Raketkanon – RKTKN#3

Four years or so back with a single track Belgium outfit Raketkanon had us hooked. Florent was one of those lust fuelled moments we all have from time to time; an inescapable connection which their subsequent second album reinforced with a longer to work but just as persuasive temptation. Now the Flemish band has returned with its successor and an even more ridiculously compelling and creatively maniacal proposition.

In many ways RKTKN#3 is the obvious continuation of the Ghent hailing quartet’s unique sound and inimitable endeavour but swiftly proves itself a whole new escapade of raw imagination and manipulative noise. The years between releases has seen a bold new maturity rise in songwriting and craft as well as creative babble, every moment of their new trespass angling to and effortlessly succeeding in getting under the skin while again vocally frontman Pieter-Paul Devos fingers the imagination and raucously roars in his own perpetually intelligible language, one which constantly teases recognition and understanding with every squall and seduction escaping his fevered throat for another layer of texture and intimation to devour and play with. RKTKN#3 rears up from a dark place, its breath at times as dystopian as it is invigorating and each spread of its suggestive soundscapes a beguiling intrusion on the assumed safety and composure of mind and senses.

The album springs into life with Ricky sauntering on the wiry lures of Lode Vlaeminck’s synth. Inherently infectious rhythms are soon cast by drummer Pieter De Wilde, his swings becoming more rapacious as the raw senses squirrelling throes of Jef Verbeeck’s guitar burst forth. Devos’ restless tones quickly add to the increasingly virulent incitement; intrigue and mayhem coating every colluding texture even as warm calms emerge to subsequently share their own growing paranoia.

It is a riveting start to the album swiftly matched by the even more asylum like Fons. Vocal gabble leads sonic stalking, the guitar offering initial glimpses of the track’s predacious heart before both ignite with the fiery blaze of the synth’s unpredictable melodic causticity. As everywhere, ever ready unpredictability soaks every twist and turn; steering the imagination and an increasingly greedier appetite for the song’s crazed composure and seductive ferocity.

Mélody matches the instinctive catchiness of its predecessor with its own melodic coaxing; vocal seduction and gentle caresses of guitar teasing forth the ever fertile and varied enterprise of Vlaeminck’s synth. There is a mordant lining to its tempting though which openly simmers but never truly ignites as the track continued to enthral before Hannibal breaks its borders. Atmospheric inkling seeds the threatening pulse of a rhythmic and electronic march, a further sinister repose the base for an even greater ravening file of sonic trespass. The track is superb, fiercely manipulative and soon had this body instinctively stomping to the feral quality to the Raketkanon sound.

Even the melancholic yet vibrant serenade of Robin wears this untamed edge on its sleeve, a suggestion of wild instincts almost taunting from within its hypnotic post punk siren calling while Lou immediately after scents its own alluring disquiet with individual melodic alchemy, every gathering thread and layer of sound portentous in its radiance. It is a predictive tone eventually given corrosive voice as the track embroils the senses in its ravenous dissonance. A fusion of progressive and noise rock with any carnivorous flavour you can imagine, the song lures and seduces with a slower proving compared to its fellow protagonists but no less successfully persuasive prowess.

The senses stabbing eruption of next up Harry instantly had ears and senses on board, De Wilde sheer rabid coercion before synth and guitar entangle their own adventurous cajolery which is more than matched by that of Devos’ ever fecund antics. Creative haywire bred on organised deviancy, it is simultaneously dance-floor rabid and imagination provocative, the latter trait tauntingly exploited by the following Ernest with its wonderfully nagging qualities within another captivating sonic kaleidoscope.

The album is closed up by Mido, an anomalously harmonious serenade as disturbingly haunting as it is infectively engaging which simply seduced from start to finish. As all tracks, it is a lure of individual uniqueness which echoes the idiosyncratic character of the Raketkanon sound

At a push the Belgian Rocketcannon is kind of akin to an entanglement of Melvins, Devo, Powersolo and Coilguns yet still pretty distant from what that hints at but as RKTKN#3 proves it is something rather special which is all you need to know.

RKTKN#3 is out now via Alcopop! Records @ http://ilovealcopop.awesomedistro.com/products/636359-raketkanon-rktkn3-12-cd and also available on cassette @ https://bethshalomrecords.bandcamp.com/album/rktkn-3

http://www.raketkanon.com   https://www.facebook.com/Raketkanon/

 Pete RingMaster 30/04/2019

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Best Ex – Ice Cream Anti Social

photo by ana massard

Moving from their more bracing pop punk guise of Candy Hearts to a more electro/indie pop natured proposition, Best Ex has just released their first EP under the new moniker. Offering six slices of warm, bubble gum scented catchiness Ice Cream Anti Social is a swiftly engaging encounter which belies the darker lyrical contemplations within.

Consisting of Mariel Loveland, Matthew Ferraro, and John Clifford, Best Ex have taken the poppy aspect of their Candy Hearts exploits full-on with their fresh evolution though as suggested there is still an edge to things if more in word than sound. Talking about their new EP, singer songwriter Loveland said, “Ice Cream Anti Social is sort of an ode to those moments where you’re alone in your room and reflecting on your life. As a whole, it covers those sorts of thoughts you can’t kick when you’re lying in bed about to fall asleep, or its midnight and you’re in your underwear, eating ice cream out of the carton, wondering what the heck happened to you.

It swiftly has ears and body on board with the single Girlfriend, the song a breeze of infectious warmth and electronic buzzing around the captivating voice of Loveland. Guitars bring a steelier fizz to proceedings, that slight edge courting the unbridled pop heart of the encounter. There is little to not eagerly embrace about the song even if, as its companions, it does not quite venture the realms of uniqueness as boldly as it might have. Nevertheless it is a temptation to greedily devour leading keener intrigue into the synth pop funk of Lonely Life. The eighties tinge of the opener is repeated within its successor, the track like a blend of Bananarama and The Ting Tings and again a captivating invitation on its own to take a lick of  Ice Cream Anti Social.

February 4th is a mellow reflection with poetic strings and melancholic beauty a suggestive charm while the following Someday is another instinctive catchy kiss on the ear, its electronically lined indie pop almost anthemic in its simplicity and organic temptations. It has an increasingly beguiling trait which is emulated by next up See You Again in its rough edged stroll. With a fuzzy hand from the guitars and a Belly-esque lining to the song’s character, it too has feet shuffling and hips swaying with content before Jellyfish brings it all to an appealing close with is ukulele accompanied vocal serenade.

As suggested, Ice Cream Anti Social is not as distinct as it might be or as unpredictable as you may wish but there is no escaping that it is one very flavoursome and easily enjoyable romp to get the era of Best Ex under way.

Ice Cream Anti Social is out now through Alcopop! Records across most online stores and @ https://bestexnj.bandcamp.com/album/ice-cream-anti-social

 

https://www.bestexnj.com/    https://www.facebook.com/bestexnj/    https://twitter.com/CandyHeartsBand

 Pete RingMaster 19/07/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Fight Like Apes – Self Titled

Fight Like Apes Cover _Reputation Radio/RingMaster Review

It has been as good as five years since the release of their second album, though there was a rather satisfying EP in between, so it is fair to say that anticipation for Fight Like Apes’ new encounter across the board has been bursting with hungry excitement. It is a wait now relentlessly rewarded by each of the twelve songs making up the self-titled proposition, offerings taking ears and imagination on a unique and rebellious exploit of indie pop devilry. It really only takes one listen to establish the album as a favourite and barely a couple more to suggest it is going to cast as one of the major triumphs of 2015.

Hailing from Dublin and formed in 2006, Fight Like Apes and their synth pop/alternative rock sound has been luring in keen and potent attention ever since the release of the EPs How Am I Supposed to Kill You When You Have All the Guns? and David Carradine Is a Bounty Hunter Whose Robotic Arm Hates Your Crotch in 2007. The following year saw them nominated for two awards at the 2008 Meteor Irish Music Awards, and it has only been a continuing torrent of support and acclaim since, though equally there have been moments to challenge as with any band. Debut album Fight Like Apes and the Mystery of the Golden Medallion that same year poked a keener, broader spotlight, attention emulated and pushed to new heights by second full-length The Body of Christ and the Legs of Tina Turner in 2010. Their sound and songwriting had already found uniqueness in presence and character which has consistently evolved from release to release, song to song at times, and it is again prevalent upon the new offering. The time between albums two and three saw the band dropped by their record label but they decided to go down the crowd funding route with quick success. This meant that it has been a length wait for their new epic of fun but as hinted at by the Whigfield Sextape EP last year; the band’s return has only brought new seductive and vivaciously eccentric pleasures.

Unleashed through Alcopop! Records, the album quickly has ears and imagination immersed in its pop alchemy through I Am Not a Merry Man. A quaint electronic coaxing jabbed by firm beats initially the song is soon sauntering along with a melodic swagger and lusty bassline, and lit up further by the ever bewitching vocals of Mary-Kate “MayKay” Geraghty. Moments of feistier endeavour also clad the constantly alluring stroll, the song an inescapable flirtation for ears and thoughts with the flowing keys and backing vocals of Jamie “Pockets” Fox just as magnetic as the pulsating rhythms and prime melodic roar of MayKay.

The following Crouching Bees from a single crisp rhythmic rap is soon engulfing ears in an elegant weave of melodies carrying a slight Altered Images air and once more badgered by thickly tempting rhythms. Vocally MayKay again is as potent in casting a mellow seduction or an impassioned raucousness, her heightened delivery a fiery incitement to the calmer waters of the keys, though they too at times provide an off kilter element of their own. The infection of sound and imagination of the album is already enslaving the psyche two songs in and only increases its bait through Pop Itch and The Schillaci Sequence. The first of the pair is a more ‘regular’ canter of indie pop design, though as it is Fight Like Apes there is plenty of sparkling vocal adventure and sonic twists whilst the second sways over the senses with melodic eloquence. It too initially seems a more reserved example of the band’s invention and creative exploration but with an agitated rhythmic shuffle and Devo-esque electro psychosis it soon puts expectations straight.

Fight Like Apes _Reputation Radio/RingMaster Review Both songs keep enjoyment keen and appetite greedy, though everything is soon eclipsed by the brilliant Didya. Easily our favourite proposition on the album, maybe from the band full stop, the song ambles in on a melodic hook which is Weezer like. That alone has lips licked but it is once Pockets takes the vocal lead with a punkish anxiety to his tone that things erupt into genius. The throaty bass and wilder tempered beats are belligerent whilst the voice of MayKay similarly has a challenging edge to it, the blend a spellbinding incitement though it is the vocal bedlam which follows that has these ears and passions are enslaved. It is like a warped mix of The Dancing Did and The Ting Tings, pure creative mania and manna, setting up the listener for a blaze of a finale.

Numbnuts calms things down a touch next, its persuasive croon persistently littered with stirring vocal snaps and musical twists on the way to creating an increasingly fiery climax whilst its successor Pretty Keen on Centrefolds has ears captivated with an eighties synth pop bubbling that nudges thoughts of Blancmange and Soft Cell. Of course things are never that simple, punchy and at times bedlamic beats adding a drama to match that of the vocals whilst keys whip up a contagious tempting for the dance-floor.

Like a mix of Morningwood and Yeah Yeah Yeahs but all Fight Like Apes, The Hunk and The Funplace sculpts another major pinnacle for the album. Rhythmically anthemic and imposing, melodically spicy and slightly nostalgic, the song easily has ears engrossed but it is the roaring chorus which takes a great song to the plateau of brilliance. It is pop at its most dynamic, provocative, and irresistible.

There is no let-up of the thrills and creative spills as firstly I Don’t Want to Have to Mate with You swirls around ears and leads expectations on a merry dance. It is a lively breeze of fascinating textures and rousing calm providing a spellbinding theatre of sound and voice, emulated in its own way by Baywatch Nights with its even slower smoulder, though again there is a snarl to vocal moments, spicy intrigue to keys, and dark shadows to surrounding scenery. Both tracks make riveting listening, a norm across the album to be fair and continued in the excellent Maevis Beacon: Annihilation, a song with more than a whisper of Young Marble Giants to it especially in its opening minute or so. All tracks make a quick and thick first impression but some reveal even more to their depths and beauty over time with this a prime example.

The mesmeric seducing of Carousel brings the release to an emotive and reflective close, and a dramatic one as epic rhythms and brooding melodies rise as the song progresses. Folkish theatre and heavy tribal rhythms break free too in the scintillating end to a sensational encounter. It may have been a while in the making and coming but Fight Like Apes has spent that time crafting their most vigorously inventive and exciting sound yet. This is a must have for all experimental and rousing pop enthusiasts, actually just every pop fan out there.

Fight Like Apes is available via Alcopop! Records from 18th May @ https://itunes.apple.com/us/album/fight-like-apes/id981566460

https://www.facebook.com/fightlikeapes

RingMaster 08/05/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard on Reputation Radio @ http://www.reputationradio.net

Fight Like Apes – Whigfield Sextape

Fight Like Apes

Returning with four new tracks on a new label, Irish alternative/indie rockers Fight Likes Apes show themselves to be a rigorously tantalising and seriously involving encounter. The Whigfield Sextape EP is a riveting slice of noise and melodic conjuration, a healthily thrilling proposition which sets the band further apart from the pack then they already were whilst expanding their creativity with a maturity which has bred even greater potency to their sound. It is fair to say that the Dublin band has already earned a depth of acclaim and support others can only dream of, their two albums being Choice-nominated releases alone, but ahead of their new full-length, Whigfield Sextape suggests that the best is still to come from Fight Like Apes, and soon.

Released via Alcopop! Records, the EP is the successor to the band’s album The Body of Christ and the Legs of Tina Turner of 10288749_10151972843491353_2388499111256954152_n2011. Musically the release seems to be working towards a leaner but fuller concentrated melodic core whilst their ever ready to surprise sonic distortion shows new restraint to its still striking nature. Fight Like Apes absorb before masterfully seducing ears and imagination with the opening track of the EP, swiftly moving on to appetite and passions with the same appetite. Opener Crouching Bees slams firm beats through the ear to start off within a cloudy blaze of electronic melodies which hold an essence of Altered Images to their breath. Mesmeric from the first touch, and increasingly so once the sublime and fiery vocals of MayKay take their sultry grip on the senses, the song grows in strength and stature with every second. A great earthy bass tone adds shadows to the glorious encounter whilst the synths, shaped by Pockets, casts enthralling scenery to the smiling landscape of the track. As mentioned there is a less imposing discord sculpted surface to the sound of the song, melodies and warm climes soaking every note and syllable but that is not to say that musically the band does not challenge and engage with raw ingredients, just that as here they are honed into a new form of bewitching radiance.

The following bwah! Begins with slowly marching beats within a crystalline electronic weave carrying an essence of Siouxsie and the Banshees to it, a feel which was hinted at slightly in its predecessor but more open on the second song. The synths roam majestically around the senses whilst guitars and effects impose their intensive and captivating designs into the psyche. The mix of vocals from both Pockets and then MayKay paint a teasing lure which alone makes the track standout potently whilst musically, as the opener, there is a more than healthy sense of eighties synth/indie pop to the proposition which adds to the flavoursome fusion of melodic elegance and caustic rub.

The Hunk and The Funplace steps up next to steal the EP from the triumphs around it, metronomic beats and the dark faced bass around MayKay’s voice instantly hugging the imagination before the keys escape their cage to blossom a tantalising tapestry of temptation courted by the even grizzlier four string predator. It is the chorus though which sends song and passions into orbit, every aspect of the track unleashing a climactic roar before settling into an almost dainty and thoroughly captivating waltz of desire and charm. Entwining all natures of the song into its subsequent bluster and breezy intent, the song is a mouthwatering envelopment in which you can see where the suggestion that Fight Like Apes is the equivalent to the Yeah Yeah Yeahs on this side of the pond is valid; though we would suggest the band has the potential to be even greater.

The EP closes with Tyson, a track which strolls through ears with bold keys alone before vocals colour their drama, MayKay again spawning harmonic hues which simply engage on every level whilst expressively painting the narrative of her words like an artist. Arguably the least striking of the four songs but still an enthralling and invigorating tempting which lingers to leave appetites voraciously hungry for more, it brings the sensational release to an explosive conclusion.

Fight Like Apes have returned stronger, brighter, and more strikingly inventive than ever and that can only be manna for us all.

The Whigfield Sextape EP is available via Alcopop! Records now!

http://www.fightlikeapesmusic.com/

9/10

RingMaster 12/05/2014

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard from

http://www.audioburger.com

 

Johnny Foreigner – You Can Do Better

 

johnny foreigner pic

     After the ridiculously appetising and resourceful persuasion of previous album Vs Everything in 2011, it is fair to say that the anticipation and excited intrigue for the new release from Johnny Foreigner was making intensive demands before a note was heard. You Can Do Better, the fourth full-length from the English quartet does not disappoint. It is another teasing and tantalising bewitchment of the already distinctive sound of the Birmingham band but one which delves deeper into their unique landscape of songwriting and imagination. As much as the previous album enraptured and enthralled, in hindsight it was maybe too ambitious in its bulk of seventeen tracks to avoid being a mix of the brilliant with simply the satisfying, which was a triumph all the same. Consisting of a mere ten songs plus a hidden treat, You Can Do Better stalks the sun side of unpredictable and magnificence from start to finish with offerings which maybe do not always master the same pinnacles of the last release but stands alongside it and with a richer impressive consistency across its adventurous narrative and sound.

    Recorded with long-time friend Dominique James (Sunset Cinema Club) once again and the first release with new guitarist Lewes Herriot alongside vocalist Alexei Berrow, bassist Kelly Southern, and drummer Junior Elvis Washington Laidley, the Alcopop! Records released You Can Do Better has been eighteen months in the making. Berrow recently gave an ‘introduction’ to the album by saying “For the last year we’ve been messing around behind yr backs. It started with robbing drum intros from Blink 182 and ended with horns stolen from Screaming Maldini and in the middle we had these 10 (11) little encounters with a louder noise than you’d possibly be happy about. And if that sentence wasn’t enough of a secret map, we created an entirely probably fictional city for the whole mess to live in. Bands are supposed to mellow as they get older, idk quite what’s gone wrong“. As the release leaps upon and engagingly taunts the senses we can certainly confirm that Johnny Foreigner has not mellowed in presence or exploratory adventure.

    Band and album rampage through ears from the first punk bred breath of opener Shipping, a tsunami of noise and rhythms coverengulfing the senses like the jaw of a sandworm in Dune. The entrance smothers and takes the listener into its cavern of shadows before expelling a loud graze of sonic endeavour and richly gripping hooks. The distinctive voice of Berrow is soon taking over centre stage as the song’s narrative entwines the imagination, extra suasion from the equally individual tones of Southern adding extra bait to the temptation. With a throaty bass coaxing from the lady only adding to the spice alongside the rattling rhythms of Laidley and the wonderful emerging consumptive discord, the track is a maelstrom of enterprise and unpredictability engaging and provoking thoughts and emotions.

   The impressive start is exceeded by the brilliant Le Sigh, a track which slowly and mischievously walks into view before unveiling a glint in its eye as its persistently raises its energy and pace, easily drawing a greedy appetite for its thickening brew of synapse seduction through its indie dance of sonic bluster and twisted guitar twang. With the devilry of say Baddies and the almost belligerent ingenuity of The Sugarcubes mixed with the sultry temptation of Morningwood all laid in a bed of eighties discord, the track is a masterful temptress of rapacious rock revelry. The repetitive chant of the chorus with its minimal cladding also brings thoughts of Japanese band The Plastics, not so much in direct sound but simply the aural addictiveness.

    The following In Capitals also takes a reserved gait to its invitation and equally builds a feisty compelling wall of bruising garage punk like enticement through raw guitars and magnetic vocals within a shuddering rhythmic frame. The bass of Southern pulls on a bordering on carnivorous growl for its prowl whilst the sonic confrontation of the guitars comes as a weave of acidic senses scorching enterprise. The power and imagination of sound here and for most tracks steals the spotlight initially with the rewards of the lyrical adventure and imagery coming in stronger potency through further encounters, this making the album a constant treasure trove to plunder.

    Both the subdued caress of mystery from Riff Glitchard and the almost disorientating sonic brawl of The Last Queens of Scotland ignite the passions with their individual premises and inventive traps. The first is a slow smoulder of self-tempering textures and emotion hues; bass snarls contrasting guitar and vocal melodies with mesmeric emotive dependencies, whilst its successor is another fire of rabid rhythmic twists and guitar sculpted toxicity tempted and encouraged to push its limited by the equally vivacious and voracious dual vocal waltz. Being a sucker for discord in any form, it has to be said that by this point Johnny Foreigner has a tight grip with their one of a kind seduction.

    Stop Talking About Ghosts flirts and romps with ears next, its entwining of bracing and disharmonious eagerness with reserved elegant shadows eventually merging into a greater transfixing anthemic riot of exhaustive rock ‘n’ roll before the more pronounced stalking enticement of Wifi Beach next takes over. It is a song which took longer to convince than others, its reflective and enjoyably messy soaking of the ears a deceptive slice of noise sculpting which without lighting fires proves to be one more highly pleasing provocation to immerse in. The same can be said about To The Death and Le Schwing in many ways, neither pulling out with ears that instantaneous connection of earlier songs but evolving over time into thrilling incitements, the first of the two especially persuasive with its riveting surface explosions of discord aligned to a rhythmic tango contrasting and provoking the song’s heavily shadowed emotional presence. The second of the pair sways and swaggers with a vague similarity to that elsewhere on the album, its body familiar but dressed in new hooks and mischief which ultimately leaves satisfaction and pleasure full.

    The closing antagonist, DEVASTATOR is a strong enough conclusion to a great album but arguably a little underwhelming against previous songs, though the ‘hidden’ song To The Deaf which emerges from the silence after, is a compelling epilogue which has the album leaving on a greater high. With You Can Do Better, whilst retaining all the qualities and invention which made Johnny Foreigner an irresistible proposition, the band has evolved their presence into an even more unique and rather thrilling encounter through a quite outstanding album.

http://www.johnnyforeignertheband.com/

8.5/10

RingMaster 09/03/2014

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard from

http://www.audioburger.com

Matt Pryor – Wrist Slitter

MattPryor2013

With a title like Wrist Slitter anticipation was of the darkest emotional and imposing persuasion but as the new album from Matt Pryor unveils its persuasion expectations were soon thrown a curve ball. There is certainly rich shadows and at times keen melancholia to the release but for the main it is an upbeat and vibrant romp of energy, emotive light, and thoroughly enjoyable enterprise. The album took a couple of songs for thoughts and satisfaction to get a hold and find an understanding for the refreshing offering but once connected the release provides a unfussy yet resourcefully crafted imaginative romp.

Renowned as the frontman for The Get Up Kids, Pryor has garnered just as eager acclaim for folk-tinged group The New Amsterdams, his children’s music project Terrible Twos, and indie-rock super group Lasorda which also features Nate Harold (fun.), Mike Standberg (Kevin Devine & The Goddamn Band), and Dustin Kinsey (The New Amsterdams). His own releases have also bred strong responses and respect but Wrist Slitter takes it to another level as Pryor’s finest solo moment. Released via Alcopop! Records in the UK, it is a magnetic feast of creatively flavoured rock pop leaving a healthy smile on the face and in the passions.

The album opens as if set in a jazz driven twenties speakeasy, excited echoes of the past awakening the imagination before Pryor ARR048_Matt_Pryor_Wrist_Slitter_Cover-kleinthrusts his sounds through the door to send them down an expanse of melodic pop rock in the accomplished guise of The House Hears Everything. Guitars and rhythms make an instant appeal to the emotions and without sparking major reactions wins their attention whilst the vocals of their sculptor equally lays down a strong start. As mentioned the song and the following Kinda Go To Pieces do not light a fire inside but certainly spark a decent appetite for their declarations, the second song like its predecessor providing an easy to access catchy stroll with hooks and melodies infectious if not startling in their ingenuity, a healthy enticement.

It is from the title track that Wrist Slitter suddenly turns on a distinctive and irresistible charm. The brief track complete with Cajun twang and invasive drone is a delicious and unexpected twist from which the album only expands and excels starting with the outstanding Words Get In the Way, the best track on the album. From its first breath rhythms make a firm frame for the dark throated bass and guitar swipes to grip and enthral the senses, whilst vocally the mix of Pryor and guest Steve Soboslai of Punchline makes a mouthwatering invitation into the heart and swagger of the song. There is an Everclear essence to the track which only adds to its immense lure whilst its contagious melodic coaxing and potent hooks creates an aural dance which is impossible to resist; only its briefness a slight niggle.

The acoustic folk opening to Before My Tongue Becomes a Sword makes a gentle entrance after a breath into another impressive and energetic prowl of the passions. The two parts do not seem connected, certainly in sound but work well as the subsequent romping blaze of pop punk seduces attention and imagination. With again guest vocals, this time from Chris Conley of Saves The Day and Braid’s Bob Nanna, and Bontempi like keys the song is a lo-key high appealing slice of melodic adventure immediately equalled by the bouncy If I Wear a Disguise. An eighties new wave feel coats the melodies whilst vocally Pryor has an earnest upbeat energy and emotional depth to his delivery to match the enthusiastic sounds around him.

The evocation of As Perfect As We’ll Ever Be is soon slowly burning its mark in thoughts and emotions, its strings a melancholic caress alongside an acoustic guitar kiss and the vocal narrative, before the Squeeze like Foolish Kids, with Pryor finding a definite Glenn Tilbrook lilt to his voice to match the UK band’s melodic prowess, weaves a pleasing embrace over the ears. Say What You’re Gonna Say also has potency and appeal seemingly sparked by the Deptford band, a thrilling hook laded melodic call instantly acquiring the passion’s support with again its short length of a few breaths over one minute again the only irritant.

The slower emotive walk of So Many Questions like the two before carries that Squeeze tone whilst the addictive hope wrapped emotive ramble of There Is No Us recalls the Everclear comparison in a merger with The Super Happy Fun Club. Both bring the listener into a relaxed state ready for the closing energetic saunter of the punkier Won’t Speak To Me which eventually leads the listener into a reprise of the opening scenery. It is an excellent conclusion to a richly pleasing and enthralling release, one which to be honest strongly exceeds what were maybe low expectations, those assumptions soon shoved back to their source with a creative craft and smiling adventure which leaves satisfaction very happy.

Wrist Slitter is available now on CD and 150 ltd edition blue marble vinyl and will be supported by a 9-date headline tour around the UK (with support from Allison Weiss) early next year.

UK TOUR DATES: February 2014:

14 – Southampton, Joiners

15 – Kingston, Fighting Cocks

16 – Nottingham, Bodega

17 – Newcastle, Cluny

18 – Glasgow, Cathouse

20 – Manchester, Sound Control

21 – Bristol, The Exchange

22 – London, The Borderline

23 – Tunbridge Wells, The Forum

http://www.ntwha.com/

https://www.facebook.com/mattpryorsongs

8/10

RingMaster 02/12/2013

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard from

http://www.audioburger.com