Bleeding Raven Interview

BLEEDING RAVEN is the aggrotech/dark tek project from Dean Mason of Gnostic Gorilla. Recently he released its debut album via Cleopatra Records. We had the pleasure to chat with Dean about the album, his latest project, a career and life changing set back and much more…  

Hello and thanks for taking time out to talk with us.

The pleasure is all mine man.

Can you first introduce the ‘project’ and give us some background to how it all started?

In a land…far far away…hahahahaha…Ok, but seriously… I first got the ‘itch’ to record music when I was a teen-ager in high school. Some buddies and I went into a little studio and recorded two songs for a single release. (Dark Hallway/Golgotha) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=p05YqqTOS_M  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=047Pk2GhPnY

Thanks to my lovely parents I released a vinyl 45 rpm as just “Dean Mason” with “Lonely Ghost Productions” as the name of the makeshift indie label. I got ‘itchy’ again in 2001 and began looking at music again, but did very little. In 2012, I got right into recording electronic music of a dark bent and scent and thus was born “Gnostic Gorilla” eventually. (I released stuff as The Lonely Ghost Project initially but changed the name to “Gnostic Gorilla”) In 2018, Cleopatra Records released “St. Basil’s Asylum”. (Gnostic Gorilla) In May of this past year, after releasing quite a few albums on different labels (KL Dark Records, Nowhere Now Records, Throne of Bael Records and LGP-ONE) I wanted to pursue something more ‘aggrotech’ in style. That’s when I initiated the “Bleeding Raven” project. Cleopatra released “Darkness Consumed” in October of this year.

How have those earlier impacted on what you are doing now, in maybe inspiring a change of style or direction?

As I mentioned earlier, I started off as just “Dean Mason” as a lad. In 2012, the Lonely Ghost Project was launched (so to speak) and then “Gnostic Gorilla” and from that evolved what we are talking about today…that is…the Bleeding Raven Project. My early music in these other projects was a mix of ‘Goth/Dark Wave/Dark Tek/Industrial’. I really wanted to do something more bizarre and almost literally more noisy and that’s when I initiated “Bleeding Raven”. It’s more aggrotech, but I also call it… “dungeon trash”…hahahahahahahahahaha I even have a shirt with that on it.   https://www.dizzyjam.com/products/157830/ 

The image or character of the ‘raven’ is common in First Nations lore and even spirituality. The raven can either be a trickster or mischievous little critter or it can be sort of a symbol of the soul preparing for death of being taken back to the Great Creator. Different nations/tribes have different ideas and stories about the raven. The ‘bleeding’ part more or less speaks of suffering, of hurt etc. So, like my lyrics however, even with the image, I allow people to have their own interpretations. That said, I think always…DAILY…of my many sisters and brothers in the First Nations communities who suffer immensely because of a racist attitude towards them. There are many…MANY young Native women/girls who have gone missing and the effort to find them hasn’t always been fervent. As well, the suicide rate among First Nation teens is extremely high.

Was there any specific idea behind the forming of Bleeding Raven and also in what you wanted it and your sound to offer?

Well, in the Spring of 2019, I had to be on the road a bit and for some long drives, I acquired on my iTunes a few albums of a more industrial bent. That includes a couple of compilations of various bands. I discovered acts like Die Sektor and Psyclon Nine and I felt very inspired to go in this direction. I sort of started to go in that direction as “Gnostic Gorilla” but I wanted a new project that was mostly aggrotech in style. I came up with the ‘dungeon trash’ (LOL) I released in October and I am very proud of it!

Do the same things still drive you when it was fresh-faced or have they evolved over time?

Definitely evolved over time. So, when I first started off, I was more into a Gothic sound or industrial. And I still love a lot of that stuff. Always will. St. Basil’s Asylum is a classic and I’m just so sad that it’s still not discovered by many yet. But anyway, yeah…things do evolve. That said, I don’t like the idea of being in a ‘genre house arrest’ and being narrow minded in your approach to music. But either way, it’s all over for me in music anyway so…I’ve done what I could.

Since your early days, how would you say your sound has evolved?

Well, from the really early days, that is from the days of the Dark Hallway release, things really evolved dramatically. First of all, that 45 was like a mish mash of metal/punk pre-grunge I guess. I was heavily influenced by Gary Numan and yet, try as I did my vocal style was markedly different than his. It’s later that I appreciated that. But, see…I love ALL sorts of music. I mean, sometimes I’m just knee deep  into The Doors and more psychedelic shit and other days I’m into Dio and Sabbath and Type O Negative and Ministry and Rammstein. Other days it’s The Cure or Smashing Pumpkins or of course, classic Numan and Japan or Bauhaus. So, a lot of what I do depends on where I’m at and I guess when it comes to music, I’m moody as hell. hahahahahaha

Do you find the changes have been more of an organic movement of sound or you deliberately wanting to try new things?

I’d say the latter, yeah.

Presumably , and you have touched on them already, there is a wide range of inspirations; are there any in particular which have impacted not only on your music but your personal approach and ideas to creating and playing music?

So, I make a distinction between that which has inspired and that which has influenced more directly my own style. The artists/bands that have been inspirations are many. Gary Numan, KISS, Type O Negative, Black Sabbath, Rammstein, Japan (David Sylvian) Ozzy, Manson, Korn, Smashing Pumpkins, The Cure, Bauhaus, Zardonic, Fear Incorporated, Frost Like Ashes, CRIX IIX and the list is endless. As for those who have been influences, while they include some of the names listed already, I’d say Ministry, Skinny Puppy, Psyclon Nine, Die Sektor. As I always do in any interview, the band that will forever be my absolute favourite is The Doors. The Doors and Gary Numan are both at the top of my own personal ‘chart’.

I also want to give a shout out to Tim Muddiman and NOT because of his connection to Gary Numan. Tim has ventured into more graphic arts in recent years and he is doing some amazing work. THAT very much inspires me…or better yet…I honour the man as an artist in every sense of the word…as a true artist.

Is there a process to your songwriting which generally guides the birth of songs?

Yeah, mostly I start off with a vague idea of want kind of song I want to do, Then I begin with beats and drum patterns and bass lines or even synth lines. (it depends) I get a general idea of the direction I want to go in before going far into the track. So, I begin to choose the different sounds and samples/loops that I want as well to give it a mood. More often than not, I manipulate these and distort or whatever to make them unique. Then as the song evolves, there’s the question of whether or not I want a traditional chorus (often not because that’s too pop) and I allow the track to sort of dictate to me where it’s going. Sort of like a First Nations wood carver who allows the ‘wood’ to speak to them as they say. Then when I have a rough demo, I begin writing lyrics and then record vocals. That’s the tough part for many reasons. Lots of hit and miss with that process. I’ve written an entire set of lyrics for a song only to discover that something else would work better and I have to (at times) chop out some of the lyrics. Hard to explain.  Also, sometimes I record the vocals and it sounds like shit. I mean, there is a need for a different ‘style’ all together. After all the vocals are recorded, I go back and add more …sometimes a sample here or an FX noise there or whatever. I’m quite ADD so if there are any sort of ‘blank stare’ moments in a song…that’s unacceptable. It has to be busy. I’m told my music is VERY busy. Then there is the final mix which is a real pain in the ass. Sometimes even at that stage you decide… “nah…this is total shit”! It’s a bit of a drag when that happens though man because you’ve come all the way to a full song and you realize it isn’t happening.

Where do you, more often than not, draw the inspirations to the lyrical side of your songs?

First off, good for you for asking that because lyrics are important for me… I realize it’s not what the listener first becomes aware of…but for me, the lyrics are important. Anyway, so…I don’t write any lyrics with any sort of ‘agenda’. In other words, I don’t preach or dictate anything. I like a very poetic approach to the lyrics with lots of imagery. Now, that said, there are certain subjects that inspire me. I often write about religious themes or philosophical themes and often touch upon injustice and hypocrisy and hate and injustice for example. But I do so in veiled/poetic language. I want the listener to decide for themselves what it could mean.

Give us some background to your latest release.

 “Darkness Consumed” touches upon a few subjects…again in veiled language. One of the tracks is called “Pontiff’s Nightmare” which is actually about St. Francis. He more or less spooked the Pope at the time with his authentically radical life style and that Pope had a dream about Francis. Francis challenged the corruption of the time by the way he lived. “Salem Vigil” is sort of… but not completely about the Salem witch trials. The song actually addresses the unfortunate phenomenon of ‘religious people’ oppressing and persecuting people who don’t fit their narrow definition of what it means to be ‘good’ or ‘decent’ and ‘righteous’.  In the end, these arrogant and often ignorant people of so called ‘faith’ are the ones who are truly evil because of the harm they inflict on many borne out of their hatred and unenlightened worldview.  

Give us some insight to the themes and premise behind it and its songs.

So, “Darkness Consumed”…that very title isn’t a nod to evil or the promotion of ‘darkness’. It’s actually about the fact that somehow, ‘TRUTH’ (light) will ‘consume the darkness’ and overcome it. That’s sort of the idea in brief. As I said, I want people to decide for themselves however what something can mean for them.

Do you go into the studio with songs pretty much in their final state or prefer to develop them as you record?

Going back to the very first single “Dark Hallway”…I had everything figured out (with lyrics) when I presented the tracks to the band. I wrote the lyrics in English class (Dark Hallway) while under the influence of benzodiazepines. Hahahahahahaha We were reading “Death of a Salesman” in that class and it was, to say the least, a rather dark story. hahahahahaha

Tell us about the live side to Bleeding Raven.

I have lost the hearing in the left ear completely and totally. It happened in October…Very traumatic actually. I have to protect the little hearing I have left in the right ear which is at half capacity. I want to be able to hear the voices of the ones I love and the more natural sounds in life. For all intents and purposes…I’m deaf. Music is no longer an option. Especially live music, even if I wanted to do something live with a band. Music has been such an important part of my life obviously…but that’s over. That’s the future.

It is not easy for any new artist/band to make an impact regionally let alone nationally and further afield. How have you found it your neck of the woods? Are there the opportunities to make a mark if the drive is there for new bands?

You’re correct. It’s very difficult to ‘break through’ in this day and age. There’s just too much out there. I mean, everyone and their cat is putting stuff out. There are so many genres today and so many…MANY indie folks (like me) who have stuff out there and are competing with the ‘big boys and gals’. You have to be creative to get known because sadly, younger people are not interested in new music aside from what they become aware of through video games or TV/Movies. I mean, I’m seriously over generalizing perhaps but it is true that, young people today don’t appreciate music the way people did in the past. They don’t grasp the concept of music as ‘art’ anymore. That’s not their fault. But because of the technology that we have today and with social media platforms…there is too much out there and for younger people, music is just “there for the taking” the way fruit on trees is there to pluck. So, you have to be creative in how you get people to notice you today. It’s not easy.

How has the internet and social media impacted on the band to date? Do you see it as something destined to become a negative from a positive as the band grows and hopefully gets increasing success or is it more that bands struggling with it are lacking the knowledge and desire to keep it working to their advantage?

So, this is sort of a continuation of the previous question. Here’s the thing, the internet and social media and digital music etc. is here and it’s here to stay. We are still trying to adapt to this I suppose. Now, you could lament and dream of the “good old days” but that’s all it will ever be…a ‘dream’. Musicians/artists have to adapt. In many ways, it has been a blessing. Many artists would have never been able to put their stuff out there so to speak were it not for the kind of technology we have today. See, I picked up music again in 2012 but only as a hobby. I then, almost jokingly put some of my stuff out there as an indie/unsigned act and I eventually got a label deal with Cleopatra Records, which for me is phenomenal. I will have three releases with Cleopatra Records by end of 2020. (the last one is another Gnostic Gorilla album) I also have releases with three other labels. So, none of that would have happened were it not for the technology we have at our disposal. I guess it’s sort of what you make of it, like anything else.

Once again a big thanks for sharing time with us; anything you would like to add or reveal for the readers?

Thanks again to you for the great (and extensive) interview. Reveal?

Ok…I’m  B A T M A N.  Hahahahahahaha  No but, seriously, I thank the many people who have been supportive of me in one way or another…be it family or friends and certainly Benny at Cleopatra Records. As I said earlier, because of the extreme hearing loss (actually deaf completely in one ear and the other is severely compromised) …I have to pack it in with regards to music. I will promote what I have and will have out soon (already recorded obviously) and perhaps a book of lyrics and that’s it. Cheers.

Dean

https://bleedingraven.bandcamp.com/   https://www.facebook.com/bleedingravenofficial/   http://www.bleedingraven.com

Pete RingMaster 17/01/2020

Copyright RingMasterReview: MyFreeCopyright

Project Silence – Infection

project silence_RingMaster Review

Following the well-received June release of Flesh Of The God last year, the first single from the band’s upcoming second album, Project Silence finished 2015 off with its second teaser in the fiery shape of Infection. Living up to its name, the song is an invasive fusion of industrial metal and aggressive electronic invention for which the band is increasingly renowned for but ,as its predecessor, also with something fresh and individual to it which suggests that their upcoming sophomore full-length is going to be one fascinating and eventful proposition.

project silence infection_RingMaster Review     Hailing from Kuopio and formed by vocalist/programmer/keyboardist Delacroix in 2008, Project Silence was initially a solo project seeded in dark electro /aggrotech flavouring. Within months the addition of drummer Silve_R alongside guitarists J and Mr. Sanderz saw the band grow as indeed their sound which was in potent evidence on their acclaimed debut album 424 released 2012. With bass player Sturmpanzerjäger also on board by then, the album was a striking experimentation of industrial, electro, and diverse flavourings of melodic and extreme metal. Its success was matched and sound pushed on by two track single One Way to Hell the following year and even more so by Flesh Of The God and now Infection. The new single is confirmation that the band’s sound has blossomed again; in many ways to be harsher and more irritable but equally more melodically and symphonically intricate and imaginative too, which as suggested makes anticipation and intrigue for the next Project Silence album very eager.

Vocal and electronic suggestiveness collude to court the imagination initially as the song literally grows within ears, its drama soaked walls of muscular temptation and roguish rhythms washed in atmospheric mystery and synth sprayed melodic tempting. Similarly vocals provide a blend of contrasts and dark secrets within their opening baiting, it all blending into evolving rich adventure aligned to dips into equally pleasing clarity where classic and symphonic metal hues bound hand in hand through the ravenous industrial discontent fuelling the energy rousing proposition.

As with any Project Silence encounter the depths are as lively and imaginative as the surface, distinct and varied textures colliding and combining for a welcomingly fierce and anthemically corrosive contagion; something bordering on euphonic viral sound as predatory and merciless as it is enticing.

Igniting ears and appetite once again, Project Silence provokes one overriding thought with Infection; roll on album two.

Infection is out now as a name your price download @ https://projectsilence.bandcamp.com/album/infection

https://www.facebook.com/projectsilenceband/   http://www.projectsilence.info/

Pete Ringmaster 12/01/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Project Silence – Flesh Of The God

PS\- Reputation Radio/RingMaster Review

Though less than two years since Finnish industrial metallers released the rousing and impressive single One Way to Hell, time seems to have gone particularly slow waiting for the next instalment of their creative ravishing of ears and imagination. The wait is now over as the band unleashes new single Flesh Of The God, a track building on the potential and gripping qualities of its predecessor and those bred in the band’s previous debut album, and with ease revealing itself as the Kuopio quintet’s finest moment yet.

cover\- Reputation Radio/RingMaster Review   Project Silence began as 2008 opened its eyes, originally as a dark electro /aggrotech seeded solo project for founder and vocalist/programmer/keyboardist Delacroix. Towards the end of that first year drummer Silve_R alongside guitarists J and Mr. Sanderz were brought into the project with the following summer seeing the band begin work on their first album. Its creation and songs saw a stronger industrial and melodic metal flavouring evolving in the band’s sound, one reinforced by the rabid throaty tones conjured by new bassist Sturmpanzerjäger who joined up at the start of 2012. 424 was released in the winter of that year, its sprawling brawl of intense promise within a conviction of brutality and rabid enterprise soon awakening attention and acclaim. The album was as diverse as it was uncompromisingly contagious, a potent base from which One Way to Hell grew its own fresh and creative fury across two songs. It was a new stretching of the band’s imagination and bracing sound but now shown as also one step towards the fiercer and more skilfully incendiary design of Flesh Of The God.

The new single makes a low key yet ominous arrival around ears, keys brewing a sonic mist and warning from which the song erupts with rampant riffs, rousing rhythms, and rugged creative terrain. The keys continue to weave an alluring atmospheric coating around song and imagination, within which the vocals of Delacroix, aligned to equally volatile sounds, pounces with emotive growls and venomous expression. Melodic persuasion is just as potent and persuasive in the tempest too, bringing a warmer climate and tempering to the hostile emprise trespassing and thrilling the senses but simultaneously emphasizing its power and uncompromising attitude.

Electro, metal, industrial, symphonic and more are textures and spices all entwined within the creative maelstrom of Flesh Of The God, the result Project Silence’s most inventive, explosive, and virulent offering to date.

Flesh Of The God is out now @ http://projectsilence.bandcamp.com/album/flesh-of-the-god

http://www.projectsilence.info/ https://www.facebook.com/projectsilenceband

RingMaster 16/06/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Project Silence – One Way To Hell

PS

    Project Silence is a sonic and invasive scourge from Finland which ignited a lasting passion and hunger in us for their presence through the album 424 which unleashed its extreme toxicity last year. The album was brawl of intense promise which shared a brutality and bewitchment that overwhelmed and seduced the passions. The band now return on December Friday 13th with new single One Way To Hell, a two track creative fury which confirms all of the intensive promise and stature of the previous release whilst stretching the band’s imagination and abrasive qualities even further.

Hailing from Kuopio, the band was formed in 2008 as initially a solo project of Delacroix (vocals, programming, keyboards),  who began brewing up a distinct dark aggressive design from ferocious essences bred in the likes of industrial metal, dark electro, trance, aggrotech, and black metal. A demo emerged soon after the project was unveiled followed to relative success by the single Voices the following year. 2012 saw the line-up of Mr. Sanderz (guitar), J (guitar), Silve R (drums), and Sturmpanzerjäger (bass) alongside Delacroix before debut album 424 was uncaged on the world to strong responses from fans backed by equally enthused critical acclaim from within the underground press alongside radio play on shows like The Bone Orchard at Audioburger.com. The experimental muscular confrontation of the new single takes the heights set by the album not maybe to new plateaus but certainly to intriguingly different and just as impressive corrosive adventures.

One Way to Hell emerges from an enveloping sonic mist; one soaked in menace and brewing industrial toxicity speared by one way to hell coverincreasingly intimidating beats and an asylum bred laugh. As soon as it has comfortably coaxed attention and intrigue from its recipient the band expels a squall of heavy duty rhythms and equally muscular riffs stalked magnetically by the shadow dwelling keys and malevolent vocal growls bred in even darker places. The track does not go for the jugular but instead bears its full weight upon the senses to immerse the whole of the listener and thoughts within a bruising and merciless yet seductive pestilence. With a deceptively contagious chorus and a just as virulently tempting swagger to its stride, the song initially does not make the same immediate impression as many tracks on the album did but with startling imagination and twists, like the excellent full stringed almost folky lure crafted by the guitars, the encounter evolves and increases its persuasion through its first and definitely across multiple returns. It is a slow burner in many ways but soon finds the flint to spark an enthusiastically hungry appetite for its bold adventure.

The track is accompanied by Death and Madness, an onslaught which carves a swifter impact on and submission from the passions to reinforce the thrilling potential and striking evolution of sound as presented in One Way To Hell. Production is less precise and clean on the second track which only adds to the throaty lure offered by the bass and mutually predacious guitar riffs punctured by just as threatening rhythms. Coursing with infection dripping grooves and rabid hooks, as well as dangerously alluring melodic seducing from the keys, the track is an epidemic of incendiary pestilence and destructive enterprise woven with threads of wanton beauty and classical elegance. Masterful and creating an even greater creative alchemy than its impressive co-provocateur, the song is a towering predator and excuse for all newcomers to check out the uncompromising might of Project Silence.

https://www.facebook.com/projectsilenceband

8.5/10

RingMaster 11/12/2013

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Project Silence: 424

Proj silence

    A new scourge to confront extreme noise fans, Project Silence is a Finnish band which is a brawl of intense promise and in 424 has unleashed an album equally as powerful and striking. Though not without flaws, the release is an immense conviction of brutality and bewitching enterprise, in fact that its only real prime issue in that it offers so much in diversity and ideas it risks confusing the listener into indecision over its impressive contents.

From Kuopio, the quintet of Delacroix (vocals, programming, keyboards), Mr. Sanderz (guitar), J (guitar), Silve R (drums), and Sturmpanzerjäger (bass), combine a ferocious furnace of industrial metal, dark electro, trance, aggrotech, and black metal, setting the band somewhere between God Destruction and The Browning with primal essences of Mortiis adding their serpentine malevolence. Formed in 2008 as originally a solo project of Delacroix, the band released its first songs soon after as a free download before working on their debut album and releasing a pair of preview songs in 2010. Obstacles and delays held up the album until the powerful collection of invention and aggression was released at the tail end of 2012. Now with its experimental muscular confrontations open to the world there is an expectation, after listening to 424 that Project Silence is on the first major step of an impending forceful ascent.

The title track wraps around the ear first, the electronic instrumental a warm expanse of electro warmth over slightly blistered 424coverambience whilst keys evoke a tender yet firm invitation to the heart of the release. The piece gives no indication of the destructive intent to follow though its brief minute and a half is merely a pleasing slight-of-hand as the malice of Pressure Revolution takes its place. The track plunders the ear initially with electronic teases and riotous shouts before gaining a stride of rampant electronics and hungry riffs. In full flight the song is a storm of brawling intensity, grazing acidic vocal squalls, and transfixing sonic rain of melodies and electro shards of infection. It is an undemanding yet sinewy encounter which has essences of Houston! and Celldweller within its heated stance.

The following My Reality immediately invades the ear with a darker ambience and invading shadows leading to a malicious caustic vocal and predatory black metal flavoured persuasion. Whereas its predecessor was a relatively direct offense the songwriting here is an evolving and senses searching journey which ravishes and seduces with equal hunger and effect. A guitar power metal infused temptation is just one seamless escapade on the insidious encounter whilst the symphonic caresses in the latter part of its presence is an extra fire of unexpected pleasure to add further diversity to song and release as is Stardancer (Raven’s whore). The track opens with a trance soaked wash which persuasively leads one right into the furnace of rampaging energy and riffs driven by a ravenous breath. Once more it is a song which into its onslaught skilfully and passionately merges a distinct spicery, the track a raptorial tempest which shifts from bringing loud whispers of Rammstein and The Kovennant to those of Firewind and Enter Shikari.

The corrosive Keeper with its dramatic keys, euphoric ambient symphony, and riveting electronic grandeur, is a powerful and compelling slice of symphonic metal imagination but again as with all songs employs a weave of provocative textures and sounds which crosses genres and appetites. As mentioned at times you feel there is almost too much going on, though everything is with a craft and inventive sculpture it is impossible to refuse its addictive lure and the more you immerse within the album the more its persuasion is dominant.

From the singular techno presence of Sky, Space and Twilight Zone, a track which perfectly accomplished did not manage to spark any fires without that viciousness that pervades throughout the rest of the album, and the black metal malignancy of the again strong but ultimately uninspiring Alone (Crushed by Your Lies), the album is soon preying on the passions once more with firstly the feral BEAST and its successor Cage of Hate. The first of the pair fuses black and pagan metal into a voracious devouring of the senses with dazzling yet shadowed industrial magnetism whilst the latter is an incendiary soundscape of spiralling elements and ideas from again a wealth of genres and styles brought into a contagious slightly suffocating maelstrom of imagination.

424 is completed by the dark electro metal revelry of Everything where again the likes of Rammstein stalk thoughts and the short evocative instrumental Promise to bring a rounded closure to the release. It is an excellent release which impresses from start to finish whilst breeding an even more powerful promise and anticipation of the band in the future when they find their unique voice, which suggested by the album is still a search in progress. The bottom-line is Project Silence left us enthused and breathless, enough said.

http://www.projectsilence.info

8/10

RingMaster 27/02/2013

 

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Traumatize: Servant of God

As deviously seductive as it is corruptive the new album from Polish dark electro band Traumatize is a release which leaves one scrambling in thought and chilled by the intrusive emotions it inspires. Servant of God at times requires a little work and resistance to its creeping malevolence but it rewards with music which dishes up some of the freshest and enlightened electro/aggrotech sounds.

Formed by Jacek as 2011 opened its eyes, the project took no time in drawing attention with first demo Death Dealer. The same year saw the release of Torment and the Patient 6032 EP as well as an array of compilations appearance which has continued into 2012, all adding to the respect and growing following of the band. March of this year saw Traumatize expand into a duo with the addition of Savina and now they prepare to unleash through Mutant E Records and Engraved Ritual their excellent album Servant Of God

Like all albums certain parts and tracks connect more than others with the individual but as a whole it ignites a firm understanding and welcoming presence for one to immerse within and allow to envelope the senses. One of the most pleasing aspects is that it rarely offers anything predictable or heard in various shades elsewhere, a variety which seemingly a great many dark electro releases over recent times lack. With songs and lyrics inspired by human related themes such as society, taboos, and feelings of all nature, the album is provocative in all aspects and a release with real depth.

The songs are also distinctly diverse starting with the excellent opener Forbidden Game. Wound up like a clockwork toy the song emerges with a whispering ambience before turning a sinister shade. The haunting becomes more intense with a music box melody warming the immediate air whilst ominous clouds and intensity builds in the shadows. As the track evolves it fills the ear with melodic caresses coated in the ever brewing menace and malevolent breath of its heart. It is a great consuming start which teases throughout, the expected forced violation never occurring.

The album proceeds to treat the ear with a constant evocative flow of diverse sounds and emotions. The devious Just A Dream coaxes salacious whispers from the darkest nightmare whilst the outstanding Death In A Pill is a deliciously destructive creature which crawls under the skin to fester and manipulate synapses. It wraps itself around the ear with openly addictive lures, their sweet embrace irresistible and the perfect disguise for the enveloping scourge of enterprising yet lingering venomous touches. It is a song only equalled occasionally on the album though all tracks leave one more than satisfied to some degree.

Further notable moments include the Elizabethan tinged melody kissed Good Or Bad featuring Her Fury Tales, the twisted and sinuous Human Mistakes, and the brilliant Siente La Sangre Correr featuring Proyecto Crisis. The latter is a greedy unravelling of the senses brought with a serpentine sirenesque breath, a curved twist of ruptured sanity. Arguably the best tracks though come in the shape of instrumental Password and the title track. The first is a fury of electronic manipulations, an overwhelming intrusion on the essence of being and totally mesmeric whilst Servant Of God is an epic hearted realisation and declaration of what fuels the lives and beliefs of many. Sumptuously rich in atmosphere and truth dawning in sound it is an impactful heaven pointing destructive aural finger.

Servant of God may not be the most instantly accessible release at times but that only makes it better and more rewarding once the sounds and invention of Traumatize work their way deeply in. It asks for a keener focus from its listener but rewards with music which evokes and incites real reactions and inspired thoughts, something most other releases can only dream of.

http://traumatize-pl.blogspot.co.uk/

RingMaster 12/07/2012

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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