Skulk, The Hulking – Afterbirth Of A Nation

It is fair to say that 2018 has ended its tenure with some of its biggest highlights release wise among which Afterbirth Of A Nation has to be one of if not the most compelling and enjoyable. The second album from one man project, songwriter and satirist Skulk, The Hulking, the offering is an imagination rousing, ear gripping slab of unique enterprise which had us drooling in no time.

The successor to his 2015 debut album, In Sickness and in Health, the new encounter this time sees Skulk joined by creatively like-minded musicians in guitarist Ashley Levine, drummer Fernando Morales, and bassist Vern Woodhead. In turn this has brought a far broader palette to the bold and adventurous escapade seeded within its predecessor. The band has merged the electronic, hip hop, and punk of that first encounter with the feral and ferocious antics of metal in its varied guises within Afterbirth Of A Nation; the result something akin to a rabid fusion of Dog Fashion Disco, System Of A Down, Five Star Prison Cell, and Agent Orange but distinct in its character and forcibly magnetic incitement.

Afterbirth Of A Nation opens up with Hide Your Children.  Straight away sauntering in, the bass begins luring ears with the dark jazzy mystique of the song blossoming alongside. Soon after the unique and captivating tones of Skulk unveil the drama and mischief of his words as the Bauhaus like lure of the encounter boils up into a metal inflamed blaze. Settling back down, new hues and enterprise rise up around the infectious rhythmic stroll and hip hop nurtured vocals; it all making for an irresistible introduction to the release.

It is a resourceful and striking beginning only accentuated by next up He Who Finishes First Is Finished First. Leading with teasing guitar bait, the song swaggers in with eager rhythms and a vocal prowess which just made us want to get involved. It is simultaneously composed yet manic, every second a devious seed and ingredient to an adventure which swiftly got under the skin echoing those earlier mentioned clues to the Skulk, The Hulking adventure.

The track is simply superb and quickly matched by the devilish swing of By Hook Or By Crooked Automatic Assault Rifle. Like a psychotic carousel it swirls in ears, from time to time slowing momentarily to add fresh adventure and revelry around another potent lyrical trespass before scooping up the listener in its carnival-esque hunger.

The darker, predacious presence of Grind (Money Crotch) intimidates as it seduces with its slow swing, bass and guitar portentous in their tempting before its lid is lifted and ferocious discontent spills out. It too is just a moment in the track’s mercurial landscape, a captivating web of sound and vocal enterprise exposed and expanded by the cycle before making way for the tenebrific grumble of Joe Candidate with again Skulk sheer magnetism at its heart. A sombre slow and simple crawl with bursts of carnal irritability, the song just seduced from start to finish, much as the album itself.

Through the mischievous punk inflamed swing of Cancer and the funk ‘n’ jazz saunter of Make It Sew, an already rising addiction to the album was simply escalated, creative devilment and vocal tenacity their inescapable fuel while This Commercialism Sure Means Business… brings an unhinged, indeed certifiable blaze of punk and blues funk tinged rock ‘n’ roll full of derision and tenacity which similarly had us leaping to feet while giving an eager roar.

And the goodness just simply continues; The Proper Way To Fail bringing back the meandering but purposeful amble the band so easily breed to entice and ensnare ears and appetite with. Unapologetically infectious especially within its delicious chorus, the track was manna to the imagination before Add Her All had the same also eating out of its creative rock ‘n’ roll hands and in turn We, The Terrorism enticed physical spasms and attitude soaked vocal involvement in its virulent nonconformist furor.

Afterbirth Of A Nation ends with the unstable temperament and exploits of May It Never End; a loco of sound and boldly resourceful enterprise which left only a hunger for more as it sealed quite simply one of last year’s major highlights and an encounter no one should let slip by.

Afterbirth Of A Nation is out now @ https://skulkthehulking.bandcamp.com/album/afterbirth-of-a-nation

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Pete RingMaster 04/01/2019

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Joecephus and The George Jonestown Massacre – Death Rattle Shake

It seems like Joey (Joecephus) Killingsworth has been dealing out potent sounds as long as The RingMaster Review has way back had music in the heart though that realisation comes with hindsight after actually being introduced to the vocalist/guitarist/songwriter through his band Joecephus and The George Jonestown Massacre; more specifically through 2010 anthem WWLD (What Would Lemmy Do), a track and chorus which still rings out in the office when faced with a dilemma. Now the band has a new slab of Joecephus led goodness out going by the name of Death Rattle Shake, a release all punk ‘n’ rollers and hard rocking, country licking, metal hugging lovers should take a moonshine soaked dance with.

Joecephus and The George Jonestown Massacre as a band rose up around 2005 though, after an EP under his own name, Killingsworth had already released a first album under the name. Performing their first show that year,  the Memphis outfit have gone on to share stages with the likes of David Allen Coe, HR of Bad Brains, Agent Orange, Jucifer, Green Jello, Unknown Hinson, Black Oak Arkansas, Jim Dickinson, Rev. Horton Heat and many more. A handful of attention and praise drawing albums have also graced and bruised the years with Hell or High Water (2010), and Arockalypse Now (2012) probably the most notable and acclaimed. Death Rattle Shake easily takes its place alongside the band’s biggest successes and as a collection of tracks we would confidently suggest is their most impressive and rousing moment yet.

With bassist Brian Costner and drummer Daryl Stephens alongside Killingsworth and featuring the organ of Gerald Stephens, Death Rattle Shake bursts into life with its title track and a slice of dirtily animated rock ‘n’ roll. With beats rapping firmly on the senses and the bass grumbling with devilish seduction, the track is soon a compelling stomp which the magnetic flirtation of keys and the grimy riffs of Killingsworth lustily align with as his vocals further incites the body romping antics the music commands.

It is an outstanding start, one of those irresistible moments we all crave for and the spark for the following diverse dance of the album starting with the blues rock saunter of Drivin Blind. Again the warm, psych lit keys of Stephens contrasts yet unites with the scuzzier tendrils of guitar rising from similarly raw sonic flames, Killingsworth like an outlaw in its midst. It is a description which and always has suited the band’s music perfectly, its character like a rock ‘n’ roll felon/bandit but  an outsider you want to run with.

The addiction sparking Terminally Hip is next swinging its angular hard rock bred hips with attitude and mischief while Karma’s A Bitch brings a cauldron of old school rock nurtured blues punk as irritable as it is boisterously animated. Both tracks incite swift involvement from body and vocal chords, firing up rock ‘n’ roll instincts as easily as Excaliber also proves itself able. Again blues and punk unite as more stoner come sludge metal hues lick away at song and ears, the track another treat even if far too short for unbridled satisfaction.

Through the psych rock seeded, R&B keyed punk ‘n’ roll of Flypaper and the cowpunk sniping of Gold Digging Whore, the album continues to broaden its flavour and magnetism, the first simply a delicious noise nurtured infestation and its successor a woozy intoxication of sour but richly appetising sonic liquor.

Though the country lined funk ‘n’ roll of Cosmic Retribution did not trigger the same greedy appetite as those before it, the track effortlessly had attention hooked as hips swayed again with that mesmeric organ of Stephens a major flirtation alongside swinging rhythms and the enterprise woven web of guitar.

From its title you will correctly guess the nature and sound of Tombstone Blues, a track which without breaking boundaries was full distraction before the album closes off with the enthralling epic stroll of Helping Hand. Though a track unsurprisingly flourishing from the open individual and united craft of its creators, it is the suggestive meander of Killingsworth’s guitar which wanders with a skilled touch and intimation across the increasingly cosmic landscape of sultry keys and boldly ambling rhythms which primarily stands out and grips the imagination.

It feels a long time since we had a Joecephus and The George Jonestown Massacre offering to chew on but well worth the wait as Death Rattle Shake is easily their best yet.

Death Rattle Shake is out now; available @ https://joecephus.bandcamp.com/album/death-rattle-shake

https://www.jk47.com/   https://www.facebook.com/Joecephus13/   https://twitter.com/joecephus13

Pete RingMaster 20/10/2018

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

The Objex – Super Charged Little Nova

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Just like its title suggests, Super Charged Little Nova the new album from The Objex, is a lean, mean punk machine. A fireball of antagonism and in your face passion which explodes with incendiary intensity and belligerence across its magnetic canvas, the third album from the Sin City dwelling band confirms the raw and insatiable might of one of the genre’s most colourful protagonists aurally and visually. It is a tougher more aggressive provocation than before from the quartet, one with a hostile punch to match its breath-taking toxicity. Quite simply the eight-track release is The Objex’s finest and dirtiest rock ‘n’ roll rebellion yet.

Formed in 2006, the Felony Melony (real name Melanie Troxler) and Jim Nasty led band has provided a forceful and virulently contagious proposition since day one, their first demo Bound And Gagged waking up the local scene before debut album Attack Of The Objex in 2007 gripped further afield as it led the band to acclaimed appearances at events such as the SXSW music festival and The Afro Punk music festival as well as subsequently support slots with Demob, Goldblade, and The UK Subs on UK tours. Second album Reservation For Debauchery hit the world in 2009 earning the band even greater attention around the globe as well as awards and nominations respectively at the Vegas Rocks Award for Best Punk Rock Band 2010 and Hollywood Music Award for best alternative song 2011 and best rock song 2012.Across the years as well as sharing stages with others such as The Dwarves, The Addicts, Agent Orange, Sham 69,The Vibrators, and Guttermouth, line-up changes have crossed the band but now with a stable team of drummer Chili (Joaquin Espinosa) and bassist Ivan Del Real alongside vocalist Felony and guitarist Nasty, The Objex unleash their most aggressive and virulently demanding release yet. It is a dive into their most hostile depths though the primal rhythms and deeply barbarous hooks which marked their previous releases still seduce and rile up imagination with their toxic infections. The album is nothing less than a brawling treat for punk rock.

Super Charged Lil Nova hits hard and potently with opener Burn, its opening sonic bait the trigger for a heavy stride of intensive rhythms and scarring riffs within a metal seeded intensity. Instantly the song grips attention like a Super-Charged covermix of UK’s The Duel and Mongrel from the US, plundering ears with a throaty bass line aligned to increasingly rapier like beats as Felony roams their frame with her ever fiery and magnetic vocals. The track continues to antagonise and flirt with thoughts and passions, reinforcing their swift allegiance as the guitar of Nasty conjures wicked hooks amongst the abrasive sonic avenging to ensure even deeper satisfaction.

The excellent start is straight away matched by the predatory Crush, again a muscular urgency and a carnivorous metal based temperament leaking into the voracious punk heart of the song’s fire. Felony and Nasty cast a web of ridiculously riveting temptation with their individual assaults across the song, enticements impressively stalked by the rhythms of Chili and the bass grouchiness of Del Real. As its predecessor, the track is an eye balling aggressor which inflames and incites the emotions with sublime ease.

A spice of salaciousness hits next through the equally tempting and irritable Queen Cobra, its instant scrub of guitar the gateway to a barrage of bone shuddering beats and caustic riffs, one again lorded over by the irrepressible vocal roar of Felony. A devil bred temptress with intimately devious designs to its sound and intent, the track is a furnace of vicious sonic enslavement and merciless melodic seduction, each extreme uniting for a ridiculously addictive and rapacious trap.

The band uncage their latest single GG (Get It Done) next, an ode to punk provocateur GG Allin which maybe does not thrust as big a pair of shock loaded balls into the face as expected but provides an old school punk rabidity and motivation to greedily devour before the ferocious blaze of Grrr steams at break neck pace across the senses. As with all the songs, there is an unpolished beauty to the core and thrust of the tempest but just as irresistibly a spine of inventive barbs and melody kissed underlining grooves poison the imagination and passions with the fullest rabid charm leading to a subsequent lustful submission from the listener.

Both Milk Man with its torrential flood of senses blasting rhythms and guitar sculpted predation, and the spiteful seducing of Thanx 4 Cumming keep album and its recipient raging with unrelenting energy. Each in their individual way light a match to old school nostalgia and modern animosity, the first oozing with discord charmed harmonies within the twisted seduction of its uncompromising musical and lyrical revelry whilst its successor does not pull its forceful jabs either as it boldly stands up and bitch slaps senses and emotions. The pair are pure punk rock and prime The Objex, reaffirming that Super Charged Little Nova is at a new pinnacle of invention and sound.

The album closes with Trainwreck Suicide, a sensational pop punk predation which if you imagine a mix of Sweet and Penetration led by the hybrid of a cloned union between Suzy Quatro and Wendy O.Williams, you would not be far from guessing the quality of the glorious closing triumph.

The Objex has never been a band which has left a bland or uneventful mark on rock ‘n’ roll but without doubt with a greater maturity and stronger antagonism to their craft and open alchemy in their sound, Super Charged Little Nova places the band on a new genre inspiring plateau.

Super Charged Little Nova is available now at http://theobjex.bigcartel.com/

https://www.facebook.com/objexlv

9/10

RingMaster 03/07/2014

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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In The Whale – Nate & Eric

InTheWhale R! 2

This week sees the release of the Nate & Eric, a fireball of rock ‘n’ roll from US duo In The Whale. The album is actually the putting together of the band’s last two EPs and if they have escaped your attention this is an encounter you should urgently add to your collection of crucial sounds. As eclectic as they are ferociously contagious, the songs making up the release are encounters bred in everything from old school rock ‘n’ roll and punk through to blues, garage rock, and plenty more. It is uncompromising, honest, balls out rock ‘n’ roll, and quite simply irresistible.

Formed in 2011, the Denver band consists of Nate Valdez (vocals and guitar) and Eric Riley (drums and backing vocals), a pair which much like Canadians The Black Frame Spectacle, turn two sources of roaring instrumentation into a full-on rapacious beast of sound and energy. In 2012 In The Whale unleashed debut EP Cake, a well-received proposition which was followed by a just as impressive live presence, which has seen the band play with the likes of Murder by Death, Local H, Reverend Horton Heat, and Electric Six as well as The Airborne Toxic Event, Agent Orange, Bob Log III, The Pack A.D. and Slash. Second EP Eric hit ears in the latter stages of 2013 with its successor Nate being unveiled earlier this year. Now the last EPs come together to create one of the most inspiring and mouthwatering propositions of 2014.

Nate & Eric opens up with the Nate tracks, and specifically Robert Johnson. From its first breath a flame of energy and intensity hits image10-5the ears through intermittent strikes of raw riffs and punching beats beneath the equally imposing vocal call of Valdez. Bluesy air oozes from all aspects too before the track settles into a predatory dance of raucous riffs and anthemic rhythms to which the vocals burn and roar passionately. The track is like a mix of the previously mentioned Canadians, Reverend Horton Heat, and Eagles of Death Metal, and just as devilish as that mixture suggests. It is Devil music and unapologetically irreverent in its infectiousness and psyche twisting charm.

If the starter was mercilessly tempting than the following Wedding Bells should be labelled as dangerous, its initial southern psychobilly twang toxic bait to which the band erupts into a garage punk enslavement with impossibly addictive pop punk relish. For less than a minute and a half, the track stomps with nagging rhythms and agitated riffs, leading into a ridiculously commanding chorus; this all under the again gripping vocals of Valdez. It is a fiery mix that Valdez and Riley conjure; alchemy of sound sculpted with an adrenaline fuelled inventive voracity through simply one predacious guitar, an antagonism lit drum kit, and flaming vocals.

Both the hard rocking Lake of Fire with its again blues kissed rabidity and the feverish brawl of Grandpa Pete keep passions and ears greedy, the first a frenetic blaze of stoner-esque heavy rock with punk urges. Acidic melodies and darkly shadowed chords equally add their potency to the fire dance, hooks and grooves just as prevalent and mischievously compelling too. There is a little tint of Wall of Voodoo to the song, though admittedly for indefinable reasons whilst its successor is pure punk revelry with metallic appetite. Holding a touch of I Am Duckeye and Melvins in its barging garage punk tenacity and devilment, the track is pure aural addiction.

The Eric half of the album begins with On A Roll and immediately a scrub of blues guitar swiftly joined by muscular rhythms and honky-tonk piano covers the senses. As Valdez opens up the narrative everything settles into an ordered yet disruptive canvas of unpredictable rhythms and searing melodies beneath those dramatically expressive vocals. There is a rich feel of Queens Of The Stone Age to the riot but only as a potent spice in a loudly individual proposition. Its triumph is followed by the best track on the release, The Clash seeded Girlfriend. Beats set out a plain but gripping frame for both men to lay down their anthemic vocal call before the track explodes into a blistering punk temptation. The Vibrators meets Rocket From The Crypt with that Strummer and co blooding, the song is an incendiary trap to dive into head first for the greatest pleasure and lustful satisfaction.

The release closes with Sunbeam where again the pair step into a stoner landscape but this time with coarse rock ‘n’ roll and seventies garage rock scenery. It is a smouldering abrasing of sound and sonic tempting, keys again adding richer colour to the riveting and shifting terrain of the magnetic provocation. It is a glorious end to a sensational release, as mentioned one which if the EPs individually have evaded your sweaty hands, is a must have, do not dawdle purchase. In The Whale expels rock ‘n’ roll in its purest yet adventurous form, a furnace to get persistently and brilliantly burnt by; the proof is all there on Nate & Eric.

The self-released Nate & Eric is available now!

www.inthewhalesucks.com

10/10

RingMaster 27/06/2014

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Final Trigger: Skrap Metal Vol II

FT Promo Screamers without Logo

Imagine the attitude of Hed (PE) merged with the funk devilry of Infectious Grooves and the rap metal aggression of Motown Rage fused into the swagger of The Union Underground, then those essences instilled into a vat of punk rage. What emerges from the toxic fumes of that volatile alchemy is an unpredictable and riotously contagious force, or to give it a name, Final Trigger. Formed in 2006 and hailing from Toronto, the band maybe is not a name yet instantly recognisable but with the release of the excellent Skrap Metal Vol II you can only suspect wider recognition is just around the corner.

The new release follows Skrap Metal of 2009, both coming through Boonsdale Records. The debut received strong acclaim with its single Start A Moshpit gaining particular attention across Canada and the US. Following years has seen the band play alongside the likes of Suicidal Tendencies, Marilyn Manson, Dillinger Escape Plan, Protest The Hero, Baptized In Blood, Hail The Villain, Threat Signal, Slaves On Dope, Agent Orange, Blaze Ya Dead Homie, Boondox and many more,  as well as them supporting Mushroomhead on a tour across the States. Now with the release of the David Bottrill (Tool/Mudvayne/Stone Sour/Godsmack) mixed Skrap Metal Volume II, the quartet of J-Roc (vocals/guitar), Fazio (bass/vocals), JJ Tartaglia (drums), and Profit G (DJ/vocals/keys) may just be looking at a new world hunger for their distinct and insatiable musical devilry.

The seven track release attaches itself to the senses firstly through the single Face It. Guitars entwine their fiery sonic tendrils Skrap Metal Vol II Album Cover 1600x1600around the ear initially, tempting the passions to take a look before the tumbling heavy muscled rhythms make their play for the affections. In reality as the sounds rubs eagerly over the senses and the vocals begin their tempting squalls it is the whole combination which provides the irresistible hook, the barbs of which become impossible to refuse once the grooves twist and writhe insidiously and the vocals and sound take on a Suicidal Tendencies like punk beckoning. With a deep bark to the chorus and Five Finger Death Punch like rabidity to the riffs adding to the persistently shifting stance, the song is a dynamic and explosive introduction and platform for the album to spring from, which it does in varying degrees.

Through The Darkness and Knock Somebody Out follow up with their own distinct personalities, the first a metal forged encounter which sonically claws at the ear whilst the range of vocals, growling and rapping take their bite at the senses with equal belligerence. It is a relatively straightforward track which without the continual and wealthy mix of flavours employed in its predecessor pales in comparison if still a song which energises the appetite. Its successor similarly sticks to the muscular metallic intent of the band but digs deeper to expel some tight flavoursome grooves and find an intensive confrontation which would feel at home in any American Head Charge or Static X fury.

Things leap back to the opening heights with next up Just A Freak, a track which stomps through the ear with the delicious salacious devilment of Hed (PE) and the charged schizophrenic energy of early Mudvayne. Prowling and leaping around with a thrilling mix of hip hop, metal, and tantalising anthemic urgency, the song is a virulently contagious call to primal needs and energy expelling participation, which like the first track leaves the listener breathless and hungry for much more, especially for the dramatic and potent drums and scurrying weave of incendiary riffs.

Time I’ve Wasted opens with an evocative melodic persuasion which is almost Breed 77 like before fusing in samples and dub lilted invention before the brewing storm. Into its stride the tempest is again unpredictable, an undulating intensity and energy in league with a constantly evolving vocal display. Eventually though the senses flattening might of the track wins through even though the rampant and fluid mix is still allowed to shape the direction of the excellent track. It is a song which dangerously veers towards the edge of chaos and disaster but the band managed to ride the rougher less impressive moments to create another convincing treat.

The Kottonmouth Kings sounding Everyday with its mesmeric mystique and the predatory T.H.C. impressively complete the release, both outstanding and diverse offerings with the second especially throwing the senses and passions around with the rapaciousness of a hurricane. Skrap Metal Vol II is a great release which installs Final Trigger as one of our regular playlist newcomers, something the band will achieve with a great many we suspect.

www.Facebook.com/FinalTriggerMusic

8.75/10

RingMaster 08/07/2013

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