One Morning Left – Metalcore Superstars

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Metalcore Superstars is the new album from Finnish melodic metalcore band One Morning Left, and our introduction to a sound which quickly you get the marmite factor feeling about in, it breeding love or eager dislike with little in between. As the eleven rousing tracks of the encounter run riot through ears with their bedlamic burst of styles and flavours, we quickly fell into the former opinion and keenly embraced its ferocious mayhem.

It has been three years since the quintet released their seemingly well-received second album Our Sceneration; it’s uncaging in 2013 quickly followed by the band increasing their live presence and hitting stages alongside the likes of like Adept, F*ckface Unstoppable (Bam Margera), Protest The Hero, and We Butter The Bread With Butter and more across Europe. 2014 saw the band begin working on Metalcore Superstars, its creation an extensive affair as the band honed their new ideas into its slightly psychotic character until arriving at the seriously eventful confrontation grabbing ears today.

Maybe the best way to generalise the One Morning Left sound is ravenous metalcore with the punk contagion of Billy Talent, the techno adventure of Silent Descent, and the mischievous prowess of Hollywood Undead; it coming with a hardcore/avant-garde surge of attitude. The result is a full-on and enjoyably unpredictable protagonist, even if one that flirts with a loss of control at times.

art_RingMaster ReviewOpener OML_KVLT sees the band announcing themselves in anthemic style, the vocals of Mika Lahti a busy and tenacious mix backed by those of guitarist Leevi Luoto. Checking out tracks from previous releases, there seems a lighter tone to the creative devilment of One Morning Left this time around with Metalcore Superstars but equally a more rabid snarl to their sonic and lyrical warfare amidst bolder drama to their imagination. The first track continues to stir ears and appetite with its fiery nature and pungent tapestry of flavours, subsequently creating a virulently infectious incitement that chews on the senses.

The following Heavy Metal Finland flirts with nintendocore like bait initially, it’s tempting aligned to vicious growling and broody dynamics which erupt further within the emergence of the tempestuous proposition. Without the constant spark of its predecessor, the track pleases as it toys vocally with heavy and death metal spices as well as similarly varied textures musically; enjoyably backing up the strong start without quite making the same impact.

The guitars of Luoto and Ari Levola aggressively dance with sonic attitude within ¡Derailed! next, but also they are unafraid to unleash some funk seeded flirtation whilst keys engage in a kaleidoscope of electro flavours and atmospheric suggestiveness. All the time moving towards a bruising confrontation, the track provides a galvanic finale within a formidable rhythmic web cast by drummer Niko Hyttinen before the outstanding You’re Dead! Let’s Disco! has body and energies fully involved in thumping aural devilry. Like Hadouken! meets The Browning, the track is a chest beating slab of sonic and vocal defiance again lit by the off-kilter imagination of keys and programming from Veli-Matti Kananen and bracingly driven by his bass lines and the swinging scythes of Hyttinen. Careering on the precipice of psychotic chaos, the track leaves body and emotions bursting with lust, a success matched by The Recipe, it a more controlled but no less forcibly resourceful and deranged web of concussive textures and fascinating theatre.

Kings and Queens throbs and pulsates straight after, its opening a haunted cascade of electronic splatters leading to a warmer toned but more punk bred aggressor as melodically engaging as it is infectiously cantankerous. That Billy Talent air is at its strongest here in a song with an inventive weave maybe less exploratory than others on the album but is still sculpted from a heftily flavoursome torrent of ideas. Its lean take on that thick diversity elsewhere works a treat, providing one more major highlight.

A muggy collage of metal and punk ‘n’ roll colours Fast and Furious 6.66 next, its electronic calms only bringing more intrigue loaded variety to ultimately an enraged bluster of the song whilst Devil’s Nest rumbles and grumbles from a sinister melodic entrance into an exotically hued adventure with duelling contrasts against aligning radiances and hostilities. A dogged but invitingly invigorating swamp of noise and flavour, the track grips attention and eager involvement with its theatre of enterprise leaving the album’s title track to bully and harry senses next, though it too is unafraid to seduce with the beckoning fingers of melodies and harmonies.

A great carnival-esque air comes with the riveting Eternity; the penultimate treat playing with a My Chemical Romance meets AFI hand within its just as potent murderous traits to ingeniously nag and thrill ears before making way for the closing turbulence of Sticks and Stones. Like being rabidly assaulted by a seductive temptress bound with irritable intent and wrapped in orchestral grandeur, the track is one enthralling end to an inescapably magnetic release.

For some, the creative turmoil and bordering on insatiable imagination of Metalcore Superstars may not hit the spot for ears or desires, but it only left us exhaustively wanting more. So be brave and take on the adventure One Morning Left offers with their latest proposal we suggest; it just might ignite your day.

Metalcore Superstars is out now in Finland via Inverse Records with full release from February 22nd in central Europe through Bleeding Nose Records, and across America and Oceania on Imminence Records.

http://www.onemorningleft.com/   https://www.facebook.com/Onemorningleft   https://twitter.com/onemorningleft

Pete RingMaster 25/01/2016

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A Breach of Silence – The Darkest Road

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Though the tightness of its grip fluctuates across its fourteen roars, The Darkest Road is a creative fury easy to breed a greedy appetite for. Unleashed by Australian metallers A Breach of Silence, it is a tempestuous slab of varied styles and flavours which has been labelled as “powercore”. Melding the potent flavours of metalcore through to post hardcore, heavy metal on to melodic death metal, and we are missing out many more spices, it is a compelling proposition which never gives ears and imagination time to settle or spawn expectations.

The Darkest Road follows the successful and acclaimed debut album Dead or Alive which was released a year ago. With having Australia’s prestigious Q Music Award in the Best Heavy Song category (2012) under their belt, which helped lead the band to signing with Eclipse Records, their first full-length pushed A Breach Of Silence into a new intensive and global spotlight, backed potently by the band’s live presence which has seen them share stages with the likes of Born of Osiris, Adept, The Amity Affliction, and Upon a Burning Body. Earlier this year the band released their controversial Night Rider ‘first-person shooter’ music video which took inspiration from their obsession with FPS video games and 1960’s classic westerns such as Hang ‘em High and The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly. Now The Darkest Road is upon us to stir up ears and thoughts whilst making another impressive step in the ascent of the Brisbane quintet.

Recorded with producers Fredrik Nordstrom and Henrik Udd (Bring Me the Horizon, Arch Enemy, In Flames), The Darkest Road as suggested ebbs and follows in the strength of its certainly unrelenting captivation, sometimes throwing a spanner in the works of getting a handle on songs and the release, but it only adds to the welcome and inventive unpredictability and constantly intriguing nature of the encounter. The album certainly starts with furious gusto and anthemic irresistibility, opener T.P.N.E shoving group shouts through ears before wiry grooves and heavy rumbling rhythms join the emerging storm. The raw and caustic vocal squalls of Rhys Flannery swiftly more in with antagonistic and skilled intent which in turn seems to light a fire in the creative swings of drummer Andrew Cotterell and the similarly vivacious motion of the grooves conjured up by Mat Cosgrove and Kerrod Dabelstein. It is a gripping and incendiary blend which is capped off by the throaty lure of bassist Blair Layt and more so by his outstanding clean vocal delivery. The song offers richly flavoursome and agitated metal of the highest order and an inescapable lure into the creative lair of A Breach of Silence, an entrance backed powerfully by the following title track.

The second song caresses ears with the impressive tones of Layt right away, evocative keys coaxing the invitation before riffs and acidic grooves erupt to trap and steal the passions all over again. As its predecessor, the track is a formidable Printencounter which is unafraid to bewitch and bewilder, seduce and rile, with a unique character seeded in the likes of All That Remains and In Flames. Its stature and temptation is matched by Vultures which strides confidently in next. Another certain anthem with its group calls and raging rhythmic confrontation, the song blazes sonically and vocally from the start, the extremes of voices a perfect union within the similarly blended canvas of predatory and melodically smouldering sounds.

Through the intensive yet warming examination of Silhouette, as the others songs upon The Darkest Road, a hope rich and potent roar against life’s obstacles, the band reveals more of their technical and imagination driven resourcefulness. A scent of Bullet For My Valentine hints throughout the evolving and inventive offering before Hang ‘em High sets its own individual fire within the release. Riffs and rhythms spew anger with their intensive and physical intent whilst Flannery almost brawls with ears through his uncompromising and pleasing vocal antagonism. It is a potent and engrossing song if without the spark of those before it, a comment which can be placed before In Reality We Trust also, though as always with the album it is mostly down to personal taste. The song storms and bleeds spite over the senses with skill and enterprise but it is mainly the vocals from both men which steal the plaudits.

From here the album does not have an identity crisis but definitely wrong-foots with persistence. Though all the tracks so far employed a diverse and varied spicing, they were bred from a fierce extreme metal canvas. The excellent Lost at Sea brings a new bloom of sound, immediately expelling a ‘folkish’ tinge to its air as well as a glorious melodic croon across its potent harmonies and sonic narrative. It is a loud whisper of something different in some ways but helps seed a new hostile and captivating breath to the album, and makes for an enthrallingly textured and majestic slice of persuasion.

   This is the End comes next and instantly spins an engaging sonic and rhythmic web around ears. It is a contagiously compelling weave, guitars and bass a simultaneously welcoming and menacing enticement over which the vocals merge hostile and catchy elements with a classic metal spiced attack. Every chord and rhythmic swipe brings a surprise and unexpected twist, the song emerging as another pinnacle and treat for the album, something Immortal is not. To be fair again it is just a personal thing but its heavy/power metal balladry complete with the genre’s trademark vocals warbles and squeals, just does not find a welcome in these ears though it is easy to hear its qualities and know it will be a favourite with classic metal fans. The song is another unique identity within the character of the album, though to call The Darkest Road schizophrenic would be going too far.

The excellent Hannibal is more from the template of earlier songs, its metalcore voracity and melodic tenacity an infectious and voracious treat which parts for the even heavier and harsher A Place I Know. The song also expels fiery melodic endeavour, again with a more classic spicing, before exploring slimmer post hardcore scenery punctuated with probably the most intensive beats and riffs on the album. It is a song which sets a fire in the belly at times but also lowers its temperature in others, but for intrigue and bold invention it is another notable moment.

Dead and Destroyed is simply brutal, a wall of angst and viciousness which still makes room for vocal croons whilst Krazy Bitch seems to pull in all the things which excites and personally frustrates in the album for a still rather pleasing encounter. The pair leaves the piano and voice sculpted ballad Time Still Remains to close the album, the song a more than decent piece of melodic metal but easy to skip by to get back to the pungent heights the album started on all over again.

The Darkest Road is a striking release, with to be honest any issues found coming from just the individual likes and dislikes we all have in our metal. It is easy to see A Breach of Silence becoming a big player in world metal if this thrilling tempest is anything to go by.

The Darkest Road is available now on Eclipse Records @ http://www.eclipserecords.biz/a-breach-of-silence-the-darkest-road-cd/

https://www.facebook.com/abreachofsilenceband

RingMaster 10/10/2014

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Surviving The Charade – We’re Never Coming Home

Surviving The Charade Online Promo Shot

First impressions of We’re Never Coming Home, the debut album from Swedish melodic metallers Surviving The Charade, went from being slightly underwhelmed to inexcusably captivated as it revealed more about the qualities and imagination of the band with each and every track. Given numerous excursions through the ears, the ten track encounter has become a rigorously impressive and exciting proposition for imagination and emotions. Certainly it still has thoughts questioning and succumbing to occasional reservations, but with the voracious inventiveness and surging potential which soaks the band both Surviving The Charade and We’re Never Coming Home have emerged as incitements to get increasingly excited about.

Formed in 2008, the Stockholm sextet took little time in awakening a potent fanbase and attention with first EP Your Breath Smells Like Ben & Jerry’s. Its strong presence was more than matched by the band’s live performances which continued to draw eager followers towards their striking emergence. The following We Refuse To Stand In EP continued their rising success as did the band’s appearances at prominent festivals and supporting metalcore greats Adept. 2013 saw Surviving The Charade drop in on England to record We’re Never Coming Home with producer John Mitchell at Outhouse Studios (Architects, Enter Shikari, You Me At Six, etc.). Infusing inspirations from the likes of Asking Alexandria and Architects into their sound, Surviving The Charade provide an intriguing weave of textures and flavours within their first album, a web which as mentioned impresses and at times has you wondering but persistently leaves ears and attention captivated.

The title track starts things off and this is where that initial felling of being underwhelmed initiated. Certainly the opening of crystalline DVDAXXX2XX.pdfkey cast melodies set before vocals squalls from a distant ledge is an enticing lead into the accomplished and skilfully crafted song but subsequently it is a formulaic encounter which barely hints at the real adventure to come. Nevertheless with punchy rhythms from drummer Sebastian Brydniak framing the evocative narrative impressively led by the clean vocals of Simon Brantklev, the track is an imposing introduction which with its brief length is the right way to look at it even though it kind of gives the wrong impression of the album ahead.

Classically bred keys grasp the ears first as Shout, Walls, Shout! erupts, a startling unexpected grab of the imagination which soars over the hostile raw squalls of the band’s other vocalist Daniel Rotstam. It is a pungently dramatic and creative entrance to the song though some of that potency is lost as it then relaxes into a more straight forward melodic metal stride. To temper that though the bass of Fredric Fji Johansson gnaws at the senses whilst the guitars of Fredrik Brollin and Viktor Lundberg grind, whine, and croon with acute devilry. It is a formidable suasion which leaves its predecessor quite pale in comparison, though as skilled and commanding as the music is, it is the vocals which steal the show, the clean tones of Brantklev a transfixing caress and the roars in great variety from Rotstam carnivorously appealing if not always fully successful.

The following Above The Skyline stomps and seduces with a blend of classically bred elegance and ferocious antagonism vocally and musically, hooks and melodies in as much abundance and strength as heavily swiping rhythms and savage riffs. It is a riveting encounter which lurches at and romps with the senses in an evolving gait but lacks the spark which lit up its predecessor. It does give another flavoursome taste to an already established appetite for the release though which is soon enriched by the outstanding Shotgun Wedding Bride. From its first breath the song is ripping at the jugular with sinewed sculpted riffs and rhythms courted by caustic vocals whilst a haunting melody teases above the ravenous persuasion. The body of the track has a post hardcore hostility to its rabidity which takes on another depth of angst and ferociousness behind the clean seducing of Brantklev which in also seems to inspire a creative rapaciousness from the stabs of Brydniak and the varied snarls from Rotstam. It is a tremendous brawl which reveals the rich promise of the band ahead and their quality now.

The initial voracious intensity and Meshuggah like blaze The Diary Of Frosty Jack keeps ears and passions feverish with its truculent sonic and rhythmic intent, though the cleaner passages whilst adding further poetic toxicity defuse the breath-taking intimidation a tad. It is another immensely satisfying onslaught though, which as across the album, for every moment where things lack certain potency or success in their twists there is a horde of highly inventive, captivating sounds and ideation to enthral thoughts and emotions.

The vivaciously anthemic Here We Stand where emotive melodies and fiery harmonies stake their lingering claim on the imagination within a maelstrom of predacious intensity leaves imagination and attention exhausted next. Of. It is a tremendous fire enticing creative thought with a dramatic presence which leaves the next up Broken Glass a real test to emulate, which it almost does with its robust and blistering contagion within a continually shifting storm of emotive melodic grace and adversarial spite.

The predatory metalcore spawned sound of Dance For Messiah brings another inventive tempest to explore though it fails to enslave the passions with either the lingering vitriol or infectiousness of other songs. It is full of great and skilfully executed twists and turns but feels too familiar in its overall body of sound ultimately, thus feeding expectations somewhat. It also suffers lying between the previous pair of songs and Like Animals. Virulently infectious and strikingly inventive, the track is a relentlessly evolving dervish of argumentative seduction and amicable ingenuity, a song which if human would be classed as schizophrenic for many thrilling reasons. It is an outstanding slab of captivation, everything about it sensational and the best thing on the album.

The closing The Night We All Forgot is a song which may be should not work but does. Its opening chorus of vocals and throaty basslines is so obvious that you feel the band is just going for an easy exit, but then things turn into a threatening stretch of savagery vocally and musically that you swiftly reassess. The song continues to change and bewilder, its melodic almost pop infused moments an unsure success and its vicious inhospitable pillaging irresistible, whilst combined they ebb and flow in persuasion. It is whole though the song is a fixture in mind and emotions long after its departure so that like the album no matter any doubts it is an undeniable triumph.

It is hard not to get excited about the future of Surviving The Charade and to cast a keen anticipation for their next releases on the back of We’re Never Coming Home, a reaction we expect a great many to find through this gripping encounter.

We’re Never Coming Home is available from Monday 2nd June through all digital stores.

http://survivingthecharade.com/

8.5/10

RingMaster 01/06/2014

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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SURVIVING THE CHARADE announce that ‘We’re Never Coming Home’, from 2nd June‏

Surviving The Charade Online Promo Shot

EURO MELODIC METAL CREW SURVIVING THE CHARADE RELEASE STUNNING DEBUT ALBUM!

 

Swedish riff beasts ‘Surviving The Charade’ set loose their killer debut album ‘We’re Never Coming Home’, out nationwide from Monday 2nd June.

Tugging from a range of sources, from the driving onslaught of Architects, through to the power of Bring Me The Horizon and Asking Alexandria, Surviving The Charade have shaped a sound that pushes and pulls, but is undoubtedly utterly captivating.

Hailing from Stockholm, Sweden and formed in 2008, Surviving The Charade instantly hit the ground running with the national release of their first EP ‘Your Breath Smells Like Ben & Jerry’s’. The record captured the imagination of the underground, and aided by blistering live performances, word soon began to spread about the band. Surviving The Charade upped the ante with their follow up EP ‘We Refuse To Stand In’ and prominent festival appearances further solidified the six-some’s blossoming reputation. Supports with ADEPT, extensive touring throughout their homeland and the release of their single ‘The Supernaturals’ has helped to push the band to new audiences. Last year STC hit England to work with esteemed producer John Mitchell at Outhouse Studios (Architects, Enter Shikari, You Me At Six, etc.) on their debut full length album, ‘We’re Never Coming Home’, and the resulting recordings are breathtaking.

Now armed with their killer album, the Euro slayers are set to blow your head clean off. The record starts in rich form, refusing to hold back as ‘Shout, Walls, Shout!’ soon tears through your ear drums, while offering a steady killer hook. ‘Above The Skyline’ continues to demonstrate the band’s deft ability to fuse biting hardcore with an anthemic refrain. As the record develops, ‘The Diary of Frosty Jack’ comes over you with blistering pace and stout groove before ‘Here We Stand’ dips to showcase the band’s growing maturity and more expansive songwriting. As the album flows, ‘The Night We All Forgot’ closes the record with a potent slab of gritty metalcore that is sure to beat your head into submission.

-SURVIVING THE CHARADE RELEASE ‘WE’RE NEVER COMING HOME’ ON MONDAY 2nd JUNE THROUGH ALL STORES-

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www.facebook.com/SurvivingTheCharade