Cardboard HIT – Subject to Status

We all have favourite bands which feel like they have been bred to pleasure personal tastes and desires and now adding to our list is UK trio Cardboard HIT. Creating a tantalising mix of punk, alternative and noise rock, and numerous other rock ‘n’ roll nurtured flavours, the East Sussex based band just creatively teased, tickled, and ravished our sweet spot with debut EP Subject to Status.

Though a brand new proposition for us, thanks to an introduction sent by drummer Matt Rouse, the release has been tempting ears for over a year now but well worth highlighting such its potent presence in an overwhelming landscape of bands and encounters very easy to be lost from sight within. With bassist/vocalist Ross Towner and guitarist/vocalist Lee Hayes alongside Rouse, Cardboard HIT opens up their first EP with the irresistible Bobby. Teasing wiry strikes of guitar get things underway, their post punk scent soon a rapid trespass with great Fire Engines like discord to their tempting. The dual vocal strike of Towner and Hayes is as magnetic as their sounds whilst the probing beats of Rouse manipulate ears and instincts with a controlled but bold touch. Growing into something akin to Eighties B-Line Matchbox Disaster and Japanese Fighting Fish in league with eighties band The Three Johns, the track is superb; manna to an already hungry appetite for more.

Say Yes is the next to feed the need, the thick strains of bass and guitar marking out its predecessor enslaving ears again as vocals and a melodic dexterity brings a calmer if still dramatically tenacious enticement. More dance friendly for feet and hips, the song swings with a bullish attitude and infectious boisterousness as again distinctive vocals rouse a similar energy in the music around them.

The grumbling tone of the bass is a delicious ingredient and once again ignites the first breath and subsequent stroll of the band’s latest single All the Voices. Its grumble is tempered by the dexterity of the two prong vocal lure, beats a swiping incitement alongside the calmest texture as the song grows more manic and wicked with every passing second.

That mellower essence is a bolder instinct within closing song Rabbit Hole, though it too has an unpredictable nature and off-kilter instinct which grabs attention and the passions. Showing a whiff of 12 Stone Toddler in its punk ‘n’ pop shuffle, the song has the body bouncing and a hungry want for more in motion in no time; heavy grooves, rapacious rhythms, and a loco invention for the fourth time seducing the senses and spirit.

With Cardboard HIT working on new material as you read, the time feels right for new fans to find the band and be swept away with their punk disco. With a trio of great videos accompanying the EP, Subject to Status is the doorway into an adventure meant to be lustfully devoured.

Subject to Status is available on iTunes, Spotify, and other stores.

https://www.facebook.com/Cardboardhit/    http://cardboardhit.wixsite.com/cardboardhit

Pete RingMaster 15/08/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Jack of None -Who Shot Bukowski

Having released one of the most fascinating albums of 2016, US trio experimental brother sister trio Jack of None offer up one of this year’s most compelling in its successor Who Shot Bukowski. Weaving a tapestry of art, alternative, post punk and electronic rock, to simplify their sound, the band infests ears and fingers the psyche across ten tracks of creative drama. It is a journey into the shadowy side of the human condition, an adventure into devious infectiousness, and increasing addiction to embrace with every manipulative listen.

Splitting themselves between Philippines capital Manila and Chicago, Jack of None consists of brothers A.G. (principal composer on guitar, bass and synths) and Julian Syjuco (guitar) alongside sister Maxine (poet-songwriter and vocalist). Last year their first album, Who’s Listening to Van Gogh’s Ear?, was greeted with widespread acclaim, going on to receive 3 nominations at the 15th Independent Music Awards including Best Album in its genre, though what that genre maybe is anyone’s guess such the eclectic nature of their imagination and sound. Who Shot Bukowski is destined to not only replicate its predecessor’s success but thrust the threesome towards thicker and richer attention with its irresistible theatre of contagious intrigue and bold enterprise.

Swiftly Who Shot Bukowski reveals that doughty adventure and imagination in opener Strangest Bedfellows, allowing the hints and seeds sown in the more industrial lined Who’s Listening to Van Gogh’s Ear? to blossom and flourish. The track glides in on a slow swing, guitar and rhythms teasing with tantalising bait around the seductive temptation of Maxine’s voice. Steelier grooves erupt as things get provocatively hazier and magnetically sinister but still the emotive affair between ear and song continues to have the thickest grip whilst sharing increasingly catchy and flirtatious lures along the way.

It is an outstanding start swiftly matched by the following pair of Sticks and Stones and X-Y-Sex. The first of the two merges industrial and psych rock with folk pop hues, its touch simultaneously grainy and warm as Maxine erotically touches the imagination with her tones. A Marilyn Manson like causticity breaks as the track bursts into a more volatile state but soon returning to that initial now increasingly jazz funk laced calm; a carousel which continues to turn across the song before its successor steals the show with its noir lit beauty and haunting contagion. The previous track reminded of US industrial electro rock outfit Scream Machine, this even more so but equally has something of eighties UK band The Passage to it too. Like a dream almost nightmarish in its Orwellian design as visual eroticism teases, the track is pure bewitchment leading the imagination on a flirtatious dance from start to finish.

Dear Georges (Vous Petit Monstre) is next, an even darker bête noire of emotion and thoughts with its entrancing charms and seductive shadows, all led by Maxine’s almost predatory melodic grace and the similarly disarming exploits of her brothers. It too carries flames of metallic toxicity through the raw torrents of guitar but is at its most fantastic with its deviously mellow caresses.

Lyrically every song is a story, a gothic poem of sorts which is as much an engineer of the imagination as their delivery and the sound cradling their revelations, The Brainwashers another fine example within its raw dance and invasive electronic machination. A uniquely beguiling hook offsets a slight repetition of earlier tracks in certain moments, a lining of dark sounds and insidious suggestion adding greater individuality to the encounter before Polyamorous Serial Monogamist writhes seductively in ears. Every melody and smouldering syllable is a physically swerving enticement only accentuated by the surge of guitar and keenly slapping beats, it all woven into a mesmeric incantation.

From the six seconds of Again, the excitable rock ‘n’ roll exploits of The Princess and the Pistol (Can You Feel That?) tenaciously romp with the senses, the track a restrained yet tempestuous incitement while next up Little Devil Girl provides its own suggestive haunting with almost visceral charm and beauty. It is an edge which grows with the subsequent surge of guitars and bass groan which emerges within the garage punk scented treat, the superb encounter never losing its composure but instilling lingering seeds of fear.

The album closes with Tenderly, She Said, a song which from a melodic kiss of acoustic guitar grumbles and smooches with the ever arresting presence of Maxine. Progressive in its tone, hungry in its diversity of texture and flavouring, the song grabs ears and imagination with sublime craft and ease, epitomising the album with its own inescapable alchemy.

Who Shot Bukowski simply captivated and thrilled from its first moment in speakers and ears, and indeed has only tightened its lure and grip ever since. This time around Jack of None would not be too misguided in hoping those previous nominations become awards.

Who Shot Bukowski is out now across most stores and @ https://jackofnone.bandcamp.com/album/who-shot-bukowski

http://www.jackofnone.net/    https://www.facebook.com/jackofnoneband/

Pete RingMaster 02/08/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Vault 51 – Kid

It is never a bad thing to make a thumping good first impression and that is exactly what US quintet Vault 51 has done with their debut EP, Kid. Not that the band is exactly a new force to attention having been around a while now with a buzz soon brewing up around them and apparently they have been signed to Roadrunner Records at some point too. Kid though is their first meaty proposition for real focus following a clutch of magnetic singles, and a forcible reason to pay close attention to their rousing sound.

Roaring out of Atlanta, Vault 51 breed a sound which lies somewhere between alternative rock and melodic/post hardcore; a proposition embracing familiar essences with fresh invention to create an individual character which blossoms across the six tracks of Kid. Already earning comparisons to the likes of Red Jumpsuit Apparatus and Story Of The Year, the band gets straight down to persuasive business with the Drew Fulk (I Prevail, Motionless In White) produced and Lee Rouse mixed EP. Thirty Six gets things underway, it’s ticking suggestiveness soon submerged in a torrent of riffs and fiery sonic flames. That passing of time is still there working away as the song ebbs and flows, the bass of Alex Garmon a gnarly temptation and the jabbing beats of Joshua Landry a biting trespass as melodies and harmonies catch alight and soar. Frontman Landon Jones leads the way with his potent tones backed by the similarly alluring voice of guitarist Tom Jepson, whose strings simultaneously collude with those of Patrick Snyder in a web of enterprise which has ears gripped and an early appetite stoked in swift time.

It is a powerful start to the release, that mix of varied flavours and textures a tempestuous yet composed blaze which as suggested earlier merges recognisable essences with bolder exploits belonging to Vault 51; a success found again within the following We Don’t Care. The track quickly shows itself a predatory individual, riffs carrying a sinister and aggressive edge tempered by again impressing vocals. With rhythms bringing their own cantankerous almost inhospitable intent, the track still plunders the senses; a Spineshank meets Breaking Benjamin spicing grabbing keen attention as things flow through mellow and harsh scenery with craft and emotional intensity.

The first two striking tracks set the marker for the EP which arguably the subsequent songs miss matching yet as latest single Magnolia with its melodic graces and atmospheric caresses soon reveals, the adventurous ear pleasing nature and power of the release refuses to die down. A volatile encounter as calm and seductive as it is fiery and imposing, the third song breeds a virulent infectiousness as forceful as that cast by its predecessors and in next up Wildfire. A poppier incitement from the off but soon lighting a pyre of emotion and intensity, the song has something of Australians Voyager and Sick Puppies to it, a mix of the two in many ways at least which has the imagination soon caught up in its creative drama.

The magnetic reflective calm of Mourning View makes an engaging contrast soon after; the song a melodic serenade on the senses with a brooding rhythmic lining as keys cast their suggestive poetry.  It too has tempestuousness to its heart which flirts with rather than breaks in ears, adding an anxiousness which firmly appeals before Sincerely Me brings things to a ferocious conclusion with a blistering tempest abound with melodic beauty and emotional drama. Maybe taking longer to initially convince than other tracks within Kid, it blossoms into one of the highlight of the release with its cyclonic breath and rousing ingenuity.

Kid makes an increasingly compelling and impressive statement through every listen, sparking the lift off of Vault 51 into the grasp of real attention but more importantly a certain new wave of hungry fans.

The Kid EP is out now on Spotify, through other stores and @ https://www.vault51.net/merch/kid

https://www.vault51.net/    https://www.facebook.com/Vault51official/    https://twitter.com/vault51official

 Pete RingMaster 25/07/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Saint Apache – Wolf Machine

The suggestion of a bold new roar within the British alternative rock scene came with a self-titled debut EP last year, now Eastbourne hailing quartet Saint Apache confirm their potent emergence with its ear grabbing, spirit sparking successor. Wolf Machine is a blaze of muscular and tenacious multi-flavoured rock ‘n’ roll, a proposition often as bruising as it is rousing taking the potential of their first encounter to new creatively accomplished and energetically hungry heights.

Formed in 2015, Saint Apache weave their blaze of sound with an array of influences said to include the likes of Every Time I Die, Buckcherry, and Rage Against The Machine. It is a fiery mix with a volatility of thought and intensity which catches the imagination with ease within Wolf Machine. As mentioned, their debut EP was a potent opening encounter with the band; a promise fuelled introduction swiftly pushed and eclipsed by the rapacious presence of their new creative challenge.

The release opens up with a richly enticing hook; You’re Not A Slave instantly laying down a rich scuzzy lure quickly joined by imposing riffs and thumping rhythms. The equally compelling tones of vocalist Thom Meredith soon roar from within the magnetic nagging tide of sound, Saint Apache stirring up the senses and spirit with persistent and boisterous enterprise. Familiar and fresh hues collude within the fire, unpredictability brewing and grabbing its moment as the track slips into a restrained passage with post punk and invention nurtured twists dancing on the ears. The guitar of Leo casts a tapestry of endeavour and imagination, every second a web of hooks, grooves, and spikiness matched by vocals and the rhythmic predation of drummer Adam Oarton and bassist Luis T.

It is a tremendous start to the release, stoner and heavy rock mixing with punkier intentions and continuing to unite their elements within the following exploits of The Story Doesn’t End Here. The wiry tendrils and fuzzy breath of the guitar brings in a psych/stoner-esque smog, grooves shooting from its midst with again a recognisable yet invigorating character. The growling tone of the bass is a physical addiction all on its own, with an irritable presence just as enticing within Meredith’s vocals and snarling lyrical expression. Rage Against The Machine essences within the first song are a thick spice within the second, giving its swagger thicker liquor to intoxicate the listener with.

Halfway Dead similarly weaves a trap of closely acquainted grooves and hooks for the appetite but again with a tenacity and enterprise which has ears and bodies greedy and bouncing. As with all tracks, it is hard to say that originality is an overpowering essence yet in the bold and craft sharing hands of the band, everything comes in an unworn design and with unique nature. Previously mentioned inspirations again can be grabbed from the track but equally there is something of bands like Damn Vandals and Turbonegro to the raw and virulent attack.

The EP’s title track brings things to a close offering a drama coated, intensity loaded temptation from its first breath which may lose some of its threat as things ‘calm’ a touch and vocals become entangled in spicily wiry grooves but never loses its intrusive touch or creative appetite within its thrilling attitude loaded incitement. It is a gripping end to a continually galvanic proposition hard to find anything other than real pleasure with.

The Wolf Machine EP is audacious and impulsive in character and sound if admittedly not so much in major originality but even there the seeds are openly being sown and bred within its four songs for blossoming further down the line. Saint Apache is ready to make their mark and if Wolf Machine is a hint to the things to come, bring it on.

Wolf Machine is out now across most stores.

https://www.facebook.com/saintapache  https://www.instagram.com/saintapache   https://www.twitter.com/saintapache

Pete RingMaster 25/07/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

White Noise Radio – Cosmos

Offering an eagerly tenacious union of hungry riffs and resourceful grooves, Cosmos is the second EP from UK outfit White Noise Radio. The band’s ear catching alternative rock owes plenty to inspirations ranging from Porcupine Tree and Karnivool to Incubus and Opeth but proven across four eventful tracks to carry a host of distinctive and potential carrying attributes likely to set the Bristol quintet a couple of steps  aside from the crowd.

Formed in 2014, White Noise Radio has forged a potent reputation and stature across the South-West, pushing broader awareness with their self-titled debut EP last year. Recorded at the legendary Sawmills Studio in Cornwall, Cosmos is poised to draw greater attention the way of the band with its captivating tapestry of melodic and sonic enterprise around a clutch of choruses which simply demand involvement.

The EP opens with the excellent Siren, a song instantly baiting ears with a fine percussive lure, their clipping touch an inviting dance to which melodies and the dark throb of Mark Detre’s bass add even greater potency. Soon the song opens up a teasing web cast by the guitars of Antoine Maas and Ben Lampard, a draw intensifying in weight and trespass before the lead vocals of Lampard grace a mellow breath coming forth within the encounter. There is still a dark edge to the song, the rhythms of drummer James Gill and Detre almost as portentous as they are progressively funky. It is a bold and compelling mix, only increasing its snarl and draw as the song blossoms across a more tempestuous yet controlled and always evolving landscape, with adventure in its creative hills.

Without knowing their influences it is not too difficult to guess the touch of bands like Karnivool and Incubus but similarly that individual character of the White Noise Radio sound is apparent and just as vocal within the equally striking Gone Inside. The wiry riffs of its entrance again make for a richly appetising lure, the guitars and bass seductive and sinister as they continue their invitation whilst subsequent mystique lined grooves flirt alongside before a heavier breath sweeps through it all. As its predecessor, the track twists and turns through a revolving spiral of aggression and intensity, each bringing new textures and drama to easily embrace as the five-piece technically and creatively weave with increasing dexterity.

Latest single, Dawning is next, the song a calmer proposal with a celestial tone to its melodies and bouncy energy to its rhythmic enticement. Vocally Lampard again swiftly impresses, his guitar play also engaging alongside the suggestive flare of Maas. A mellower encounter in comparison to the first pair, it too has a fire in its belly which erupts in sonic bursts and though for personal tastes lacking the final bite and boldness of the first two songs, the encounter has ears and appetite bound in no time.

Wires bring things to a similarly collected close, its Tool-esque tranquillity almost deceitful of the emotional and fiery energy waiting to break at certain times. Throughout there is a dark almost predacious edge to the bass and riffs, a fine tempering to the spiralling sonic lights of the guitar and the ever harmonious and inviting tones of Lampard just as magnetically backed by Maas. With a Bush like scent also seeping from the song, it makes for a fiercely gripping conclusion to a firmly pleasing release.

White Noise Radio has not quite found their unique voice yet but Cosmos suggests it is coming whilst offering songs which quickly get their highly enjoyable hooks into the psyche. The fact the EP only gets stronger and more impressive over listens just adds to the fun.

The Cosmos EP is out now and available @ https://whitenoiseradio.bandcamp.com/album/cosmos

https://www.facebook.com/WhiteNoiseRadioRocks/    http://whitenoiseradio.rocks/

Pete RingMaster 18/07/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Serenading webs and trapping harmonies: introducing Tali Dennerstein

Tali Dennerstein is a British rock singer, songwriter, and producer who is beginning to lure eager attention with her unique mix of Pop/Folk Rock, Gothic Rock, Grunge and Dark Ambient Music. It is a kaleidoscope of flavours embraced by imagination and invention as evidenced by her latest release and videos. We seized on the chance to find out more by talking to the lady herself, exploring her creative beginnings, her solo project, new EP and more besides…

Hello Tali and thanks for taking time out to talk with us.

Can you first give us some background to yourself?

I’m an alternative rock singer, songwriter and producer. I’ve always been very passionate about music and from a very early age, I grew up listening to a lot of 80’s and 90’s Gothic and Grunge Rock music, which really inspired me to want to start my own musical journey. I’ve always enjoyed writing lyrics and after being in a few different bands, I decided to become a solo artist, mainly because I liked having control of the direction my music was taking.

You mentioned previous bands. How have those experiences impacted on your own musical explorations?

I’ve been in a few different bands in the past. My first band was a more electronic /trip hop style band and my last band was a heavy rock/grunge band and I think it definitely helped me to decide the style and direction that I most enjoyed working with. I’ve also collaborated with a couple of artists online and recently I’ve also started a synthwave side project, which has been really fun to work on because I love the 80’s electronic sound and it’s been fun to do something so completely different.

Many solo projects decide to go under a created moniker; you?

As a solo artist I decided to use my own name, although I did consider having a band name but I just couldn’t think of anything that was good enough.

Was there any specific idea behind the direction you wanted your work and sound to offer?

I had a lot of song material, which I’d written over many years that I hadn’t really had a chance to do anything with for a long time and I really wanted to get as much of it completed and out there, as possible for people to hear. That was my main reason for starting my solo music. I also really wanted to try and create my own sound by merging both gothic and grunge rock styles together, as those were my two favourite genres of music styles, when I was growing up. I like folk and electronic music too, so I also tried to add some of these influences into my sound as well.

Are you driven by the same creative things and intent from being a fresh-faced musician or have they evolved over time?

As a solo artist, I’ve only really just begun so it’s relatively new for me but I think the same thing drives me as a songwriter and that’s always been to create meaningful music, that people can enjoy and relate to and that helps them in some way.

Since your early days as a songwriter how would you say your sound has evolved?

My sound has evolved quite a bit. I started with a very 90’s indie pop and folk rock and ambient electronic sound but my next album will be much heavier and a lot darker, both lyrically and musically.

Has it been more of an organic movement of sound or more you deliberately wanting to try new things?

I do like to experiment with different ideas and sounds, so I try new things to hear how they might add to a song but with regard to changing the direction of my music to a heavier sound that was deliberate because it’s how I felt the songs on my future album worked best and it just felt right. I do still like to write softer more folk rock and electronic tracks, as well but I tend to go with what feels right for each individual song, when it comes to creating the right sound.

Presumably a wide range of musical tastes you have an equal array of inspirations; are there any in particular which have impacted not only your music but your personal approach and ideas to creating and playing music?

I’m inspired by a lot of artists and bands but my biggest inspirations are Curve, Alice In Chains, Soundgarden, and Nick Drake. I love Curve’s Doppelgänger album and the way the guitars create just this huge wall of distorted sound. I also loved the way they used a lot of electronic elements, which merged in with the guitars. It made the tracks sound quite industrial, even though they were considered a shoegaze band. They had a very interesting and unique sound. I’ve also been very inspired by how grunge bands wrote their lyrics. They were often really deep and introspective and really made me think about what message they were trying to convey. I liked the fact that the lyrics weren’t straightforward and were hard to figure out and that everyone could find their own meaning in them.

Is there a particular process to your songwriting?

I always start by recording any melody ideas that come to my mind and I get a lot of ideas every day, so I like to keep my sound recorder next to me no matter what I’m doing. I tend to think of the subject matter usually after I’ve thought of the melody and that’s because I get an idea for the theme, usually based on the feel of the melody.

Where do you, more often than not, draw the inspirations to the lyrical side of your songs?

I’ve drawn a lot of my inspiration from some very tough situations I’ve had to face in my life, so my lyrics have sometimes reflected my hopes for things to improve, as well as my need to face the pain and fears I feel each day, due to my situation and to become stronger, despite the circumstances. I’ve also written lyrics based on things I’ve experienced in the past, such as heartbreak or bullying or about things that are happening in the world around me, that I feel strongly about such as war conflict and also about peace.

Could you give us some background to your latest release?

My latest release is a 7 track EP called Live For Tomorrow and I recorded the songs a while ago but I’ve only just recently released them.

Give us some insight to the themes and premise behind it and its songs.

The first song is called Summertime and it’s a very upbeat pop rock song, with a feel good Summer vibe. It’s about releasing and letting go of negative thoughts and instead embracing all of the small but meaningful and beautiful things that life has to offer, that we sometimes don’t always see, when we’re stuck in a cycle of depression. It’s also about keeping hope alive and just trying to stay optimistic. The second song is called Tonight and it’s a folk rock song. It’s about a girl being led on a journey, to find herself and unknowingly being guided by invisible forces in the right direction who are watching over her and protecting her. It’s lyrically written in a fairy tale style. The third song is called Live For Tomorrow and the track is an indie pop song, about a relationship that just isn’t working out and it’s about just accepting things and looking to the future and letting go of the past. The fourth track is called Hurt. It’s a slow electronic ambient song and is about unintentionally hurting someone you love and feeling guilty about it and how you miss them after they’ve gone. The fifth track is called See The Sun. This one is very 90’s Brit pop, in style and it’s about closing the door to the past and looking forward towards a brighter future. The sixth song is called Skyline and is about being there for someone who’s hurting and telling them you’ll always be there for them. The final track is called Far Away. That song is about imagining a better world, where hatred, greed and fear don’t exist.

Do you go into the studio with songs pretty much in their final state or prefer to develop them as you record?

I usually have some idea of how I think a song should sound and then I use that as a base to develop and add any ideas later on. I also work with a really great producer, and we work together until each song sounds right, so it’s a slow developmental process right up until a song is finalized.

Tell us about the live side to your music?

I love performing but at the moment, due to my circumstances I can’t perform, although I’d really love to. I’ve been concentrating on recording from home, as many songs as I can and I’m hoping sometime in the future, I’ll be able to perform them live.

It is not easy for any new artist to make an impact regionally let alone nationally and further afield. How have you found it?

I honestly don’t know because I usually use social media to get my music heard. I don’t think where I live, there’s much of a music scene.

So the internet and social media has been a potent impact on your music? Some see it as something destined to become a negative from a positive as things progress and grow. How do you see things?

I think social media is a great and very positive way for helping musician’s and bands to get their music heard. It can take time but it’s amazing to be able to connect directly with music lovers from all around the world. I think the only negative aspect is that there are a lot of musician’s and bands trying to promote themselves on social media and it can be hard to get people to click on music links as the market is saturated but it just takes determination and hard work and it is worth being on social media in the end.

Once again a big thanks for sharing time with us; anything you would like to add or reveal for the readers?

I’m giving away 3 free songs to whoever signs up to my mailing list, plus an extra free track off of my latest EP.

Explore the music of Tali Dennerstein further @ https://www.facebook.com/TaliDennerstein.music as well as https://talidennerstein.bandcamp.com/album/live-for-tomorrow-ep and https://twitter.com/talimusicartist

Pete RingMaster 13/07/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Scout Killers – Deception

Being a band we have had a close ear on for a handful of years now, we can suggest that the Scout Killers sound has now all grown up as it fuels one sizeable treat in the shape of their new EP. Deception offers four tracks of infectious alternative rock with a snarl in their heart and imagination in their nature. It is easily the UK quintet’s most striking and accomplished proposal yet and the moment far bigger spotlights could wake up to their presence.

Previous single Rip Me Apart hinted at a coming of age of their sound last year but now is shown to have been just another step in the growth bursting out within Deception. Since emerging in 2009, Scout Killers has become an established and eagerly supported presence within the British underground scene. Nudging attention with their debut EP We Cage The Storm and making a stronger impact with their self-titled first album, the Bath based outfit has increasingly blossomed in creativity and reputation as a live proposition, sharing stages with the likes of Fearless Vampire Killers, The Computers, F.O.E.S, and No Devotion among many, and through further releases like the Stand Your Ground EP of 2014 and the previously mentioned impressive single.

Deception takes things to a whole new ball park on all levels, the release quickly gripping ears and stirring the imagination with opener Freak Show. A lone guitar melody winds itself around ears first, soon being joined by the rousing tones of vocalist Scott Cox and the imposing yet inviting beats of Chris Phillips. There is instant muscle in the rising sound of the song, tension in its vocal and sonic drama, all bound in an infectiousness which fuels the attack of the forceful web of sound. The dark hues of Tom Graham-Hibbs’ bass are a throbbing grounding to the fiery textures cast by guitarists Beau Stevens and Julien Morrez, the union of the five a theatre of craft and imagination.

The seriously impressing start is followed by the mellower air of Keep Telling Me Lies though it too has a tempestuous edge with gives bite to its riffs and emotion. Bouncy rhythms temper the melancholic hue of melodies, bass and vocals bringing their individual shadows to the plaintive voice of the song. A Pearl Jam meets Alter Bridge washes over ears though as its predecessor, the track emerges as something distinct to Scout Killers, an individuality which has also come alive more dramatically with the EP.

Let It All Go hits the plateau of the opener, melodies and rhythms coming together for a suggestive start which soon becomes a more imposing proposal as Cox’s vocals once more grip attention with some superb backing from others within the band. A slice of meaty rock ‘n’ roll with a controlled attack which adds to its weight, the song truly hits the spot before You Have It All brings things to an equally heady conclusion. The final track flirts with ears initially, a guitar teasing and coaxing before being quickly joined by the rapier swings of Phillips and the growling bait of Graham-Hibbs’ bass. As catchy as it is an intensive roar, the song twists and turns with a resourceful fluidity and craft, leaving on a senses scorching stomp of a finale which demands a swift dive back into the EP’s depths.

Like many others, we have has a soft spot for Scout Killers though after Deception it has just become a touch lustier, the EP a wake-up call for national attention and beyond.

The Deception EP is out across most online stores July 7th

http://www.scoutkillers.com/    https://www.facebook.com/scoutkillers/    https://twitter.com/scoutkillers

Pete RingMaster 05/07/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright