MPG (Mike Paradine Group) – Bayonne, NJ

MPG_RingMaster Review

Having stomped around and downed a brew or three to the debut Mike Paradine Group album, Death in The Family around four years ago, there was no disguising the anticipation waiting to check out its successor Bayonne, NJ after its recent release. Thanks to the man himself, we have got our eager teeth into Mike Paradine’s second solo album, and true to say expectations were not let down in any size or form.

Bayonne bred Paradine is probably better known as drummer and songwriter in New Jersey based metal band ArticFlame, the band he founded after leaving heavy metallers Balistik Kick, where he had been a member for thirteen years, in disillusion at its “negativity and inactivity”. Since emerging, Paradine and ArticFlame have released to date a quartet of increasingly acclaimed albums whilst sharing stages with the likes of W.A.S.P., Manowar, Savatage, Quiet Riot and many others.

Also the author of King of Toys, a highly praised horror/poetry book about a 5 year old boy who is abused by his drug addled parents and after a horrible episode of abuse, sees his broken down toys come to life and avenge the event, Paradine unveiled his debut solo album Death In The Family in 2012. It was built on a collection of personal songs lyrically seeded in themes such as an on-going feud with certain family members, growing up in the late 70’s, early 80’s in Bayonne, 9/11, and his battle with cancer as a 13 year old, as well as more humour fuelled adventures. The album was a heart delivered and felt proposition of rousing emotion and rock ‘n’ roll which its successor emulates with similarly intimate tracks based on experiences, people, and life in the home city where he still resides. Where it Bayonne, NJ differs to the first album is in its sound. Whereas Death In The Family revelled in numerous styles across heavy and hard rock to varied metal exploits, the second full-length sees the band stick solely to the hard rock sound which Paradine started his musical life playing. As the release soon shows though, it does not prevent songs from offering a broad variety of sound and enterprise, or from sparking the same depth of pleasure as the previous encounter.

art_RingMaster ReviewWith Paradine writing the lyrics, melodies and playing the drums across the majority of the album and Allen Carescia writing the music, playing guitar/bass, and producing, Bayonne, NJ quickly grips ears and attention with opener Deadbeat Dad. Straight away there is a grouchy attitude and muscular intent to the song’s rock ‘n’ roll, guitars sharing irritable riffs as rhythms firmly jab behind the growling tones of Paradine. Direct and pulling no punches, the song is a raw and potent slab of confrontational rock ‘n’ roll backed as strongly by the similarly toned Heaven Would Be Hell for Me. Almost predatory in its stroll and sonic belligerence, the song is east to be drawn to but truly comes alive when harmonies and melodic flames dynamically erupt to leave an already keen appetite greedier.

In the first MPG album, a host of vocalists featured across its songs but for Bayonne, NJ Paradine and, as in the third track, fellow ArticFlame Michael Clayton Moore take turns driving tracks. Fair to say there is a different spark and dynamic at play with Clayton Moore’s recognisable tones; tracks given another rich hue to tempt with, a third emerging when both vocalists unite their contrasting styles for an anthemic lure again as here. In tandem with that, Paradine’s rhythms are alone as thick a tempting in the song as too the sultrily spiced guitar adventure brewing within its boisterous persuasion.

Riot at the Public House stirs up body and emotions in similar style and fashion next, the aggressive attitude of the opener returning to line the invitation of hooks and grooves and colour the prowl of the bass. Clayton Moore again leads the excellent rousing of body and spirit, embracing the great contrast between both men’s tones vocals, though as good as it all is, things leap up another gear, vocally and musically, in Unforgotten Highway. The song is spellbinding as melodic caresses and emotive shadows cradle the superb vocals and emotional expression of Clayton Moor. As soon found, it is an provocative incitement which stays with thoughts long after it leaves ears, its melodies alone as lingering as the potency of the vocals and the subtle percussive touch of Paradine.

Bayonne is potently delivered to ears and imagination through Zombietown next, its barren spirit and decaying landscape enjoyably tempered by the honky-tonk piano/keys spawned shuffle uniting with Paradine’s accusing delivery and the agitated nature of the sounds around him. Showing yet one more strain of the varied flavouring to the album, the striking proposal makes way for another in the funk infested rock ‘n’ roll of Dancing Bag of Bones. There is a Cooper-esque feel to the song as it sizzles in sonic endeavour and spicy enticement, flirting and twisting like its protagonist in ears before leaving heftily satisfied emotions in the masterful hands of Little Darling. A superb cover of the Thin Lizzy classic, it quickly revels in Paradine’s undisguised passion for the Irish rockers, an essence enjoyably scenting many songs within the album, whilst showing its own adventurous touches in thrilling tribute to the legends.

Obviously inspired by that aforementioned book of Paradine, King of Toys simmers in and seduces ears soon after, its melodies an emotive suggestiveness within the music of this time Mike Marino. Keys and guitars court each other’s respective elegance and fiery drama as an array of vocal textures bring the tale to the imagination. More of a grower than other tracks, it too leaves a lingering and enjoyable mark before the old school air of Taking on all the World blazes away with an impassioned weave of melodic acidity and blues infested invention. Without quite sparking the same fire as numerous others on the release, it still has ears enthralled and a wish for more vocal before the album closes on the twin treats of Hey Mama, another irresistible cover of this time The Godz track, and finally Daddys Little Girl. Each recorded separately to the rest of the album, the first features Dave Manheimer and Kilroy on guitar with “Ghost” Meehan on bass alongside Paradine whilst the closer is an emotive ballad with drummer Mike Young backing Clayton Moore who wrote the, yes “sappy” but richly enjoyable song.

Increasingly impressive, Bayonne, NJ is a rock ‘n’ roll treat so easy to get unavoidably involved in, and as the first MPG release, a proposition which just makes an appetite for more as lively as the pleasure found within it.

Bayonne, NJ is out now through http://www.mikeparadine.com/

https://www.facebook.com/mpgrocks/

Pete RingMaster 3/02/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Shotgun Justice – State Of Desolation

SJ_RingMaster Review

State Of Desolation is the debut album from German heavy metallers Shotgun Justice, a band which for the past decade has seemingly become a potent live force in their homeland. That is easy to understand given the potential to explode the songs making up their first full-length have, though it is a spark that is frustratingly unrealised across much of State Of Desolation. Nevertheless the album is an intriguing proposal which, without ever lighting that fire, keeps drawing ears back with its intriguing array of flavours and to see if so far reserved but satisfied reactions can change.

Formed in 2003 by drummer Tobias Groß and guitarist Erik Dembke, Shotgun Justice’s sound is bred in old school heavy metal but as keen to infuse spices from varied essences from thrash to hard rock into its exploits. As shown by State Of Desolation, at times it is a richly potent mix and in other moments missing the mark, certainly for personal tastes, but it is an adventure which lures intriguingly keen ears.

With vocalist Marco Kräft, bassist Tom Schubert, and guitarist Kai Brennecke alongside Groß and Dembke, Shotgun Justice start that adventure in their album with Proclamation Of War; a portentous instrumental with vocal samples setting the theme before Blood For Blood takes hold of ears with its antagonistic riffs and rhythmic swipes; them all carrying an edge of intimidation. The entrance of Kräft vocals sparks some agreeable hooks as the song relaxes its menace a touch, though bass and drums still prowl with force around the unspectacular yet inviting hard rock/metal body of the song. It is a strong start to the album elevated by some inventive twists and turns exposing their bait later into the encounter.

ShotgunJustice-StateOfDesolation-frontover_RingMaster ReviewThe following Blessed With Fire similarly has all the right ingredients to grab attention but not the last essence to leap into loftier success though with its rhythmic rumble and growling riffs, there is no inclination to pass it by before its end. A touch of ArcticFlame frequents the song and reappears in its successor Nothing Left To Fear, a predatory proposal of a song with attitude to its courting of ears and fire in its sonic belly, each additionally blessed with some deliciously spicy grooves. The track soon outshines its predecessors; its thrash meets classic metal nature an instinctive incitement for involvement before Nemesis (A Global Killer) offers its power fuelled balladry for easy consumption. Schubert’s bass is a great dark rumble in the song’s lining whilst Kräft leans on his vocal strengths to portray the emotive narrative though sadly the addition of operatic female just does not work for these ears at all.

The Scales Of Justice wraps ears in its fine suggestive sounds next, sparking ears and thoughts alike with its percussive lures and wiry guitar persuasion, though harmonies in the background lay less enjoyably on ears. It is a potent hint for the imagination though leading right into the rawer jaws of Head Full Of Bullets. Teasing with its low key but provocative entrance, the song is soon charging with thrash spawned nostrils flared as rhythms smacking its robust flank. At its centre a blues induced calm comes over the track to further engage an already keen appetite for the song, its previously urgent charge now another predatory stalking beneath an anthemic vocal call.

Things get more adventurous and unpredictable from hereon in on the album, and equally more fascinating and tempting. Firstly Forsaken steps forward with a tapestry of cosmopolitan rhythms aligned to a sultry Asian vocal lure, the bass walking around them with a brooding tone to its strings. It is a great start which continues as guitars spin their exotic web and vocals find new flavour to their delivery if also a little bit of waywardness in trying to compliment the impressing sounds around them. As the track continues to expand its theatre and thrills it takes best track honours with ease.

The heavier bones and weight of Harvest The Storm takes over to explore its own progressively natured trail of vocal diversity and tenaciously inflamed imagination. At times an aggressive torrent of provocation and in others turns an evocative melody thick calm, the song is a compelling tempest which as its predecessor, reveals a potential and boldness suggesting greater things ahead that is missing in the earlier part of the album.

Ending with its similarly impacting title track, it is fair to say that State Of Desolation is a volatile proposition in its strengths and qualities but a release which certainly across its final quartet of songs leaves a great taste in ears and enjoyment. Though over a decade as a band, Shotgun Justice still feel like a work in progress but as suggested by Forsaken alone, moving in the right direction.

State Of Desolation is out now via Kernkraftritter Records.

http://www.shotgunjustice.de/   https://www.facebook.com/shotgunjusticegermany

Pete RingMaster 27/01/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Starsoup – Bazaar Of Wonders

band

An adventure which coaxes emotions and imagination into expanding its evocative narratives, Bazaar of Wonders the debut album from Russian progressive rock band Starsoup is a richly engaging and intriguing encounter. It is a release which maybe does not ignite a burning fire in the passions but certainly leaves them smouldering with an appetite to explore enthusiastically the excellently crafted and skilfully presented songs. The album is an enticing proposition, a colourful weave of heavy metal and progressive invention merged with additional varied flavours, a mix which captivates from start to finish.

Started at the tail end of 2011, Starsoup is the studio project of vocalist/guitarist Alexey Markov (Shadow Host, Distant Sun) who has keyboardist Andrew Gryaznov (Timesquare) alongside him. Their album, which evolved around the compositional foundation of a quartet of songs written and melodically composed during Markov’s time in the band Crime Of Passion where he was the vocalist and Gryaznov played keys, took over a year to emerge as other projects and the involvement and time of guests upon the release extended its ‘birth’. With a presence and sound which sparks thoughts of a diversity of bands from the likes of Dream Theater, ArcticFlame, and Stone Sour to Rush, Fates Warning, and Avenged Sevenfold, the album is a striking declaration of strong impressive vocals and melodic exploration within a senses inciting keys sculpted grandeur.

The Moscow duo open the Sublimity Records released album with the band’s first single Angels, one of the previously mentioned coverfour songs which bred the album and as the others re-recorded and evolved for the album. With the impressive piano skills of Gryaznov making an emotive invitation, guitars and bass soon ignite the air around a firm and commanding rhythmic frame from by Alexander Vetkhov who provides drums and percussion across the whole of Bazaar of Wonders. As the strong and expressive vocals of Markov start unveiling the lyrical narrative, his delivery across the whole of the album diverse and potent, the track mixes up a power ballad like stance brewed with a feisty energy. It is a welcomingly introduction to the album and a clear portent of things to come, keys and vocals the brightest beacons within creative songwriting and striking musicianship across all aspects.

The following Ain’t No Superman confidently idles in with a jazz funk like swagger, its heat accelerated by melodic guitar flames. Into its stride the song is a more straight forward heavy rock encounter but one with a wealth of additives which keeps it unpredictable and intriguing, if less successful than its predecessor. Nevertheless there is plenty for the ears to get excited by, as also with Try. An acoustic guitar and piano resourcefulness wraps the ears before Markov fills the ballad with his fine voice backed with good harmonies. As it walks into its fullest height there like in all songs, is a fire in its belly which empowers the passionate bursts which erupt from within the melodic canvas. If aggression is the want the song, and ultimately the album are unlikely to suffice but for melodically spawned emotive adventures the release is a refreshing offering.

Both Cradle of War and Rumors of Better Life continue the ballad seeded attack, though the first of the pair from its elegant first third with a glorious flame of saxophone to its breath explodes into an intensive and muscular persuasion which constantly flirts with the passions throughout its impressive venture. Its successor is a mesmeric sunset of seductive melodies and evocative charm, a caressing wash of beauty which without enflaming emotions feeds them and thoughts skilfully.

The album’s best track Past Bites bruises the air with a fine array of sinewy riffs and crisp rhythms, a Metallica edge and essence seeping into the boisterous elements whilst again inventiveness fuels the triumph of the track and the intense hunger for its presence. It is the pinnacle of the release which makes the likes of the following The City and the Stars and Voices of the Wind seem pale in their balladry, though both again are impressively crafted. Between them though there is the excellent instrumental Bazaar, a piece of composing and realisation incendiary to imagination and emotions brought with a sonic mastery  which simply seduces from start to finish; guitar, keys, and bass exceptional provocateurs in its mystique clad temptation.

The closing trio of songs, Road to Sunset with its great sultry sax calls and anthemic vocal mixes, the heavy metal bred Perfect Loser, and the closing piano conjured instrumental Rain in the Desert ensures the album ends on an enterprising and enjoyable stance, each individual and additional lures to a fine album. As said earlier, Bazaar of Wonders does not leave fires raging in the passions but certainly makes Starsoup worthy of close attention.

https://www.facebook.com/Starsoup

7.5/10

RingMaster 08/11/2013

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Kill Ritual: The Serpentine Ritual

One word speared thoughts as the debut album of US thrashers Kill Ritual unleashed its barrage of old school modern breathing sounds, exceptional. The Serpentine Ritual is outstanding, a release which just lights up the heart and captivates the senses as it chews on them with rabid glee. It is an adventurous album with no desires to break down new realms but just twists steadfast essences into something unique and thrilling to the band.

Kill Ritual formed in 2010 with Steve Rice and Wayne DeVecchi, ex-Imagika guitarist and drummer respectively, continuing the music they had began working on before the demise of their former band. Recruiting former Eldritch guitarist Roberto Proietti, former Dark Angel bassist Danyael Williams, and SF Bay Area vocalist Josh Gibson, the quintet began writing and working on their debut. The result a thrash driven sound with plenty of progressive and classic essences which combined makes The Serpentine Ritual released through Scarlet Records, one of the most enjoyable albums this year. It is a riotous beast of a record which recognises its target and unleashes slabs of essential and enterprising rock music to ensure capture. Imagine a fusion of Testament, Anthrax, Exodus, and Arcticflame and you get a measure of the hungry pleasure ready to explore upon the ear.

Produced by Steven Rice and Andy La Rocque, the album conquers appreciation immediately with the brilliant opening title track. The Serpentine Ritual is a song which stands there snarling and intimidating from its opening seconds, the scorched guitar spiral only reinforcing the muscular fire about to erupt. Once from its reins the track ravishes the senses with growling basslines, writhing and scything riffs, and a sonic whipping which just hits every sweet spot. The vocals of Gibson are instantly impressive and as track and album progress his stature just grows and grows. Beside his great delivery and range the predatory darker toned vocals add that extra shadow and devil to proceedings in the same way the heavy aggressive rhythms and bass stalk alongside the soaring guitar sonics and melodic invention. With a groove to seduce any resistance the song is a classic, arguably best thrash track this year.

The following Torn Down and Time TO Kill stand strong alongside the staggering starter, both in their distinct shapes, the first a classic bombardment of perfectly crafted venom and musicianship not to mention unbridled energy and the second a contagion of crippling rhythms and heart exploiting riffs. They are both songs which if they do not grab full allegiance suggests maybe thrash metal is not for you, such their irrepressible and irresistible classic presences.

Every song on the album is a boisterous and winning engagement, their towering aggression and intent an unstoppable infection of instinctive invention and domination brought through dazzling skills within energetic songwriting and sound, as ever though some tracks do rise above others for an individual though it is quite marginal to be honest. Tracks like Ambush and Cold Hard Floor alongside the opener ignite bigger fires of passion within compared to others. The first of the pair is a raw and bruising brute of a song where the band exposes extra malice and violence in their music, from the coarser delivery of Gibson to the merciless rhythms of DeVecchi and the destructive riffs. The latter song is a magnetic brew of classic rock n roll, a devil dance of majestic guitar play from Rice and Proietti completed by a brilliant guest solo from Andy La Rocque. Gibson again stretches his range to greater and skilled expanses, he is destined to greatness.

The thumping onslaught that is The Day The World Dies and the hardcore/classic metal tinged Prisoner Of The Flesh equally match those great heights with their combative breaths and antagonistic riff and rhythmic imagination. They again show the strength of variety from band and release as well as the extreme skills of each individual perfectly harnessed with clarity into an unrelenting stunning consumption.

The Serpentine Ritual is as mentioned at the start exceptional, a release drawing on established wells and through sonic alchemy producing music which is as fresh and refreshing as found anywhere in the genre and metal as a whole. The Kill Ritual has begun, in band and musical destiny.

http://www.killritual.com

RingMaster 30/10/2012

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

ArcticFlame: Shake The Earth

After his impressive debut solo album Death In The Family earlier in the year, songwriter/drummer Mike Paradine returns with his ‘day job’ ArcticFlame and its unleashing of storming new album Shake The Earth. The album is the fourth full length release from the band and is a deeply impressive and invigorating explosion of classic and power metal brought with a distinct and rich imagination.

It has to be said such was the great pleasure brought by The Mike Paradine Group and their aforementioned album, which found acclaim and strong media response including regularly play on the likes of The Bone Orchard podcast from The Reputation Radio Show, that there was a heightened anticipation for the next release from the New Jersey quintet which Paradine founded in 2001. The album feeds those expectations and more with ten majestic slices of metal to captivate and fire up any rock and metal heart. Wonderfully eclectic yet soaked in the classic essences of metal throughout it is a release which concretes the reputation of ArcticFlame as one of the most accomplished and essential bands around.

From those early times when Paradine, upon leaving previous band Balistik Kick, set about forming a band influenced by the traditional metal of Iron Maiden, Judas Priest and Motorhead, ArcticFlame has been on a constant rise. From their first ever gig supporting Thin Lizzy, shared stages with bands such as Motorhead, Overkill, Helloween, WASP, and their well received EP of 2005 through their debut album Primeval Aggressor of 2006 and its successor Declaration of 2008, the band has risen higher and grown stronger stage by stage. Unexpected changes in 2010 could not make an obstacle for the band for long as the new line-up of Paradine, new vocalist Michael Clayton Moore, guitarist Sebastian Garcia, and returning original bassist Jeff Scott, emerged stronger and more determined. 2011 saw Alex Schuster join their ranks as second guitarist and the release of third album Guardian At The Gate which marked the band as one of the most powerful and enthralling melodic metal bands around.

Shake The Earth not only builds on what came before but throws the band up with the giants of the genre, their incendiary sounds and sharp imagination a sonic explosion of skill and passion. The album is a brew of multiple flavours which sets it apart from similar styled releases. Their melodic prowess again runs as a controlled riot throughout whilst the generated energies are as rampant and hungry as any offering anywhere. These strengths are fused with an array of grooves and disharmonies compound the full ignition of the passions, their discordant breath an inspired counter to the scorching and inventive melodies which burn from within every song.

The opener Man Made Man instantly piques interest with its electrified strokes across the ear, their sparks slowly blistering the air whilst heralding the following predatory stomp of badgering riffs and heavily jabbing rhythms. The vocals of Clayton Moore as expected are immense proving he is one of the best metal vocalists around and immersed in the surging guitars sounds, a wonderfully snarling bass from Scott, plus the unmissable power and mighty punches from Paradine, it all combines to show the band is pushing new heights. It is a thunderous start with a song which will rile the passions for fans across the years.

Two Sides Of The Bullet and Last Chance continue the high octane adrenaline riling enjoyment. The first is a pulse racing bruise of a track which fires up any passions still only simmering from the opener whilst the second simply enflames the soul with its abrasive intensity and incisive melodic dazzle. Both offer rock n roll at its best, neither arguably trying to break down boundaries but simply conjuring the freshest most majestic sounds from existing palettes.

The punk rawness of Call In The Priest as it rampages like a bull increases the heart rate whilst songs like Rider Of The Headless Horseman and the excellent Run To Beat The Devil only leave raptures with their melodic charms and insatiable hearts. The last of these three especially shows how the band, their craft and songwriting, has reached yet another level which can only reward fans and music alike.

The album ends with a cover of the Uriah Heep song Rain and the power ballad Seasons In The Cemetery (Gardens Of Stone), the first a vocal and piano treat passing to the second and its orchestral kiss upon the ear brought with a power metal embrace. If there is only one minor quibble about Shake The Earth it is that as it progresses the earlier charging energy dissipates, though the quality remains at the same impressive height, making it a little top heavy in adrenaline. Just a minor complaint and the placing of tracks as they are do allow one to recover the loss of breath which results from the first three quarters of the album.

Shake The Earth is outstanding and easily one of the best melodic metal albums this year, and ArcticFlame… well they simply make the best kind of metal to leave one energised and fulfilled.

http://www.arcticflamemetal.com

RingMaster 11/09/2012

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Mike Paradine Group – Death In The Family

Unsure what to expect going into the debut solo album from Mike Paradine, the drummer of metal band ArcticFlame, there was a slight reticence alongside the intrigue. Traditional metal the sound his day job creates is not the favoured sound here but as soon as the opening chords and riffs broke out upon Death In The Family any doubt was blown right away. The album is an eager and undemanding muscular burst of honest and straight forward rock ‘n’ roll. An immediate buddy to go sink some beer with and delight in mischief alongside, basically a total joy.

The Mike Paradine Group has produced an album that captures the imagination and heart with songs that carry no pretence or self indulgence. They are tunes wanting to have and to offer fun which they do across all ten exuberant tracks to the fullest satisfaction. The collection of songs are a personal journey for Paradine with many of the themes being taken from his “on-going feud” with certain family members, his battle with cancer as a thirteen year old, and his life growing up through the 70’s and 80’s in Bayonne, New Jersey. With the lyrics and melodies provided by Paradine alongside the music of Dave Manheim (Supernatiral, Society Killers), who also produced the release, the album is an honest creation from the heart with no sign of bitterness or anger, just truth.

The album sees Paradine bringing vocals and all drums to its tracks with Manheim providing the guitars, bass, and keyboard. There are also additional contributions from Richard Holmgren (Wolf) and Michael Clayton Moore (ArcticFlame) who do the vocals on some songs as does Manheim, Jeff Scott (ArcticFlame) on bass for the cover of Parasite by Kiss, and Kilroy on guitar. Death In The Family is wonderfully varied, bursting out with quality heavy metal energy and aggression at times whilst on some tracks exciting the ear with powerful rock based songs. There is never a predictable moment or any point when one looks forward to the next track. The release is not ground breaking but simply feeds the senses with the best infectious rock ‘n’ roll wrapped up in an invention and energy that captures the heart and imagination.

       Venom And Piss opens up the party with robust eager riffs and a melodic teasing of the ear. It takes the senses on a boisterous addictive ride, the song dripping well crafted metal intent and fresh energy. Holmgren brings the personal words of Paradine forth with an accomplished and expressive delivery that lies perfectly on the irritable groove which winds around the ear persistently. An excellent start easily backed up by following song Rise Up from the Grave. With Clayton Moore taking over the vocals the song deals with being a 13 year old boy having cancer, the defiance of Paradine despite losing his leg from it at the time bristling from every word and punched through by the fine metal driven sounds behind. Already the album has won the heart but it only gets better from here on in.

The wonderful Cooperesque Monster’s Ball is an instantaneous love affair; it defies anyone not to join in within the opening minute of its infection. The tale of various serial killers gathering together for a party is an exhilarating audio cartoon strip to increase the pulse rate. The dual vocals of Paradine and Manheim ride an avalanche of hungry riffs and a groove that takes control with a siren like charm. The solo it unleashes is as sharp as the evil that frequents the characters within the song and the anthemic like quality throughout is a rewarding pleasure to fully lose one self within.

The album holds these heights throughout with songs like the soulful power ballad On a Tuesday Morning (The John J Harvey), the mighty Taste My Fist another metal defiant tune carrying a great Dead Kennedys like groove dealing with Paradine’s battle with cancer, and the stunning emotive closing ballad The Dust, all striking deep and wholeheartedly with quality and immense relish. The finest moment on the album though is Suzie with an Uzi, a punk veined rock song that captivates with a contagious melodic attack and hi-intensity energy. It sums up the whole album, irresistible excitable riffs, extremely well crafted flowing songs, and a personality that one simply cannot fail to be enamoured with.

Death In The Family is one of the most enjoyable and impressive albums to come out so far this year. It makes no claim to be anything more than what it is, an excellent vibrant rock ‘n’ roll album that makes listening to it a complete and long lasting pleasure.

www.mikeparadine.com

RingMaster 27/03/2012

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