Trepalium – Damballa’s Voodoo Doll

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They can try to call it groove metal, progressive metal maybe, or even avant-garde death metal, but quite simply the Damballa’s Voodoo Doll EP is swing metal in all its fresh faced glory. The six track dance of voracious metal rabidity and ridiculously virulent contagion is the new hex cast by French metallers Trepalium, a band no strangers to unleashing some of the most blistering and imagination stretching extreme metal over the past decade. French metal is in the midst of an innovative heyday right now, with seemingly every corner offering a new proposition to devour. It is also producing some of the most startlingly inventive proposals, unique experimental /avant-garde offerings from the likes of 6:33 and Carnival in Coal through to Pryapsime, Hardcore Anal Hydrogen, and Toumaï. One of the most rabid and nastily inventive of them all is Trepalium and their death metal bred sonic pestilence.

The band across four albums has persistently pushed their and metal’s boundaries with a raw hunger to infest viciousness with a seductive multi-flavoured originality, an intent bearing the most compelling fruit on Damballa’s Voodoo Doll. Cloaked in the allure of arcane mysticism and bursting with the tenacity and energy of vintage New Orleans jazz and swing, the EP is a nonstop stomp through fiercely grasping shadows and insidious black-hearted temptations, commanding feet and emotions like a maniacal puppeteer.

Voodoo Moonshine sets the sorcery in motion, a violent barroom the scene for big imposing and alluring beats to tone up ears and appetite ready for the salacious flames of brass and the throaty vocal malevolence of Cédric ‘KK’ Punda. His tones, as the music comes with a swagger, a demonic confidence which even in short grunts has intimidation and temptation dripping from every sound. The guitars of Harun Demiraslan and Nicolas Amossé are soon spinning a web of grooves and swing induced revelry, every flirtation and melodic toxin embraced in the rhythmic contagion of bassist Ludovic Chauveau and drummer Sylvain Bouvier. Embraced in the seductive heat of a full complement of brass and caressing keys, the track is a festival of sound and creative devilment, like a brawling romance between Gojira and Cherry Poppin’ Daddies with Destrage and Mucho Tapioca in close attention to give some hint of its infectious alchemy.

Talking of the first of those bands, Gojira’s Joseph Duplantier appears on the following title track, another taking a mere breath to enthral with its swinging 30’s big bandUpdatedArtwork like entrance clad in a just as immediately imposing and ferocious but catchy aggression. As in its predecessor, grooves bind and vein the track like vines, creeping deep into the passions and psyche as keys conjure their own individual demons. Imagination and emotions are just as swiftly inflamed by the villainous tapestry of sound, every unpredictable note and twist as well as boozy growl, an epidemic of incitement, though it is soon over run by the dark majesty of Possessed by the Nightlife. Twenties seeded keys paint the landscape before beats and riffs prowl and lurch up on the senses, their danger and menace as inescapable as the anthemic bait provided by the increasingly punchy rhythms. The song is brutal and uncompromising. from the pestilential tone of the bass to the barbarous predation of the guitars a merciless threat but again pure viral addiction leaving feet exhausted and thoughts ignited.

     Guédé Juice provides its own enslaving irreverence next, rhythmic swings and acidic grooves the frame to dirty jazz colours and a feverishly sultry climate of enterprise and creative rapacity. By the end of the song exhaustion and bliss are in overload and the spell keeps being casted as Fire on Skin broodily appears. Offering an opening impression or certainly the spark to thoughts of Creole like prohibition and dark magic in an embrace of the Dirty Thirties, the track is a muggy affair initially before the fetid mists part and the band bursts through with a metal driven rampage. Still employing eruptions of jazz endeavour, the track roars and bellows with extreme metal hostility and melodic rock enterprise, though it is a devious savaging as again there is a swing to much of its intensity and a venom which simply seduces body and soul.

The closing Blowjob on the Rocks spills its own dangerous persuasion to being the release to a mighty conclusion. There is a shadow and underlying animosity to the track, a seeming secret which flirts with ears and imagination throughout as the fully stocked brass persuasion spreads a weave of tangy intrigue and noir lit drama. It is a dark theatre only enhanced by the spicy nature and invention of the guitars, the trapping weight of the rhythms, and the treacherous elegance of the keys.

Damballa’s Voodoo Doll is dangerous; it is bad for the health of the body with its ridiculously infectious tempting and lethal for the psyche with its serpentine seduction and mystique. Ultimately though, the EP is one of the most exhilarating and lustful things likely to be heard this year, the next, or whilst the sun still warms our souls.

Damballa’s Voodoo Doll is available now via Klonosphere @ http://www.klonosphere.com/trepalium/

https://www.facebook.com/TREPALIUMBAND/

RingMaster 10/02/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard from http://www.thereputationlabel.today

 

6:33 – Deadly Scenes

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Entwining an extensive mix of styles and psyche exploring sounds is a carnival of fun in the hands of the most inventive and accomplished bands but loaded with the uniquely flavoursome imagination that is 6:33, that bold daring becomes pure musical alchemy. The French avant-garde metallers had us hooked with their Giggles, Garlands & Gallows EP of 2012, an introduction to our subsequently feverish ears backed up a year later by their formidable second album The Stench from the Swelling (A True Story), both featuring CinC/Carnival In Coal/ We All Die (Laughing) vocalist Arno Strobl. Now the Paris quintet have turned up the lust with new album Deadly Scenes, a tempest of invention and sheer aural ingenuity which sees the band at its loftiest pinnacle of creativity yet and surely the most exciting incitement in music today.

The Kaotoxin Records released stomp consists of nine tracks romping down dark avenues of psyche igniting drama and heavy, almost vaudeville like creative emprises. It dives into ravenous shadows, through blood strewn scenery, and across the darkest corners of mind and soul, leaving smiles and bruises as a token of its salacious esteem. Like an anarchic tempest of sound grown from the creative sap of Faith No more, Pryapisme, Polkadot Cadaver, and Mr Bungle, the perfectly formed and fluidly sculpted Deadly Scenes is a tapestry of intrigue and unpredictability casting unbridled pleasure. It carries a lyrical derangement and musical maelstrom across every one of its truly individual offerings, each sublimely and voraciously igniting every cell of those drawn into its inventive hex.

The album starts it’s ridiculously compelling spell with the ‘gospel’ of Hellalujah, certainly it starts that way with a richly resounding choir announcing “Lord Jesus!” It is a great wrong-footing coaxing, even for 6:33, which is soon opening up its invention through a building crescendo of flavours which unite in a sturdy footed stride. It is a bedlamic revelry of sound with a show tune essence to its invention, but as is the norm for the band a mere moment in the travel of a song. Bursting into a ruggedly flirtatious and body swerving blaze of swing and melodic rioting, the song is afire with hooks and metallic lures, all courted by the drama of the keys and the show-pop tenacity of voices and similarly inflamed sound.

Ego fandango comes in next, soaring keys and preacher bred samples the bed for the subsequent muscular and antagonistic stroll of the song. In many ways a Mike Patton essence is never 760137674726_TOX043_6-33_Artwork_480x480far from the band’s music, here helping flavour the rampant vocal and inventive swagger flirting with an Oingo Boingo like vivacity and enterprise. Female vocals, as in the first song, provide a magnetic companion to the ever striking and gripping delivery of Rorschach whilst spices of Queen and Five Star Prison Cell bring further strains of sonic colour to the ever evolving terrain of the brilliant encounter.

A tribal and shamanic rhythmic canvas provides the landscape for the following brilliance of The walking fed, its hypnotic bait a constant persuasion as a low key Yello like electro and vocal beckoning lures ears into a sinister weave of progressive metal and funk infused exploration. The dark bass conjuring of S.A.D. works masterfully with the beats to cage the fiery endeavour within their walls but leaves his strongest most potent tempting for the closing stretch of the song where he unveils an addictive steely web as medicine man chants dance with the keys.

The furious intensity of I’m a nerd escapes another choral welcome straight after, its hellacious rage of metal an imposing roar before everything moves into a country kissed pop ramble with 12 Stone Toddler like pop ingenuity and Kontrust spiced mischief. To be honest as with every song, words can only give a hint of the depth and invention of the superbly blended flavours and ideas escaping the heart of the sonic incitement, and even listening in person, further twists only reveal their lures over numerous plays.

Through the theatrical noir of Modus operandi and the psychotic stalking of Black widow, 6:33 continue to paint new provocative pictures of musical drama and virulence, the first a kaleidoscope of again Faith No More ferocity with the worldly rock essences of Les Negresses Vertes, but as expected honed into something mouth-watering and unique to the band. Its successor is a furnace of creative and rhythmic fury sculpted into a virulent dance of sonic mayhem and deliciously cultured harmonic beauty; a Mr Bungle meets Toumaï seduction for want of a better clue. Their brilliance and exhaustive presence is followed by the gentle acoustic caress of Last bullet for a gold rattle, a country seeded night around a crackling campfire evolving into a melodic shuffle of Cajun/Latin sultriness.

The smouldering Lazy boy croons and bawls impressively over the senses next, it’s raging fury and warm lingering seductions a battlefield of gripping unpredictability. The song is as contagious and as vicious as any song you are likely to hear this year, but there will few which fuse the extremes as imperiously as this. Its sensational bellow brings the listener to the epic title track. Deadly scenes has a theatre all of its own as it narrates, soundtracks, and relishes a clutch of dark tales and spoiled souls. Atmospherically pungent and musically deranged, the track as the album blows ears and imagination away, leaving the passions exultant. Imagine every sound and musical spice you would wish in a soundtrack to your day and it will probably be in the enthralling and feet manipulating track.

     Deadly Scenes is another stunning triumph from 6:33. With every release we ask how they will top their new pinnacle but they do as evidenced by this front runner for most exhilarating if not important releases in 2015.

6:33 Deadly Scenes is available via Kaotoxin Records from 12th January as a limited edition (1,000 copies) DigiSleeve, bundled with a free 26-track label sampler, a special cassette version limited to 100 copies @ http://www.kaotoxin.com/product-category/kaotoxin-releases/ and digitally @ http://listen.kaotoxin.com/album/deadly-scenes

http://www.633theband.com/

https://www.facebook.com/6h33official

RingMaster 12/01/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard from

http://www.thereputationlabel.today

 

Pink Tatami – Chapter and Verse

Pink Tatami

It is with great thanks to the vocalist of Pink Tatami, Mike Marques that we can bask in one of the most invigorating and downright thrilling releases of the year so far. The frontman of the French band introduced himself and colleagues with the hope that a review of their debut album Chapter & Verse might be possible. One blast of just its opening song and a review was not only possible but essential. Consisting of twelve exhaustingly imaginative fusions of alternative rock and metal, with plenty more besides lurking and seducing from within, the album is a breath-taking tantalisation. Bulging with virulent hooks, deceptive shadows, and an irresistible invention which hooks its claws in from the first second to the magnetic last, this is a debut of not only an outstanding band but of a potentially major force.

More than merely flirting with experimental tendencies, the sound of Pink Tatami feeds off the richest essences within metal and rock, every song a distinctive individual combining for an enthralling and mouthwatering proposition. Toying with and igniting the imagination and passions like a mix of Faith No More meets Kontrust with the devilry of Dog Fashion Disco and Destrage adding to the constantly evolving recipe with an extra spice of 6:33, sound and album roars and teases with all the charm of a bestial predator, the seduction of a sultry temptress, and the psychotic lures of a deranged puppeteer, though not always in that order or combination.

Recorded over a two year period, Chapter & Verse leap at ears and imagination right away, the Paris quartet simultaneously stroking coverand threatening the senses with dark riffs and rhythms with the entrance of opener Twisted Lip. The track soon settles into a feisty keen stride, the bass of Alex Ghilardi growling imposingly whilst the guitar of Florent Beaucousin coaxes and fires up thoughts in league with the richly impressive tones of Marques. It is an immediately flaming temptation which elevates its psyche metal seeded bait with the pop rock twist of the chorus. That Faith No More comparison is a swift suggestion though song and Pink Tatami only use it as flavouring to their ripe feast of sound. Across its saunter the song fuses in some funk twists with a Red Hot Chili Peppers lilt and a strong melodic rock grunge like enticement, an ingenuity which only adds to the potency.

The very strong start is soon shaded by the following Sinistra, which opens up its lure with an electro resonance, its stimulating wash surrounding the welcoming vocals and subsequent blaze of guitar steered by the punchy beats of drummer Bamby Alfonço. Again there is a definite Patton-esque flavour to the teasing which only accentuates the rich tones of the song. Flowing into slower romancing avenues and rapaciously toned energetic ventures, the track keeps thoughts and appetite on their toes and greedy for more which False Rebounds is more than happy to offer. Sinister whispers lurk as a singular guitar brings the song into view, the dark ambience standing over the emergence of the song until pushed aside by funky enterprise and bouncy vocals which step in to steal attention. It is a constant balance though, the shadows never far from making their narrative heard alongside evocative melodies and the livelier urgency of the track ever eager to have its say. It results in a riveting and thrilling proposition though in many ways just the appetiser to its quite magnificent successor.

The title track to the album is simply glorious, from its opening scrub of riffs and pulsating hypnotic beats a ridiculously virulent and anthemic suasion. The start has a Buzzcocks feel to its tempting and is soon courted by surf rock like croons and floating harmonies. Capture of heart and soul is done within those opening seconds, leaving the rest of the track to wrap tighter bonds around their submission. Into its stride the track enlists the contagion of rap metal with hip hop seeded vocals chopping across the ears whilst a sonic mystique dances provocatively in the background before erupting into a blazing sun of impressive vocal soars and searing melodies. It is easily the best song on the album, and the others are mighty, and one of the best to grace the year to date, much like the album.

Fears that there might be an anti-climax in store after such a triumph are soon chased off by both The Employee and “A” is for…, the first stalking ears at through dark vocals upon a stirring ridge of riffs before expanding into an intrigue noir kissed adventure with a sultry melodic breath. A track which manages to smooch with and haunt the senses at the same time it is another striking slice of invention; corrosive floods of aggression and predacious riffs having as much of a say in the painting of the song’s mysterious canvas as the mesmeric vocals and entrancing melodies, not forgetting the arcane tempting watching on. Its successor brings a ska toned walk to its delicious pop rock dance, crooning and embracing the listener in another RHCP spiced escapade which entrances and mischievously plays.

   The caustic touch of Dumas & Dos Santos brings another flood of ardour upon the album, the carnivorous bass tones and rapier like aggression of the guitars and rhythms irresistible as they thrust a violent furnace of intensity through the ears. It is tempered though by an infectious side to its provocation which increases the epidemic invasiveness of the explosive treat. It is a pleasure taken on further by the dark suggestiveness of We Can Help You, a track veined by exploratory sonic adventure and intrusively appealing twists, and the intensively shadowed Dorothea Tanning, its tale and invasive sounds an enveloping cloak of danger and creative spite. The song roars and thrashes about as its theme unveils every black twist and intimidating turn whilst merging passages of intimidating seduction into the turmoil.

Adhesive spits and romances with its diverse wares next, the song a gentle caress in certain moments and a voracious assault in others reminding of Russian punk rock band Biting Elbows at times. The song is surpassed by the following Evokes, a spiral of sonic addiction from its first seconds before careering into the passions on a torrent of punk/metal rabidity. Grooves and riffs squall irresistibly across the bow of the rhythmically challenging song, vocals adding irrepressibly to the raucous tempest. It is a stunning and quite brutal peak to the mountainous range of the album, a Breed 77 toxicity only adding to the inescapable trap.

Closing on the mild in comparison Eye Bank, a song where thoughts of Poets Of The Fall come to mind but just another tone in something unique to Pink Tatami, Chapter & Verse is one of those gifts you cannot turn away from without assistance, an enslaving incitement with far reaching snares. Though long in the making, the album is only the debut of Pink Tatami, a quite magnificent and accomplished one admittedly, but just the start of their journey. It is scary to think how good they have the potential to become and extremely exciting.

The self-released Chapter & Verse is available now!

https://www.facebook.com/pinktatami

http://pinktatamiband.bandcamp.com/album/chapter-verse

10/10

RingMaster 17/04/2014

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard from

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Dark realms and shadowed emotions: an interview with Déhà of We All Die (Laughing)

 

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The union of musician and composer Déhà (C.O.A.G., Maladi) and vocalist Arno Strobl (Carnival In Coal, 6:33) for the project We All Die (Laughing) has resulted in one of the most extraordinary experiences and towering creative tempests of recent times. Consisting of a single thirty three minute track sending the listener on a continually expanding landscape of emotionally drenched progressive dark metal, the Kaotoxin Records released Thoughtscanning is a powerfully provocative and enthralling immersion for thoughts and emotions. Keen to learn more about the project we took up the offer to talk with Déhà, questioning him about the band and album as well as news on his other projects.

Hello Déhà and thank you for sharing time with us so we can dig into the creative world of We All Die (Laughing).

The first question is obvious, how did the union of you both come about for the project?

Just out of nowhere, Arno & I started to discuss with an artist/fan relationship because I am a huge appreciator of Carnival in Coal. I talked to him about my different projects and I sent him the first demo of WADL back then, he fell in love and we decided to make this true!

You both guested on The Deceit EP from Eye Of Solitude; was that actually working together or just happened to be both appearing on the same song?

Well… I kinda forced my appearance on that song, haha! I was recording Arno’s voice for this song and I was like “oh fokdatchit, I’m going to scream a bit and in any case, they can remove my stuff” and they liked it really much! Funny fact it was before we released the album so many people were just asking “what the hell is “wadl” ?” and that was someway a good thing.

So We All Die (Laughing) is the first time you have intensively worked together creatively then?

Exactly. And that was fantastic. We understood each other without a need to talk or else.

Was there a particular spark which brought the actual project to life and specifically determined its direction?

That “power” we have together was the sparkle that started the fire. This mood we had was just “the” stuff we needed.

A bit of a naughty question ;) but has each other’s music been something which has thrilled and inspired your individual passions or has it been more an encounter which has artistically impressed without lighting feverish emotions?

As for me, despite everything you might hear on this album, I was not inspired by any other music at all. This is emotion, as cliché as it sounds…

 A quick mention about your other bands/projects if we may; 6:33 has been a lustful passion for us since discovering Arno and co through the Giggles, Garlands & Gallows EP in 2012 whilst admittedly it has been only recently with C.O.A.G and Maladi that we have been drawn into the imaginative aggressive fire of yourself, Déhà. For you is there anything from those and other of your projects which have helped spawn or inspire some of the We All Die (Laughing) sound?

Absolutely not. The most “influential personal band” on this album might be some “imber luminis” stuff (an own project of mine) but it’s not even that hearable.

You have just released the extraordinary Thoughtscanning, your stunning one track epic debut album. How have responses cover Artwork by Maxime Taccardibeen and have they matched your expectations?

We have absolutely nice reviews all over the world and this is really great! I was not expecting that much positive reviews as the music’s complex, but I am really happy and grateful!

I will be honest and we said so in our review that a single thirty minute plus track was a daunting and initially not the strongest lure…that was until we plunged into its depths for the first time.  Did you have worries about a similar fear and maybe assumptions about a single track album scaring people off or was that something which never crossed your minds?

It did, but I am used to composing long tracks for one purpose : the trip, the journey given by the music has to stop only when we state it. And this album, even if lyrically divided in parts, had to be one song because it’s a circle closing on itself. And we wanted to keep it that way.

Was the release always planned as one piece of music?

Absolutely.

Thoughtscanning is an enthralling, intimidating, and breath-stealing adventure, certainly challenging but equally a virulently stimulating and dramatic journey for the emotions and imagination. Tell us about the premise behind the album and its theme.

It’s emotion. I won’t say it’s the purest emotion I might release, since I have different projects and bands for my different emotions, but WADL is mainly this constant struggle between you and yourself, wanting to be healed and at the same time, you don’t want to be healed, you’re tired, or else. It’s a cliché, but to hell with it. People are all clichés.

How did Thoughtscanning emerge; did it grow and come to life as we hear it on the album or was it more like a movie, scenes created and recorded in random order to be shaped after into the sonic narrative we are confronted with?

From the beginning until the end, I would fuse your two metaphors : It’s a movie which was shot from start to finish

We imagined that the album evolved right up to its final moments, is that the reality or did you have it in a finished state before recording?

It was exactly like what you’re hearing.

How long did the album take to create?

The Composition took one year, the voices recording took 2 months of demo & 1 week for the final recordings

The first pressing of Thoughtscanning also included an Amy Winehouse cover; tell us about that and how you approached a song which is distinctively hers?

It was our label’s idea for this song, we had plenty of choices but we never really agreed. When Nico told us about this song we totally agreed in one shot, since we’re appreciating Winehouse’s music and it was a pleasure, since her lyrics went perfectly with our concept.

Can we assume We All Die (Laughing) is an on-going project or will you be disappointing us with little or no more releases?

On-going.

Portraits by Maxime Taccardi.What comes next for We All Die (Laughing) and for you individually?

An EP, at some point, and more stuff at some point. We’re not stopping. As for my side, you can expect releases for Merda Mundi, COAG, Imber Luminis, Maladie and Clouds.

Once again thank you for talking with us.

Any thoughts or last words to inspire or provoke the readers?

Act.

www.facebook.com/wealldielaughing

Read the Thoughtscanning @ https://ringmasterreviewintroduces.wordpress.com/2014/01/14/we-all-die-laughing-thoughtscanning/

Pete RingMaster

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard from

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The RingMaster Review 11/03/2014

Destrage – Are You Kidding Me? No.

 

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     Destrage is a force which confronts and seduces the imagination with such an exhaustive vivacity of sound and adventure that it becomes a proposition which has you simultaneously confused, bewildered, and thrillingly basking in a maelstrom of sonic alchemy. Hailing from Italy, the band has forged an impressive and unforgettable once bitten presence which is ascending into more fevered attention release by release, but it is the release of new album Are You Kidding Me? No. which feels like the trigger into worldwide recognition and ardour with its Metal Blade Records release. With more flavours, styles, and imagination than a carnival in Rio, the release turns a band which was still waiting to explode around the globe into an exhilarating infection of the psyche and passions with that target in its sights. With words like unpredictable and intriguing the weakest descriptions of the inventive anarchy teasing and ravishing the senses, Destrage is a ten-legged groove machine with just as many schizophrenic characters posing as songs within its latest temptation.

     Formed in 2005, the Milan quintet has been on a charge of persuading and recruiting hearts at home and further afield since their first days, the current line-up in place since 2007 especially stoking those the fires. From their first demo Self Id Generator, Destrage has continued to evolve into a aurally spectacular provocation, the albums Urban Being of 2009 and The King Is Fat’n’Old the following year potent bait greedily devoured by more and more willing souls, though you suspect it will be nothing compared to the awakening sparked by Are You Kidding Me? No. Live too the band has left wasted bodies and hungry bodies in their wake, the undertaking of tours across Europe, Japan, and numerous festivals and shows where they have shared spaces with the likes of Every Time I Die, Parkway Drive, Red Hot Chili Peppers, Parkway Drive, Hatebreed, Unearth, Municipal Waste, Sick Of It All, Freak Kitchen, Monuments, Jeff Loomis, Penny Wise, After the Burial, Puddle of Mudd, August Burns Red, Enter Shikari, Caliban, Lordi, Moonspell and many more, increasing their stock. The new album though feels and sounds like their time to lead the pack has now come and it is not a moment too soon.

     You may be wondering what the band sound like, which we will endeavour to reveal song by song, but suffice to say it is Coverwonderfully something quite impossible to label. Opener Destroy Create Transform Sublimate tells you all you need to know about Destrage and whether to unreservedly embrace or stand scratching your head over their voracious experimentation and invention. The track opens with a spiral of sonic enterprise courted by aggressive riffs and combative rhythms, the mix alluring and intimidating in equal measure. It is not long before the song is throwing off any restraint to stomp with entwining essences of groove and funk veining a still voracious assault of technical and carnivorous metal. The impressive vocals of Paolo Colavolpe are just as eager to tempt and savage as the music with a delivery as wide as the range of sounds around him. The song aggressively dances like a fusion of Jane’s Addiction, Red Hot Chili Peppers, American Head Charge, and French band Mucho Tapioca, but even with its gait it switches and shuffles its suasion without notice or care.

   With a climactic finale which simply thrills and enthrals, dub and techno added to the spice cupboard of the song, the towering opener is swiftly matched in quality and psyche twisting grandeur by Purania. From a charged entrance of rapacious riffing and similarly hungry rhythms, the song settles into a melodic bordering mellow stroll which lasts just the length of the impatience the band has to light the touch paper to another maze of eclectic sonic fascination. Imagine a hybrid of Mr. Bungle, Dillinger Escape Plan, 6:33, and System Of A Down and you get a glimpse of the beauty and schizophrenic glory of the song, a triumph within which the guitars of Matteo Di Gioia and Ralph Salati craft a narrative and web which bewitches and challenges, their hypnotic mix of creative frenzy and skilful acidic elegance spellbinding within the predatory frame built by bassist Gabriel Pignata and drummer Federico Paulovich.

    My Green Neighbour rifles ears next, its first breath a frantic tsunami of beats and riffs courting a bedlamic mind-set. Forcing its agitated psyche and attack into a smoother flowing blaze of heavy and melodic metal, the song takes little effort in replicating the temptation of its predecessors, merging varied flames of sound and persistently captivating detours into a brawling riot of invention and insatiable metal manipulation. The stunning tempest then has to step aside for the more primal bordering bestial presence of Hosts, Rifles & Coke, its heavy throated savagery magnetic and even more tantalising when it shares time with a contagion of melodic prowess and mouth-wateringly catchy choruses, all seared by a scotching solo to top things off.

    Both the discordant and masterful mayhem of G.O.D. and the smoother voiced mesmeric Where the Things Have No Colour unveil new scenic aspects of the Destrage’s songwriting and imagination; the first a riot of Faith No More meets Ugly Kid Joe voraciousness aligned to a mind tripping sensibility and the second a progressively honed melodic venture through rapturous harmonies and exotic melodies within an irresistible toxin of craft and infectiousness. Arguably the track is the band at its most restrained artistically but certainly no less potent and imaginative as well as exciting.

     Waterpark Bachelorette has the band squalling and rioting over the senses, grooves and lethal rhythms a blistering endeavour matched by the predacious expulsions of vocals and sound which litter the rampant torrent of rock ‘n’ roll. Guitar doodling veins the song for only the most satisfying results whilst the addictive anthemic call of vocals and hooks make a lingering bait which seeps into the breather of melodic caresses and sonic entanglement. Its excellence is soon equalled by firstly the dramatically textured Before, After and All Around and the almost hysterical invention of – (Obedience), the track verging on maniacal with its avant-garde/melodic metal ants nest of busy yet ordered chaos.

    To prove that the song is still not the deranged imagination of the band exhausted the closing title track takes all honours on the Are You Kidding Me? No. Featuring a guest appearance by Ron “Bumblefoot” Thal (Guns’N’Roses), the track is an inventive meshuga but one which knows exactly what it is doing. Fusing experimentation, jazz, funk, and pure dementia into its unrelenting crazed waltz, the track is a triumph of insanity which disorientates and seduces with perfect touch and irreverence. Ending on a sensational emotive stomp of gypsy punk with swing desires and reminding very much of Kontrust and another French band Toumai, the track is a magnificent concluding revelry to a quite brilliant and monumental release.  Quite simply Destrage has provided your probable album of the year.

www.facebook.com/destrage

10/10

Ringmaster 06/03/2014

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard from

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We All Die (Laughing) – Thoughtscanning

 

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     A long epic track going well into double figures time wise is never the most immediate persuasion here to be honest so it is fair to say that the debut album from We All Die (Laughing) with its single thirty three minute track was not the most instant appetiser and top of the list to cover. The fact that Thoughtscanning was released by Kaotoxin Records, a label which had a glorious year in releasing impressive inventive propositions in 2013, did encourage a dive into the proposition offered, plus the fact that the band consists of multi-talented musician and composer Déhà (C.O.A.G., Maladi) and vocalist Arno Strobl of Carnival In Coal and site favourites 6:33. It will prove to be one of the wisest decisions made this year at The RR and by anyone who immerse within what is an extraordinary experience and towering creative tempest. The album is a masterful enticement and admittedly challenging encounter but one all should bravely embrace.

    Creating a continually expanding landscape of emotionally drenched progressive dark metal, but with so much more to its 760137614821_TOX030_We-All-Die-(laughing)_Artwork_1400x1400-300imaginative adventure, Thoughtscanning is a piece of work which leaves the richest satisfaction and experience in its wake. We All Die (Laughing) first emerged as guest musicians on Eye Of Solitude’s EP The Deceit, their offering now reissued as a bonus track on the band’s recently released excellent album Canto III. Now the French-Bulgarian link-up fully unveils itself as a creative force to be reckoned with and incited by with their debut.

      A long guitar casts the first coaxing, its melodramatic voice and resonance a lone figure in a barren atmosphere but as potently evocative and imagination sparking as you could wish for. It has an essence of early-The Cure to its call which is enhanced with a wash of minimalistic melodic enticement and great earthy throaty tones from the bass. It is a deliciously magnetic entrance which is so powerful that when flames of skilfully sculpted guitar light the air a tinge of disappointment washes over emotions just for a second or two.

     From here on in the song slowly but clearly expands with its every second, the ever appealing vocals of Strobl adding another provocative aspect to the already compelling persuasion. Stretching further into its dark shadow drenched heart, the clean melodically built vocals merge with sanity bruising squalls whilst an intensity coats and increases the urgency of the sounds even when they find new avenues to slowly and elegantly investigate within the at times bordering on psychotic expulsion of emotional toxicity. It is impossible to clearly represent all that is going on and unleashed within Thoughtscanning but sure to say musically the track evolves through webs and mixtures of progressive and black metal, avant-garde and melodic death metal, doom and jazz metal with more besides, every minute a new recipe and provocation impossible to tear away from.

    As suggested earlier vocally the track also is a vibrantly shifting temptation, smooth melodic tones moving into guttural torrents with ease and in other moments creating a dark shadow through intensive deliveries which simply shape the syllables into an impacting and thought provoking narrative. Not for the first time in his career Strobl brings moments which are pure Mike Patton like to the persistently evocative adventure and in union with Déhà creates a maelstrom of seduction and venom which is as thrilling and compelling as the music surrounding their bait.

     The down side to the album?…well it is so long that it will definitely not suit all but it would be amiss not to say that there is never a moment where it is predictable and does not have senses and attention on alert for more breath-taking insurgences by the album into emotions and to be honest the track simply flies by, never feeling as long as it obviously is. Thoughtscanning is a thoroughly enthralling and impressive release which is a must investigation for all fans of anyone from Faith No More to Opeth, Periphery to Dark Tranquility, Tool to of course 6:33, in fact every metal fan as We All Die (Laughing) has something for all within their opus. With a limited-edition first pressing also containing a cover of Amy Winehouse track Back to Black, this is a must.

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9.5/10

RingMaster 14/01/2014

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