Indya – Harder Faster

Indya_RingMasterReview

Need something to put some spirit rousing energy and vitality into your day? Then we suggest checking out the new single from UK band Indya for a swift and highly agreeable shot. Harder Faster is a virulent stomp of rock ‘n’ roll with the anthemic prowess of Andrew W.K., the pop infectiousness of Gwen Stefani and No Doubt, and the inventive dexterity of Pryti; a rebel rousing, thigh slapping slice of devilment just as happy to add some flavoursome glam to its hard rock bred adventure too.

Indya is led by vocalist Natalie Indya West, a songwriter/musician who was in the arms of music from an early age through her Mother’s keen and eclectic taste for artists such as Free, Bad Company, David Bowie, Rainbow and many others. From school, Natalie went on to study music at the Performing Arts & Technology school in Croydon before going on to study at the Colin’s Performing Arts College in Essex. Having to fund a large part of her schooling herself, she eventually took up a job as a pole dancer in a Gentleman’s Club, an experience which saw her fall in with the wrong crowd and into a subsequent debilitating habit. It is a time though which gave a spark to her songwriting and the often raw lyrical themes explored within that cathartic release.

Indya art_RingMasterReviewPerforming as a singer and professional dancer over recent years, Natalie eventually pulled together the band which is Indya last year, recruiting the talents of guitarist Daniel Baune, bassist Raymond Tagnola, and drummer Tobias Miorin to help bring her life bred songs to life. Combining inspirations from the likes of Rainbow, Deep Purple, Bowie, Madonna, and Amy Winehouse into their hard rock seeded rock ‘n’ roll, the band is looking to make a potent impact on ears and attention in 2016, and if Harder Faster is a sign of things to come, it is hard to see them failing.

The song opens on a great blues meets glam rock groove, beats badgering its lure with their own feisty bait. Things soon settle into an infectious canter as Natalie’s vocals flirt with and dance on ears and the imagination. The virulence of its energy and rousing bounce alone has hips and appetite gripped, the dexterity of vocals and melodic enterprise only adding to the easy going yet heavily dynamic proposal. The song is pure rock ‘n’ roll, but equally prime pop with a touch of punk to it too and quite irresistible.

Providing the thrilling lead to Strip Me Down, their new EP, Harder Faster has all the temptation to bring the UK music scene to the point of no return with the name Indya on its lustful lips.

Harder Faster is out now.

http://www.indya-band-official.rocks/      https://www.facebook.com/Indyaukmusic   https://twitter.com/IndyaOfficial

Pete RingMaster 25/04/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Graveyard Shifters – High Heels & Broken Bones

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Aggressive devilry and riotous adrenaline is the order of the day as Finnish crossover punks Graveyard Shifters unleash the follow-up to their well-received debut EP of last year. Their new brawling punk ‘n’ roll stomp comes in the hellacious shape of first album High Heels & Broken Bones, a tempest of punk, metal, and raw rock ‘n’ roll with the intent of taking the world on a tour of bone crushing, senses devouring partying. At the same time band and release storm through the explosive highs and lows of life, dragging out the belligerent animal in us all for a non-stop ride of fury and fierce revelry.

Bursting out of Kerava Graveyard Shifters began in 2013, taking little time to make a thick impression with their imposing sound and similarly impacting live presence. Within six months the Brainwashed by Moonshine EP was uncaged to rouse up attention and eager support, its release last year the seed to the broad recognition now being forcibly nudged by High Heels & Broken Bones. Their new ten track protagonist demands you take notice, insists you take part, and leads the listener on a unassailable rampage of bad mannered, virulently contagious rock ‘n’ roll. It might not be the most original incitement, but as the thoroughly enjoyable trigger to mischievous deeds and thrills, it is a job superbly done.

High Heels & Broken Bones opens up with its title track and an immediate rage of rowdy riffs and thumping rhythms stirred up by the antagonistic scowls of vocalist J. Matilainen. Infectious hooks and anthemic band calls proceed to litter the insatiable call to party arms, the track like a mix of Kvelertak and Turbonegro with the punk devilment of a Black Flag as the guitars of V. Vainionpää and H. Kansonen kick up a sonic storm around voice and rhythms.

With a slightly more merciful start, the following Tearvomitor keeps things blazing intensely, its initial lure of riffs and sonic enterprise a rich spice against the exploding beats of drummer A. Salmenoja and the predacious tones of J. Sumkin’s bass. The song is soon an eyeballing, energy igniting punk roar equipped with seriously enticing hooks and again great vocal chants from across the band. Once more you can argue there are few surprises with it yet the song is a memorable and seriously potent stirring of emotions and appetite swiftly backed by the just as hostile and magnetic Buy Low, Sell High. The metal seeding of the guitar’s invention is a compelling lure caged again by a bruising conflict of attitude and confrontation rooted in vocals and rhythms, the combination a keen and flavoursome riling of ear and air.

Love On The Rocks strolls in next with a hard rock swagger and potent catchiness, its early invitation a friendly, almost poppy persuasion but just the lure into another ferocious uproar. Except this time this outburst is just one evolving moment in the imagination and sound of the song, mellow vocals and spicy hard rock tenacity revolving with aggressive and infectious elements. The most adventurous and striking track on the album so far, it is a highly pleasing, expectations defying proposal quickly emulated by both the stylish rancor of Bender with its great tempting of piano amidst rousing vocals and melodic metal guitar flames, and in turn the grizzled temperament of Pocket Puppet Show. The first of the two moves from a bright and almost cheery antagonism into a death metal bled rancor whilst the second is part hardcore and part extreme metal inhospitality with just the right amount of rock ‘n’ roll wantonness, and equally one compelling threat.

A melodic caress emerges from the ire of the song, serenading ears until the inflammatory sounds of Firestarter burn the senses and atmosphere alike. There is nothing especially dramatic and stand out about the track, or so you think, but by its seriously satisfying end it is a lingering incitement, though to be fair quickly overshadowed by the outstanding dark charm of Doomsdaydreaming. Gothic in its climate, caustic in tone, the song is a thick blackened detonation of metal virulence and punk bad blood, like Andrew W.K. and Agnostic Front in an unrestrained dust-up.

Beerserker is a similar type of ravishment, though more metal driven in its character around a furious punk heart, and another making a stronger and more potent impression than first thought, a success echoed by the closing Finnish animosity of Kyynelyökkönen. The last track bellows and incites with ease, riffs and rhythms the gripping web for bitter toned vocals and sonic trespasses to spring from.

It is a fine end to a mightily enjoyable encounter, and for us introduction to Graveyard Shifters. High Heels & Broken Bones is maybe not an album to change your world but undoubtedly will be a hefty nudge to change your listening habits.

High Heels & Broken Bones is available from June 12th on Eternal Sound on CD and digitally.

http://www.graveyardshifters.fi  http://www.facebook.com/GraveyardShifters

RingMaster 12/06/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Sons of Huns – Banishment Ritual

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Riff clad and groove shoed, Banishment Ritual is one of those albums which is so hard to tear yourself away from once it has its eager and rapacious hooks deeply entrenched within the ears and passions. Sculpted by Oregon trio Sons of Huns, the eleven track release is as virulently contagious and thrillingly magnetic as any stoner/heavy metal confrontation to come along over recent months and though its originality can be argued and debated the album is a ridiculously easy to devour magnetic treat. Since 2009, The Portland band has been firing up and building a keen and potent home fanbase since forming but now with the release via EasyRider Records of the riotous Banishment Ritual, expectations are simply rife with the expectation that the band will soon be recognised and cooed much further afield.

Consisting of guitarist/vocalist Peter Hughes, drummer Ryan Northrop, and bassist/vocalist Shoki Tanabe (who has recently departed the band to be replaced as touring bassist by Aaron Powell of Belt of Vapor), Sons of Huns has already earned a major reputation for their live performances which has seen them grace numerous Portland festivals and stages supporting the likes of Red Fang, Andrew W.K., Danava, and also comedian Brian Posehn. The band’s 2011 self-titled EP drew potent acclaim as did the 7” single Leaving Your Body, but you feel as debut album Banishment Ritual stomps and ravages through the ears like a sonic terrier on heat that everything before was mere foreplay for the real thing.

The title track opens up the storming exercise in persistent dramatic riffery and rhythmic entrapment with an eager swagger and Cover Artfiery breath if not the rabidity and aggressive attention grabbing shown in later tracks. A warm blues squall wraps the guitar enterprise whilst the vocals have a strength and expression which matches the sonic intensity and melodic tantalising veining the track. It is a compelling accomplished start which lays down the appealing canvas for greater things to play upon starting with the following Argenteum Astrum.

The second track is a delicious flame of sci-fi inspired adrenaline coaxed stoner rock ‘n’ roll, a merger of Motorhead and Red Fang with the sinews of Black Tusk rippling throughout its contagious charge. The band is equally unafraid to twist and shift things around within the charge, a slow melodic croon teasing the senses midway in for a mesmeric enticement that tempers and compliments the sturdy riffery and thumping rhythms. It is the first of a few pinnacles closely followed by the mighty seduction of Heliolith, a track where grooves entice places which should never be felt up in public and riffs cage thoughts of escape with resourcefulness and irresistible addictiveness.

The dual assault of Horror In Clay and I’m Your Dad bring the album to another peak, the first with a blues crafted energy and rampancy which flirts with the passions through evolving gaits and inquiring sonic imagination whilst its successor, the best track on the album is pure undiluted bruising rock ‘n’ roll. Part early Queens Of The Stone Age and part Black Sabbath with a spattering of Trucker Diablo, the song emerges as a unique and exhilarating blaze of voracious enterprise to ignite a greater rabidity to the already spawned hunger for the album.

Following the decent but out of place amongst the other tracks instrumental Waking Sleep, Sons of Huns unleashes another incendiary device for the passions with the intensive infection of Planet No. 9, another track where grooves are as epidemically inciting as the riffs and rhythmic confrontation. With strong vocal harmonies to aid the always enjoyable delivery of Hughes and Tanabe, the track storms the barricades with charm and insatiable energy aligned to aggressive endeavour and addiction forging adventure. Seriously challenging for best song on Banishment Ritual it gives a tall order for the rest of the album to live up to.

Both the smouldering lure of Lord of Illusion and the garage rock escapade of instrumental Rollin’ the Dice make a fine if unsuccessful attempt, the pair as many of the tracks breeding a psychedelic air to their stoner and blues emissions, whilst Super Kanpai Rainbow steps up to the plate with an impossibly infectious temptation of garage punk and metal merged into a psychedelic psyche taunting with sonic colour as vibrant and transfixing as the imagination spawning its intriguing and thrilling offering.

Completed by final stoneresque fire of Oroboros, The Sword meets Led Zeppelin to give a whiff of its heat, Banishment Ritual is an outstanding release which makes a stronger persuasion with every encounter.  Maybe not strong on originality but towering in every other aspect, it is an outstanding full length debut placing Sons of Huns towards the frontline of stoner/blues metal.

http://sonsofhuns.com/

8.5/10

RingMaster 03/12/2013

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