Abel Raise The Cain – For Strangers Only

With a sound that wraps the senses like suggestive mist and a handful of songs taking the imagination on atmospheric, intimacy fuelled journeys, it is fair to say that the debut album from British rock band Abel Raise The Cain has been a highly anticipated proposition. Their fusion of evocative textures and energies within an indie pop/post rock nurtured landscape has made for an increasingly devoured and acclaimed live and recorded proposal, persuasion and success sure to be accelerated by For Strangers Only.

The album sweeps across the senses with a melodic breeze, each track an insight to emotion soaked lives and familiar situations. They swoop in on individual experiences, cinematic perceptions which if you put a series of kitchen sink dramas back to back would make the perfect soundtrack while stretching their intimacy to broader climes. Without a breath being taken, each song emerges from the last with just the whispers and glimpses of eclectic life between them, sometimes subtle reflections sometimes bold as “Dead Presidents, Revolutionary movement leaders and mixed up youth” bridge songs. It makes for a release which needs numerous plays to explore every alluring pasture and suggestive street corner but a simmering increasingly compelling blossoming which only brings increasingly striking rewards.

The 2012 formed, Northeast hailing Abel Raise The Cain draw on the inspirational sounds of bands like Arcade Fire, Sigur Ros, and The Editors for their adventures, open essences woven into their own canny tapestries. Both tracks of their debut double A-sided single, Too Late and The Promise, quickly drew eager praise and support including regular play on UK radio including BBC Introducing, the band continuing to lure plaudits and new ardour led fans with their successors; songs making powerfully persuasive teasers before For Strangers Only.

The album opens with Awakening, its orchestral welcome warm and descriptive as cinematic samples rise within its embrace. The short piece lives up to its name, opening the heart of the album with smouldering grace before freeing the equally seductive and euphoric flight of One Thing. With the romancing of Saerla Murphy’s violin cradling the engaging dusty tones of guitarist Sean Crichton as the keys of Gaz Murray float, the song is a vibrant outlook and stroll urged on by the tenacious beats of Adam Hicks.

Its anthemic and tenacious call is echoed within the following We’ll Never Know, the track swiftly revealing darker shadows around its radiant core. Within it, the bass of Gary Hughes manages to be simultaneously melancholic and flirtatiously welcoming as keys and strings come to a poetic boil in tandem with the melodic enterprise from Shaun Buckle’s guitar. The post rock climate of the song only grows across its length, consuming ears with wistful yet forceful intent before Black Swans bubbles to the surface. One of the singles sparking the eagerness awaiting For Strangers Only, the song brews its melancholy lined, heartbreak hued croon with craft and zeal, breaking into emotional crescendos as violin and keys respectively comfort and invigorate the spirit. Reminding a little of Doves, the song is superb, a cathartic release for band and listener alike.

The folkish air of Dark Side Of The Street keeps ears and imagination just as keenly hooked, the song a gentle but enthused canter sharing melodic and harmonic enterprise like sunshine. For some yet undefined reason, the song nudges thoughts of Pete Wylie before a country scented rural sigh slips into the similarly flavoured Million Dollar Night, a ruminative slice of balladry which may not quite light personal fires as other moments within the album but still leaves pleasure full, especially with an essence something akin to The Verve

Hideaway is a similar encounter with matching results; its country rock lilt and sultry smoulder a plaintive temptation breeding spirited expulsions across an expressive body. It also just misses persistently hitting the spot yet is one rousing experience impossible not to be drawn back to.

The album departs with the band’s new single, Every Rise. With hope falling from every note and harmony, the song is a thrilling end, a spirit igniting anthem of life with boisterous rhythms urging and melody rich flames licking at the imagination.

Each track is an individual exploration but For Strangers Only equally works like a symphony, each song a movement in its social and emotional tour. Certainly the first couple of listens are fine enjoyment but thereon in is where the magic happens.

For Strangers Only is released March 31st

http://www.abelraisethecain.com/    https://www.facebook.com/AbelRaiseTheCain    https://twitter.com/abelraise

Pete RingMaster 30/03/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Abel Raise the Cain – Black Swans

Picture 31_RingMaster Review

With its video already hitting number one in the Beat 100 music chart, Black Swans, the new single from British indie band Abel Raise the Cain, is already making a potent teaser for the band’s upcoming debut EP, For Strangers Only. The song is an atmospheric embrace but one with a bubbling underbelly and raw intensity which potently captivates. The Northeast band has already lured strong praise and support through their previous release and fair to say, Black Swans is going to do their ascent no harm either.

Picture 33[1]_RingMaster Review   Formed towards the end of 2012, Abel Raise the Cain quickly took inspirations from the atmospheric and epic soundscapes of bands like Arcade Fire, Sigur Ros, and Editors into their own immersive weaves. The double A-sided single Too Late/The Promise in 2013 grabbed the attention of fresh fans and radio stations across the UK, subsequently backed by second single Waiting later that same year. Live the Teeside seven-piece has bred a strong reputation playing with the likes of Happy Mondays, Primal Scream, Dexy’s Midnight Runners, Spiritulized, Kodaline, and Skaters alongside their own successful shows. Now with its video as mentioned already setting down a marker, Black Swans, ahead of a highly anticipated EP confirms Abel Raise the Cain as a band destined to welcomingly hit your radar at some point.

The single gently but keenly sweeps in with synths and keys a provocative coaxing around the plain but inviting tones of vocalist and rhythm guitarist Sean Crichton. As the anthemic beats of drummer Adam Hicks stirs things more energetically and the violin seducing of Saerla Murphy adds more emotive and suggestive hues, the song becomes a compelling fusion of different and you would imagine conflicting textures but everything unites and flows seamlessly. The track continues to roar with melancholic emotion and lively passion with each passing minute, the keys of Gaz Murray a warm and emotive incitement to the sonic enterprise cast by guitarists Phil Bailes and Andy Grange whilst the bass of Gary Hughes tempers it all with a dark tone which reflects the heartbreak fuelled the lyrical and emotive hue.

The track is a symphony of sound and emotional turbulence; not a song which initially grabs as potently as it eventually grows to do and one maybe missing a moment or two of wrong-footing the listener to bring further drama and strength to an already climatic presence. To be fair though that is just nit-picking to please personal tastes, for Black Swans only and increasingly satisfies, suggesting the forthcoming For Strangers Only is going to be something well worth checking out.

Black Swans is available from July 27th

http://www.abelraisethecain.com/   https://www.facebook.com/AbelRaiseTheCain

RingMaster 27/07/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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