing out the same hunger as inspired by his previous solo work for this album As well as his own releases and Ascension, the guitarist is also recording the new album from Exorcism featuring Csaba Zvekan and Joop De Rooij (both also in Ravenlord) as well as again joining up with Zvekan in new band D.O. Messiah, showing the appeal and impressive reputation Parmar has earned over recent years, which will only grow further when, after being invited by Gresswell, he joins Coalition who record their new album later this year.

Ascension wastes no second of its inventive presence to light up the senses and thoughts with full and extensive atmospheres, their embrace consistently fuelled by the sonic skill and grace of Parmar’s melodic incisions and alchemy; sounds and imagination which comes more often than not with a breath and caress of eastern influences and suggestion within an almost exhausting creative temptation. Set alongside the equally captivating and warmly invasive keyboard enterprise and ingenuity of Gresswell  the union makes for a release which leaves visual and emotional alchemy in its enthralling wake.

Jay Parmar

Jay Parmar

The title track opens up the adventure, a piano aiding a sun of melodic enticing to introduce the first steps on the departure into the vast realms of the album. Its company comes from crunchy riffs slowly bringing their voice to the brewing unveiling of this beckoning expansive landscape. With the sounds of both musicians coming together to sculpt the view there is a sense of depth and long passage ahead in the exploration of the immediately majestic world. The song appears as a travelogue of textures and sonic exhilaration instantly in league with the wonderful orchestral seduction at work , and their unity finding itself in tandem with the melodic weaves and wash already igniting the passions. As in all songs the music is like a ‘travel guide’, a provocateur to beauteous scenery and imagination whether visual or reflectively emotive, an investigation which is enjoyed physically and imaginatively.

From the immense opener the album takes flight through The Steel Sky; sinewy almost cold riffs from guitar and bass guiding the listener through shadowed clouds and imposing structures to find the sonic rays of light and melodic coating of sun brought from the keys and the stunning persuasive guitar commentary. It is then followed by the equally powerful Two Worlds Two Tomorrows, the track seemingly the sister to its predecessor as deeper in to the heart of the emotive terrain we go. Every song within the album feels connected to what came before and follows, for a fulfilling and ear widening melodic peregrination.

The smouldering and sizzling sonic traverse of Altered Reality and the provocative Troubled Memories step forward next to raise the temperature further. The first has fire to its intensity and creative sonic discharge whilst ensuring a continually evolving surprise in its presence with a compelling regal mid-section with potent and sirenesque strings, their orchestral embrace stepping in to temper the heated insistence of Parmar and set celestial cascades of melodic glory falling upon the ear, whilst the second is a dazzling candescent of melodic and harmonic craft leaving again only rising emotion towards its enthrallment

The biggest highlights of the thrilling album come with the final three tracks starting with A Fleeting Dream, a piece which triggers an unbridled flood of thoughts and ideas with furnace bright melodies and descriptive paint box rich sonic colouring. Parmar wrings out every emotive drop of incitement with his playing whilst the keys of Gresswell especially when he flows through a stunning sea of floral melodic expression which reminds of Dave Greenfield at his best, inciting the fullest ardour for what is the best track on the album. The outstanding and riveting The Awakening has its say on the final choice of top dog though with its initial colonial call moving aside for another poetic and provocative voyage of shifting gait and imagination whilst the closing Flight through Eternity simply lures the last of any passion still sheltering out with its strongest Eastern sultriness and inflamed closing sunset.

Ascension is an excellent and continually giving album, a release which just gets better and more potent with each travel of its ambient hot pilgrimage. The Inner Road has produced a release which is not only progressive/ instrumental rock at its best but melodic enterprise of any description.

http://www.inner-road.com/

https://www.facebook.com/pages/Steve-Gresswell/442768909088975

https://www.facebook.com/jayparmar

9/10

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