The Survival Code – Hopelessness Of People

Checking out recent single Crawl combined with the potency of previous releases, we declared The Survival Code a band it is so hard for us not to be excited about. That track was the second teaser for the London based outfit’s new album; an intimation alongside its predecessor of something to truly anticipate. Having feverishly devoured the full-length we can announce that Hopelessness Of People not only lives up to the promise offered by its singles but has emerged as one of the year’s major gems.

Formed by Dubliner Gary McGuinness, The Survival Code has bred and earned a rich reputation since emerging late 2011, each release seeing their imaginative rock bred sound openly growing and evolving backed by a live presence which has constantly proven itself a rousing experience. Though numerous musicians have been alongside lead vocalist guitarist McGuinness, it has been his long term link up with drummer/backing vocalist Tom Cook which has been the heart and power of the band. A trio for their acclaimed Matt Hyde (Trivium, Slipknot, Ash) produced 2015 debut album, MMXV, and the subsequently just as striking Broken Strings EP two years later, The Survival Code has slimmed down to just the core duo upon Hopelessness Of People and the band has never sounded more powerful, dynamically bold, and rousing.

With Hyde again producing, Hopelessness Of People takes mere seconds to entice and thrill ears with opener Same Skin. Its initial guitar shared lure is a calm intrigue ridden coaxing which soon flares up with rapacious energy as Cook’s beats court their own infectious trespass of a swing. McGuinness’ vocals are just as captivating, like the sounds a blend of melodic composure with underlying aggression and volatility. Embracing rock in its various shades alongside a twinge of punk irritability and metal bred ferocity, the track and band’s sound soon establishes its inescapable identity though with its tenacious almost stalking hooks and hungry grooves there is a certain Sick Puppies hue to the excellent encounter, a spicing which enjoyable lingers across the whole release in varying degrees.

Crawl is next to snare thick attention, immediately imposing with its senses harrying riffs and formidable rhythmic swing. From its already infectious threat, appetite wrapping grooves and imagination stoking twists combine for a web of contagious enterprise matched by the equally compelling vocals of McGuinness in turn backed by Cook’s potent tones. There is a touch of Coheed & Cambria to the track, a pinch of Adelitas Way too as well as the aforementioned Australians but the song rises to be all The Survival Code. As a single it got us lustful to hear Hopelessness Of People and still does each and every time roaring from within its midst.

A calmer entrance by the following Take It As It Is only brings a mutually eventful slice of melody rich and highly catchy hook loaded alternative nurtured rock where rhythms swing with muscular intent and emotion fuels vocal expression while Anything Goes These Days strolls with emotive tempestuousness in its heart and raw power in its snarly breath. In their individual ways, both songs had the body and imagination bouncing, the first especially with its keenly crafted unpredictability.

One of the album’s early tasters is next, Along The Way a single earlier this year which effortlessly hits the spot whilst leaving a lingering breath which again just draws intrigue and attention the way of the album. Though the track does not have the incendiary dynamics of Crawl, it is a virulent persuasion which again has the body dancing to its whims before Self Medicate wraps thoughts in its emotive balladry and the imagination in a tapestry of creative and vocal intimation. A slow burner compared to its companions within the album, the song just grew by the listen enticing purposeful contributions from hips and vocal chords.

In so many ways the track epitomises the almost deceitful virulence of Hopelessness Of People, quietly nagging away yet openly seducing with its resourceful breeding; a template just as successful behind the decisive enterprise of Not Working. It is another which seems to be a touch subdued compared to other tracks but the truth is clear when from nowhere we found ourselves repeating melodies and a chorus which had burned itself into the memory.

Damn these Survival Code boys are devious and at it again within the smouldering and increasingly fiery and just a bit funky This Time Around. McGuinness and Cook unite to weave a contagion of hooks and melodic grooving as tenacious as the expectations devouring exploits of the song, repeating the feat with new imagination for the quite outstanding and devilishly tempting Too Late and in turn Next Step. Another major favourite here, the second of the two borders on the feral, its metal seeded antics spring grooves which demand subservience and riffs which harass to the point of addiction. Around them, melodic flames and vocal angst roar to add to the undiluted captivation.

The final pair of Integrity and Goodbye proves there is truly no moment within the album which is lightweight in presence and enjoyment. The first has a vocal calm which rests perfectly within the more unevenly tempered air of the song though McGuinness’ delivery has a hint of prickliness to it too while the closing offering is a slice of magnetic rock ‘n’ roll which too mixes hushed aggression with volatile energy whilst casting an infectious wind of melody woven turbulence and emotive exclamation.

Quite simply releases like Hopelessness Of People are the reason our hunger to devour new music is more lustful than ever. It is an appetite which has been rewarded so many times this year alone but few as relentlessly and powerfully as by The Survival Code.

Hopelessness Of People is released Friday 31st August, through Good Deeds Music Ltd.

 https://www.thesurvivalcode.co.uk/    https://www.facebook.com/thesurvivalcode    https://twitter.com/thesurvivalcode

Pete RingMaster 30/08/2018Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

H2NY – Tremor

H2NY-Press-Photo_RingMasterReview

It has been almost four years since Halfway To New York made an impressive introduction to themselves with the Treading Water EP; a highly enjoyable encounter which only grew in stature and persuasion over time. Since then, apart from the occasional listen of the release, the band has been lost to the shadows of thoughts as a swarm of other encounters have stolen attention.  The band now returns to reclaim ears with first album Tremor and having shortened the name to H2NY, the British quartet show the time between offerings has been well spent breeding new maturity and adventure in their melodic rock.

Formed as 2012 opened its eyes, H2NY have backed up the success of the acclaimed Treading Water EP over time with tours across the UK and performances at the Hard Rock Calling Festival in Hyde Park and headlining Trafalgar Square as part of the Closing Paralympic Celebrations. The band has successfully invaded the US too; supporting Fuel and then Alien Ant Farm whilst playing shows in 38 US States involving the covering of more than 24,000 miles in the process. As mentioned the past couple of years have seen the band slip from focus and personal radar somewhat but fair to say, they have reappeared with a bang with Tremor.

The album opens with the first single taken from it, Bleed. Straight away a muscular wall of riffs and rhythms encase ears, H2NY swiftly showing the power in their sound and equally the harmonic prowess of vocalist Sam Burkey. It is a magnetic entrance only blossoming further as the melodic and sonic enterprise of guitarist Scott De Jongh courts the darker rumbling tones of Daniel Mount’s bass. The great undemanding yet potent band harmonies simply bring richer colour to the captivation; mischievous hooks and a rousing tenacity similarly as persuasive as band and release get off to a masterful start.

art_RingMasterReviewOn the Run follows with its own sinewy strength and presence, and like its predecessor an infectious swagger and imagination which steers every groove and hook straight into a waiting greedy appetite. With the jabbing beats of Martin Griffith framing its resourceful blaze, the track recalls the great essences which made the first EP an easy draw on ears whilst revealing the new dynamics and bold creativity shaping album and songs like Little Piece of Everything which comes next. The band’s latest single makes a less forceful entrance but soon brews its own anthemically nurtured and energetic tempting which has feet and voice in eager participation with its rousing endeavour. Emotively hued with seamless variation in its cry and intensity, the song keeps the spirit already stirred up by the first pair, in full swing.

The melodic croon of Love Behind You firmly engages ears and thoughts with another side to the band’s sound where pulsating beats align with a melancholic caress of guitar as Burkey’s voice shines with emotive expression. There is an underlying tempestuousness led by the great prowling throb of bass to the song too, a volatility which threatens to erupt and at times almost breaks through but always finds itself reined in by the reflective heart of song and word; a design equally soaking Slide By straight after. Elegant and sombre, the track is a serenade of acoustic and melodic flames which also builds more aurally dramatic points in its contemplation.

Both songs keep ears eager and enjoyment ripe but swiftly find them eclipsed by the outstanding pair of Every Inch a King and Caught in the Middle. The first of the two begins as a brooding tempting with dark rhythms and sultry melodic suggestiveness prowling and veining song and ears respectively before uncaging a virulent contagion posing as a chorus. It is glorious stuff, vocals a gripping protagonist as strong and persuasive as the climactic air and sonic invention at work. As its breath dissipates, the track slips into the thicker shadows of its successor. Simultaneously emotionally dark and addictively catchy, the song is a thrilling emotional maze of bold vocals and fiery textures around an almost predatory rhythmic spine. The track is majestic, an ingenious blend of textures and emotive shades taking best song honours.

The following Blue Eyes has a thankless task backing up two major pinnacles of the release yet with its melancholy lined character and body of alternative/melodic rock it has ears and satisfaction on side with ease. Carrying a tinge of Sick Puppies meets Adelitas Way, the outstanding song beguiles before making way for the explosive dynamics of Over and Out which soon has body and soul keenly bouncing. As many of the songs, it has an old friend familiarity and like most uses it as an easily engaging spice to the unpredictability and anthem like vivacity of its unique character.

More Yesterdays Than Tomorrows lays a strongly alluring and feverishly tenacious hand on ears next before the album’s title track soothes, by this point, an admittedly exhausted body and imagination with its heart bred hug and melodic romancing subsequently leading to its own particular blaze of sound and emotion. Each entices and heavily pleases before leaving Counting Sheep to bring Tremor to a fine end with its intimate balladry sculpted on folkish melodies, mesmeric harmonies, and impassioned emotion.

Tremor is a superb ‘return’ from H2NY; an attention and spotlight grabbing proposal which, whilst igniting ears and pleasure, reminds that the prime thought after Treading Water, that the band had a big future ahead of them, is still the undeniable case.

Tremor is released April 15th via iTunes and other stores.

http://www.h2nyband.com/    https://www.facebook.com/H2NYBAND    https://twitter.com/h2nyband

Pete RingMaster 14/04/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Adelitas Way – Getaway

AW_RingMasterReview

Adelitas Way has persistently shown themselves capable of writing and creating anthemic roars that instinctively ignite the spirit and adrenaline. From their self-titled debut album and tracks like Invincible, the US band has early on uncaged impassioned and dynamically persuasive proposals. With new album Getaway though, they have hit a new peak. From start to finish, it is a conveyor belt of rousing proposals, as sturdy and aggressive as they are melodically contagious. It is probably fair to say that the Adelitas Way sound has never been one close to re-inventing the wheel, but they and certainly these ears have no issue when body and spirit is relentlessly given a shot of the band’s fresh and anthemic virulence.

Getaway is the fourth album from the 2006 band, and as suggested another in a line of highly persuasive and captivating releases. Whether they have hit the personal sweet spot or not, all have gone to establish the Las Vegas quartet as one eagerly devoured proposition on record and indeed live where they have shared stages with the likes of Guns N’ Roses, Shinedown, Creed, Alter Bridge, Three Days Grace, Chevelle, Theory of a Deadman, Breaking Benjamin, The Pretty Reckless, Godsmack, Staind, Flyleaf and many more.

The successor to Stuck of 2013, the Johnny K (Disturbed, Staind) produced Getaway sees the foursome of Rick DeJesus, Tre Stafford, Robert Zakaryan, and Andrew Cushing in no mood to hold back on their emotive intensity and sonic dexterity. The evidence is immediate as the band’s new single Bad Reputation, and first taken from the album, launches at ears with infectious bait. Choppy riffs and similarly tempting rhythms immediately press suggestively upon the senses as the always welcome tones of vocalist DeJesus step forward. Inspired by his own feelings about a reputation he has earned over the past few years, his reflections come entangled in a web of spicy melodies and snapping hooks within a climate of sound which builds small but effective crescendos of energy and intensity.

COVER_RingMasterReviewIt is a great start which barely waivers over the next stretch of songs starting with the album’s title track. The band’s hard rock bred sound is in feisty mood from its first breath, almost irritable in its sonic jangle backed by attitude lined rhythms. Increasingly fiery yet equally catchy, especially around its sizzling chorus, the track has feet and emotions quickly involved and in time exhausted, though they get a chance to relax with the sultry smoulder of Good Die Young. The fiercely energetic tracks always emerge as personal favourites across an Adelitas Way encounter but as proven here, the band is very accomplished at creating emotively and sonically incisive balladry. Expectantly it does come with a raw edge and dramatic intensity which only helps it make a potent impact as enjoyment flies high.

Low brings a great grouchiness to its riffs and nature next, guitars almost carnivorous in tone as a Sick Puppies like flame of melodic and harmonic energy emerges from within the song’s growl. As many tracks, ears feel like they are meeting up with an old friend, being enveloped in a recognisable infectiousness which adds colour to the band’s blaze of heavily pleasing and fresh enterprise. By the end of the first minute, vocal participation is inevitable, a temptation most tracks are equipped with as shown by the volatile roar of Put You in Place with its web of spidery steely grooves and the mercilessly contagious I Get Around. A resonating bassline invitingly groans from the heart of the second of the pair, its dark hues a gripping tempering and spark to the tempestuous and boisterous roar around it. Not alone in showering the senses in serious infectiousness, the song epitomises the power, attitude, and rousing ferocity of the band’s sound, and equally its rock pop prowess.

Across the tenaciously excitable Filthy Heart with its blues spiced sonic winery and the mellower coaxing of Harbor the Fugitive, band and album, maybe without matching earlier heights, has ears and firmly attentive whilst Sometimes You’re Meant to Get Used really stirs things up again with its tantalising blend of rapaciously snarling textures and melodic revelry bound in emphatically infectious imagination.

The album concludes with firstly the blues rock flavoured Shame, an enticing flame of enterprise which again might not create the same lustful reactions as others but with a whiff of Bowie-esque toning to parts of the vocals, only holds attention firm before Deserve This twists and turns with robust rhythms and crunchy riffery leading its fractious yet anthemically layered tapestry of striking sound and endeavour.

It is a fine end to a thoroughly enjoyable release where major surprises are low but invigorating rock ‘n’ roll is nonstop incitement. Getaway is the most rounded and fertile release from Adelitas Way, and for us, the most fiercely enjoyable so far.

Getaway is out now via most online stores and @ http://adelitaswayshop.bigcartel.com/category/cd

https://www.facebook.com/adelitasway   https://twitter.com/adelitasway

Pete RingMaster 07/03/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Emphatic – Another Life

emphatic

Nestling potently and comfortably amongst the likes of Three Days Grace, Alterbridge, Chevelle, and Creed, US rock band Emphatic step forward once again to light up ears and thoughts with their new album Another Life. It is not a release which exactly sets down new markers or offers dramatically unique ventures within its eleven emotively powerful offerings but certainly it is one which leaves a strong canvas of infectious and richly rewarding musical narratives for senses and imagination to eagerly indulge in. The successor to the acclaimed Damage of 2011, the new album provides an appealing dose of heart sculpted highly accomplished rock intensity and passion.

Formed in 2004 by guitarist Justin McCain, Emphatic has had a steady and constantly ascending emergence, first leaving strong marks through their self-titled debut album of 2005 and three years later the Goodbye Girl EP. It was the release of Damage though which triggered a new depth of attention and awareness, not forgetting acclaim around the band. Live too with the sharing of stages with the likes of Stone Temple Pilots, Buckcherry, Avenged Sevenfold, Papa Roach, Breaking Benjamin, Flyleaf, Five Finger Death Punch, Theory of a Deadman, Alter Bridge, Black Stone Cherry, and Adelitas Way, the band’s reputation has grown and brought an enthused audience to their excellently crafted and energetically honed sounds.

The release of the last album was followed by the departure of vocalist Patrick Wilson who suffered a career halting injury when he fractured his larynx, and with also rhythm guitarist Lance Dowdle and bassist Alan Larson leaving, Emphatic was facing uncertain times. Eventually though McCain and drummer Patrick Mussack enlisted Jesse Saint (Scum of the Earth/The Autumn Offering) on bass and Bill Hudson (Cellador) on guitar whilst the frontman spot was taken by Toryn Green, the former vocalist of Fuel and touring lead vocalist for Apocalyptica. The new blood and energy gave a new lease of life to the band it is fair to say and certainly has combined to create in Another Life, their finest moment yet and a thoroughly enjoyable and persistently satisfying encounter.

The Omaha, Nebraska based band immediately works on the senses with the opening persuasion of Life After Anger. The song is a keen Album Coverand emotional caress with the vocals of Green taking little time to impress amongst sturdy beats and sinew driven riffs. The melodic heat and expressive voice of the track equally lays a reflective enticing lure and with an element of Seether to it, the song makes an excellent lead into the heart of the release which is straight away backed up by Time is Running Out. Again there is a familiarity to the track, something which applies to the album as a whole, but equally there is a flourish and intensity which marks it as Emphatic bred. The addictive sonic groove and continuing to impress vocals and supportive harmonies capture the imagination alongside a solid resource of invention and enterprise which parades across the song to bring forth a strong appetite for album and band.

The following Lights makes a gentle coaxing with its first breath before adding a little more urgency to its still restrained and emotional beckoning. The song than settles into a provocative and intensive narrative which without matching the heights just set still draws thoughts and emotions into its embrace whilst stretching the variety within the album, a melodic diversity given another flame by next up Some Things Never Die. The song similarly misses previous plateaus set but with a melodramatic touch of keys and tenderly preying call of riffs and bass, emerges to give its share of strong satisfaction and another string to the album’s aural bow.

Both The Choice and the title track bring the album up to its earlier heights, the first with an expectation feeding slice of rock but one which ensures they have a skilled and potent meal whilst the second entwines a delicious groove around an imaginative and fiery melodic painting of contagious adventure and evocative craft. The best song on Another Life, it leads passions by the hand into a sweltering dance of reflection bred, melody soaked colour within captivating passionate scenery.

As tracks like the stylish I Don’t Need You and the ballad Louder Than Love unveil their varying temptations and the fevered Forbidden You provokes the imagination, Emphatic continue to provide a thoroughly engaging presence. The three songs again are slightly adrift of the biggest highlights of the release whilst being soaked in a sound which arguably many bands have explored previously, but each nevertheless creates a persuasion and invitation that is hard to refuse or not want to accompany again.

Closing with the greatly pleasing Take Your Place, a track like many with an anthemic lure to its chorus and skilled bait to its melodic craft, and the lead single from Another Life in the shape of the adrenaline fuelled Remember Me, the album at the end of the day is an absorbing and openly enjoyable encounter. Superbly crafted and impressively delivered, Emphatic has brought a proposition which leaves you fully satisfied and with an increased appetite for their offering, a meal you know and feel safe with but also one filled with little spices of invention that keeps it fresh and daring.

http://Emphaticrock.com

7.5/10

RingMaster 23/10/2013

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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