Backtrack Lane – In Fine

Four years after the release of their well-received debut album Black Truth & White Lies, French rockers   Backtrack Lane return with new EP, In Fine. Offering six creatively robust and impassioned tracks, the EP revels in a new energy and flair of enterprise in the Paris quartet’s sound; it a mix of the familiar and the captivatingly fresh sparking rich enjoyment with ease.

Formed in 2009, Backtrack Lane has played hundreds of gigs across their homeland, moving from small local stages to some of the most prestigious venues whilst playing alongside the likes of Black Star Riders, Gotthard, and numerous more. 2011 saw the release of first EP, It’s Not Like…, the national attention stoking Black Truth & White Lies album appearing two years later. The multi-flavoured alternative rock of In Fine is Backtrack Lane poking even bigger and broader spotlights while being for many a potent introduction to a band which knows how to rock ‘n’ roll.

With its lack of real uniqueness more than countered by the passion and energy at its enterprising heart, In Fine is a magnet in the speakers swiftly grabbing ears with opener Fifteen Minutes. Straight away the steely riffs of Adrien Crestey and Stefan Gatti spark the appetite, the heavier dark throb of vocalist Raphael Gatti’s bass zoning in on the instincts for predatory sound. Their collusion is instantly joined by the latter’s vocal prowess; his energy in delivery matched in the sounds blossoming up around him. With keys melodically shimmering behind the forceful yet invitational web created by the foursome, Gui O’Crest’s rapier like beats are like a punctuation to each strand of temptation. The song continually expands and grows note by note, blues filtered grooves only adding to the creative prowess working on body and imagination while familiar hues, with a suggestion of Sick Puppies/3 Days Grace to them, simply accentuate the lure and adventure of the encounter.

Underground is no less of a temptation with a vine like groove instantly wrapping around ears as desert rock seeded melodic enticement brews around another great vocal beckon from Raphael Gatti. A definite Josh Homme air creeps across the songwriting and character of the track, its slightly tempestuous climate and energy as irresistible as its sonic dexterity and spicy melodies with Crestey’s lead enticement teasing with a Billy Idol hue. As its predecessor, the song might be missing majorly unique surprises as feet and spirit are keenly manipulated yet expectations are left empty by its adventure and fresh breath, qualities just as rampant within next up Perfect Motion. Though there is more restraint in its first touch than those before, its zeal to stomp is soon in charge and throwing rapacious grooves and boisterous rhythms at ears as vocals add their own catchy exploits. Once more Queens Of The Stone Age is an inescapable clue to the bold and potent sound inciting something which simply is a thick pleasure.

Breaking the Rules has a broader hard/alternative rock landscape to its sound, Stefan Gatti and Adrien Crestey blending their hook littered designs with infectious prowess as rhythms stroll and vocals roar. Ultimately the song misses matching the lofty peaks of those before it but thorough enjoyment and involvement is a given as with the blues lined inevitably catchy prowl of the following Stray. An energetic slice of pop rock with a broad smile in its air and nature plus a snarling bassline to get greedy over, the song saunters without distractions into eager ears and spirit with its lively romp.

The EP is closed off by After the Rain, another song with a sizzling blues rock nurtured spicing and instinctive contagiousness in its creative veins. Once more things are familiar yet full of an adventure with a seduction and craft hard to not be taken by. In Fine delivers rock ‘n’ roll which feeds all the wants; fun, energy, and passion all served with something extra driven by imagination.

In Fine is available now.

http://www.backtracklane.com/    https://www.facebook.com/Backtrack-Lane-143002764878/    https://twitter.com/backtracklane

Pete RingMaster 30/05/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Blacktop Mojo – Burn The Ships

The past four years since forming has seen Texan rock band Blacktop Mojo court a potent reputation for their sound and live presence, all the time increasingly nudging global attention to turn their way. The release of second album Burn The Ships is the moment that awareness just might happen, the release a striking and thickly accomplished slab of highly flavoursome, sinew moulded rock ‘n’ roll.

Formed in September 2012 by vocalist Matt James and drummer Nathan Gillis, Blacktop Mojo swiftly leapt into the live scene with the intent of playing as many shows and tours as they could. It is a hunger which prevails to this day, the Palestine, TX quintet sharing stages with the likes of Bon Jovi, Candlebox, Drowning Pool, Aaron Lewis, Saving Abel, Puddle of Mudd, Whiskey Myers, Dirty River Boys, and The Bigsbys among a great many others over the years. Debut album I Am stirred things up at home with its release in 2014, similarly inviting broader notice of the band’s hearty hard/melodic rock sound. Burn The Ships though is a wake-up call to bigger spotlights upon the band, the Philip Mosley produced and Austin Deptula mixed and mastered encounter a fiery roar very hard to ignore or avoid finding a healthy appetite for.

The Blacktop Mojo sound is arguably not the most unique, the band drawing comparisons to the likes of Shinedown, Black Stone Cherry, and Soundgarden yet has an individual character and diversity which lifts it from the crowd with ease. All the evidence lies within Burn The Ships and its inventive and impassioned rock ‘n’ roll; a proposition hitting the ground running with its majorly rousing opener Where The Wind Blows. A lone melody with a country rock twang makes the first beckon, a sister lure swiftly by its side before muscle bound rhythms loom over ears amidst the continuing invitation of that initial welcome. Soon into its thick and potent stride with the growling tones of Matt Curtis’ bass rich bait alongside the meaty swipes of Gillis, the track has its infectious claws firmly around ears and appetite with James’ delivery leading the way and in turn the listener into one peach of a chorus impossible not to get fully involved in. With the riffs of rhythm guitarist Kenneth Irwin equally steering the temptation as lead guitarist Ryan Kiefer spins wiry grooves, it is a seriously compelling proposal,

The following End Of Days is just as formidable and satisfying, its robust rhythms and gnarly grooves alone gripping body and an instinctive passion for heart bred rock ‘n’ roll. As its predecessor, the song carries an irresistible chorus to back up the already successful lures at play and the album’s powerful start, success its title track continues. As provocative guitar temptation wraps its flame lit charms around ears, Burn The Ships quickly shows itself an equal to those before in enticement, gaining even greater strength in that trait as its groove takes on a nagging quality as it meanders around the vocal potency of James. With Seether-esque hues involved, the song croons and roars; flexing its muscle as it spins its inventively intoxicating sonic web with each passing second. The track is pure drama and the pinnacle of the album though challenged throughout.

The earnest strains of Prodigal follow, its Staind lit serenade a mellow emotive caress allowing for a breath whilst enjoying its melodic heat, suggestive flames building  into a bigger blaze before Shadows On The Wall smoulders and erupts in a 3 Doors Down scented fire next, subsequently  followed by the virile throes of Sweat. The trio do not quite teach the heights of the first three tremendous tracks but each with their individual natures and temptations leave plenty to embrace and firmly enjoy.

The snarling properties of Pyromaniac bring the album back to its loftiest heights, the song as heated as its title suggests with irritability in its riffs and a bass grumble so easy to grow lustful for. Melodically, there is a 3 Days Grace air contrasted and complimented perfectly by the grungier textures at work on the senses, both linked by an instinctive catchiness  which again features in potent form within the predacious 8000 Lines, a song stalking ears with rapacious riffs and antagonistic beats as sonic enterprise and vocal drama ignite. The track is outstanding; its unpredictability enhanced by melodic beauty as an oasis of calm shares ears with its tempestuous heart.

Both Dog On A Leash with its red-blooded plaintive call and the reflective cries of Make A Difference leave satisfaction full, each revealing further twists in the album’s make-up and enterprise while Chains brings a web of athletic grooves and beefy rhythms in a burly persuasion raising the ante again. It is pure captivation preying on an already eager appetite for sound and encounter.

Concluded by the emotionally charged Dream On and the melancholic musing of Underneath, the impressive Burn The Ships has plenty to see the band make the next step towards global recognition. Its songs are shapely and sound rich if not always on the truly unique side. Its craft and imagination more than compensates though as ears embrace the open potential also lying within a triumph of a listen.

Burn The Ships is out now through Cuhmon Records @ https://blacktopmojo.bandcamp.com/releases or http://www.blacktopmojo.com/store

http://www.blacktopmojo.com/   https://www.facebook.com/BlacktopMojo   https://twitter.com/blacktopmojo

Pete RingMaster 15/03/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Kolo – Do You Want To Rule The World

Kolo_RingMaster Review

It is hard to tell if Do You Want To Rule The World, the debut album from UK rockers Kolo, is getting its first outing this September as kind of implied by its press release or came out earlier this year and is now getting a national reboot come Sept 25th. What we can tell you though is if you have yet to get a taste of Kolo’s vibrant pop rock sound, the album is very deserving of a hefty moment of your time. It might not blow you away, though it could easily do that too, but as we found, band and album only provide a perpetual lure to return and party in its infectious melodic revelry.

The band emerged in 2006 when Exeter bred vocalist/guitarist Jon Burnell, equipped with a wad of songs inspired by “all the tramps and slightly weird people who come into the record shop” , moved to London and subsequently linked up with Spanish born bassist Dani Mourinho and Croydon drummer Steve Fuller. 200 or so shows down the line, the band found itself invited to support 3 Doors Down, this notable moment in their emergence followed by the band performing at a host of O2’s around the UK and the recording of their first EP. Recorded with producer Sean Genockey at the legendary Rockfield Studios in Wales, and mixed by Kirk Kelsey, it was a well-received introduction selling over 4000 copies and whilst providing a further spark to the band playing in the US and chances to share stages with the likes of Scouting for Girls, Mr Hudson, The Rifles, and Infadels.

In March 2014 the band flew to Nashville to record Do You Want To Rule The World with 3 Doors Down guitarist Chris Henderson who had personally invited Kolo to record their album at his own studio. Seemingly released worldwide via LHM Records this past May, we are assuming September’s outing is another additional and welcome nudge on the world’s attention, a persuasion for more take notice of what really is one thoroughly enjoyable and increasingly compelling encounter with the almost exhaustingly energetic and creatively lively Kolo.

cover_RingMaster Review     Their album opens with the previously successful single Castro, its gentle emergence offering no hint to the anthemic roar to follow. With muscular beats and a meaty bassline joining early harmonies and melodically climbing guitar, the song slips into a controlled but feisty stroll which is never afraid to spring a flurry of fiery energy and catchy hookery the way of ears. It is a great invitation into the heart of Do You Want To Rule The World and quickly backed by the sturdier but no less infectious Be Someone. Again Mourinho provides a bass temptation to get hungry for whilst guitars and beats collude to cast a boisterous enticement catching ears as potently as the alluring tones of Burnell. The song is a kind of mix between Foo Fighters and Sick Puppies without sounding overly like either and the perfect set up to the stirring air and magnetic textures of Andrea which comes next.

The song is another melody driven warm tempest of enterprise for which the word rousing fits perfectly whilst its successor Mr Bigshot recruits ears and feet with a smiling swagger which you would swear came from an ELO seeding. With more bounce and swing than a bungee rope, the song leaps around inciting the same in others whilst entangling their vocal chords in its rich virulence of pop and rock at its united best. It is not particularly demanding or ground-breaking but all irresistible, heart-warming temptation.

Rule The World courts the alternative rock emotion of a 3 Days Grace in its pungent and energetic croon lit by the rolling bait uncaged by Fuller at choice moments whereas the outstanding Break Your Face dangles spicy slithers of grooving from its Stereophonics meets Fall Out Boy creative theatre to become more captivating and impressive with every passing minute. Both tracks hit the spot for body and soul, a success also pretty much found by High Heels and its harmonic mellowness over more of the rhythmic energy and prowess which as much as anything stands out across the album as a whole.

Variety is another strong feature to the songs within Do You Want To Rule The World, and maybe no more openly than through King Of The Street People which from opening with an enticing merger of voice and emotive strings twists into a breath-taking, urgency fuelled saunter sure to set dance-floors on fire and coax appetites into pure greed. It is pure pop and instinctive rock ‘n’ roll with a classical air and hungry rock breath, the provocative lure of strings a perfect companion to the grouchy voice of the bass and the contagion of the song an exhilarating soundtrack to the creative drama thrilling the imagination. As Break Your Face, the song is Kolo at its musically ingenious best and if there is anything to say ‘against’ the album, it is that the band does not take this boldness enough into other tracks.

The haunting start to Earthquake is a mesmeric lead for thoughts and the following adventure of changeable energies and similarly mercurial melodies and textures, its success making way for the pop infection that is closing track Dreams, another fiery serenade of vocals and guitars with a rhythmic skeleton equipped to be as tender as it is dramatic. The pair provides an enjoyable end to an album which maybe is not ground-breaking in any major way but reveals more as it only improves with age.

Kolo is a band to make you feel good and make your body move in ways you thought forgotten. Their songs are rock pop to lick your lips over but be warned once they infest there is no shaking them off… thankfully.

Do You Want To Rule The World is out now via LHM Records through most online stores.

Pete RingMaster 24/09/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Feral Sun – Evacuate

 

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The final week of January sees the debut album from UK rockers Feral Sun getting a well-deserved reboot, a re-release sure to mop up the unsuspecting appetites and fans that were not netted the first time around by the band. Evacuate is quite simply a collection of emotive and sonic anthems which come in varying forms and all roar with a snarling angst. They are also propositions which seem as familiar as they are fresh, the band weaving inspirations from the likes of open Stone Sour, Karnivool, Alter Bridge, and Trivium into their own distinctive designs. It plays like an old friend re-groomed, revitalised, and with a new found individuality.

Formed in 2009, the London quartet spent time honing their sound and live set before unleashing themselves locally and gaining a swift reputation and potent following for their stage ferocity and similarly impacting sound. Next came the creating of their first album, an imposing but feistily seductive encounter which again embraced a strong and acclaimed acceptance upon its first unveiling. With anticipations keen thanks to a trio of singles from the release, Evacuate is now poised to inflame the country with its national outing, with an inevitable success it is easy to expect thanks to its stirring and imaginative body of sound and enterprise.

Evacuate takes little time in awakening ears and attention as opener Find A Way follows its initial jangle of guitar with a wall of heavily swung beats and predatory riffs. It is a formidable entrance given greater potency by the instantly magnetic vocals of Mick Burns and a broader coaxing of guitar from himself and lead guitarist Marco lo Coco. That earlier mentioned familiarity is soon apparent but it only spices up the dramatic weight and character of the song. At times essences of Seether make a suggestive whisper and in others a mix of Stone Sour and Mudvayne, but all colouring which increases the reach and appeal of the impressive start.

There is also a raw quality to the track and a ‘raggedness’ to riffs which only increases the texture and lure of the proposition, revealing one aspect of the band’s sound to which the next up Alone Feral Sun covershows another. Also offering an aggressive touch at first, the song soon slips into a mellower melodic landscape, Burns opening up an emotive narrative with increasingly impressing vocals as lo Coco tantalises with an elegant melody against the darker provocative tones of Alex Nikitin’s bass and the skilfully fluid rhythms of drummer Jay Stephenson. His rhythmic incitement ebbs and flow in attack and weight perfectly as the song croons with passion and intensity as a 3 Days Grace like persuasion spices the unique theatre of Feral Sun’s invention and fiery craft, the band entwining melodic and hard rock with a more classic bred adventure.

The album’s excellent title track is stomping with teeth bared and passions inflamed next, prodding and swiping at ears with antagonistic attitude wrapped in a sonic and melodic tempering. Feet and voice are swiftly recruited by the song, its anthemic qualities as potent as the intimate drama colouring the track before it passes the listeners over to the alluring charm of People Are Dying. Its opening balladry within a sultry climate, leads senses and imagination into evocative scenery of acoustic led persuasion when subsequently opens up into an expanse of fiercer fiery incitement in sound and vocals. A slow burner compared to its predecessors and arguably never reaching their plateaus, the song still impresses and thrills much as One More Day after it.

With no song leaving ears and satisfaction wanting, there is a shallow dip in the album caused by the might of its start and impending closing stretch. This song for example a seriously compelling stroll of brewing anger and militant intensity with a craft individually and united from the band to match, yet it just misses the final spark to emulate the heights of the early songs. Nevertheless with lo Coco spinning a web of impressive skill and adventure around the ever striking vocals, it leaves a lingering pleasure and impression just as the Audioslave scented Into Pieces and the enslaving Long Road. The first of the two almost stalks ears and thoughts with its predacious gait and aggravated riffery whilst the second finds a similarly imposing leer to its sound and emotion bound in another strapping of sonic intrigue and vocal might, especially in the latter passage where the whole band unveil an irresistible vocal call to arms.

Breathe continues the strong diversity to Evacuate next with its distinctive and rigorously engaging balladry. Its highly pleasing flame of melodies and harmonies is followed by the equally potent emotional reflection of Take This Away. The track aligns resourceful calm and expression with raw blazes of angst soaked aggression from guitars and rhythms, providing further evidence of the maturity and imagination within the band’s songwriting and its fascinating realisation.

The album ends as mightily as it began, with firstly Caught In The Act exploring a mouth-watering blend of hard rock revelry and dirty rock ‘n’ roll tenacity. It results in the most inventive and unpredictable treat on Evacuate. The whole album is a heady peak of quality and temptation, but its start and finish provide the pinnacles with this song a tempestuous march of hungry riffs, hostile rhythms, and grooves to drool over. Its successor Falling is just as exhilarating with its virulent stroll of vocals and hooks interspersed with gripping rock pop devilry posing as a chorus. The album’s final song leaves ears and appetites, which are already full to bursting with highly enjoyable sounds and enterprise, just that little bit hungrier and greedier for more.

Evacuate is a roaring stomp of a release, not always as unique as it might be but for the main using the recognisable flavouring in fresh and contagious ways. For a riot of thoroughly satisfying and invigorating rock ‘n’ roll, it is hard to imagine too many over shadowing Feral Sun’s debut in the coming months.

Evacuate is released on Monday 26th January through all good stores and @ http://www.feralsun.bigcartel.com/

http://www.feralsun.com/

RingMaster 26/01/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Cole Childers – Aurora EP

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Providing an intriguing and seriously captivating blend of hard and alternative rock with also a slight tendency for metal, the Aurora EP is one of those potential soaked treats which catches you by surprise and opens up a certain appetite for more. The debut solo release from Cole Childers, the impressive six track encounter is a bed of drama and evocative enterprise which roars and seduces with equal potency. It is not a proposition to explore new avenues for fiery melodic rock but certainly one making a tasty addition to its ranks whilst marking Childers out as a striking presence to contemplate and keep a keen eye on ahead.

The Bainbridge Island, Washington hailing, now Seattle based musician brings his experiences from being a member of the United States Navy since 2000, as well as other personal moments and insights into his songwriting, lyrically and in sound songs gaining a dark and often challenging texture to their incitement. Returning from a six month deployment in 2006, Childers formed rock band Chasing Corona which released the critically acclaimed album Black Eye and Candlelight as well as going on to share stages with artists such as Motley Crue, George Clinton, Creed, and Joan Jett. In 2010 he left the band and also since leaving the military, found in his words that “I was able to move back to where it all began, with new purpose and clear direction.”

As soon as the opening track from Aurora embraces ears there is recognition of that passion you sense in the man running through the release in sound and vocal delivery. Save Me straight away casts a wall of demanding riffs and ImageProxy.mvcrhythmic swipes which awaken attention and imagination instantly. It is a feisty entrance by the song which is soon entwining senses in taught grooves before relaxing into a melodic and emotive caress clasped by evocative shadows. It is a fiery relaxation though which is soon aflame as the rigorous chorus erupts with similar vocal causticity from Childers. It all combines for a gloriously magnetic lure aided by the great throaty prowl of the bass and those firm swinging rhythms which punctuate every twist and emotional expulsion of the song. As lyrically gripping as it is in sound, the song is like a mix of Johnny Wore Black and Sick Puppies, and a scintillating start to the release which alone fires up a hungry appetite for more in the passions.

Childers latest single comes next to continue the immense presence of the EP, Fall With Me also entangling the senses in raw and strongly imposing scythes of guitars at first before Childers begins unveiling the emotively striking and stirring premise of the song. It along with an accompanying video, potently tries to portray the turmoil and sacrifice in war which goes unrecognised or certainly felt by those on the outside. It has a metal edge which makes for a predatory essence whilst a 3 Days Grace like angst and expression adds further rich hues to the incendiary and thrilling encounter. There is equally a skill and poise to the musicianship of Childers which hones the emotion and aggressive flavours that drive the heart of the song into a thought sparking proposition.

The evocative balladry of Addict is next, keys and voice making a captivating embrace which flourishes further as Childers explores a flowing harmonious presence whilst embraced by shadow kissed strings. An electronic agitation adds its resonance across the brewing climate of the song, a whisper of Linkin Park spicing up a Pearl Jam/Breaking Benjamin like croon. It is a mesmeric blaze of dramatic enticement which makes way for the tempestuous air and energy of Run Away. Again Sick Puppies comes to mind as hooks sparkle and riffs rub their captivating bait on ears whilst a raw energy colours the song’s emotional bellow. As with all the tracks, there is an inescapable contagion and ferocious beauty which wraps and ignites the imagination whilst forming a lingering lure in the passions.

The EP is completed by firstly the heavy rock fuelled Impossible, a track which lacks the spark of its predecessors yet still has plenty to ensnare and draw back eager attention, especially the potent and increasingly impressing vocals and expression of Childers. It is followed by the title track to being things to a potent close. The acoustically cast track looking at a broken relationship and its twist, is a smouldering caress of a song where vocally Childers again shines and melodically is an evocatively flaming sunset of sonic richness and emotive endeavour. It is an excellent finale to an outstanding release which just gets better with every listen. As mentioned at the start, Aurora is not setting new plateaus to emulate but definitely provides one captivating promise drenched adventure which suggests to expect big things from Cole Childers ahead.

The Aurora EP is available now via Vanity Digital Music on iTunes, Amazon, Google Music and other digital download sites.

colechilders.com

8.5/10

RingMaster 13/08/2014

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Farley: A Good Problem To Have

Farley

Sometimes a real juicy pleasure comes out of the blue and such is the case with A Good Problem To Have the debut EP from Pennsylvanian alternative rock band Farley. Arguably it should not have been an unexpected joy as the band is the creation of singer/songwriter Tim Farley who was a member of the acclaimed hard rock band Pan.a.ce.a, but this is a completely different beast and sound to his former band. Farley combines rock and pop teased sounds to create songs which simply light up the ear and excite the heart with creative and intelligent and irresistible craft.

Tim Farley began writing songs for a solo album last year whilst Pan.a.ce.a was still seemingly going strong with plans ahead. It was a shock to him when the band disbanded but it spurred him on to dive into recording his first solo release. For the release which was written and produced by Bret Alexander and Tim Farley, guitarists Pat Flynn (Underground Saints) and Dustin Drevitch (Lemongelli), drummer Zhach Kelsch (Dive, Ajar), bassist Matt Jaffin (Pan.a.ce.a), and keyboardist Adam Tarin (Royal Benson), were brought in for the recording of the Kickstarter funded project. The result is a release in A Good Problem To Have, which just hits the sweet spot.

The rock pop contagion Hindsight starts things off and takes the heart and senses immediately into a soak of satisfying energetic FARLEYenthusiasm. It is impossibly catchy which just gets more infectious the further into its heart you get so that by its end you have nothing less than addiction for its melodic caresses and boisterous enterprise. It is an undemanding but fully giving song littered with hooks and sonic guitar kisses which leave excited rapture in its wake, especially with its anthemic climax.

The EP shows variety and distinct flavours across its songs with the following Today the first example. Moving from the danceable enthusiasm of the first track the band turns to mellow textures and warm whispers for the second song. It is a gentle yet feisty sun which wraps tender hot arms around the senses whilst offering passionate caresses and hearty energies to ignite the pulse rate. Like the first it is not an over complicated song but one which meshes layers of emotion and sound with consummate skill. It does not quite reach the heights of its predecessor but such the quality of the opener it was on a losing wicket and easily leaves a real joy behind nevertheless.

Unforgettable pulls greater emotive powers out of its heart to be one of the biggest highlights on the superb release. Sounding like a hybrid of 3 Days Grace, Kingsize, and Sick Puppies, the song is a masterful fusion of sizzling melodies, addictive hooks, and delicious grace. The vocals of Tim Farley continue to shine and draw one deeper in to the songs and it is fair to say the EP shows him at his best and is his finest moment to date.

The best track on the EP comes with Fuel The Fire, a stomping rock n roll beast with a snarl to the vocals and intensity as well as an incendiary breath to the impressive guitar work and solo. With essences of Starving for Gravity and Volbeat with a splash of Calabrese, the track grabs the passions by the hand and takes them on a captivating cruise down heated rock roads lined with flaming melodic scenery. It is a song which you feel you know right away but only offers fresh and new magnetic pleasures to enjoy.

The release is completed by the country rock flavoured Waiting On Me, and the delightful Tiger Lily. The last is a sensational ballad which bewitches from first note to last musically and vocally and echoes the early songwriting triumphs of Elvis Costello. It is a brilliant end to an equally immense EP.

We may have lost Pan.a.ce.a, but the world has gained Farley, a completely different and on the evidence of A Good Problem To Have, greater proposition now and for the future. The band is working on their debut album and it just cannot come soon enough.

www.facebook.com/farleyband

RingMaster 13/12/2012

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright