Tarah Who? – 64 Women

Released last month but a release which should escape the attention of no one is the imagination soaked five track punk furores that is 64 Women. The new EP from Tarah Who?, the compelling encounter is an incendiary rock ‘n’ roll device which explodes on ears and senses with ravening appetite.

Consisting of Paris born guitarist/vocalist Tarah Carpenter and drummer/backing vocalist Coralie Hervé, LA based Tarah Who? has regularly tantalised and incited the senses through their releases but there is something about 64 Women which hungrily eclipses all before it. Each song is an individual adventure and trespass of imagination and enterprise united in a punk breeding and grunge/alt/noise rock nurturing. They have a bite and snarl which forces a step back and virulent contagiousness which had us jumping headlong into their devouring no bounds feared exploits.

Fair to say given our enjoyment with previous encounters including acclaimed last EP, Half Middle Child Syndrome, anticipation was certainly alive with maybe unfair expectations of something certain to spark our appetites but it took little time for opener Linger to set the first breach of a whole new ardour for the band’s  voracious assault and bold adventure. Within a breath, the guitar is winding its acidic lure around ears whilst invading them with clamorous thrusts, Hervé’s lurking beats just as invasive before the song explodes in a body jerking, attitude fuelled roar of noise and temptation. Vocals are equally as confrontational and magnetic, swinging from the threads of the continuing infectious clamour with matching voracity. Unpredictable twists and ear gripping enterprise simply add to the ingenuity and rabid flirtation of the track as a whole new level of Tarah Who? incitement unfurls.

Copycat follows, hitting its creative stride instantly with rhythms a swiftly catchy lead to the skirmish of guitar and emotion. Like a rapacious mix of Spinnerette and in some ways 4 Non Blondes, the song reveals rock ‘n’ roll instincts and punk rock belligerence. Again the duo slips into calmer but no less striking moments within the sonic urgency before Hurt shares its own mellow breath as it rises up in a radiant melodic dew with Carpenter’s tones again providing an equally enticing persuasion soaked in emotion and reflective observation. It is a gorgeous moment in the release, a haunting seduction of craft, sound, and heart with inherent dissonance in all.

In contrast but with matching captivation Umbilicus strides from its first breath with punk antagonism and devilment, but another song unafraid to tease with unexpected momentary detours within ravenous goading which only add to its might and irreverence while Numb Killer brings the EP to a close with its own wonderfully nagging virulence and enterprise. Riffs tease and arouse as hooks ignite song and pleasure alike, all the while rhythms prowling and invading with equal contagion. Add the vocal tenacity and catchy intrusiveness of its creators and you have another song within 64 Women which leaves only a desperate hunger for more.

And as a whole the EP has us greedy for the next moment with Tarah Who?, something which has a real task on its hands to outdo the band’s latest riot but easy to suspect will relish and provide a thrilling adventure in trying.

64 Women is out now via Kurukulla Records.

http://www.tarahwho.com/   http://www.facebook.com/Tarahwho   https://twitter.com/Tarahwho

Pete RingMaster 19/11/2019

Copyright RingMasterReview: MyFreeCopyright

Fatty Cakes And The Puff Pastries – Self Titled

Primed to have you eagerly bouncing with a massive grin on your face, the debut album from Fatty Cakes And The Puff Pastries is a romp of glorious mischief and mayhem. The self-titled introduction certainly has no reticence in challenging prejudices and the bigoted standards so many live by but does so with a rousingly unapologetic sense of devilish humour. In other moments it is quite simply delicious grrrl riot misbehaviour and throughout instinctive often disdainful fun which we quickly bred greedy lust for.

Consisting of Amber Fargano (lead vocals/ukulele), Vishinna Turner (bass/backing vocals), Audrey Johnson (drums), Victoria Crow (back vocals/glockenspiel) and Staci McDowell (back vocals/chord), FC&PP hail from Fresno, CA. It appears they have kicked off a bit of a stir with their inimitable sound back home and listening to their first full-length it is easy to see why and expect that to spread far further. As soon as opener Panic Attack launches the release, ears are fronted up with a proposal which dares you not to have fun or get heavily involved, a taunt impossible to take up. Senses harrying beats and dirt laded riffs are the first lure, Fargano’s vocal incitement the swift second before the band’s soon established melodic and harmonic revelry gets involved. Just as quickly, the band’s music sets out its inescapable individuality though there is plenty which reminds and hints at bands such as 4 Non Blondes and Lunachicks and even more so here and across the album British artists such as Girls At their Best, X-Ray Spex, The Modettes and in certain moments The Rezillos.

It is an outstanding start easily backed by next up Fat Grl Tears. It is a compelling blend of guitar scuzz and melodic enterprise fuelled by mischievous shenanigans. As proven time and time again across the album though, that devilment cannot hide the fact that the band writes and craft some striking pop punk songs unafraid to involve a host of varied flavours and merciless hooks.

Petty Petty Princess is quickly a case in point, its core lure a jangling hook around which vocals, individual and en masse, tease as rhythms tenaciously canter. The fact the song did not grip as greedily as those sandwiching it is down to their magnificence only especially that of the following Alien Babe. From the delicious throaty bait of bass to the fuzzy wash of guitar amidst vocal incitement, the track got under the skin. Again The Rezillos came to mind as too early Blondie but mouth-watering spices in a unique Fatty Cakes recipe of rousing commotion and pop disorder.

Across the likes of the equally irresistible BFF, a slice of pop seduction with a calm but truly manipulative swing, and the gang fronted punk rock sorcery of Witch, band and album only further their enthralment of ears and appetite while Antifa Cakes (Not My Puff Pastry) provides a melodic intoxication which has the body instinctively swaying before it all breaks into feral punk turbulence and attitude; ingredients as proud within the relatively calm but thickly defiant Grrrl Gang.

The vocal harmonics within the band, whether bold or understated, are just as magnetic as any other aspect and are the delicious fuel to Magic Grl, a superb song which firmly hints at those earlier mentioned UK references before Feminist Gold 2k uncaged its punk ‘n’ roll exploits on an increasingly greedy appetite. As with all songs, it adds another potent hue to the album’s varied but melodic punk palette, a web increasing again through the loudly irritable stomp of Minimum Rage.

The release is closed up by Internet Bitch, a track which stole favourite track honours at the last breath with its rhythmically rousing and vocally animated rascality. With more than a passing echo of the Au Pairs, the track was manna to our ears; its emotional dissonance echoed in sound and imagination whilst springing yet another deviously infectious indeed viral temptation. It is a sensational end to a similarly thrilling encounter from a band before which global attention and ardour is surely on the way.

The self-titled Fatty Cakes and the Puff Pastries album is out now through Emotional Response Records; available @ https://fattycakes.bandcamp.com/album/fatty-cakes-and-the-puff-pastries

 https://www.facebook.com/FattyCakesPuffPastries/

Pete RingMaster 8/01/2019

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

The Twindows – Valkyrie 2.0

For most, musical bliss can come in various shapes and styles; creative adventures which just connect with personal instincts and tastes. It is fair to say that for us it recently came all rolled up in one hungrily tempting proposal going by the names of The Twindows and their debut album Valkyrie 2.0.

Hailing out of Philadelphia, The Twindows breed a rapacious sound which infuses essences of everything from noise and indie rock to metal and grunge to a punk across the decades borne heart. It is a bold and boisterous web of temptation as virulently infectious as it is ferociously imaginative and led by a voice truly we could listen to all day long. Vocalist/guitarist Aster Grimm has one of the most devilishly tempting voices and just as magnetically matched by the creative antics of guitarist Kyle Anderson, bassist Caleb Banas, and drummer Oskar Daoud across Valkyrie 2.0. Together they have nurtured a release which teases, seduces, and arouses across eleven lust inducing slices of musical diablerie.

It begins with Like My Music; raw and salacious pop infested punk rock roaring from aggravation with Damned like hooks and rhythmic rapacity to the fore. Grimm blossoms in the centre, her tones stirring song and attention further as for one minute and three quarters the track provides the album with one irresistible start.

The following Mosquito / Thick Skin swings in on a blend of grunge nurtured rock ‘n’ roll upon a ska seeded bounce. Fiercer textures with metallic toning soon sizzle and sear around the tenacious attack of Grimm, the track’s noise punk instincts just as vocal before it passed thick attention and an already keen appetite over to Forgiven. Instantly it entangles ears in rhythmic espionage; boisterously coaxing beats and a glorious bass grumble getting under the skin as guitars weave a sonic web around Grimm’s similarly magnetic lures. Something akin to Throwing Muses embroiled in the punk ‘n’ roll of Spinnerette and in turn fused with devilment of Die So Fluid, the track is sheer captivation; one as seductive as it is predacious and all feral temptation.

Dig Tree comes next, the track a bewitching slice of punk pop initially, nostalgically recalling bands such as The Chefs and 4 Non Blondes. It floats across the senses but has a sonic causticity which just adds to the song’s bait again headed by Grimm’s engagingly manipulative presence. Whilst adding a new hue to the album broadening adventure, the song has feet and hips involved just as easily as rock ‘n’ roll instincts.

That variety of flavouring across the release is encouraged again by next up Ska Death (Ska Death Lounge Death Ska), an unstoppable incursion of ska/noise punk which had the body eagerly bobbing along before expelling a hellacious sonic gas of aural volatility, a tempest returning with greater dexterity after the song relaxed again into its lively bounce, and with bolder imagination as sax flames sear the riveting bedlam. Imagine Animal Alpha infused by the spirit of The Jellycats and the punk revelry of The Mo-Dettes and you come close to the song’s infectious alchemy.

The Twindows let their punk instincts run riot in Reversals next, the track an insatiable rock ‘n’ roll charge with noise bred vapours crossing a kaleidoscope of twists and turns while Pulp within a similar but even more corrosive landscape leaps around with kinetic intensity and agility. All the while though as rhythms dance, sonic spices and melodic adventure simmers and rise up to temper and challenge the tempestuous nature of the track.

The inescapably catchy punk ‘n’ roll of Instigator unerringly worms into the psyche within seconds straight after, the song like a mix of The Kut and Daisy Chainsaw but as everywhere uniquely Twindows; a trait just as potently shown by the grunge rock of The Industry. Admittedly, the song did not quite hit the spot as those tracks around it within Valkyrie 2.0 but only added to the fun before The Pixies endowed Sleepycore had us licking our lips once more. With its almost somnolent swing and Grimm’s vocal bewitchment, the outstanding track simply transfixed, even more so when it’s deceitful gait unveiled a furious if still controlled intent.

Bringing things to a close Wire Mother surrounds its energetic croon with abrasive psych and indie punk imagination, the song another as unpredictable in sound and imagination as it is irresistible in persuasion. It provides a provocative and rousing conclusion to an album which just lit the fires of personal tastes while offering something completely fresh to ponder, taste, and devour.

We have nothing more to add except go and have a nibble yourselves.

Valkyrie 2.0 is out now and available @ https://thetwindows.bandcamp.com/album/valkyrie-20

https://www.facebook.com/thetwindowsmusic/

Pete RingMaster 21/03/2018

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

 

Courtesans – Better Safe Than Sober

Every release comes with a host of persuasive words in press releases etc. telling you that their focus is something essential to your pleasure and personal soundtracks. Sometimes the build-up lives up to the proposition in question, sometimes not and of course the only true representation comes with the actual listen. Occasionally though, they hit the target dead centre and such is the case with the Better Safe Than Sober EP from UK outfit Courtesans. Words around it claim the release to be “one of the first unique sonic amalgamations to be heard in 2017”; a suggestion spot on except it forgot to say ‘first and best’ as well as ‘heard this, last, and plenty of time before that’.

Coming three years after their acclaimed debut album 1917, a release like the EP emerging from highly successful crowd funded support, Better Safe Than Sober is a mesmeric dark blossom of the London band’s dark pop, a tag which barely covers their fascinating sound. Haunting and seductive, unapologetically insightful and melancholically hypnotic, the band’s music challenges and incites. All aspects have simply flourished between releases and now come to a mutually evocative and provocative head within the outstanding Better Safe Than Sober.

Intimate and socially reflective across its shadow draped body, the EP opens with new single Mesmerise, a song about losing one’s identity in and outwardly. The song is glorious, instantly caressing the imagination with its shimmering caress of keys and the brooding bassline of Agnes D. Jones as Sinead La Bella’s voice adds its own transfixing presence. Like a dark serenade, the track soothes and provokes from its first breath, the drama of its melodic and atmospheric touch compelling. Like a siren it lures body and mind into its creative lair, invading the senses with charm and elegance like a blend of Throwing Muses and early Cure.  The bewitchment is completed by the web of drama spun by Saffire Sanchez’s guitar, given trespassing strength by the heady beats of Vikki Frances with the smouldering emotion of it all building to a fiery crescendo of defiance and intensity.

Feel The Same is just as captivating, a single strand of guitar skirting the spoken delivery of La Bella as harmonies float around them. As it spreads its infectious sounds around introspective reflection and realisation of the deceit of others, there is a touch of 4 Non blondes to the track but as in the first song, a reference which only hints at the uniqueness on offer in a second irresistible incitement within the EP.

Next up John Doe similarly centres around the recognition of the ills in one’s life, a broader social outlook surveyed. From its opening Midnight Oil like rhythmic throb and lilt, vocals lay melancholic hands upon ears. Beats and bass are soon increasing their respective punch and moodiness as angelic harmonies glisten around La Bella. Bewitchment again is the only suitable word, the song almost shamanic in its rhythmic dance and haunting beauty.

An imposing edginess comes with Knowhere; a steely tone and rapacious attitude lining the tempestuous slice of raw indie punk hued confrontation. Its air is sinister, deceptive as lures and hooks tempt and entice the listener and hope into the snarling heart of the demon battling the song’s melodic light and catchy enterprise.

The released is finished by The Tide, a song straight away gripping ears and attention with an opening melody resembling the John Carpenter scored Halloween soundtrack as La Bella’s words again paint a picture of emotional honesty. Bursting into a melodic rock fire with senses licking flames, the track commands body and imagination, its perpetually alternating and evolving landscape an arousing revelation reminiscent of Danish band Forever Still when its blaze is at its richest.

There is simply no arguing that Better Safe Than Sober is one of the year’s biggest moments so far, an essential investigation which only increases its hold and stature with every involvement in its open conflict of light and dark.

Better Safe Than Sober is out March 31st through most online stores with physical copies available @ http://thecourtesans.bigcartel.com/product/pre-order-better-safe-than-sober-ep

Upcoming live Dates:

1st April – MANCHESTER – Ruby Lounge

5th May – BRIGHTON – Green Door Store

23rd July – GLOUCESTER, Amplified Festival

https://www.thecourtesans.org/    https://www.facebook.com/thecourtesans    https://twitter.com/the_courtesans

Pete RingMaster 31/03/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Hands Off Gretel – Burn the Beauty Queen

HOG_RingMasterReview

Checking out the ear exciting single One Eyed Girl a few short weeks back, our closing line was “Roll on Burn The Beauty Queen”. That is the title of the debut album from UK grrl punksters Hands Off Gretel, and just a handful of days ago it was unveiled to quench hopes and anticipation for its potential riding on the back of its lead single. Burn the Beauty Queen is glorious, a feast of grunge fuelled punk ‘n’ roll snarling and barracking like a fusion of Die So Fluid, Spinnerette, and The Raincoats. It is an infestation of ears and psyche skilfully weaving recognisable flavours into its own distinctively imaginative exploits and more than fulfilling the promise offered by its first single.

Emerging from an early musical partnership between vocalist/guitarist Lauren Tate and guitarist Sean McAvinue and following the demise of the former’s Lauren Tate Band, Hands Off Gretel quickly started to draw attention with Tate’s ‘frustration songs’ as creative fuel. Late 2015 saw Sam Hobbins invited to play bass and drums on the South Yorkshire band’s album, subsequently become the permanent Hands Off Gretel drummer to join Tate and McAvinue, newest member bassist Joe Scotcher completing the current line-up.

In a year already seeing Hands Off Gretel release the single My Size as well as One Eyed Girl and play Whitby Goth Weekend, Camden Rocks Festival, Rebellion, Kaya Festival, and Isle of Wight Festival, Burn the Beauty Queen is the pinnacle and needs barely two minutes of opener Queen Universe to confirm the fact. Teasing, almost taunting with a lone riff initially, bait swiftly accompanied by the potent tones of Tate, the song is soon a cauldron of imposing rhythms, cantankerous riffs, and spiky hooks with bitchy harmonies adding their great snarl. It is a stunning start quickly reminding of those earlier references yet just as powerfully showing its own character of sound and invention as it stomps over senses and into the passions.

There is no chance of such a powerful bordering on psychotic beginning being followed by an antic-climax either as One Eyed Girl follows to confirm its position of one of the best songs heard this year. Grumbling in ears from its opening bassline, the track is soon aggressively challenging and seducing as Tate’s catchy yet confrontational tones align to the nagging and addictive exploits of McAvinue’s hooks and riffs as rhythms swing with venom. Again there is no escaping a Brody Dalle essence to vocals and indeed the sound but the song bounces around on its own unique terms to feed an already keen appetite for what is on offer.

art_RingMasterReviewBad Egg is next, coaxing ears with a singular hook wearing an early Adam and The Ants scent before things open up with wiry melodies and predacious beats as McAvinue’s guitar spins a web of tangy melodic intrigue. Less ferocious and imposing than its predecessors, the track is dangerously bewitching, leaving a lingering imprint before Teethin’ strolls in like a gunslinger, one hiding its bite behind catchy endeavours but perpetually gnawing away with post and old school punk invention. Its exceptional persuasion is followed by that of Little Man, a haunting ballad-esque canter seemingly as much inspired by the darker explorations of Siouxsie and The Banshees as bands like Hole and 4 Non Blondes, and quite irresistible.

From its dark shadows, Hands Off Gretel go for the jugular with the punk infested and simply brilliant Always Right. It is a rousingly irritable assault, like Bikini Kill meets Au Pairs and also fiercely addictive as its virulent enterprise and piecing hooks take hold before Under The Bed bares its cranky attitude and nature with creative zeal.

Through the barbarous Oh Shit with its predatory bassline and scything riffs and the raging fire of World Against She, Hands Off Gretel prove that even their least unique offerings simply ring true with ears and emotions and set the band well apart from the field whilst tracks like Eating Simon with its Three Imaginary Boys like Cure hooks and enslaving rhythmic rumbling offer evidence that the quartet just might be one of the bands helping steer British rock to new glories ahead.

Then we have Plasters, a superb and slightly deranged piece of imagination which drawls discord, musically and emotionally, whilst casting another highly addictive web of beats and sonic hooks. The song brings seventies punk, eighties new wave, and nineties grunge into the raw and twenty first century invention of Hands Off Gretel for something quite striking.

The dark amble and warning of Push The Girl and the climactic theatre of Awfully Miserable bring Burn the Beauty Queen to a powerful close; the first sublime creative drama in the ear and its successor, from an engrossing low key unleashing, a tempest of scything beats and grumpy basslines littered with electric grooves and spiky hooks as crescendos rise and fall.

It is a great end to one of the year’s most impressive and seriously pleasurable releases of 2016. Hands Off Gretel bring a fresh excitement to music, Burn the Beauty Queen the biggest thrill.

Burn the Beauty Queen is out now and available @ http://www.handsoffgretel.co.uk/_p/prd15/4533789831/product/burn-the-beauty-queen-album

http://www.handsoffgretel.co.uk/   https://www.facebook.com/handsoffgretel/

Pete RingMaster 21/09/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Playing House – New Haircut EP

Photo by Veronica Aguilar Photography

Photo by Veronica Aguilar Photography

The New Haircut EP is another debut this year which needed little time to excite ears and incite reactions to go wow. There has been a few already in 2016 and amongst the most thrilling is this introduction to East London alt-pop trio Playing House. The three song festival of pop discord and irresistible hooks simply grabs attention and a swiftly greedy appetite with its creative devilry and maturity. Listening to the EP for the first time was a being stopped in the tracks moment with the grin on face and the passions telling all.

Much like another big site favourite Horse Party, Playing House is a two girl, one guy exploration of pop music. Every raw jangle, off-kilter twist, and discord fuelled sidestep of the genre embraced and re-honed to the threesome’s own startling escapades whilst weaving in the melodic prowess and flirty hooks you would expect and hope for. Inspirations for the three are said to include the likes of David Bowie, Velvet Underground, and Chic but you just can tell that their own tastes provide a much broader canvas for their music to draw from before finding its own unique character.

Hitting the London live scene in the September of 2015 with a sold out headline show at St Giles in The Fields Church, hosted by Kal Lavelle for her We Love Shows series, Playing House have become a greedily devoured live proposition. The New Haircut EP is going to try and transfer that support to a broader landscape with its release; success hard to see being missed as gets ears lustful again listening to the release whilst fingers hit keys.

It opens with the first song written by the band, Feel The Weight. Its initial touch is a fuzzy mist of keys, the second a romping stroll of bouncing rhythms and a spicy hook still embraced by that melodically dissonant wash. The coaxing into the song is ear thrilling and becoming even more irresistible as things relax for the lively and lyrically potent vocals courted by an equally infectious prowess to rhythms and riffs. The edge to its thick beats contrasts perfectly with the funky swing of the song and the imaginative blend of vocals from the two ladies, a combination of sound and energy which has a definite and repeated in other songs feel of 4 Non Blondes to it.

The excellent start only hits another plateau with the EP’s title track and band’s new single. New Haircut is quite superb, again enslaving attention from the first moments as choppy and steely guitars entangle around the vocal roar. Once the song slips into post punk meets alternative pop ingenuity, the deal is done, ears and passions enslaved. From there rhythms roam and roll with a quirky almost deranged tenacity whilst stabbing riffs and those increasingly choppy chords have feet and spirit throwing shapes like a slinky. The track is quite brilliant with that vocal agility and adventure of the band the ringleader to glorious revelry and lyrical incitement of thought.

The release is completed by Grapefruit, another addiction in the making proposal which takes barely seconds to entice and engross as guitars chip away at ears which are simultaneously being slowly seduced by keys. Though carrying a more restrained energy than its predecessors, the song has a lively swagger and charm which will have bodies on their feet and hips swaying in boisterous union.

It is a fine end to one thrilling first look at Playing House. You always assume a band will grow and blossom further from their first endeavour which in this case means the British music scene has one mighty and destined to be exhilarating adventure brewing ahead of them. A must hear release.

The New Haircut EP is released April 8th

Upcoming live dates:

Wednesday 13th April – Birthdays, London (EP release show)

Sunday 17th April – Sound Control, Manchester

Wednesday 20nd April – Sneaky Pete’s, Edinburgh

Thursday 21st April – The Garage, London

Friday 22nd April – Sofar Sounds, Liverpool

Saturday 23rd April – Moon Club, Cardiff

http://www.playinghouse.co.uk/   https://www.facebook.com/playinghouseuk   https://twitter.com/playinghouseuk

Pete RingMaster 06/04/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

For more exploration of the independent and promotional services check out http://www.zykotika.com/

Heel – The Parts We Save

Heel_RingMasterReview

Amongst many eagerly anticipated offerings this year has to be the debut album from UK alternative rock quartet Heel. Having impressed with their first EP and even more so with subsequent releases as well as a striking stage presence, Heel has been one of the bands enveloped by increasing acclaim over recent times. It has put some strong expectations of The Parts We Save upon them which the London band has appeased with ease. Maybe at times the album does not quite fulfil all the potential within it but for rousing, imagination sculpted rock/pop contagiousness, the album persistently hits the spot with adventure and charm.

Formed in the winter of 2011 from guitarist Daniel and vocalist Margarita’s songwriting sessions, Heel quickly began working on their first EP once its line-up was completed by bassist Fred and drummer Nick. Produced by Justin Hill (Sikth), their opening release quickly grabbed attention and praise. Its success was subsequently pushed further by its successor Stranger Just The Same in 2014, an encounter also recorded with Hill. With video/singles luring play on the likes of Scuzz TV and Kerrang, the band set about working on an album, flying out to Japan`s legendary Geimori studio in Sapporo to record The Parts We Save with Daniel and Margarita producing.

Mixed by Ben Grosse and Paul Pavao (Marilyn Manson, Disturbed, Depeche Mode, Ben Folds, Thirty Seconds to Mars, etc.) and mastered by Tom Baker (Beastie Boys, Deftones, David Bowie, B.B. King), the album swiftly shows the growth in the band’s magnetic sound and its maturity in songwriting as opener An Apology sets to work stirring up ears. The first single from the release when uncaged last December, the song immediately consumes the senses in a sonic lure from which a bass led swagger within sultry caresses of guitar bounds. Its catchiness is instant and only strengthened by Margarita’s alluring vocals. Carrying thick drama to its rhythmic design and exotically seductive grooves, the track also develops an infectious No Doubt like charm which lies agreeably upon Heel’s own web of melody and imagination fuelled tenacity.

'The Parts We Save' Cover Artwork_RingMasterReviewThe excellent opening to the album continues with Selfish Burn which again has that Gwen Stefani and co spicing to its feisty pop ‘n’ roll. Throaty funk infused bait from Fred’s bass provides a potent spine to the song, an agitated smoulder of sonic and melodic resourcefulness laying upon it whilst Margarita’s tones again add a lusty freshness with a tinge of mischief to the temptation. Though seemingly crafted from the same template as the first and next up Yellow & Bliss, each song reveals its own individual and forcibly enticing character. The third track, and the band’s brand new video/single, is a lively shuffle with skittish rhythms and an animated gallop of chords and hooks beneath a breeze of warm harmonies and psych rock tinged enterprise, and quite irresistible.

Nothing New strolls in next with a melodic smile on its face and a devilish bassline at its heart for another inviting slice of impassioned pop rock whilst Shatter is a tender flirtation initially, which brews up into a spirited canter of jangling guitar and animated vocals aligned to mesmeric harmonies. By its close, the gentleness of the song is a near on surge of energy and passion, and increasingly bewitching.

The mellow croon of Cool allows body and emotions to settle; well at first as soon it also raises its enthusiastic agility and creative zeal to lead feet and hips on a merry dance egged on by virulent rhythms. A vibrant and catchy mix of textures and energies, the song has pleasure flowing, running right into the path of the outstanding Keep Running Back To Me. A tapestry of dynamic rock ‘n’ roll as punkish as it is bluesy, as feverishly tenacious as it is rapaciously heavy; the track is like a mix of My Baby and Spinnerette with a touch of Throwing Muses to it and quickly ignites appetite and emotions.

The dark drama of Live This Forever takes over, the track also a heavier proposal with a punk/grunge breeding to its invention and a fiery attitude to its emotive heart. It prowls, almost stalks ears as it unveils its shadow rich theatre, again grabbing eager involvement in its proposal before Fake Love twists and turns with its pop punk infused 4 Non Blondes like rock ‘n’ roll to great success.

Finishing with the tantalising melodic breeze of Streets Full Of You, a final harmonic and emotive kiss on ears with its own line in imaginative shadows, The Parts We Save is an encounter with plenty of eagerly lingering moments. Some songs are a more instant and imposing arousal than others, but each only provides rich enjoyment and an appetite for more from a band still growing into its skin of originality but establishing itself as one of Britain’s brightest propositions.

The Parts We Save is released March 4th via iTunes and Amazon.

http://www.heelband.com/   https://www.facebook.com/Heellondon   https://twitter.com/heellondon

Pete RingMaster 04/03/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

For more exploration of the independent and promotional services check out http://www.zykotika.com/