Insanity – Toss a Coin

If there is brawl you really want to be at the heart of, it is Toss a Coin the new album from Swiss hardcore outfit Insanity. It brings eleven insatiable confrontations to the ear; a clutch of spirit raising, defiance driven roars which refuse to take not today sir for an answer.

With a sound bred in the New York hardcore scene at its height, Insanity has sonically bullied and physically roared their way to a potent reputation and presence within the European punk scene over the past five years, one now sure to be re-ignited again by Toss a Coin. Since emerging, the Lucerne quintet has surged from their homeland across Europe into international waters, sharing stages with the likes of Hatebreed, Agnostic Front, Madball, Sick Of It All, Terror and many more along the way as well as headlining their own successful tours. Their debut album, No Limit, set down a certain marker in their ascent, its well-received presence matched by that in success by the Ready To Row EP. Released through Bastardized Recordings is a new powerful statement from the band, in sound and political/social quarrel as well as simply rousing punk ‘n’ roll.

With gang shouts, body manipulating grooves, and addiction forging hooks as prevalent as raw antagonism and instinctive antipathy to the world’s ills, Toss a Coin snarls and harasses from its initial second and opening breath of first up No Tolerance For Intolerance. The gnarly tone of Pery Zemp’s bass instantly has ears lured, riffs a great dirty backing before both collude with the rapier like swings of drummer Raphael Renggli and the first of involvement enticing band shouts. Vocalist Tobias Küng is soon to the fore directing middle finger reply to prejudice, the guitars of Yannick Balmer and Michael Portmann casting a mesh of grouchy riffs and animated grooves. There is no escaping the swift influence of its attitude and body, a submission subsequently given to song after song in varying but certain degrees thereon in.

The excellent start is matched by the caustic stomp of Find A Way, its intensive assault a furious charge compared to the swagger of the previous protagonist but veined with melodic tendrils and scythes and twisting spirals of noise. For all the rage, already an inbred infectiousness is as powerfully commandeering reactions, Insanity entangling both with imagination and zeal. It is a quality as rich within the album’s title track and indeed What I See after that. The first of the pair points and challenges with every syllable and note, band cries and neck muscle testing catchiness a particular trespassing incitement within nothing but while the second flows from its predecessor upon another deliciously grouchy bassline into a web of seriously grooved and rapacious punk rock with the instincts to rock ‘n’ roll.

Four tracks down and we would have forgiven any upcoming slip-ups such the potency of the quartet but no second is wasted in allowing ears and attitude a moment to relax, With My Friends an immediate air punching, hip guiding announcement of kinship stoking the fires. Again pleasure is ignited by Zemp’s bass, its metallic grievance manna for personal taste more than matched by the rest of the band within the inflammatory holler.

Down consumes ears in a cantankerous bawl next but one delivered with deliberate restraint carrying a perfect level of volatility; a blend lifting the body to its feet and vocal chords to their highest decibel throughout. Such success is an easy finding for All I Need too; its badgering riffs and probing rhythms herded into greater feistiness by Küng and listener by the ever persuasive and addictive gang clamours.

Through the mercurial but persistently wilful and stormy climate of One Day and the surly belligerence of $laves, there is no let-up in disdain and disobedience or imagination lit invention which may at times take a while to reveal it’s surprises within the tempests but hungrily makes each track distinct and riveting incitement; What’s Hardcore just as eager to prove the point with its punk ‘n’ roll revelry. Like a vipers nest, the song writhes with grooves, their snaky lures even flirting away when the song is running headlong with punk predation.

The final ignition of defiance and unbridled pleasure is provided by Die For, a body stomping charge riding thrash nurtured riffs like a surfer as melodies flare and rhythms prowl. Musically, the senses feel like they are being stalked by the track, vocally being willingly drawn with the spirit into mobilisation, both whilst rocking like a hound in heat to their combined militancy.

It is a glorious end to an outstanding encounter entwining the familiar with instinctive contumacy and enterprise resulting in one of, if not, the most enjoyable and manipulative treats heard so far this year.

Toss a Coin is out now through Bastardized Recordings @ https://bastardizedrecordings.bandcamp.com/album/toss-a-coin  or http://insanity.ch/store/

http://insanity.ch/    https://www.facebook.com/insanity.metal

Pete RingMaster 26/05/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Grabbing the throat of attention with Chasing Sounds

chasing-sounds_RingMasterReview

Uncaging their own individual punk fuelled snarl from the heart of Austria, Chasing Sounds is a band with a sound as young and fresh as its existence and already beginning to stir up real attention. We recently seized upon the chance to find out more in interview with the rising band, taking a look at their origins, debut album, and what drives them forward…

Can you first introduce the band and give us some background to the band’s beginnings?

We are Chasing Sounds a melodic HC/Punk band based in Vienna, Austria.

I’m Attila one of the founding members, I play bass and try to “sing” harsh backing vocals in the band. I’m the songwriter, and since I compose mainly on guitar, I record all the guitars and bass in the studio as well. The band was ”officially” formed by Mate (drums) and me on Aug. 8th 2013 which means; it was the day when we put together our very first song ‘Knock Out which later became our first single along with a music video to it as well. Mate and I knew each other since elementary school, and we’ve been in our first garage band together back in 2005. We managed to break up before we even had a singer or a gig. We remained friends though, hung out and knew it way before that we were gonna end up in a real band together. The only question was when. It took us ”only” 8 years to get our shit together. So everything was planned, it wasn’t just a lucky coincidence. In early 2015 Florian (singer) and Mate K. (guitar) finalized our line-up, so I moved backed to my beloved bass. This was the original plan, and it seemed to work for a while

So you were in other bands before; how has those experiences impacted on what you are doing now?

Myself (Attila) have played in a lot of other bands before, the latest was a now defunct progressive punk band (or however should I label the genre) called Good Reason. In that band I had the challenge to keep up with 3 very talented amazing musicians. I learned a lot from those guys.

I was in another HC/Metal band before and a shitty metalcore band too. Mate (drums) was in 2 progressive metal bands Dysentery and Disconcrete. They’re both defunct now, but released great music, you can find them somewhere on the internet I guess…

What inspired the band name?

That’s an awesome story, we had the band name way before we had any material written or we even went to jam under the name Chasing Sounds. It was one of those average high school night outs, me (Attila) Mate and another friend of ours were hanging out drinking and smoking at Mate’s Grandma’s basement; our usual spot to hang out after going thru all the bars in Bratislava. We were pretty drunk and under the influence of other substances, listening to some weird electro music, playing around with words Mate spat out Chasing Sounds. We knew it at that very moment that this will be our band name if we ever manage to put a band together. I remember this like it was yesterday. This was around 2010.

cs3_RingMasterReviewWas there any specific idea behind the forming of the band and also in what you wanted it and your sound to offer?

I wanted to combine all the styles of music which I love. Most of the songs are heavily guitar driven, I like fast punk rock parts, great grooves and sing-a-longs. I knew it from the start how I wanted my band to sound like, and I think we’re on the right path and even the people seem to get it. Sometimes we get these crowd responses that “dude you guys totally sound like Ignite, Rise Against or Strike Anywhere” which is really sweet to hear and is a huge compliment. Even tho’ I don’t really hear it this way, but for sure those bands influenced us as well.

Do the same prime things still drive the band when it was fresh-faced or have they evolved over time?

I always set goals for us. When it was only the 2 of us it was about writing songs, getting a singer and a guitar player so I could switch to bass, and have a line-up and start playing gigs. Then it was time to record an album, make videos, tour, and the same thing over and over again. Now of course we want to play bigger and better shows, play more in general, do another record. We are searching for a Booking Agency or Promoter who would help us with the booking of our gigs and bigger tours. So if you’re reading this, give us a hint or spread the word. Thx!

How would you say your sound has evolved since it began?

Since the band itself is really not that old, the sound is pretty much the same. We use the same equipment we did 2 years ago, and everything sounds pretty much the same, when we play live. I’m gonna experiment with new sounds and different songs on our next record, so if you guys will still follow us, you can expect something different, but again, it’s not gonna be a radical departure, I mean we’re not gonna start playing bluegrass or something like that…

Any progression within the band and your music is more of an organic movement or more the band deliberately wanting to try new things?

It was all organic, once we compose a new song and we like it, we will keep it even if it’s not exactly what the rest of the songs sound like. I think this is one of the best parts about creating music, you’re basically unlimited in what you’re doing; you can play the same melody, chord progression or whatever in a million ways, you just have to pick one you like the most.

Most of the songs we write are not planned. When I say to myself that now I’m gonna sit down and write a great song, it’s not gonna work that way.

Presumably across the band there is a wide range of inspirations; are there any in particular which have impacted not only on the band’s music but your personal approach to creating and playing music?

Since I’m the songwriter most of the times, things that happen to me personally, things I see happening in my near and own experiences and after hearing a great song from somebody if it kicks me in.

Is there a particular process to your songwriting?cs-art_RingMasterReview

I’ll just sit down with my guitar and noodle around. If something catches my attention I’ll try to build a structure around the main riff, and turn it into a song. Then I record it on my phone, and will bring it to band practice. If it’s not total bullshit and Mate’s feeling it too, we jam on it add or take away parts and will go back to it. If we like it we keep it in mind and will work on it the next week. This is the usual writing process we follow. Sometimes we just come in, take our instruments and start from zero. If the musical chemistry hits at that point, something magical can come out. This is the unusual side of how we write music, and how our best songs were made. See Yesterday’s no Different.

Are you a band which goes into the studio with songs pretty much in their final state or prefer to develop as you record?

Since it’s really not affordable to go into any studio, get stoned or drunk, and just jam on a riff and call it a song we don’t do that. I think nowadays 90% of the bands won’t to that, because it’s just a waste of a lot of money. The times when record labels gave 1 million dollar recording budgets to bands are over. It just makes no sense to do it in my opinion unless you have your own studio.

Give us some background to your latest release.

Our debut album Elektrobioscope came out on December 3rd 2015 so as your reading this, it’s gonna be one year old in around two weeks. I think there is a little bit of everything on this album; people who listen to Hardcore, Metal, Punk or any other sub-genre of this music will find, at least one song which they will like. Just take the opening song Here we Are, it’s an instant throwback to the 90’s skate punk scene, fans of fast paced bands like Pennywise, No Use For a Name  and similar will probably like it. Another song Spirit of AC is again very pop/punk driven like late 90’s Blink 182 it’s got that Dude Ranch feel to it. An album which created a musical milestone in my life, and if anyone wonders what does ”AC” stands for its Atlantic City, the place where we hung out and got the inspiration for this song. Moving on to other songs on the album; Corrupted Bullshit, Knock Out, and False Flag Attack are straight up old school hardcore songs, with a great portion of NYHC vibe. Fans of Madball, H2O, Biohazard, Agnostic Front should check them out. Especially when we perform them live, that’s where all the energy comes out, and if the crowd is feeling it those are the best moments of our shows. Then we got the title track Elektrobioscope and Yesterday’s no Different which are the more serious songs, and definitely the best ones on the whole record. Judge it yourself and give it a go, the album is on our Bandcamp page you can download it for FREE!

Can you give us some insight to the themes and premise behind it and its songs.

The topics of the songs are mixed. Everyday life feelings, anger, various events happening in the world, motivation, abstract, love, break-up…

Flo writes the lyrics based on what he wants to write about or after listening to the instrumentals. Or, when Attila writes a riff or the basics of a song he gives them a working title or brings an idea for a song name – Flo can relate to this and might write lyrics to that title.

Tell us about the live side to the band, presumably the band’s favourite times?

As mentioned above, you will like us playing live because there is so much energy going on stage that you either enter that bubble and forget everything outside of it or you stand still, which means something is wrong with you. This isn’t positive or negative energy. It can be both, but most importantly, it’s fun!

cs2_RingMasterReviewIt is not easy for any new band to make an impact regionally let alone nationally and further afield. How have you found it your neck of the woods? Are there still the opportunities to make a mark if the drive is there for bands?

There are hundreds of bands coming and going in a matter of couple of years. A band might start with something huge which gives them attention at start but nobody cares if they break up in a year or two. It’s more about staying stable, keeping your fans up-to date, being productive and never get bored pushing what you like to do the most.

How has the internet and social media impacted on the band to date?

The internet is a powerful tool which connects people. Social media has levels which allow smaller bands to stay connected easily with their fans on a daily basis. Of course it can be used at a much bigger scale.

Once again a big thanks for sharing time with us; anything you would like to add?

We sell two type of T-shirts as merch and some more designs are about to come. They look great so get you some and support us haha. We ship for free!

https://www.facebook.com/chasingsoundsband   https://chasingsounds.bandcamp.com/releases

Pete RingMaster 28/12/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Graveyard Shifters – High Heels & Broken Bones

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Aggressive devilry and riotous adrenaline is the order of the day as Finnish crossover punks Graveyard Shifters unleash the follow-up to their well-received debut EP of last year. Their new brawling punk ‘n’ roll stomp comes in the hellacious shape of first album High Heels & Broken Bones, a tempest of punk, metal, and raw rock ‘n’ roll with the intent of taking the world on a tour of bone crushing, senses devouring partying. At the same time band and release storm through the explosive highs and lows of life, dragging out the belligerent animal in us all for a non-stop ride of fury and fierce revelry.

Bursting out of Kerava Graveyard Shifters began in 2013, taking little time to make a thick impression with their imposing sound and similarly impacting live presence. Within six months the Brainwashed by Moonshine EP was uncaged to rouse up attention and eager support, its release last year the seed to the broad recognition now being forcibly nudged by High Heels & Broken Bones. Their new ten track protagonist demands you take notice, insists you take part, and leads the listener on a unassailable rampage of bad mannered, virulently contagious rock ‘n’ roll. It might not be the most original incitement, but as the thoroughly enjoyable trigger to mischievous deeds and thrills, it is a job superbly done.

High Heels & Broken Bones opens up with its title track and an immediate rage of rowdy riffs and thumping rhythms stirred up by the antagonistic scowls of vocalist J. Matilainen. Infectious hooks and anthemic band calls proceed to litter the insatiable call to party arms, the track like a mix of Kvelertak and Turbonegro with the punk devilment of a Black Flag as the guitars of V. Vainionpää and H. Kansonen kick up a sonic storm around voice and rhythms.

With a slightly more merciful start, the following Tearvomitor keeps things blazing intensely, its initial lure of riffs and sonic enterprise a rich spice against the exploding beats of drummer A. Salmenoja and the predacious tones of J. Sumkin’s bass. The song is soon an eyeballing, energy igniting punk roar equipped with seriously enticing hooks and again great vocal chants from across the band. Once more you can argue there are few surprises with it yet the song is a memorable and seriously potent stirring of emotions and appetite swiftly backed by the just as hostile and magnetic Buy Low, Sell High. The metal seeding of the guitar’s invention is a compelling lure caged again by a bruising conflict of attitude and confrontation rooted in vocals and rhythms, the combination a keen and flavoursome riling of ear and air.

Love On The Rocks strolls in next with a hard rock swagger and potent catchiness, its early invitation a friendly, almost poppy persuasion but just the lure into another ferocious uproar. Except this time this outburst is just one evolving moment in the imagination and sound of the song, mellow vocals and spicy hard rock tenacity revolving with aggressive and infectious elements. The most adventurous and striking track on the album so far, it is a highly pleasing, expectations defying proposal quickly emulated by both the stylish rancor of Bender with its great tempting of piano amidst rousing vocals and melodic metal guitar flames, and in turn the grizzled temperament of Pocket Puppet Show. The first of the two moves from a bright and almost cheery antagonism into a death metal bled rancor whilst the second is part hardcore and part extreme metal inhospitality with just the right amount of rock ‘n’ roll wantonness, and equally one compelling threat.

A melodic caress emerges from the ire of the song, serenading ears until the inflammatory sounds of Firestarter burn the senses and atmosphere alike. There is nothing especially dramatic and stand out about the track, or so you think, but by its seriously satisfying end it is a lingering incitement, though to be fair quickly overshadowed by the outstanding dark charm of Doomsdaydreaming. Gothic in its climate, caustic in tone, the song is a thick blackened detonation of metal virulence and punk bad blood, like Andrew W.K. and Agnostic Front in an unrestrained dust-up.

Beerserker is a similar type of ravishment, though more metal driven in its character around a furious punk heart, and another making a stronger and more potent impression than first thought, a success echoed by the closing Finnish animosity of Kyynelyökkönen. The last track bellows and incites with ease, riffs and rhythms the gripping web for bitter toned vocals and sonic trespasses to spring from.

It is a fine end to a mightily enjoyable encounter, and for us introduction to Graveyard Shifters. High Heels & Broken Bones is maybe not an album to change your world but undoubtedly will be a hefty nudge to change your listening habits.

High Heels & Broken Bones is available from June 12th on Eternal Sound on CD and digitally.

http://www.graveyardshifters.fi  http://www.facebook.com/GraveyardShifters

RingMaster 12/06/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard on Reputation Radio @ http://www.reputationradio.net

 

 

Caustic Method – The Virus

CMPic_Reputation Radio/RingMaster Review

     The Virus is a scourge to the senses as potent and inescapable as the equivalent physical protagonist is to the flesh, but a fierce ravishing easy to develop a rabid appetite for. The album is the new incitement from US metallers Caustic Method, a fury of raw and contagious animosity that stirs up the blood and puts a fire in the belly. Though the band has been devouring audiences and fans since 2003, the new release is, like for so many, our introduction to the Syracuse roar, and no finer a way to get infected can you imagine.

Caustic Method has earned a rich reputation for their sound and live performances since forming, sharing stages with everyone from Hatebreed to Cypress Hill, American Head Charge to Otep, Hed P.E. to Korn and hordes more from all diversities of metal and voracious rock ‘n’ roll. Last year The Virus EP sparked thick attention and feisty anticipation for the band’s new album, its success a step towards the band signing with Pavement Entertainment for its successor’s release.

The album launches itself on ears and senses with an instant wall of sound and the vocal roar, the song’s title Virus, the first word expelled by the throat of Matt Caustic. Right there the infection has taken hold; that initial concussive touch the opening toxin in a tide of predatory rhythms and hellacious riffs driven by a sandstorm of a vocal delivery. The track is never an out and out savaging though, Darin Scott’s grooves and hooks given space to wind their temptation around the imagination, backed similarly by the dark throaty tones of Eric Maliszewski’s bass. The Caustic Method sound brings up thoughts of bands like Hatebreed, Bloodsimple, and Mushroomhead across song and release but ultimately there is a freshness and originality which offers a distinct proposal from the NY quartet.

The opener is also the band’s current single with an outstanding video to match its presence and an explosive start to The Virus quickly reinforced by the following Left to Die Alone. This too is a blaster to the senses set on the highest setting, riffs and beats stalking the listener as vocals rummage in the psyche with Caustic’s ever gravelly persuasion. The rhythmic jabs of drummer Angel Rivera are a deceptive lure, initially seemingly merciful whilst still resonating on bone before the man’s stick swings get more creatively agitated and venomous. The song even with a slightly mellower embrace midway continues to hunt down the passions before making way for the similarly ravenous tempting of The Lone Star Tragedy. The song is a more straight forward but enjoyable offering at first, holding back its imagination until it is well entrenched in ears. Clean vocals and spicy grooves soon break free, though are soon swamped by the hostility that set things off and the track ends as it began, snarling relentlessly.

CAUSTICMETHOD COV_Reputation Radio/RingMaster Review  Integrity Fail continues the bruising next, but with a bluesy melodic seducing which spices up its hooks. Aligned to a less intensive energy and atmosphere, it ensures the track is a juggernaut with the hand brake on in attack but a heavyweight persuasion that prowls and lingers as more variety is shown within The Virus, and in turn S.D.V. straight after. The track unleashes its dirtiest heavy rock ‘n’ roll traits to collude with a metal ferocity, a mix of vocal delivery as enticing as the blend of flavours stirred into the tempest of sound.

Through the groove infested Six Feet and the rhythmically compelling Which Way the River Runs, the contagion grips even tighter. The first is a storm of again vocal diversity and tenacious guitar bait, a feverish turbulence of attitude and creative energy which is something akin to Drowning Pool meets Blunt Force Trauma, and another pinnacle of the album. The second of the two avails ears of its fearsome potency through an opening assault of beats from Rivera which sparks a torrential virulence of hungry riffs and cantankerous grooves, the bestial bass of Maliszewski offering the most magnetic one of all. Both tracks kick the album back to the impressive levels it began on, though to be fair the previous couple of songs or so were hardly lightweight in arousing pleasure and emotions either.

Fool Me Once finds yet another gear in the toxicity of the release, it’s addictively malicious and insatiable onslaught an evolving ravaging as able to stroll invitingly with spite in its eyes as it is in uncaging a tirade of raw intensity. It is another landmark in the album, a mix of Static X and Agnostic Front which is not emulated but strongly backed by the melody rich, blues grooved rocker Bottle of Scotch. At times there is a little surface similarity across the album which certainly does it no harm at all such the enterprise and invention within, but it is great to have something additionally unique from the first breath, and the penultimate track is nicely that.

The album injects its last dose of pathogen through Anti Hero, a final slab of metal and emotional vehemence to set ears and thoughts ablaze with a spiralling of inflamed grooves, caustic riffs, and a bass seducing which borders on the carnal. It is a tremendous end to an excellent release and though Caustic Method is not going to turn the metal world on its head with The Virus, they will and certainly are earning a new and broader enamoured spotlight on their presence as the album’s qualities live up to their biological namesake.

The Virus is available now via Pavement Entertainment @ http://www.pavementmusic.com/product/caustic-method-the-virus-pre-order/

www.facebook.com/causticmethod   http://causticmethod.com/

RingMaster 04/06/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard on Reputation Radio @ http://www.reputationradio.net

 

Throw The Goat – Blood, Sweat & Beers

Throw The Goat

If like us you are a sucker for dirt encrusted, alcohol fuelled rock ‘n’ roll then Blood, Sweat & Beers from US rockers Throw The Goat is a must. It is a brawl in the ears and party in the heart, rock music at its most instinctively aggressive and virulent. Whether the second album from the Californian trio offers anything more is debatable; certainly it is not trying to explore or expose anything particularly new but equally there is a freshness and tenacity to its sonic fight and incitement which ensures this is no run of the mill proposition. The truth is it does not matter if Throw The Goat is crafting riots from existing vats of ideation, with a sound which plays like the bastard son of a merger of bands like The Clash, Agnostic Front, and Motorhead to just pluck three from the past decades of rock ‘n’ roll, they and their new album is one irresistible rampage.

Blood, Sweat & Beers is the follow-up to the band’s acclaimed debut album Black Mountain of 2012. Recorded with, as its predecessor, Finch drummer Alex Pappas who also mixed and mastered it, the new encounter is a continuation of the power and addictiveness found in its predecessor but with an openly new breath and energy to its stomp. Released on the band’s own label Regurgitation Records in the US in March, it has been kicking up a storm of praise and attention, with the UK now in its sights this month.

Opener Buffalo takes a handful of seconds to make a gentle coaxing of ears before unleashing a tirade of rowdy riffs and antagonistic rhythms. Those beats are met head on in energy and aggression by the vocals of bassist Michael Schnalzer, and in no time aligned to a blaze of great varied vocals from across the band and sonic enterprise courtesy of Brian Parnell’s guitar. It is an instinctively anthemic punk ‘n’ roll provocation setting the party off to a mighty start, though the song is swiftly surpassed by the album’s outstanding title track. Blood, Sweat & Beers flies from the traps with a feisty roll of stick prowess from drummer Scott Snyder. Within the time it takes the listener to get to their feet he is driving forcibly on with fiercely swung beats with the track now a raging tempest of rabid riffs, squirming grooves, and vocal addictiveness. Again the whole band offers plenty to make an aggressive provocation a ridiculously magnetic one, in voice and sound, an offering rife with unbridled energy and ripe with virulent contagion. Quite simply the track is a roar of rock ‘n’ roll which will rarely be rivalled this year.

cover     The band brews up its dirtiest punk side for Drown next, a simple raw rage of riffs and rhythms bound in spicy melodic hooks and vocal antagonism which goes down like a beer in the hands of a thirsty man. Its unsurprising but richly satisfying incitement is followed by the slower predatory flirtation of Swamp. Its air is thick with toxic attitude and body a brooding mesh of rhythmic intimidation and wiry sonic colour, and yet another appealing twist in the variety by the album. Building up intensity and energy within its tempestuous dark climate, the song proceeds to shift from sludgy scenery to raucous explosiveness, entwining both within its imposing walls.

The filth clad bassline opening up All We Have is an instant addictive lure, bait increasingly infectious as a feverish rumble of beats from Snyder adds fresh dramatic with their temptation. The best opening to any song on the album, a riotous anthemic seduction all on its own, it leads to another ridiculously gripping and intrusive persuasion of punk and heavy rock. Parnell spins a melodic web as the song continues to twist and shift into new inventive and bewitching scenery, whilst noise rock and hardcore elements are flirted with for another major highlight of the album.

     Idyllwild Eyes crowds in on the acclaim given with its own bellow of bristling vocals, spiteful beats, and abrasing riffs. It also brings a highly flavoursome melodic lure from Parnell, a regular occurrence on all songs, alongside the unpredictable tendency in their invention which the band showed on the last song. These are times where you almost feel that the band missed a trick on the album by not using this increasingly successful adventure more in their songwriting, though it offers a potential which will hopefully be realised by the band and to be excited by ahead.

Ears and passions are lit again by Uprooted, a riveting prowl of a punk rock song, and straight after through the eighty eight second bawl of aggression and attitude that is 8 More Minutes. Soaked in a hardcore heart, the track simply rages around deeply grabbing hooks and addictive rhythms for a brief and seriously potent anthem. The album from its broader rock opening, delves into heavier and more hostile punk belligerence towards its latter stages, this song a prime example backed by the similarly bred Waste straight after. Despite the increasing animosity permeating the songs in sound and vocals though, hooks and grooves lose none of their enticement and potency within the tracks whilst the swinging sticks of Snyder are a constant source of pure incitement.

Road Home brings the album to a close, the song a rowdy and lusty slab of devilry which maybe is more straight forward and unsurprising compared to other songs before it, but still provides an exciting end to one of the most enjoyable encounters to stir up the year so far. Throw The Goat is rock ‘n’ roll through and through with a sound and indeed album to match. This is one bruising all rock fans need.

Blood, Sweat & Beers is available now via Regurgitation Records @ https://throwthegoat.bandcamp.com/album/blood-sweat-beers

http://www.throwthegoat.net/   https://www.facebook.com/throwthegoat

RingMaster 22/04/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard on Reputation Radio @ http://www.reputationradio.net

Panzerbastard/Tenebrae Split – Sons Of Belial

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Record Store Day is seeing some rigorously compelling releases this year including the mouth-watering Sons Of Belial split featuring Bostonians Panzerbastard and Tenebrae. Consisting of six tracks forged from an animosity driven union of hardcore and imposing dark metal, the release is a rugged and bruising slab of uncompromising rock ‘n’ roll. Fierce sounds collude with lyrical and vocal antagonism as the two protagonists unleash not the year’s greatest moment but certainly one of its imposingly memorable propositions.

The first three songs on the split come from Panzerbastard, the quartet acclaimed for their impressive Gods, Thugs and Madmen album which came out in 2012 via Patac Records. They open things up with a cover of the GBH track Drugs Party In 526, a track instantly prowling ears and imagination with scorching hooks and a thick throaty bassline. It is a potent lure leading into a brawl of punk rock infused with metallic sinews and incitement. As the raw vocals engagingly court the antagonism fuelling every corner of sound, the band unveils a web of melodic temptation and sonic enterprise which simply lights up ears and appetite. It all adds up for a bracing and anthemic captivation getting the release off to a thrilling and intimidating start.

Workhorse is next and flies from the blocks with sonic turbulence behind voracious rhythms and ferocious riffery. Vocals virtually brawl with the senses from its first breath yet there is a swagger and virulence to the encounter which for not much over a minute drags the passions to their feet with ravenous tenacity. Whereas its predecessor enticed, especially towards its end, with a hostile dance of beats, the second song is an unbridled onslaught and just as irresistible.

The band’s offering is completed by another cover, this time of Motorhead’s Iron Fist. Severely caustic merciless rock ‘n’ roll from the first rub of sound, the track roars with the power and snarl of the song’s creators but is given a contagious punk make-over veined with spicy Panzerbastard invention. The song might not quite rival the original but certainly it gives it a run for its money.

Tenebrae steps up next, the quintet the striking union of hardcore talent including vocalist Mark Civitarese (The Unseen), drummer Rob Falzano (Ramallah, Blood for Blood), and guitarist Craig Silverman (Blood for Blood, Agnostic Front, Ramallah, Slapshot). Completed by Dominic Dibenedetto (guitar/vocals) and Ryan Packer (bass), Tenebrae come to the split fresh from the recent release of their self-titled EP, which is also available on Jailhouse Records. First track Wake Up swiftly fills ears with muscle driven beats and turbulent intensity encased in punk blooded riff aggression and squalling vocals. The track is a gripping blend of punk and metal, the former providing the heart and the latter the hostility. Threatening and openly infectious, the track has ears and appetite hungry, a want fed resourcefully by the heavy metal bred Ways Of The Black next. The track is the reverse of the previous in many ways, classic metal its canvas and punk its colourful chorus and addictive nature, which body and voice cannot resist engaging in.

The band’s final track Norse Tribe is their best, though all leave greed for more rampant. Predatory and savage in equal measure, with bludgeoning rhythms punctuating a scarring riff coloured fury, the track stalks and stomps with bestial intent and vitriolic charm as it brings the whole release to an incendiary and exhilarating close.

Sons Of Belial is a treat and the perfect way to celebrate Record Store Day but also in gaining entry into the intimidating and exhilarating confrontations of both Panzerbastard and Tenebrae.

The Sons Of Belial Split is available from November 28th via Jailhouse Records as a limited to 500 12” vinyl @ http://jailhouserecords3.bandcamp.com/album/sons-of-belial-panzerbastard-tenebrae-split

https://www.facebook.com/panzerbastardboston

https://www.facebook.com/pages/Tenebrae/279454968783253

RingMaster 28/11/2014

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

 

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard from

http://audioburger247.webs.com/

American Heritage – Prolapse

americanheritage2014

With the departure of vocalist/guitarist Adam Norden following its recording, Prolapse from American Heritage might be the last thing heard from the Chicago band, but if this is so what a way to go out. It is a beast of a proposition, a tsunami of controlling grooves, belligerently aggressive rhythms, and a primal force of voice and breath. It is bullying mass of provocation and passion, a lingering statement from what will be a sorely missed band if there is to be no more.

Consisting of six new tracks and three covers brought in the fusion of thick sludge metal, imagination binding mathcore, and abrasing noise rock/hardcore ferocity the quartet is renowned for, the successor to acclaimed 2011 album Sedentary, uncages a caustic savaging which rivals anything they have unleashed before. Recorded with Sanford Parker and released through Solar Flare Records, sixth album Prolapse quite simply brings the band’s presence since 1996 to an incendiary and exhilarating end.

From the first sonic blast of opener Eastward Cast the Entrails, band and album has ears and attention severely grasped, the punishing initial touch leading into a bruising maelstrom of ferocious rhythms, corrosive riffs, and brawling vocals. Within the tempest though grooves raucously flirt and technical prowess seduces, the track increasingly expanding and flourishing in the imagination and emotions. Equally as it grows contagiousness coats the tenacity and enterprise of the guitars and rhythmic antagonism, the provocation becoming as seductive as it is hostile ensuring an insatiable and explosive start to the album swiftly matched by its successor.

Anxious Bedwetter roars and assaults with the entwined charm of Corrosion of Conformity, Mastodon, and Agnostic Front, it swiftly buffeting and igniting emotions with a torrential american_heritage_prolapseonslaught of raw riffery and rhythmic violence cast by drummer Mike Duffy. Again though there is a virulent temptation from scorching melodies and spicy grooves at work, all as uncompromising as the heart of the encounter but spreading irresistible magnetic toxicity. Vocally Norden leaves no syllable and emotion untainted by venom and anger whilst his and fellow guitarist Scott Shellhamer’s sonic temptation is simply bracing.

The pair of Obliviocrity and Constant and Consuming Fear of Death and Dying make no compromises on the senses, the first from another debilitating sonic squall and with nostrils flared, rampaging through ears on a breath-taking sonic turbulence and rhythmic inhospitality. To the destructiveness though again grooves are enflamed with a melodically brewed acidity and creative spice which invigorates and sears the senses. Its quick hellacious ravishment is contrasted by the prowling presence of the second of the pair. Reaped from the predatory essences of doom and sludge, the song crawls provocatively over the listener, imposing and oppressing in its air whilst exploring a brighter terrain of engaging melodies and radiant invention. There is still a menace to its raw beauty though, the band finding the same kind of dark allurement which has blessed the music of Killing Joke over the decades, bassist Erik Bocek, a constant primal enticement across the whole release, bringing forceful heavy seduction to the body of the song.

The hardcore severity always lurking within American Heritage is given full rein in the outstanding Mask of Lies next, the track a furnace of spite and rage with flesh flailing rhythms and riffery to match. It is a savaging you can only embrace and invite back time and time again, much as the next up Blackbird, it a hellacious forging of hardcore, punk, and noise rock rancor with psyche twisting invention. The track is a glorious predator and the pinnacle of the album, a relentless creative scourge which just has you drooling for more and ears and emotions exhausted.

The departure of the triumph is the start of the trio of covers on the album, starting with the outstanding take of the Descendents track Hürtin’ Crüe. It is an erosive swamp of sonic and vocal intensity, a merciless blaze with the charm of a public flogging and quite irresistible. It is followed by the Black Flag track Thirsty and Miserable, American Heritage treating it to their own kind of barbarous enterprise and stormily inventive bad blood before moving on to Bulletproof Cupid, the Girls Against Boys encounter. Openly salacious from its first vocal caress and fiercely imposing as soon as its first note preys on ears, the song is a delicious sinister seduction and dare one say even more potent than the original.

The track brings another unmissable offering from American Heritage to a fine close. What will be missed is the band’s presence, that realisation reinforced by Prolapse as it scars the senses whilst sparking a big tinge of sadness. Things move on and you just feel further raw adventures will be ahead in some guise from the members of the band, something very easy to breed an excited anticipation for, especially after this grand finale.

Prolapse is available now digitally and as CD and vinyl versions via Solar Flare Records @ http://music.solarflarerds.com/album/prolapse or http://americanheritage.bandcamp.com

https://www.facebook.com/americanheritageband

RingMaster26/11/2014

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard from

http://audioburger247.webs.com/