Juno – Speed Won’t Cut It

Juno_RingMasterReview

Speed Won’t Cut It is a mighty roar to get you to your feet, incite a closed fisted punch of the air, and arouse the spirit to stand defiant and proud. It is also the new irresistible punk incitement from UK punks Juno, a band just bubbling under finding major attention for a while now but now giving it an almighty nudge with their latest four-track EP.

Formed in 2008, the Leeds band sparked keen interest with their debut release We are Juno. A trio initially, they expanded attention and their line-up by the time of second EP Set Sail in 2009. A short break followed before a new head of stream saw the band return with the acclaimed Counting Backwards Causes Explosions EP. It was six tracks of boisterous rock ‘n’ roll which with its 2012 unleashing, drew a host of new fans and led to the band signing with The Animal Farm and the release of its successor Answers a year later, a proposition which eclipsed its predecessor in sound, persuasion, and success. Aligned to a potent live presence and craft which has seen Juno share stages with the likes of Summerlin, ACiD DROP, The Roughneck Riot, Twenty Twenty, Blitz Kids, Forgotten Roots, Adelaide, The Afterparty, Page 44, Failsafe, The Headstart and many more, the foursome of lead vocalist/guitarist Rob Kirk, lead guitarist/vocalist James Duncan, bassist/vocalist Ben Rowe, and drummer Matt Grum are now ready to pounce on full nationwide recognition without stopping at those boundaries and it all starts with the highly tempting Speed Won’t Cut It.

speed_wont_cut_it_RingMasterReviewMerciless hooks and swinging melodies have always been a part of the band’s punk ‘n’ roll offerings but alongside the band’s energy, all have gone up the gears within the new EP. It opens up with new single/video Last Dance, a track which ensures its invitation is quickly taken by feet. It is pure contagious punk rock with a flavoursome touch of AFI to it, though it quickly enforces its own lively character upon ears and imagination. With busy rhythmic bait and fiery guitar enterprise backing up Rob’s anthemically leading vocals, it is gripping stuff and just the start of the voracious revelry to follow.

Will I Be Free steps up next, immediately offering attitude in its riffs and jabbing beats. That continues into the quickly established canvas of jagged guitar tempting and band harmonies, Rob’s voice the ringleader as Ben’s bass prowls deceptive calms before one incendiary chorus. As with the first track, you cannot claim that Juno are re-inventing punk rock but few songs and indeed bands have set ears and emotions alight as effortlessly and rousingly recently as Juno in their first two songs on the EP alone.

Across the tracks the luring of physical participation from voice and body is inevitable and continues with the swinging stroll of Sirens. An arguably less imposing encounter but no weak link in stirring up spirit and thick enjoyment, the song bounds along throwing hooks into a gripping sonic resourcefulness to, like the Pied Piper, tantalise and seduce ears and spirit.

Speed Won’t Cut It ends on its biggest high and the mighty call to arms of Face Our Demons. Like a melodic punk version of Stiff Little Fingers, the track makes thick nudges on thoughts and emotions as its web of guitar tenacity and rhythmic pugnacity aids the song’s inescapable rebel rousing. The track is glorious; an inflammatory slice of intense punk ‘n’ roll which by its unstoppable and virulent finale, is sure to have the listener standing tall and yelling enough is enough to those and things which have taken advantage and more. It certainly did here.

Juno songs have a social and emotionally political aspect to their words which seems to further fire up the sounds around them and in turn the listener. It is a balanced weave though, which makes Juno easily stand out from similarly intense propositions whilst providing a hell of a great time, as proven by the must have Speed Won’t Cut It.

The Speed Won’t Cut It EP is out now across most online stores

http://www.wearejuno.com/   https://www.facebook.com/junoleeds   https://twitter.com/wearejuno

Pete RingMaster 10/03/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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One Morning Left – Metalcore Superstars

OML promo_RingMaster Review

Metalcore Superstars is the new album from Finnish melodic metalcore band One Morning Left, and our introduction to a sound which quickly you get the marmite factor feeling about in, it breeding love or eager dislike with little in between. As the eleven rousing tracks of the encounter run riot through ears with their bedlamic burst of styles and flavours, we quickly fell into the former opinion and keenly embraced its ferocious mayhem.

It has been three years since the quintet released their seemingly well-received second album Our Sceneration; it’s uncaging in 2013 quickly followed by the band increasing their live presence and hitting stages alongside the likes of like Adept, F*ckface Unstoppable (Bam Margera), Protest The Hero, and We Butter The Bread With Butter and more across Europe. 2014 saw the band begin working on Metalcore Superstars, its creation an extensive affair as the band honed their new ideas into its slightly psychotic character until arriving at the seriously eventful confrontation grabbing ears today.

Maybe the best way to generalise the One Morning Left sound is ravenous metalcore with the punk contagion of Billy Talent, the techno adventure of Silent Descent, and the mischievous prowess of Hollywood Undead; it coming with a hardcore/avant-garde surge of attitude. The result is a full-on and enjoyably unpredictable protagonist, even if one that flirts with a loss of control at times.

art_RingMaster ReviewOpener OML_KVLT sees the band announcing themselves in anthemic style, the vocals of Mika Lahti a busy and tenacious mix backed by those of guitarist Leevi Luoto. Checking out tracks from previous releases, there seems a lighter tone to the creative devilment of One Morning Left this time around with Metalcore Superstars but equally a more rabid snarl to their sonic and lyrical warfare amidst bolder drama to their imagination. The first track continues to stir ears and appetite with its fiery nature and pungent tapestry of flavours, subsequently creating a virulently infectious incitement that chews on the senses.

The following Heavy Metal Finland flirts with nintendocore like bait initially, it’s tempting aligned to vicious growling and broody dynamics which erupt further within the emergence of the tempestuous proposition. Without the constant spark of its predecessor, the track pleases as it toys vocally with heavy and death metal spices as well as similarly varied textures musically; enjoyably backing up the strong start without quite making the same impact.

The guitars of Luoto and Ari Levola aggressively dance with sonic attitude within ¡Derailed! next, but also they are unafraid to unleash some funk seeded flirtation whilst keys engage in a kaleidoscope of electro flavours and atmospheric suggestiveness. All the time moving towards a bruising confrontation, the track provides a galvanic finale within a formidable rhythmic web cast by drummer Niko Hyttinen before the outstanding You’re Dead! Let’s Disco! has body and energies fully involved in thumping aural devilry. Like Hadouken! meets The Browning, the track is a chest beating slab of sonic and vocal defiance again lit by the off-kilter imagination of keys and programming from Veli-Matti Kananen and bracingly driven by his bass lines and the swinging scythes of Hyttinen. Careering on the precipice of psychotic chaos, the track leaves body and emotions bursting with lust, a success matched by The Recipe, it a more controlled but no less forcibly resourceful and deranged web of concussive textures and fascinating theatre.

Kings and Queens throbs and pulsates straight after, its opening a haunted cascade of electronic splatters leading to a warmer toned but more punk bred aggressor as melodically engaging as it is infectiously cantankerous. That Billy Talent air is at its strongest here in a song with an inventive weave maybe less exploratory than others on the album but is still sculpted from a heftily flavoursome torrent of ideas. Its lean take on that thick diversity elsewhere works a treat, providing one more major highlight.

A muggy collage of metal and punk ‘n’ roll colours Fast and Furious 6.66 next, its electronic calms only bringing more intrigue loaded variety to ultimately an enraged bluster of the song whilst Devil’s Nest rumbles and grumbles from a sinister melodic entrance into an exotically hued adventure with duelling contrasts against aligning radiances and hostilities. A dogged but invitingly invigorating swamp of noise and flavour, the track grips attention and eager involvement with its theatre of enterprise leaving the album’s title track to bully and harry senses next, though it too is unafraid to seduce with the beckoning fingers of melodies and harmonies.

A great carnival-esque air comes with the riveting Eternity; the penultimate treat playing with a My Chemical Romance meets AFI hand within its just as potent murderous traits to ingeniously nag and thrill ears before making way for the closing turbulence of Sticks and Stones. Like being rabidly assaulted by a seductive temptress bound with irritable intent and wrapped in orchestral grandeur, the track is one enthralling end to an inescapably magnetic release.

For some, the creative turmoil and bordering on insatiable imagination of Metalcore Superstars may not hit the spot for ears or desires, but it only left us exhaustively wanting more. So be brave and take on the adventure One Morning Left offers with their latest proposal we suggest; it just might ignite your day.

Metalcore Superstars is out now in Finland via Inverse Records with full release from February 22nd in central Europe through Bleeding Nose Records, and across America and Oceania on Imminence Records.

http://www.onemorningleft.com/   https://www.facebook.com/Onemorningleft   https://twitter.com/onemorningleft

Pete RingMaster 25/01/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Ligaments – Ligaments (Eat Pizza EP)

Ligaments Online Promo Shot

As soon as learning that the armament within punk ‘n’ rollers Ligaments involved a double bass, intrigue and excitement, as we are suckers for the throaty seduction of said instrument, was rife. It was an anticipation swiftly satisfied by the London based trio’s excellent Ligaments (Eat Pizza EP). With throaty bass slaps in tandem with roaring vocals and voracious riffs, the four-song encounter proved itself to be an imposing and impressive introduction to the band.

Formed in 2012 after Napoli hailing Nicola Itro (double bass, vocals) and Londoner Jake Maxwell (guitar, vocals) met at the 12 Bar Club in Soho, Ligaments create a sound which is part ’77 punk, part old school rock ‘n’ roll, part rockabilly rapacity, and all 21st Century ferocity. Last year saw former Pettybone member Zel Kaute join the band on drums, bringing a passion for pizza with her which humorously themes the visual side of the new release. Already Ligaments have supported the likes of Pure Graft, The Meteors, The Vibrators, and GBH, and made Europe a regular playground for their thumping live presence, but it is with their debut EP that it is easy to expect a new spotlight shining on the creative bellow and potential of this exciting band.

Recorded with Wayne Adams (USA Nails, Death Pedals), the EP takes little time grabbing attention as opener Precinct 13 brews up an immediate dirty hard rock coaxing. Initially held in a Ligaments covermore distant embrace, it is soon bursting loud and anthemically upon the senses, and straight away Itro’s moody basslines are claiming an eager appetite. Equally the blaze of riff causticity and swinging punchy rhythms from Kaute are stealing their share of the focus. Minor Threat has been offered as a reference to the band’s sound but similarly here essences of Living End and AFI make a potent flavouring to the riotous proposition.

The great start is right away eclipsed by 4th, and again bass slaps and tenacious beats provide inescapable bait for the guitar of Maxwell to blaze over. Into its stride, the track marries a melodic ferociousness with a whiff of The Bronx to it, to a bruising yet captivating Peacocks like punk rumble. It is raw, unfussy, and magnetically anthemic but just an appetiser itself for the closing pair of treats starting with the Tiger Army like swing of Turn To Acid. Sultry in air and contagious in rhythmic enterprise, Itro again laying down virulent temptation, the track is stripped down rock ‘n’ roll providing an unpolished but craftily lean musical narrative almost revelling in its addictive nature.

Final song In The Black Lodge emerges as the favourite, again the dark charms on Tiger Army and AFI seeping into the psychobilly kissed landscape of the song. An anthem for feet and voice to instantly consume, the track stomps through ears, jabbing the senses with every swing of its epidemic energy. With thick basslines and insatiable melodies adding further primal tempting, it is a roaring blaze of the song.

Whether a fan of punk or rockabilly, in fact for anyone with a taste for any shade of rock ‘n’ roll, there is great pleasure to be found in Ligaments first release, and a ripe potential fuelling their impressive debut which suggests the band is going places.

The Ligaments (Eat Pizza EP) is available through all digital platforms from Monday 16th February and on ltd edition (250 pressed) CD @ http://theligaments.bandcamp.com/

https://www.facebook.com/TheLigaments

RingMaster 16/02/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Farewell, My Love – Gold Tattoos

fml new fixes

    Though it is hard to dismiss US rock band Farewell, My Love as just another teen fad, even when their emergence is drawing an eagerly attentive and rapidly growing fanbase from a seemingly young teen element you cannot help sensing that they will be just as hungrily derided. The band’s debut album Gold Tattoos equally gives evidence and support to that assumption in many ways but also suggests that they are much more than just a blaze of style. The Arizona quintet look set to have a love or hate relationship with media and music lovers, much like one of their biggest influences My Chemical Romance. Whether they override the animosity bred towards them like the band they definitely sound like and certainly rip the primes essences from on their debut, time will tell but it is fair to say that there is much more substance and depth to Farewell, My Love than you would suspect from their look alone. When the Phoenix band hits full stride and potency on the twelve-track romp they easily and infectiously steal attention and a keen appetite for their presence, though sadly it is not an appeal and strength which is sustained throughout the whole release. Honesty declares that we have to admit that early MCR found a soft spot to exploit in our passions here and just occasionally Gold Tattoos and band threaten to reap that same appreciative well too.

    Consisting of vocalist Ryan Howell, guitarists Röbby Creasey and Logan Thayer, bassist Charlee Conley, and drummer Chad Kowal, Farewell, My Love first sparked rich focus their way with the A Dance You Won’t Forget EP in 2011. With its bulging choruses and anthemic potency, the release was soon soaking up eagerness and praise from newly drawn fans. Comparisons to the likes of Avenged Sevenfold, AFI, 30 Seconds to Mars as well of course as MCR were latched upon the band’s sound something Gold Tattoos only accentuates. It is fair to say that the Don Debiase (Modern Day Escape, Beneath the Sky, For All Those Sleeping) produced album is not rippling with startling originality but again like the songs individually, the Standby Records released encounter has something about it which is hungrily refreshing and hard to turn away from.

     Afraid Of The Dark opens things up, a resonating heartbeat haunting the atmosphere before fiery guitar sonics burst out to FML_cover-officiallead rampaging grooves and rampant beats into a welcome seizure of the ears. That MCR influence is an open contagion from the first full stride of the song, even vocally Howell sounds like he is laying homage to Gerard Way in his tone and delivery. The song though is an intriguing and addiction inflicting stomp, sonic bursts and melodic endeavour keeping things unpredictable if still familiar across the thoroughly engaging track. There is a drama and theatrical vivacity to the song too, if at times laid on almost too thickly, which adds something richer to its invitation to remain in control of already magnetised emotions.

    The strong start is followed by the equally enticing My Perfect Thing, the song more reserved compared to the first but still lively and similarly littered with hooks and rich harmonies across an inventive body. That ‘ingenuity’ though comes with a rich dressing of recognisable adventure which defuses the undeniable craft and hunger of the band to excite and entertain. Nevertheless the track keeps attention enthused before firstly Faceless Frames toys with and then Mirror, Mirror inflames the passions. The first of the two pumps sinew built rhythms through the ear with rousing hooks as anthemic bait wantonly seduces the imagination whilst the second lights the touch paper to a pop punk voraciousness, the rapacious drive of the song irresistible as it leads the listener into a virulently contagious chorus. If MCR at their epidemic best was a lure for you than this song is the next best thing, a treat which suggests the band can possibly be something special if they find their distinct presence.

     From here on in the release ebbs and flows, or more deflates with fitful returns to earlier heights. Certainly the likes of Rewind The Play and Skip The Memories provide imaginative attempts to persuade but seem content to drift into a more formulaic design lacking incendiary grooves and the depth of riotous exploit which made the first third of the album as impressive as it was. The songs though do tease with swipes of sonic drama and nibbling hooks from time to time to keep you hanging on just in case, though ultimately they disappoint with Friends & Fiends another example, it an agreeable song with fine electronic colour but unable to lift the spirits and appetite for their attempts.

    The keys driven ballad Paper Forts is an elegant figure of a song with great vocals but again finds no purchase with thoughts and emotions, its boy band breath off-putting at times. Its failure though is soon forgotten once Angels unveils its eloquent pop fuelled suasion. It is not a song to challenge earlier triumphs but has that something special with stroking orchestral bred synths helping to make it a lingering impact. Neither the title track nor the closing The Queen Of Hearts stoke up the fires either but as with all songs there is quality and undeniable promise about them to keep you interested if uninspired.

    If someone like My Chemical Romance is a passion then Farewell, My Love is an investigation definitely needed to be made though of course if they are not then look elsewhere for your new adventure. As an EP and just made up of the first quartet of tracks, Gold Tattoos would certainly have had us enthusing much more about band and release but as a full length confrontation it relinquishes that early capture of the passions quite easily as it progresses to provide very decent but underwhelming company. It is hard not to have a mixed view about the album but easy to admit it does offer more than enough to suggest that if not now, ahead they could become one of those naughty secrets that we all have in our playlists.

http://www.facebook.com/farewellmyloveofficial

7/10

RingMaster 03/02/2014

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Miss Vincent – Creepy

Miss Vincent pic

After getting over the disappointment that Miss Vincent was not a psychobilly band, their debut EP’s cover and title as well as the band name all the clues adding up to that deceitful assumption, the UK pop goth punk band turned out to be a rather enjoyable proposition which in Creepy they have a release which is more than a decent ride of melodic persuasion and feisty energy. Emerging as a hybrid of Alkaline Trio and Fall Out Boy with some healthy genes of NOFX, AFI, and Social Distortion spliced in for extra flavour, the Guildford quartet have introduced themselves with a release which without lighting fires leaves  a wash of satisfaction and promise behind which cannot be ignored.

Formed in 2012, the foursome of vocalist/guitarist Alex Marshall, guitarist Lawrie Pattison, bassist Owain Mainwaring, and drummer Jack Donnelly has earned themselves a solid reputation and potent fan base around the southeast of the country. The Creepy EP has all the charm and infectious persuasion to send the band into passions much further afield. It will not be lighting new pyres of adventure for pop punk certainly but should place Miss Vincent in the watch closely column of the media and future fans alike.

The release opens with Deadlock, a firm and well-crafted invitation but one which leaves the passions a little underwhelmed. From the 998130_579896398741788_2057771635_nstrong vocals to incisive web of riffs and sonic invention, the song makes an appealing companion with hints of unique imagination whispering from within, but ultimately it lacks the spark to ignite anything more than a passing interest and respect for its predictable but accomplished offering. The following I Don’t Want This has no such problem, the temptation from its opening charge of jagged riffs and contagious groove is an instant awakening for ear and thoughts. True there is little new to devour but the song has the fuse and fuel to grip full attention and breed an equally keen appetite. With a strong whisper of Green Day and slighter spice of Against Me! to its stomp, the encounter is a vibrant and energetic persuasion, the bass of Mainwaring a prowling throaty shadow which seduces whilst the great harmonies of the bassist and Pattison make a great backdrop to the delivery of Marshall.

Planning To Fail, with the rhythms of Donnelly crafting out a sinew framed cage for the song to wrap around, lies somewhere between the opening pair, at times leaving a lack of fulfilment on the taste buds and in other moments showing an invention and imagination which adds a hearty confidence to their promise and future creativity. It has more than enough to light a deeper intrigue over their horizons though as does its successor Carry On, a track which surges from the start with a magnetic fire of riffs merging into virulently infectious melodies and hooks. It is an excellent romp which takes best track honours on Creepy and leaves the emotions keener and greedier than before.

The closing Testing Times is bred from the same seed box as its predecessor, the opening riot of rapacious melodic flames and taunting riffs veined by crisp rhythms is irresistible as it leads the ears into the again impressive vocals of Marshall. There is a sense of Billy Talent to the construction of the song, hooks and sonic barbs littering its passage to ensure no one escapes the song’s addictive claws and adventurous enterprise, which actually leaves the previous tracks seem lacking. It is a great conclusion to a release which sets down an opening marker for Miss Vincent that should see them as they evolve take to loftier plateaus and recognition.

It may not provide anything to get your teeth of originality into but as the ground floor of something with all the possibilities of major things rising from within, Creepy is well worth a slice of your time and enjoyment.

Grab the Creepy EP as a buy now name your price release at www.missvincent.bandcamp.com

https://www.facebook.com/missvincentband

7.5/10

RingMaster 25/09/2013

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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In Evil Hour – The World Bleeds Out

pic by Helen Templeton Photography

pic by Helen Templeton Photography

A snarling insatiably commanding beast of a release, The World Bleeds Out the debut album from UK punks In Evil Hour is a sensational blistering of senses and thoughts from a band who know how to craft virulently contagious and potently provocative songs. A blaze of essential fresh punk rock with a lyrical bite which takes no prisoners within incisive swipes upon politics, society, and the apathy and ignorance that pervades modern culture, the ten track release leaves a fully exposed and hunger driven passion in its wake, whilst In Evil Hour steps forward as another irresistible voice declaring that UK punk rock is again leading the world.

Formed in 2003, the quartet from Darlington takes seeds out of inspirations from the likes of AFI, Amen, Black Flag, The Stooges, Bad Brains, NOFX, Bad Religion, Sick of it All, and Rise Against to name a few, into their own flavoursome hardcore punk. It is a sound which is not unafraid to load itself with infection soaked hooks and riffs but as an additive to tempt rather than undermine the sinew lined directly evocative heavy punk attack they conjure. Released through STP Records, The World Bleeds Out is a savage yet anthemic confrontation which allows hope and temptation to be as rife and alluring as the aggressive and spiteful creative toxicity which stirs up and incites the imagination.

Opener Divide And Conquer stands eye to eye with the listener as the rasping growl of Alice confronts the ears skirted by crisp and a0645899867_2antagonistic rhythms and swiping raw riffs. The track is soon charging for the jugular of the senses with rabid beats from Mike whipping the song on whilst bassist Mark and guitarist Gareth create a vitriolic and persuasive mesh of caustic might. With anthemic vocals in league with an equally demanding instigator in the chorus, the song is an outstanding and powerful entrance into the album.

     Far From Home takes up the fury next with a splattering of rebellious beats sparking the rest of the song into an initial rage against the senses. It is a great start but one which is left behind once the song settles into an incisive stomp of rumbling rhythms ridden by the continuing to impress, with greater strength as each song steps forward, vocals of Alice. There is a Wendy O Williams essence to her delivery which only enhances the lyrical expression and song attack overall, something which the music seems to understand and find inspiration from, this track gaining ever increasing intensity and rapaciousness with every syllable expelled with brawling strength.

Both As Seas Rise and Where You’re Left continue the immense presence of the album if not quite to the earlier heights set, the first creating a sonic scrap with the ear in which there is only one winner, especially with the deliciously catchy swing and barbed melodic enticement through the guitar skills and vocal harmonies and calls. Its successor is a scorching flame of guitar scalding and rhythmic bashing again steered impressively and skilfully by the vocals singular and as a riotous union.

The lethal swipe of animosity that is Little Death is a fifty five second storm of magnetic viciousness, a hardcore blitz which thrills from its first uncompromising breath through to its last. It moves over for the mutually outstanding Help Me Out, an acidic spiral of heavy rock guitar teasing and taunting whilst the rest of the band adds their particular predacious craft and incendiary invention. A bruising rock n’ roll rampage which leaves the passions aflame with greedy appetite it provides one more stunning moment amongst a great many on the release.

The instantly compelling bass lure to The Terminal brings in another exceedingly agreeable altercation, the band arguably more restrained in its proposition though no less direct and imposing lyrically and in presentation. The bass continues to steal the show on the track, its finest and most potent moment on the album where at times it feels like it is given a back seat place in the production, whilst as now expected Alice draws attention with her striking presence which to be fair often puts most other aspects in the shade.

The excellent title track grazes up the senses and passions with its own individual exciting and imaginative spat whilst the brilliant I Lost Years, where bass and guitar find another plateau to tease a new rapture out with their impossibly addictive rough charms. A Dead Kennedys like hook steers the passions whilst the surrounding body of the song is a mix of Angelic Upstarts/UK Subs and Penetration/AFI. It is a terrific creative and raucous adventure cementing the depth and quality of band and album.

With Murder Murder closing up The World Bleeds Out with one final tempest of contagion drenched excellence, a blend of Bad Religion and The Duel coming to mind as it steals another wave of ardour from the emotions, In Evil Hour emerge as one of the most impressive emerging forces in punk rock, and not just in the UK. A classic album from an extremely impressive band, not much left to say.

http://inevilhour.bandcamp.com/

https://www.facebook.com/InEvilHour

10/10

RingMaster 17/09/2013

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