Black Water Chemistry – Return To Ashes

Though formed in 2014 it is the last eighteen months or so that the buzz around Welsh metallers Black Water Chemistry has really intensified. It has been a time where the band itself says that they have been “working tirelessly to cement their style and increase their fan base”, success of that intent in the first aspect now strikingly heard within and in the second poised to be ignited by new EP Return To Ashes.

Tagged as metalcore but with much more to its template of imagination and adventure, the Black Water Chemistry sound is a cauldron of aggressive energy and inventive enterprise. It has maybe yet to breach the walls of true uniqueness but as the four tracks within Return To Ashes shows, it has an individuality which is as memorable as it is unpredictable. Formed by blood brothers in vocalist Matt Saunders and lead guitarist Chris Saunders and completed by bassist Gizz, rhythm guitarist Murph, and drummer Dan, the Newport hailing quintet embrace inspirations from the likes of Architects, Parkway Drive, Killswitch Engage, Chelsea Grin, August Burns Red, Mastodon, and Periphery to their creative breast. They are strands of influences which light up the band’s sound but more seems to spark Black Water Chemistry’s own individual endeavour.

The EP opens up with new single Oracles. Instantly ears are under a barrage of predacious rhythms but equally are wrapped in a wiry mesh of grooves hunted by ravenous riffs. Vocals come with matching force and attitude but soon reveal great diversity as clean strains alternate and unite with throaty squalls. Already that richness of sound within its metalcore breeding is working away, enticing and intriguing as simultaneously other aspects trespass the senses. Evolving through more placid but no less gripping moments before the track’s rock ‘n’ roll explodes it is an outstanding start and appetiser to the fresh impetus in the rise of Black Water Chemistry

The Last Iconoclasts follows, it also making a striking entrance as guitars and rhythms concoct a web of rabid temptation before vocals roar and croon to create the song’s very own lure of unpredictability and imagination. The punk ferocity of its predecessor is accentuated within the second offering as too its raw metallic animosity, the song prowling almost stalking the listener at times and seducing them with melodic elegance and angst in others.

There is no let-up in the great mercurial attack of the band’s instinctive imagination and feral enterprise within next up Masterstroke. The song is borne of a more heavy rock/melodic metal seeding but again an untamed but skilfully crafted maelstrom of extreme metal nurtured ill-content. Grooves and riffs tease and nag as rhythms stalk and bite, every twist and turn an ear luring confrontation before the EP concludes with the hellacious fire of its title track. If the last song nagged in certain ways, its successor simply harasses, rewarding its imaginative malefaction with a beguiling entanglement of senses infringing adventure and unexpected twists and turns; at times roaring like a natural union between Periphery, Bring Me The Horizon, and Reuben.

It is a fine end to a release which will surely thrust Black Water Chemistry forcibly into much thicker and eager recognition and attention. Excellent from the off and even more striking by the listen Return To Ashes is a wake-up call to the UK metal scene fuelled by a potential which will conceivably take the band beyond those boundaries.

Return To Ashes is released August 31st.

https://www.facebook.com/BlackWaterChemistry/   https://twitter.com/B_W_Chemistry    https://blackwaterchemistry.bandcamp.com/

Pete RingMaster 29/08/2018

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

URNE – The Mountain Of Gold

From the ashes of one great thing rises another; certainly it looks that way listening to the new EP from UK metallers URNE. The Mountain Of Gold is the debut release from a band featuring ex- Hang The Bastard members in vocalist/bassist Joe Nally and guitarist Angus Neyra. From the demise of their previous acclaimed outfit, the pair formed URNE, pulling in the rhythmic prowess of drummer Rich Wiltshire to join them. Distinctly different in sound but with the same level of craft and imagination which made their previous band so potent, URNE across four fierce yet melodically magnetic tracks suggest they have the wares to be just as rich a proposition.

Produced by Architects and Sylosis guitarist Josh Middleton, The Mountain Of Gold allows new single Dust Atlas to kick things off. As the first beats of Wiltshire firmly rap the senses, a slow drawling groove emerges to entangle ears. Its sludgy air is soon courted by a livelier rhythmic taunting which in turn drives the subsequent heavy/groove metal trespass of the already compelling encounter. Neyra’s guitar dances on the imagination whilst carrying a more imposing threat in its breath, a trespass which in turn festers in the opening throes of Nally’s vocals. As the song, he soon shows diversity as mellower and harmonic hues emerge in his tones, a move bringing an even greater blend of flavours and increasing invention.

It is a thickly impressive start with a touch of bands such as Mastodon, Exodus, and The Sword to it though hues in something far more individual to URNE; a trait just as potent within the following creative drama of The Lady And The Devil. Essences of doom and occult metal join the more classic swing of the track as it gets its instinctive groove going alongside the enticing clean tones of Nally, the dark brooding in his bassline a great tempering to the fiery air of again a track which masterfully and imaginatively evolves.

The EP’s title track as good as stalks ears next with its rapacious riffs and rhythmic grumble speared by a groove which instantly inspires the body’s movements. There is punk-esque irritability to things at first, one dismissed by melodic and harmonic radiance but only to the wings to return as the enthralling cycle repeats. Neyra shares his prowess with as much dexterity as the song has in captivating ears and attention; a potency all three share with their individual and united enterprise.

The March Towards The Sun concludes the release, the song featuring Middleton within its tenacious and untimed but deviously designed rock ‘n’ roll. The track is breath raw and antagonistic but equally precisely sculpted and seductive as another mercurial landscape of varying and animated metal consumes ears.

The Mountain Of Gold is a striking and more importantly rousing introduction to URNE yet you cannot help thinking from its power and potential we have heard nothing yet which is soon clear as being just as exciting.

The Mountain Of Gold is out now available across most online stores.

https://www.facebook.com/urneband/   https://twitter.com/urneband

Pete RingMaster 15/08/2018

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Naberus – Hollow

Around seven years after emerging upon the Australian Metal scene, Naberus released their debut album, The Lost Reveries. It was a well-received offering earning critical praise and confirming the Melbourne outfit’s potent presence within their national metal landscape. Now the quintet has unleashed its successor in the shape of the ravenously resourceful and compelling Hollow and it is fair to say the band has hit a whole new level.

The Lost Reveries was the band’s sound at the time at a pinnacle, one which was heavily influenced by melodic death and thrash metal, a mix honed over previous tracks and EPs since day one. Whilst Hollow also revels in those hues it reveals an embracing of a far broader template including essences of groove, nu, and technical metal. Everything about the new album is a growth from its predecessor, one which maybe will be a step too far for some original fans but will surely recruit a whole new tide of fresh appetites. At fourteen tracks it is a bulky proposal for sure which flirts with overstaying its time but one which pretty much constantly holds its strength and lure throughout before leaving with a bang.

Mixed by Henrik Udd (Bring Me the Horizon, Architects, A Breach of Silence) and mastered by Ermin Hamidovic (Architects, Periphery, Devin Townsend), Hollow launches at the listener with the outstanding Slaves. Immediately the guitars of Dan Ralph and Dante Thompson entangle ears with their sonic wires as the vocal snarl of James Ash harries ears. Djent spices infest the intensive blaze as other flavours collude in its rapacious web around the scything beats of Chris Sheppard and the predatory growl of Jordan Mitchell’s bass. Familiarity and individuality merge in its intensive roar, they all going to make a savagely raucous yet skilfully woven captivation.

The following Space To Breathe is just as swiftly imposing but inviting, taking a less invasive stance initially as its elements settle before uniting in its own ferocious trespass. Ash’s vocals again impress with their not vast but strong diversity within the emerging rich tapestry of sound. There are essences of bands like Spineshank and Static X to the track at times but equally it lusts after death and extreme metal textures with the same fervour and invention before the superb Split In Two uncages its own similarly but individually woven tempest. Harsh and melodic strains in both vocals and music make an easy union as the imagination in songwriting incites their drama, the track continuing the explosive success of the first pair ensuring that Hollow is already a riveting proposal.

Both Shadows and Webs nag the senses whilst seducing attention; the first a sonic harassment as adventurous as it is predatory with its successor, deceitfully calm at its start, a subsequent cauldron of fiercely simmering intensity with scalding eruptions and a persistently bubbling enterprise. True uniqueness could be said to be less potent within the two yet everything about them and all songs is as fresh and inventive as you could wish, the album’s title track further evidence. Its enmity is a harsh fury from the start, searing trespass and rhythmic lashing entangled in the sonic imagination of the guitars and the collage of vocal incitement. It makes for a dramatic and dynamic assault which just hits the spot like a sledge hammer.

Through the likes of the belligerently tenacious I Disappear, the corrosive reflection of The End and Seas Of Red with its almost feral tides and melodic fire, the album continues to delve into malice, aggression, and different degrees of variety in their individual characters. It is fair to say that the latter two of the three did not ignite the same energy of passion and acclaim as those previously within Hollow yet all easily enticed and pleasured before The Maze had ears lost to its creative course. Living up to its name, the thrilling song is a tangle of grooves and melodic vines within a formidable confrontation, each tunnelling through song and psyche alike.

My Favorite Memory similarly springs a spiralling union of endeavour within its dark catacomb but its mercurial exploration of emotion and sound quickly develops its own individual presence while Fading with far more savage jaws challenges and erupts upon the senses with enterprise and inventive dexterity, every member of the band creating a simultaneous threat and temptation within the track.

The album is closed up by firstly The Burrow and finally The Depths, both tracks leaving thick enticements in their wake for a swift return with the closing incitement within Hollow a labyrinth of irrepressible grooves and sonic wires through a lusty trespass of vocal and rhythmic animation. The track is another major moment within the release possibly its greatest following so many lofty peaks.

As a whole Hollow is a refreshing and rousing offering from a band deserving thick attention hereon in. Yes with so many tracks it might be a stretch in one go; a couple of times songs almost merging into each other in certain ways but each is an imagination and pleasure sparking assault in their own right and proving Naberus one exciting proposition.

Hollow is out now through Eclipse Records.

https://www.facebook.com/naberusband   https://twitter.com/NaberusOfficial

Pete RingMaster 10/07/2018

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Hostile Array – Self Titled

With a sound delivering a punch as rich and inescapable as that of the heart and lyrical confrontation it surrounds, the self-titled debut album from US post hardcore outfit Hostile Array s one striking and impressive introduction. That forceful, indeed imposing attack though comes in layers of enterprise and imagination which equally enticed and ignited an always searching appetite for fresh, exciting, and individual.

Emerging in the initial weeks of 2017, Maryland hailing Hostile Array have already hinted at the potential of the album and gave a rich taster of their sound through a couple of singles. Their music is tagged as post hardcore but has real depth and adventure to its character embracing an array of metal and punk spices alongside inspirations cited as including Underoath, Norma Jean, Silent Planet, and Architects. Consisting of Brendan Frey, Garrison Frey, Hector Fernandez, Fredy Menjivar, and Andrew Markle, the band also has a ferocious lyrical intent and touch, songs getting their claws into political and social issues, corruptions, and ill-doings.

The album opens up with the outstanding Herd Instinct, the track one of those first couple of singles luring keen attention. Sonic intrusion and rhythmic baiting opens its tempting, a great grumbling bass soon in tandem with fury fuelled throat rasping vocals. Quickly though there is imaginative hints licking at ears, blossoming with melodic enticement and wicked hooks as the roar continues to harass air and social mentality. It is a cauldron which continues to evolve, metal bred textures coursing hardcore irritability; invention escalated by the potent landscape of clean and raw vocal dexterity.

Bastardized follows with its own ferocious incursion, snarling and blistering the senses from its first breath before sharing a more nu-metal natured breath with a touch of bands like Spineshank to it. Snapping and jabbing at ears, the track springs toxic contagion and intense discontent within an atmospheric melody stranded weave; seducing whilst preying on the listener before Wiretap uncages its own ferocious animus with instinctive catchiness and melodic suggestion at its core. There is a whiff of Deftones meets Architects to its growing body but to be honest as all hints offered to tracks, the Hostile Array sound absorbs and turns all in its own individuality.

Next up Devoid brawls and hollers within atmospheric smog next, it’s calm but portentous climate an emotive glaze to an inner volatile frustration while Migrant Myth is a net of metallic wiring around a blaze of unbridled displeasure. Both tracks invigorate their already resourceful landscapes with tenaciously adventurous twists and turns spun from unpredictable and contrasting textures. The second of the two is immense, too short but a thrilling trespass of persuasive enterprise igniting the passions for the following sonic and melodic fire of Newspeak; a track quickly burying itself in ears with emotional intensity and melodies as descriptive as the words they colour.

New single Warmonger is next, looming up from a distance with the animosity and skilled dexterity its title suggests. The throaty grumble of the bass and the composed bone splitting swings of beats incite the sonic flames and vocal voracity which climbs their irritability; they in turn like accelerant sparking melodic shimmers into senses broiling, emotionally burning flames.

Viciousness and tempting contagion shape up Calloused, it as body inspiring infectious as it is vocally and lyrically scathing with a tapestry of flavours and invention to accentuate both aspects. The song flows straight into the waiting jaws and feuding tendrils of Bluebird, it an equally accomplished and magnetic patchwork of ire led emotions and flavours woven into one fluid and riveting trespass.

Final track Disillusioned is a pyre of punk and metal malcontent and emotional grievance within a skilled bedlam of imagination and ferocity. It is a powerful striking last attack in a charge of nothing but; a truly memorable departure demanding a swift return to the album to face, endure, and thrill at its creative challenge and vendetta on world ills. There have not been too many post hardcore bred releases which have truly fired us up in the past couple of years but Hostile Array have not only provided such a treat but one which deserves to be considered as the best of the lot.

The Hostile Array album is released June 1st, available @ https://hostilearray.bandcamp.com/album/hostile-array

https://www.facebook.com/HostileArray/   https://twitter.com/HostileArray/

Pete RingMaster 29/05/2018

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Pretty Pistol – Welcome to the Dead Club

How to describe the new EP from UK garage punks Pretty Pistol; well feral certainly fits, sonically clamorous and tenacious too but suiting it most is simply that Welcome to the Dead Club is rather damn good. Offering four virulent slices of punk fuelled noise, the release is another of the year’s special moments so far more than worth a few minutes of your time.

Formed five years after the initial chance meeting in 2010 at a Hole gig by vocalist Laura Le Rox and drummer Emma Waller, Pretty Pistol’s line-up is completed by guitarists Rich Cooper and Billy Larsen. Described as “Sitting somewhere between Gallows, Be Your Own Pet, Milk Teeth and The Kills”, a pretty suitable intimation, the South London quartet has made a potent mark on the capital’s live scene, sharing stages with the likes of Penetration, KidBrother, Drones, and Crazytown. Recorded with producer John Mitchell (Architects, Enter Shikari, You Me At Six), Welcome to the Dead Club is their inescapable jab at bigger attention, a raucous swipe not easy to see being ignored.

As opener Cry Wolf explodes on the senses, instantly there is no escaping the rapacious presence of band and song, and indeed the magnetic tones of Le Rox. Her attack is as urgent as the sounds around her with a hint of ‘desperation’ to its lilt though really it is just an earnest bred eagerness to stir things up, again just as the individual garage punk sound Pretty Pistol unleash. Riffs and rhythms collude in devious persuasion, getting under the skin as forcibly as the flying hooks and that glorious verbal trespass. There is a touch of Asylums to the track too which only adds to its virulently striking presence and to be honest if the goodness stopped right there we would still be urging attention the EPs way.

It is not an alone treat though as the following Drive Me To The Dogs quickly reveals. The gnarly stride of bass makes an immediate lure, post punk spun tendrils a swift second as the track infests ears. Its melodic and catchy chorus tempers the trespass a touch but only backing up its infectiousness before the cycle enticingly repeats. Waller’s beats land with purpose and anthemic prowess as the guitars entangle ears with sonic toxicity while Le Rox backed by one of the guys, is an insurgent siren you are not sure whether to embrace or fear.

Another appetising bassline lures Hurricane into view; its bait immediately followed by an ear worm of a hook and in turn a blast of voice and attitude. For no obvious reason but strongly we were reminded of Red Tape as the track continues to blossom in enterprise and temptation every twist and turn making a keener captivation in another rousing if too short a gem within the EP.

The release concludes with the equally compelling No Guts (This Is Glory), a web of swiping beats, belligerent bassline and devilish sonic enticement bound in the vocal carousing of Le Rox. Cannily fingering the imagination whilst heartily firing up the senses and spirit, the song completes a fiercely and irresistibly exhilarating proposition.

Living up to the band’s name, Welcome to the Dead Club is a threat lined, danger fuelled beauty and Pretty Pistol a band we expect to make a continuing if not major impact on the British punk, indeed rock scene.

Welcome to the Dead Club is out now through SaySomething Records @ https://www.prettypistol.co.uk/store/welcome-dead-club-cd

https://www.prettypistol.co.uk/    https://www.facebook.com/pg/prettypistoluk    https://www.twitter.com/prettypistoluk

Pete RingMaster 20/04/2018

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

One Last Daybreak – A Thousand Thoughts

Creating a plaintive post hardcore roar with an emo tinged heart, British outfit One Last Daybreak release their debut EP this April. Offering up five ear luring tracks, A Thousand Thoughts is a potent introduction with a strong ability to grab attention while revealing the potent potential within its creators along the way.

Essex hailing, One Last Daybreak is as fresh as they come, emerging this past January. Whether they have taken time before then honing their style and sound we cannot say though it would not surprise such the accomplished nature of their first release. It has the great rawness which comes with a first endeavour from a newly uncaged proposition but equally a sure touch and imagination which suggests bigger things ahead even at this early stage. With inspirations including the likes of My Chemical Romance, Architects, and Underoath, One Last Daybreak quickly make a persuasive statement which to be fair becomes even more compelling by the listen.

A Thousand Thoughts opens with its first single According to Pleasure, I Was Low on the Food Chain. A lone guitar makes a keen melodic invitation and is quickly joined by bold rhythms amidst a colluding sonic jangle. Vocalist Connor Catchpole is soon in the midst of the lure with his melodic, angst lined proposal; his strong delivery just as potently backed by that of guitarist Jack Smith to create a fiery and enticing union. Quickly the song has the body bouncing as familiar strains meets fresh endeavour, the strings of Smith and lead guitarist Matt Pike creating a captivating weave over the darker moody hues of James Hicks’ bass. It is a strong start to the release enticing ears and intrigue with ease if offering elements of predictability but for personal tastes is soon outshone by the following track.

The Sand In The Hourglass, The Life In My Lungs instantly makes for a compelling affair, the resonance of drummer James Hart’s first swings ringing around the enticement of guitar before driving the blossoming track with boisterous energy as vocals and sonic imagination brew their winning persuasions. Swiftly there is a freshness and spark to the song less noticeable in its predecessor, its character and imagination bold with a fire in its belly which erupts with lava-esque intensity. Short and voracious, the song grabs and firmly retains best track honours though the EP’s title track soon makes for an eager rival with its infectious nature. Though it misses the keen creative invention of the last track it makes up for it with its rich catchiness and eager energy aligned to that natural flair in sound the band seems to have.

The release is brought to a close by firstly In The Movies, a blaze of sonic causticity and temptation further fired up by vocal ferocity and melodic infection, and finally A Coffin For Two. It is an assault of wiry grooves and voracious riffs backed by rhythms with the intent to split bone and a major rival to that top track title. With metal, punk, and rock essences all become embroiled in its physical and emotive furnace; the song is an irresistible predator which alone sparks a real appetite for more.

As suggested, A Thousand Thoughts only gets more enjoyable with every play as too anticipation for the potential it reveals. It is a great sign that the band’s strongest and most striking moments is when they replace familiarity with bold adventure and an edge of unpredictability and though too early to declare One Last Daybreak as the future of something or other, the ingredients to make a mark are brewing nicely.

A Thousand Thoughts is released April 7th.

https://www.facebook.com/onelastdaybreak    https://twitter.com/OneLastDaybreak

Pete RingMaster 04/04/2018

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Cove – A Conscious Motion

A Conscious Motion sees UK outfit Cove releasing their sophomore EP, a proposition announcing the Kent hailing quintet as one highly promising addition to the hardcore scene. Melodically inflamed, the 2016 formed band’s sound has a real sense of adventure to its character suggesting the potential of major uniqueness to come they continue to grow. As the new release shows, it is already a thoroughly enjoyable proposition from a band hungry to push themselves.

A Conscious Motion reflects on themes “such as the pain of loss and the challenges of soul-searching and acceptance” and features the band’s latest line-up of guitarists Pete Woolven and Ben Brazier, bassist Charlie Smith, drummer Jack Bowdery, and new vocalist Ben Shorten. The band linked up with Oz Craggs at Hidden Track Studios for the EP, reuniting with him once more for five tracks which has seen “a little piece of everyone in each song, something we didn’t have before and this has definitely broadened our sound.”

The EP opens with Coincide:Collide, a track which lures intrigue and increasingly keen attention from its first rhythmic tapping. Quickly guitars loom over that continuing bait, their tides of riffs and grooves dark and slightly portentous but wholly enticing. The quickly impressing tones of Shorten soon intensify its appeal, a Deftones-esque breath becoming tenser and more imposing as the track unleashes its roar. As mentioned, Cove is tagged as hardcore with an alternative bent but as the first song on the EP reveals, at times it is a far more flavoursome mix.

The EP’s best track is quickly followed by a just as compelling offering in Solis. From its first breath, ear gripping grooves work their bait, vocals a caustic alignment as rhythms pounce with aggressive tenacity. Harmonies and melodic flames add to its brewing temptation, punk scowling similarly infusing the adventurous tempest. As the first, it gives suggestion of a real appetite to push their boundaries, the band not content on just repeating the well-received but less individual exploits of their first release.

Recent single All I Believe is next, the song a blaze of sound and enterprise which as the first track begins with a mellow air over simmering discontent; a volatility subsequently erupting with voracious intensity and craft. Vocals again strike a rich engagement whilst grooves and a brooding bassline only add to the blossoming captivation. Though not connecting with personal tastes as quickly as its predecessors the senses bracing blaze of sound made a compelling persuasion as it grew to match their temptation.

The atmospheric instrumental of Host provides a dark calm for the imagination to play with before Reflect:Resolve closes things up with its incitement  of wiry grooves, rhythmic tempting, and emotive vocal ferocity. It too makes for an alluring agitation if without quite reaching the heights of those before it, though at times the song tempts with a majestic touch which it never quite sustains across the whole of its nevertheless fully satisfying presence.

Cove has strived to find their own identity in sound with A Conscious Motion, to stand out from the crowd and though they have some way to be truly unique, the quintet has definitely found a new character which warrants keener attention. The EP is a potential ridden affair from a band moving in the right direction towards becoming a renowned integral part of the European hardcore scene; right now they are certainly one of its imaginative and enjoyable additions.

A Conscious Motion is out now through iTunes and other stores.

Upcoming Cove UK tour dates:

April: 15th – Bournemouth – Anvil | 16th – Guildford – Boileroom | 17th – Nottingham – Red Rooms | 18th – Manchester – Satans Hollow | 19th – Huddersfield – Parish | 20th – Glasgow – Garage Attic | 21st – Edinburgh – Opium | 22nd – Sheffield – Corporation | 24th – Birmingham – Flapper | 25th – Oxford – Cellar | 26th – Tunbridge Wells – Forum Basement | 27th – Bristol – Mothers Ruin | 28th – Bridgend – Hobos | 30th – London – Thousand Island

https://www.wearecove.com/     https://www.facebook.com/WeAreCove/    https://twitter.com/WEARECOVE

Pete RingMaster 27/03/2018

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright