Tirade – Nothing Dramatic EP

Back in 2016, UK rockers Tirade unveiled their self-titled debut EP, a release suggesting the potential of “something truly distinct and unique in sound and songwriting” whilst making for a rather pleasing and infectious introduction. Three years on and the Manchester hailing outfit step forward again to realise much of that promise within the Nothing Dramatic EP, a collection of contagion loaded tracks which argue the intimation of its title.

Whether Tirade has brought the full potential heard in that first release to life in Nothing Dramatic we question as while getting caught up in the individual creative webs of its songs it is easy to feel there is still plenty more to be discovered within by the quartet but there is no escaping the new wave of imagination and craft let alone instinctive catchiness fuelling five ear grabbing, appetite sparking encounters.

Nothing Dramatic opens up with its title track and immediately had ears pricked with its initial spindly riff, a hook even more enticing as a mass of noise bred temptation brews up around it. Straight away an infectious coaxing is at play, becoming even more mischievous as the band’s alternative rock bred sound erupts with a devilish swing and melodic tempting. The vocals of bassist Jake Tilley are just as magnetic as the enterprise around them, his and drummer Stevo Somerset’s manipulative rhythms caging the inventively magnetic exploits of guitarists Josh Pearl and Alex Young. Blending muscular and forceful textures with more poised and seductive hues, the song sets a high bar for the release and a moment which remained our favourite though closely nudged throughout the EP.

No Time follows with a moodier temperament though swiftly boisterous energy steers its controlled but eager stroll as vocals, harmonies and emotive melodies wrap a darker rhythmic breath. That instinctive contagiousness to Tirade songs again needs no invitation to make its persuasion as a diversity of hues and imagination continue to shape the mercurial landscape of the ear hooking track.

Similarly To Be Honest brings a tapestry of ideation and flavours to court the imagination, the song twisting with individual craft and turning with united adventure before Burned Out springs an almost punk/new wave like dexterity upon its pop ‘n’ roll canter. Both songs simply grabbed ears and appetite, the first with maybe less imposing invention than within tracks around it but with ease none the less while its successor uncaged a virulent and resourceful proposition come trespass of creative audacity to set another major moment within Nothing Dramatic.

The closing Well Spent proved just as sharp and ambitious, familiar and openly new threads of imagination woven into another seriously infectious snare of sound unafraid to reveal calmer melodic caresses within a landscape of enticing drama and angular temptation. It is a great and striking end to a similarly impressive release which only left us wanting to hear more.

Tirade themselves admit the likes of Lower Than Atlantis and Don Broco provided an inspirational seed to Nothing Dramatic and definitely there are strong hues of both to its rousing holler yet again the band’s sound has an even stronger voice of individuality which if still not in full roar is heading the right way as suggested in their definitely and highly recommended encounter.

Nothing Dramatic is released August 30th.

https://www.facebook.com/TIRADEbanduk/    https://twitter.com/tiradeband

Pete RingMaster 30/08/2019

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Unimagined – Friendless

Something wicked this way comes and it goes by the name of Friendless, the debut EP from US rockers Unimagined. Offering five rousing slices of the band’s “theatrical metal”, the release swiftly and increasingly had ears and imagination in the palms of its creative hands as it introduced a proposition we found rather easy to devour.

Hailing from St. Louis, Unimagined emerged in 2017 and soon earned a potent reputation and support across their local scene. Their sound is an animated mix of post hardcore and alternative metal; something akin to a n animated fusion of Pierce The Veil, My Chemical Romance, and At the Drive-In. It is a carnival of flavour and imagination honed into one melodically rousing and tempestuously seductive proposition which across Friendless never leaves a moment void of bold adventure and creative drama.

Too Dead To Dance sets the EP off and alone convinced there was something special going in within ears, its declaration subsequently echoed across its companions. The outstanding opener instantly had its hooks under the skin as the rich clean vocals of guitarist Caleb Freihaut align with the rapier swings of drummer Kai. The guitars of Jake Morgan and Nathan Simpson add to the emerging theatre with the waiting throat scathing roars of fellow vocalist Jarett Clark poised to erupt upon the already alluring mix. With every passing second the track simply escalated its captivation, the grumbling swing of Patrick Reuben’s bass adding further threat within the melodic enterprise embracing Freihaut‘s expressive dexterity.

It proved enthralling stuff and was soon matched by the imagination fuelling next up Something Borrowed, Something Blue. Its entrance is maybe less dramatic than its predecessor’s but with boisterous energy to its stroll and the crystalline caress of keys the song had little difficulty enticing attention, undisturbed focus rewarded with a tempest of aural drama and fiery invention brought with craft and imagination. The contrast of the lead vocalists works a treat in the creative maelstrom, the tenacity of the sounds crowding their magnetism simply rousing and as with all tracks every second, note, and syllable brings compelling persuasion.

The EP’s title track follows, Friendless. strolling in with a certain swagger as its theatre of sound and intimation quickly casts its narrative. Raw vocal prowess provides a scathing trespass within the swiftly thick theatre of enticement, the song almost bullying with its melodic wiring and muscular manipulation. Eventually its pressure becomes a senses harrying assault but one tempered by the melodic elegance of keys.

The final pair of She Was Scared Of Storms and Lemons & Sodomy simply escalated the bountiful character and prowess of the EP. The first of the pair is a serenade with fire in its belly, a pyre of creative animation and endeavour which had the body bouncing and appetite lusting while the second from its inescapably seductive melodic teasing erupts in a kaleidoscope of inflamed passion and resourcefulness ; both fascinating stages for the fertile craft and imagination of Unimagined.

As Friendless reaches new borders it is easy to expect and assume Unimagined will be launched into keener spotlights. The EP is a thrilling beginning to a proposition with still so much more to discover within their depths and imagination; something else to be eagerly excited over.

Friendless is out now via Standby Records; available @ https://standbyrecords.merchnow.com

https://www.facebook.com/UNimaginedBand/   http://unimagined.standbyrecords.com

Pete RingMaster 21/06/2019

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

House Of Hatchets – Reach

Having heard rather good and promising things about UK outfit House Of Hatchets there was genuine intrigue and a sense of real anticipation facing the band’s debut album, Reach. Across ten slabs of multi-flavoured alternative metal, the encounter swiftly revealed all the answers to any questions posed and yes the Edinburgh quintet pretty much live up to the ‘hype’ and potential offered.

Reach also quickly established that the band’s sound is a kaleidoscope of styles and textures, each track a twist from another revelling in familiar flavours and unique enterprise and all emerging as something as individual to House Of Hatchets as you can imagine or wish. A hindsight listen showed that the seeds and hints were already firmly sowed in the band’s 2017debut EP, The Grind and now in full bloom within Reach. As with that earlier encounter, the band has linked up with Romesh Dodangoda (Bring Me the Horizon, Bullet for my Valentine, Monuments) upon their first album, a release in full rousing voice from its first breath.

Moth Song starts things off, looming in from the distance on a sonic thread with soon reveals its melodic intimation. Finally face to face with the listener wires of guitar entangle with restrained but muscular rhythms, a confrontation which relaxes a touch as the voice of Chris Allison joins in and erupts in full temptation as the track instinctively bounds through ears. Even then it is a mercurial attack, ebbing and flowing in intensity and aggression as its unpredictable nature colludes with enterprise and an impassioned heart.

It is a great start to the release driven by the rhythmic powerhouse of drummer Frazer Parker and bassist Pete Cook; their muscle complemented by craft as echoed within next up Epitaph. Similarly the prowess of Allison’s delivery and tones are a potent essence in the track’s adventurous stroll, the guitars of Jamie Parker and Lewis Wheeler writhing and creating around all with sonic and melodic dexterity. As all tracks; it too is an offering which revels in its mix of metallic and melodic strains which teases of others yet never shares anything less than individuality.

The voracious instincts and contagion of The Sick And The Damned follows with its web of styles and adventure across a melody rich and unapologetically infectious exploration. A relentless temptation within which guitars seduce and sear, rhythms tempt and assault and vocals singularly entice and unitedly arouse before Lilith unveils its own sonic landscape of beauty and tempestuousness. For all their ravenous appetites and imposing trespasses, there is an instinctive poppiness to songs which is no better highlighted than with the creative and fiery cauldron of this excellent proposal.

Uprising leaps upon the listener next, its nu-metal essences colluding with crossover instincts as the song jabs and incites before sharing its full melodic anthemic roar. Hooked on its lures in quick time, the track only escalated its persuasion by the twist and turn, placing a firm hand on best track honours though quickly rivalled by subsequent incitements such as the following Burn. Ferocious in breath and intent as extreme and melodic metal merge, the track provided an invigorating and thrilling incursion to challenge its predecessor.

There is a somewhat calmer nature to Open Ocean, a melodic tide in sound and voice infesting whirling sonic eddies to break up an otherwise fierce maelstrom of emotion and intensity. It is a skilfully woven mix which if not quite matching up to other tracks just captivated before Black And Blue brought its tempest of sound and imagination to accost the senses. Virulent in every trespass shared, it too made a potent play for favourite song with the outstanding Asylum making another compelling declaration soon after with a voracious onslaught of thrash fuelled adventure.

Last One Lost brings things to a close, the song a beguiling melodic metal croon come insurgent storm with richly persuasive power in its voice and heart as the album makes a final turn in its constantly changing sequence of enterprise and adventurous sound.

House Of Hatchets is a band demanding and deserving of closer attention and their first album one which you can only see bringing that greater recognition. For all the great releases heard across a year few truly ignite real excitement levels but Reach is one.

Reach is released June 21st; available @ https://houseofhatchets.bandcamp.com/album/reach

https://www.facebook.com/houseofhatchets/
http://www.houseofhatchets.com/    https://twitter.com/houseofhatchets 

Pete RingMaster 21/06/2019

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

TREP – Lucian EP

Since forming two years back, Welsh metallers TREP has earned potent support and reputation across South Wales. Now they are hoping to spark similar reactions further afield with the release of their debut EP, Lucian and with it offering up five slices of imaginatively woven alt-metal it is not too hard to expect decent success in the intent and hopes of the Cardiff based trio.

Lucian revels in the band’s mix of classic and modern alternative metal, its character nurtured in melodic dexterity and rousing choruses gifted with individual craft. Freshly breathed and individually natured it also embraces inspirational hues of bands such as Muse, QOTSA, Mastodon, Tool and Breaking Benjamin; the first pair openly spicing the EP and its song’s inventive flavouring.

The first of two EPs which together unveil an elaborate story with themes looking at “dystopia, a dictatorship, and the use of technology for a chance at a better world…but at what cost?” the swiftly fascinating Lucian opens up with the single Silence the Crows. Immediately a guitar cast wire entangles ears, winding around their flesh with intimation and dexterity as rhythms gather their bait and in turn the quickly captivating vocal blend of guitarist Rhys Evans and the supporting tones of bassist Sam Green and drummer Max Hill steps forward. There is a flirtatious touch and lure to the song from its first breath but equally a snarl in its melodic almost deceitful smile, an edge which is as much threat as it is sonic enterprise as Evans guitar reveals greater flavouring and invention by the passage.

It is easy to hear why the song made a more than decent lure to attention when released as a demo in 2017, and is now flourishing in the band’s growth in sound and the surroundings of the EP; its rich presence matched by that of next up The Time You Have Lost. There is something familiar to the track which only adds to its swift lure and bold enterprise whilst welcoming an array of melodic and sonic hues to its creative breast. Arguably even more virulent than its infectious predecessor, the song equally has its own volatile instincts which just add to its drama and increasingly captivation.

The EP’s best track is followed by the equally enticing It’ll Never Happen. Rising on a calmer breeze of sound and attack, it strolls with inescapable catchiness but all the while is brewing up the next twist and turn which then breeds another moment of fluid but unpredictable adventure. Maybe more of a grower than its predecessor despite its swift persuasion, the song rises to set down one more highlight of Lucian before another potent bloom in Architect spins its own dextrous and resourceful web around ears. Classic metal spicing accompanies its rise, Avenged Sevenfold coming to mind a little as the song broadens its tempting but also there is something to it which carries an eighties rock/new wave flavouring. It is an essence which teased within earlier songs but is a rich scent here even if a direct comparison still evades our ears.

The outstanding Better World brings the release to a close, the song an alluring mix of melodic metal and stoner infused rock ‘n’ roll with rich grooves and versatile rhythms offering to references to the likes of Mastodon and Red Fang. Again the great vocal mix of the trio is a magnet within the captivation of the sounds set on casting their own adventure and eager temptation.

Impressive from the off and only increasing its stature and potency over time and listens, Lucian is a striking and rousing first proper introduction to TREP; so much so we are already greedily anticipating the next chapter in the sonic story.

The Lucien EP is out now; available @ https://trepmerch.bigcartel.com

https://www.facebook.com/TrepBand/

 Pete RingMaster 21/03/2019

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Down To The Bunker – Misery

A growling, snarling beast of a release, Misery is the debut album from Swiss quintet Down To The Bunker and an encounter which marks them out as one richly promising, indeed already impressive proposition. Offering up nine tracks of alt metal predation merged with heavy rock contagion and hardcore dissonance it all delivered with potent technical prowess and an uncaged heart, the release is one wake-up call to and declaration of intent from one rather exciting outfit.

Formed in 2012, the Genève hailing band has worked through years of line-up instability as it searched for the right personnel. It is a time though the band equally used to explore and hone a sound which is as unpredictable as it is varied and adventurous. A self-titled EP in 2015 drew keen attention though its support live was a struggle with again a changing line-up trespassing the next steps for Down To The Bunker. Now though things seem to have settled and with the band’s strongest line-up to date, the stability relishing result being the striking Misery.

Embracing a sound which sees the likes of Tool, Korn, Rage Against The Machine, Meshuggah, Gojira, Promethee, and Code Orange amongst its inspirations, Misery is an album which arouses as it challenges. Almost every moment has attention glued to its lures, the thrill of the unexpected rearing its head throughout an encounter which twists the familiar into its own pattern of fresh imagination and invention. Certainly there are moments where it ebbs and flows in the intensity of its temptation but there are few if any moments where it allows the listener to impulsively drift off elsewhere.

From the opening bait of first track Mother, the album was burrowing under the skin; sonic lures straining against the speakers urgently wanting out. The guitars of Matt and Jerem continue to bait the senses as heavier and darker strands join them, the bass of Arnaud a predatory taunt alongside the considered but imposing swings of drummer Léo. Completed by the fine tones of vocalist Jo, the track swiftly grows into a formidable and compelling incitement, imagination and unpredictability increasingly fuelling its enterprise and inescapable persuasion.

The increasingly magnetic and impressive start is easily continued by the album’s title track. It too springs from a seductive sonic lure if one which lances the senses rather than caresses them. The emerging web of guitars ensnared ears with swiftly nagging and devious intent; a strength of coercion matched in voice and rhythm. There is a touch of Mudvayne to the track at times which does it no harm or indeed the atmospheric winds which bring haunting melodies amid seemingly calm but dark aural intimation.

With the twisted canvas of The Asylum a refreshing bedlam of sound and individual craft shaped into another tantalising captivation come threat and the, at times, even more creatively unhinged and similarly fascinating Chrysalis, there is no let up on attention and enjoyment. Each track lured and trapped both with a creative greed which alone marks Down To The Bunker out, a dexterity in thought, songwriting and adventure which equally infests next up Ethics. As with all songs, it is a writhing collusion of sonic vines and metallic dissonance matched in vocal and lyrical dispute, and like each a blend of the barbarous and seductive as a cast of styles and flavours join up to ignite the band’s imagination and sound. There are moments of deceptive and corrupted calm which maybe disrupt the flow and impact of the track but it is that unexpected ideation which also makes it as potent as anything within Misery.

Through the intimately reflective and melodically evocative Waves, a quest with its own underlying snarl, and the sonically invasive and haunting Lost In The Desert, there was no let up on bold enterprise and striking intimation. The latter is like a senses suffocating limbo which slowly but surely reveals it’s waiting demons and distortions resulting in an experience which gloriously tests and provokes.

a final pair of bonus tracks in Machine and Alive brings the album to a dramatic and imposing close. The first and another major highlight of the release openly wears familiarity in its holler yet it would be hard to say it is anything other than a Down To The Bunker creative clamour while its successor prowls, pretty much crawls through ears with a great mix of heavy grunge and rapacious metal bound in melodic volatility.

It is a great end to an album which just pleasures and grows more impressive over time. In their seventh year Down To The Bunker will be making their first introduction to a great many with Misery but it is easy to believe they will be no strangers to them and major spotlights hereon in.

Misery is released February 22nd via Tenacity Music; available @ https://tenacity-music.bandcamp.com/album/misery

https://www.facebook.com/DownToTheBunker

Pete RingMaster 20/02/2019

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Chasing Dragons – Faction

There is no doubt there has been plenty of eager anticipation for the debut album from British rockers Chasing Dragons, especially since the release of their last EP, Faction: Prologue, a couple years back. It was a kind of teaser for the band’s first full-length, unsurprisingly called Faction, which built on their earlier offerings and successes whilst peering into a whole new landscape of sound and imagination, indeed intimation now fully explored and expanded within the new encounter where we would suggest, the Chasing Dragons sound has come of age.

The time since the last EP has also seen the Leeds outfit truly establish themselves on the UK live scene with a big reputation to match, Chasing Dragons sharing tours and stages with the likes of Stone Broken, The Qemists, Skid Row, SikTh, InMe, Diamond Head, Aaron Buchanan and The Cult Classics, Courage My Love, Skarlett Riot, Theia and many more. Featuring nine new songs along with re-recorded versions of the three tracks from the Faction: Prologue EP, the album swiftly ignites attention and imagination with opener Factionless. Part intro part full intimation, the track stretches up from its initial arousal on the ever striking tones of vocalist Tank. Like a flame within unsettled atmospherics, her potent presence is a rich lure and spark for the outstanding piece’s subsequent shadow bound predacious stroll. Portentous yet virally inviting, the track masterfully erupts before making way for the melodically inflamed How The World Went Black. Guitarist Adam quickly spins a web of metallic temptation woven with melodic rock enterprise whilst the track bites through the determined beats of Katie, they courted by the dark rumble from Murf’s bass. Progressive hues emerge as the song evolves, technical craft lining its invention as all the while Tank radiates with her powerful and impressive delivery.

Amongst the band’s influences stand artists such as Halestorm, Avenged Sevenfold, and Bullet For My Valentine, all open spices to the band’s individual recipe as proven again by the melodically vociferous roar that is Parasite and the dramatic exploits of Like Gravity. The latter is a tempest of textures and flavours carrying a volatility which accentuates its warmth and elegance rather than devours them. As many tracks, it is a proposition which grows by the minute through new twists and avenues, all unpredictable and each an imaginative turn along the track’s magnetic journey.

 Through the equally tense Bareknuckle Lover, the mercurial attack of the track as alluring as it is resourceful, and the lively emotive roar of For Kingdom For Glory, Chasing Dragons continue to add fresh adventure to their release. The second of the two in some ways promises more than it delivers, certain inventive moments not exploited as much as personal tastes wished yet is still a gripping snare of sound.

The calmer climate and croon of This Time Is Ours allowed a breath as it simply enthralled though it too has a sprightly nature which eventually catches fire with Adam casting another striking blaze veined with mazy temptation before the riveting Devil In Her Eyes wound eager attention around its tantalisingly creative fingers and in turn The Connection takes ears on a saunter through gothic lined shadows and emotionally suggestive caresses before subsequently erupting into a furnace of muscular sonic theatre. The second of the trio is especially irresistible, every moment a clever thread into the next unexpected and virulent turn of the song though then pretty much matched in glory by its successor.

As the classic seeds of the similarly impressing I’m No Devil (I’m Just A Girl) catch fire within its metal/heavy rock drama and Whitehorse teases and fascinates, the album continues to reveal new aspects in sound and craft; the latter’s haunting opening passage an especially mouth-watering incitement for ears and imagination which hints at new corners and corridors for the band to explore ahead.

We Are The Wall concludes the release, the track a ravenous onslaught of sound and intent driven by rapacious rhythms and coloured by wiry grooves and rich melodies as Tank for a final time powerfully incites thoughts as she potently roars.

It is a fine end to an equally ear-catching album which as suggested declares Chasing Dragons at a new level in songwriting, sound, and performance, a plateau teasy to suspect the metal/rock world will be unable to ignore.

Faction is available now across most online stores.

Chasing Dragons November 2018 Faction Headline Tour

 2nd – Manchester – Satan’s Hollow – support Ward XVI, Soul Desire, Fear Me December

3rd – Croydon – Croydon Rocks Fest

4th – Southampton – Joiners – support Novacrow + TBC

6th – Norwich – Brickmakers  – support The Killing Culture + TBC

7th – Birmingham – Hammer & Anvil – support Novacrow + TBC

8th – Nuneaton – Queens Hall – support Novacrow + Simai + Fleer

9th – Stamford – Mama Liz’s – support Synthetic + Black Hawk Down

10th – Wakefield – Black Mass – support Novacrow + The Sourheads + Seas Of Scarlet

https://www.chasingdragons.co.uk/   https://www.facebook.com/chasingdragonsuk/   https://twitter.com/xchasingdragons

Pete RingMaster 18/10/2018

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Chandrian Kill – Bring Out Your Dead

Maybe there should be no surprise the craft and magnetism to the Bring Out Your Dead EP, the debut release from British outfit Chandrian Kill, but it still makes for a strikingly unexpected and attention entangling introduction. The band is the creative union of vocalist Nic Whitmore who previously fronted Number One Son and songwriter/guitarist Ted Clark renowned for his past creativity as part of Moesaboa and Life in the Making. Both men have been a potent part of the UK metal scene and are looking likely to continue so as Chandrian Kill.

Clark began writing for Chandrian Kill a couple of years back; in time contacting Whitmore and luring him back from his long break from music to develop and arrange the songs. This led to the duo entering the studio this past March to record the three tracks making up Bring Out Your Dead. Subsequently mixed and mastered by Brad Tuttle (Seventh Studios), the EP has emerged a riveting proposition with its weave of predacious melodic metal with the eager animation of alternative metal aided by more than a hint of the gnarly attributes of djent.

Bring Out Your Dead opens up with new single I Collide. Instantly voice and guitar link up in a rich melodic lure as darker rhythms keenly prowl. It is a warm enticement though swiftly showing its volatile nature as irritability surfaces through djent natured trespasses and rawer throated vocals. Similarly there is an increase of fire to the melodic enterprise as the pair creates a cauldron of contrasts and emotive intimation in the music alone, Whitmore’s ever alluring vocals sharing that internal conflict within the exploration of the external one perpetually working away through our lives.

It is a captivating introduction to release and band which is as powerfully backed by the calmer but even darker Filter Off. Its entrance is a sonic mist of sorts but soon spreading for the wiry melodic and rich vocal enticement of the track to involve ears and imagination. As with the first, shadows lurk and rise in vocals and sound as the track revolves its unpredictable spiral of emotive suggestion. The turns become more voracious and antagonistic as the song proceeds, each twist a new fresh proposal to get enticed by with an increasing appetite.

Remain Alive concludes the release, the track casting its own individually melodic flames within another tempestuous climate. Its turmoil though has a stronger temper in the melodic web of the song, keeping it relatively restrained throughout though it is always bubbling away trying to break free. It is a tension crafted by Clark which is emulated in the vocal dexterity of Whitmore, the pair creating a trespass as fearsome as it is seductive.

The first in a sequence of planned EPs, Bring Out Your Dead as forcibly pleasures as it mercifully captivates. The band’s sound has been referenced to the likes of Deftones and Stone Sour, and there are moments when Skyscraper (the great nineties rock outfit) flicker in thoughts, but truthfully Chandrian Kills have a sound individual to all and just as flavoursome as all mentioned.

Bring Out Your Dead is out now via Bar3 Records.

https://www.facebook.com/Chandriankill/   https://twitter.com/ChandrianKill

Pete RingMaster 10/09/2018

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright