Sonick Plague – Self Titled

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You have to be grateful to Sonick Plague and Pavement Music for bringing us not only a blast from the band’s past but giving it a fresh breath and energy, though it is easy to suspect a straight release of their 1988 debut album would have been a treat too for those us missing it first time around. The West Virginian thrashers though have re-recorded and re-energized that rampage, originally titled What’s the Purpose, and uncaged it as a self-titled offering and attention filler whilst the band works on new material. It is old school thrash dosed up with punk and classic metal ferocity, and yes the band’s sound has been emulated, reworked, and twisted many times over the years since Sonick Plague unleashed their album, but still the songs just stir up ears and appetite.

Formed in 1984, the band’s first ‘memorable’ line-up of Ken Cuccaro (drums) and Tim Meehan (guitars), alongside Tony Teodoro (guitars) and Sean Donnelly (bass, vocals) came a few years later, the four behind the band’s 1988 debut album. Though it swiftly gained hordes of new fans and attention, not long after it’s unveiling, Meehan left the band to be subsequently replaced by guitarist Chuck Crilly. From there Sonick Plague undertook their own self-supported tour and shared stages with the likes of Death Angel, Voivod, Gwar, Pantera, Ludichrist, Crumbsuckers and many more. The intensity of that tour and surrounding shows saw the band’s stability shaken, and after a few unsuccessful line-up changes the band parted. It was apparently the sad passing of Teodoro in 2012 that sparked Cuccaro, Donnelly, and Crilly to begin talking musical things again, and with the addition of Matt Dupre, Sonick Plague reformed and set about re-recording their first offering.

album-cover-_RingMaster Review     Recorded at the legendary Carriage House Studios, the album quickly gets down to business with Street Wars. An alluring melodic entrance gives no indication of the sonic rioting to come but it does wake up ears and imagination nicely. Increasing its muscle and drama with every passing chord, riff, and spiky beat, the track eventually hits full steam, the vocals of Donnelly ripe with attitude and aggression. We are as many, not able to bring a comparison to the first version of the album but it is hard to imagine his delivery being any more potent first time around. Musically, with age and maturity involved, you can assume the release also has a richer and thicker body, and certainly the opener rumbles and grumbles as if old school thrash was a fresh proposition.

The great starts continues with My Gun, the throaty bass of Donnelly a great coaxing alongside the virulence of driving riffs and concussive swings cast by Dupre, Crilly, and Cuccaro respectively. Settling with an attack somewhere between a lively prowl and an all-out charge, the track bites and snarls whilst a solo lights the air. Of course we have heard this all before in many ways, but from those coming after and being inspired by Sonick Plague and the bands around them in the eighties, and a great many of them definitely labour to make the same highly satisfying assaults as the reworked but undiluted proposals offer on this release.

Both AA and I Don’t Want to Relax churn up air and the senses, the first with a rabid nagging of riffs and crisp beats led by the grouchy tones of Donnelly, and its successor through its military and Celtic teased imagination. The second of the two is pure anthem, enslaving from its opening contagious moments to and across a ravenous landscape of psychotic grooves and quarrelsome riffing speared by rhythms as hellacious as they are viciously precise. The track is thrash bred but simply rock ‘n’ roll in its most irresistible form, and easily our favourite, and probably the best track on the album, despite many challengers. Its punkish character also adds to the anarchic glory before making way for the crushing yet infectiously tempting turbulence of View of Death and straight after the middle finger growl of One Swift Kick. Each keeps body and appetite greedy, the first with its predatory and unrelenting gnawing at the senses and the second courtesy of a deliciously bestial bass sound and another scourge of heavy niggling riffs and contagion spilling grooves; the mesmeric melodic oasis deep into its tempest is pretty juicy too. The track stands aside I Don’t Want to Relax as the pinnacles of the album, each the perfect invitation to newcomers to Sonick Plague past and present.

The pair of Misc Bullshit, with its classic metal hued enterprise within another savaging embrace, and finally NRG brings the album to a great close. The last track simply brawls with the listener vocally and musically, leaving no attitude coated stone unturned in its tenacious and uncompromising carnage, and both songs again showing plenty of accomplished and inventive touches not always fuelled by hostility.

As mentioned we cannot say how much the songs have changed during their re-recording etc. but there is no denying the unfussy but skilled craft and technical ability set loose. This is certainly an album in many ways you already know thanks to those who have followed over the years employing the sounds Sonick Plague and their like inspired originally. It is going to be interesting how the band’s new songs shape up, but easy to suspect they will also offer a thoroughly enjoyable ride.

Sonick Plague is available now digitally via Pavement Music and on CD @ https://squareup.com/market/sonickplague/sonick-plague-cd

https://www.facebook.com/sonickplague   http://www.sonickplague.com/

RingMaster 28/07/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard on Reputation Radio @ http://www.reputationradio.net

 

 

Russkaja – Peace, Love & Russian Roll

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Our own introduction to Austrian turbo polk metallers Russkaja was through their third album Energia! and there is no denying it stole our ears and lustful soul with ease. Now the septet returns with its successor Peace, Love & Russian Roll and fair to say the devilish fun continues. The album in many ways seems a more concentrated attempt at flirting with the broadest attention, songs sung predominantly in English this time around and the bedlamic nature of their songwriting turned down a touch, but it does not stop the band unleashing another manic and exhilarating stomp.

Formed in 2005 by vocalist Georgij A. Makazaria, Vienna hailing Russkaja has a sound which embraces the essences of its member’s Ukrainian, Austrian, and Russian heritage, the latter especially a potent hue in an adventure which entangles folk, punk, ska, jazz, metal, polka…well you name it and it will be in there as shown by both Energia! and now Peace, Love & Russian Roll. As suggested the band seems to be looking at stirring up a wider spotlight of attention with their new album, but in no way does it mean they are dipping into commercial attributes to cheat the imagination and fans, just that Peace, Love & Russian Roll has, well I guess it is a more mature and knowing touch to the songwriting and sound behind its magnetic schizo waltz.

The festival of flavour and adventure starts with the body igniting Rock’n Roll Today. Its opening fanfare of trumpet has ears instantly hooked, with the scythes of energy, riffs, and drum stick swipes only adding to the enticing. Within a few more breaths the track is in full throttle, stampeding through ears with a punk ferocity, multi-flavoured tenacity, and a web of rhythms which, as the sound, shifts gait and nature with every passing clutch of seconds and inventive twist. Vocally Makazaria growls as he leads the boisterous revelry, feet soon a blur in return and hips swinging to the breakout of ska seeded hooks. Like a mix of Kontrust and Tankus The Henge, the track sets the union between album and listener off in rigorously contagious and thrilling style, especially with its fifties rock ‘n’ roll detour towards its exhausting climax.

   The following Slap Your Face equally has the senses and imagination aflame, and again it all starts with an irresistible entrance which this time is blessed with the kind of blaze of brass that Roxy Music cast in their heyday. Soon metal riffs and beats back up its tempting, the mix persistently punctuating the ska seeded funk swagger which soon breaks out. As the first, the song is a flowing stroll of infectiousness and invention. Its fusion of sound reminds of Biting Elbows and Gogol Bordello at times with the added spice of King Kurt in for good measure, and fair to say that if as its predecessor, it is not luring your body and vocal involvement within the first minute, you should check you have a pulse.

Hometown Polka calms things down a touch with a restrained saunter spiced by the teasing violin strings of Mia Nova which provide a charming welcome. Its catchiness is in full flow pretty much straight away though, growing with strength as lively crescendos to the song come littered with a throaty bassline, mass vocals lures, and swinging traditional temptation. The dark allure of H-G. Gutternigg’s potete (a hybrid of bass trumpet and trombone), only brings greater flirtation to the song, complementing the spicy trumpet of Rainer Gutternigg and the melodic dance set by Engel Mayr’s guitar simultaneously.

A further breath can be taken thanks to There Was A Time, a warm yet melancholic croon of voice and sound. Once more infectiousness is as ripe as the skills breeding the total seduction, the English sung reflection making another persuasion impossible to not join within one round of its chorus. The sublime persuasion is matched by the Latin sparked El Pueblo Unido, its Spanish sung and South American coloured tones the canvas for a rousing ska infused canter complete with climatic crescendos and mariachi like drama.

597_Russkaja_RingMaster Review   Lovegorod wears its ska influences with a broad creative smile whilst Parachute guided by the pulsating beats of Mario Stübler is a folk shaped swing of melodic and lyrical romance hugged by siren-esque harmonies and trembling Mediterrean caresses. Both songs hold attention and imagination in firm and pleasing hands but each finds itself over shadowed by the theatre of the following Let’s Die Together. Arguably the most traditionally Russian bred song on the album, it is a bordering on schizophrenic maelstrom of voice and sound which boils into a familiar and addictive quickstep. Its energy and passion increases with every swaying step, its roaring catchiness of band cries over a deeply hooking swing, sheer inescapable virulence.

One major triumph is backed by another in the noir lit prowl of Salty Rain. Dark rock ‘n’ roll with a healthy spice of jazz and melodic sultriness, the song swiftly entrances body and imagination, once again hips coaxed into eager movement as the immersive narrative grabs thoughts. A core ska spine of guitar binds the outstanding track’s varied beauty together, alone manipulating limbs before letting You Are The Revolution flick the switch to another raucous outpouring of sound, attitude, and energy. Metal and punk collude to create the raw and gripping stomping with the bass of Dimitrij Miller, not for the first time, a prime protagonist in song and ears. Of course as volatile as it is, there is a contagion to its tempest which is just as mouth-watering as the turbulence around it.

Peace, Love And Russian Roll concludes with firstly the country rock/folk croon of Radio Song, a serenade as lyrically mischievous as it is musically tangy, and finally its title track. The last song’s name just about sums up it and the album’s contents, Russian rock devilry spawned by the theme of uniting in the good things to make life and the planet a better place. It is a glorious end to another delicious slab of unpredictable and inimitable aural festivity. If pushed previous album Energia! with its less polished and more of a raw toning still edges it as our favourite Russkaja moment but Peace, Love & Russian Roll is right up there leaving so many other offerings this year in its wake.

Peace, Love & Russian Roll is available now via Napalm Records http://shop.napalmrecords.com/russkaja

http://www.russkaja.com/    https://www.facebook.com/russkajaofficial

RingMaster 26/07/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard on Reputation Radio @ http://www.reputationradio.net

 

 

WhiteMoor – Pause and Effect

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Good words are seemingly only heard when people talk about UK indie band WhiteMoor, and having our introduction to them through their new album Pause and Effect, it is easy to see and hear why. The bands third full-length consists of eleven highly accomplished and creatively sculpted songs which are not always instantly striking but work away with a persistently enticing air and lingering tempting. So many of them come with hooks which just get under the skin, often unknowingly, and even if without such potent tempting, the band’s tracks make the most endearing companions.

Derby based WhiteMoor began in 2010, formed by guitarist Barrington Mole who quickly linked up with vocalist Benny Ryan. With the band’s line-up completed by bassist Luke Inglis, drummer Tom Scribbins, and keyboardist Louise Tomlinson by 2012, the quintet soon sparked fan attention with early singles and a self-titled debut album. A stirring of radio and media attention was not far behind either, especially as the following year in 2013, the band unveiled second album Horizons with again a host of well-received singles before and after only reinforcing their emergence on the British rock scene. Pause and Effect now feels like the key to awakening the broadest national awareness. From start to finish it is a heftily enthralling and lively proposition which just gets stronger and more persuasive with every listen.

By those already aware of the band, Pause and Effect is said to find the band exploring a heavier guitar driven sound with darker tones around the contagious hooks, fiery melodies, and mesmeric harmonies the band is already renowned for. Opener Hollywood certainly backs that claim up in potent style, the song from a gentle and evocative breeze of guitar and keys brewing up into a stomping cascade of energy and rhythmic enticement. The guitars continue to wrap the thick beats with their own new intensity and rigour, squeezing out infectious hooks and fiery enterprise with ease. With the mellower but no less feisty vocals of Ryan, backed strongly by those of Mole and Tomlinson, a great contrast to the sturdier and more voracious air of the music, the song grows and increasingly seduces with passion and creative tenacity.

Pause and Effect - Front Cover_RingMaster Review   The great start is matched by A Cage for the Animals next, it too a swift potent lure from its first breath though this time with a more aggressive touch before slipping into an expressive and melodically driven canter. It reveals a grungier essence with its increasing incitement on ears and body, but also a character which has glimpses of bands like Manic Street Preachers and Feeder to it. Though as the first song, and many others, there is something indefinably familiar to certain aspects of the song, it never feeds expectations, only refreshing itself and ears with every magnetic turn.

Both Dark Sparks and Be the Last keep things bubbling nicely, the first surrounding a pulsating bassline with shimmering keys, emotively hued vocals, and a sparking and immersive caresses of guitar. It too has a snarl and intensity to it, though restraining them into a more melancholic but still lively stroll. The keys of Tomlinson are compelling, at times almost Devo-esque in their imagination and touch, and as the album, the song evolves into a major tempting over time. Its successor slips into ears with an electro pop like coaxing, the keys again providing something to intrigue and wrong-foot whilst the rest of the band craft a more concentrated drama of their own. Once more ears feel they know the song as it unveils its charms but thoughts find no reason why and the appetite cares little as it devours another engrossing proposal.

The emotive smoulder of Codes comes next, the song revealing a whiff of Brit pop to its vocally shapely and melodically skilled body. Though it does not fire up personal tastes as successfully as those before it, the song only shows more of the depth and impressive songwriting of the band before the similarly less commanding Ghosts satisfies without igniting that extra spark. There is no escaping the individual and united craft weaving its clean and musically poetic enticement though, or that in its predecessor She Makes Me Fly, a seductive kiss on ears with plenty of twists and invention to keep the imagination glued.

All get simply outshone by the irresistible God Help the Queen though. It opens with an Echo and The Bunnymen hued lure of keys and a rich melodic hook, its rhythms also carrying the darker shadows of the Liverpool band before exposing body and emotions to a tantalising and rousing chorus. The song is just glorious, with the opening clutch of songs a major peak in the album’s landscape, and alone a good enough reason to go explore Pause and Effect.

The pair of Only Human and Masquerade provide good reasons too, the first an emotive melodic hug you only want to sink deeper into and the second a flame of fuzzy key bred atmospherics, caustic guitar tones, and magnetic vocals and harmonies, all tempered by another juicy dark bassline. Every song shows another fresh glimpse to the prowess and inventive depth of the band’s sound and imagination, the latter of this two revealing the band can turn their hand to more aggressive textures with ease.

Concluded by Until Tomorrow, a strong and masterful slice of melancholic balladry, Pause and Effect is a rich and constantly rewarding release. Certainly some songs for personal tastes lack the spark of others and thus the success, but each only grip and fascinate with, as the album itself, increasing potency over every listen. If WhiteMoor is new to you, than their new album is worth plenty of your intrigue and attention whilst for existing fans Pause and Effect shows the band in yet another creative light; looks like everyone is a winner.

Pause and Effect is available now via Sound-Hub Records on CD through http://www.whitemoor.co.uk/ and digitally @ https://goo.gl/goikuZ or http://goo.gl/p6oVQv

https://www.facebook.com/WhiteMoor

RingMaster 26/07/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard on Reputation Radio @ http://www.reputationradio.net

Rum Thief – Reach For the Weatherman

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Want something to get excited about? Then check out Rum Thief and superb second EP Reach For the Weatherman. There has already been an eager buzz about the band from live shows and especially last year’s debut EP Clouded Mind, but we suggest nothing compared to what will be stirred up by this new outstanding encounter.

Rum Thief is the solo project of Manchester bred Jot Green, a musician who after a decade plus of playing drums in bands decided to bring his own songs to light. He surrounds himself with friends live, currently guitarist Johnny Brown, bassist Iain McGowen, and drummer Chris Hobs joining Green on stage, whilst the EP’s are all the man alone. As mentioned, Clouded Mind awoke attention and helped spark a potent local appetite for the band’s live presence, its sounds and a just as lively and provocative lyrical side luring acclaim and radio play. Now making a roar at a national spotlight, Reach For the Weatherman builds on its predecessor’s strengths and lures, matching its power and success whilst bringing an even more honed and vital breath to melodies, hooks, and simply the open passion fuelling songs.

cover_RingMaster Review   Reach For The Weatherman opens with its title track, a moody yet vivacious bass coaxing aligned to choppy ska seeded riffs marking the swiftly enticing entrance of the song. Just as quickly spicy hooks and jabbing beats join the escapade, whilst the gripping and distinctive tones of Green’s vocals add further irresistible drama to the increasingly contagious proposal. Sonically fiery with a scent of surf rock to its chorus, the song is a multi-flavoured, feverishly coloured stomp; rock ‘n’ roll leading to addictions and lustful inclinations. It is glorious, small but striking twists amidst a tapestry of vocal and musical imagination stirring up body and emotions from start to finish.

The exceptional start is potently backed by Stitch In Time, though it cannot quite reach the same heights and spark the same slavery as its predecessor. Nevertheless with a pungently forceful stroll in gait and rhythms within tangy guitar caresses, the song magnetically swings along leading ears across a landscape of emotive expression and vocals alongside a vibrant flame of melodic tenacity. The Arctic Monkeys essence which only whispered in the first song, is a stronger enjoyable hue here, but just one spice amongst many strands of varied rock flavours colluding to create something unique and again riveting.

New single Dirty Shoes kicks it all up again to epidemic proportions, its initial union of acoustic guitar and the ever alluring vocals of Green, the lead and spark to a precocious shuffle of rockabilly like rhythms and hooks amongst tendrils of melodic and grooved devilry. The track just grows in the ear, its body maturing and basking in the seemingly simple yet skilfully woven fusion of sound and heart driven energy. The song is as the first, an epidemic of contagion and adventure; both tracks stealing the show from the grasp of equally exciting encounters.

The acoustic seduction of My Friend closes up the EP, it also part of the double A-sided new single with the previous song. Keys are soon snuggling up to the vocal and guitar embrace starting things off, whilst emotive and intimate tones line every syllable and chord as the song brews up a fuller and more intensive, though never imposing hug. It is a fascinating end to an outstanding release, another glimpse at the strong and diverse songwriting flowing from the imagination of Green.

Having missed Rum Thief’s first EP, a look back shows it to have been a striking first step for Green and his project but just the taster for the masterful and mighty appearance of Reach For the Weatherman. As asked at the start of this piece, want to get a buzz on? Then this EP will fully satisfy and much more. There are very big things ahead for Rum Thief we suspect.

The Reach For the Weatherman EP is available from July 27th

EP Launch Party, 21st August @ Night and Day Cafe, Oldham St, Manchester in association with Scruff of the Neck Records.

https://www.facebook.com/RumThief

RingMaster 27/07/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard on Reputation Radio @ http://www.reputationradio.net

 

Seething Akira – Airstrike

Cruisin'_RingMaster Review

Like a raid on the senses and a mass riot for the body, the new single from UK rockers Seething Akira sets the world on fire in just three volatile minutes. Setting out the kind of tempest fans to the band’s fusion of alternative and heavy rock with electro and hardcore dub step are accustomed to, Airstrike equally thrusts its hellacious mitts into a richer and deeper vat of anthemic intensity and psyche twisting tenacity for one ferocious devilry.

Hailing from Portsmouth, and with inspirations from the likes of Prodigy, Senser, and Enter Shikari joining their own rebellious ideation, Seething Akira was soon inciting a potent and loyal local support when emerging in 2011. First EP, You Missed The Show that year showed the band was loaded in potential but it was from the Transmission EP a year later that they hit their stride in sound and broader persuasion. Live the band has only earned an acclaiming stature, the quintet taking in shows with bands such as Hacktivist, The Algorithm, Senser, Don Broco, Black Futures, Sonic Boom Six, Max Raptor, PWEI, and Heart Of A Coward over the years. Last year the Aggro Vito EP reinforced and pushed on the band’s sound and presence but for us Airstrike is the band’s most exciting and ridiculously involving offering yet.

Airstrike_RingMaster Review     Airstrike allows no escape for feet and emotions, let alone voice, stirring them up in its first seconds and then dragging them into its maelstrom of energy and attitude. It spews increasing slavery through voracious rhythms, psychotic enterprise, and a vocal assault which makes the term incitement seem lightweight. The thumping beats of Stu Mealcliffe alongside the pulsating synth stabs of Charlie Bowes cast the first lure, their union unrelenting until the subsequent vocal roars of Kit Conrad and Bowes add their united antagonistic charm. The metal spawn riffs of Harvey Sneezeface Ware aligned to the predatory prowl of Terry Brown’s bass instantly turns the already virulent temptation into a beast of a proposal, their entrance sparking greater intensity and aggression elsewhere too. The landscape of the song continues to evolve and unpredictably shift, sinister melodic endeavour from the guitars sparking a similar air to keys before the dynamics at the heart of the song explode once again in a torrential and commanding cascade of techno trespasses, heavy duty rhythmic and riff induced incitements, and vocal belligerence.

Airstrike is a brawl impossible to resist and it is easy to imagine Pendulum being offered as a hint to the song’s might. But more so it has the hues of bands like G.R.I.M, Axis Mundi, and a dirtier Pop Will Eat Itself to it. Those flavours do bring a certain familiarity to it at times but that is countered and overwhelmed by the sheer energy and unique enterprise of Seething Akira. This is a band which just gets bigger and better whilst persistently knocking on the fullest spotlights.

Airstrike is available from July 27th

Upcoming Seething Akira tour dates:

July 31st O2, Islington, UK *

Aug 1st Downstairs, Aberdeen *

Aug 2nd Audio, Glasgow, Scotland *

Aug 3rd Bannermans, Edinburgh, Scotland *

Aug 4th Warehouse 23, Wakefield *

Aug 5th The Asylum, Birmingham *

Aug 6th Academy 3 Manchester, UK *

Aug 7th Waterfront, Norwich, UK *

Aug 11, Knust, Hamburg, Germany *

Aug 12 West Park Eventhalle, Inglostadt, Germany *

Aug 13 Little Devil, Tillburg, Netherlands *

Aug 14 Hypothalamus, Rheine, Germany *

October 3rd, MAMMOTHFEST, Brighton

* Main support to Mordred on EU tour

http://www.seethingakira.com/     https://www.facebook.com/seethingakira

RingMaster 27/07/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard on Reputation Radio @ http://www.reputationradio.net

Coquin Migale – Socotra

 

Evolution 2015 (2)_RingMaster Review

Following the success of their acclaim luring, attention grabbing single Gold, UK rockers Coquin Migale now release the second single from their similarly well-received Feel EP, in the mesmeric shape of Socotra. The song emulates the same irresistibly sultry and radiant allure which fuelled its predecessor whilst simultaneously exploring fresh tenacious shadows and brighter smouldering hues. It too embraces a fiery mix of alternative and indie rock with psych pop, but honed into its own individual and distinctive design, which just as the last single, simply enthrals.

Since forming in 2013, Coquin Migale has seemingly only stoked increasing attention and appetites for their ear seducing and imagination lighting sound. The Yellow Room EP which came out swiftly after the band emerged caught the radar of fans and media alike, as just as potently did their live presence. The Feel EP and Gold a few short weeks back certainly took sound and support up another level or three, and it is easy to expect Socotra to do its big bit in helping Coquin Migale become a nationally devoured proposition.

From the first pull of a pulsating throaty bass string aligned to a surf rock kissed guitar tempting, the song has ears in hand with the immediately joining and enticing vocals of Alex Soper only enhancing the opening seduction. As the beats of Dan Rawlinson bring a new spring to proceedings and in turn Soper produces a slightly thicker ‘growl’ of a texture to his delivery, the track begins to verge towards an invigorating bellow. The guitars of Matthew Wooton (since left the band) and Soper flame and resonate with sonic endeavour and melodic incitement whilst the bass of Stevie Kane throbs with provocative expression. The song continues to entwine its siren-esque coaxing with the new dynamic crescendos, each seemingly to incite the other to find more zeal and passion, which in turn helps create a blaze of a proposition overall.

As much as Gold was devoured here, Socotra edges it, though tomorrow it might be the other way round as both songs simply excite and announce Coquin Migale as one fresh and intoxicating band. If new to the Newcastle quartet, then Socotra is a must, if already hooked then you do not need any further persuasion to go explore.

Socotra is available from 24th August via End Of The Trail Records.

https://www.facebook.com/CoquinMigale    https://twitter.com/CoquinMigale

RingMaster 27/07/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard on Reputation Radio @ http://www.reputationradio.net

 

Abel Raise the Cain – Black Swans

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With its video already hitting number one in the Beat 100 music chart, Black Swans, the new single from British indie band Abel Raise the Cain, is already making a potent teaser for the band’s upcoming debut EP, For Strangers Only. The song is an atmospheric embrace but one with a bubbling underbelly and raw intensity which potently captivates. The Northeast band has already lured strong praise and support through their previous release and fair to say, Black Swans is going to do their ascent no harm either.

Picture 33[1]_RingMaster Review   Formed towards the end of 2012, Abel Raise the Cain quickly took inspirations from the atmospheric and epic soundscapes of bands like Arcade Fire, Sigur Ros, and Editors into their own immersive weaves. The double A-sided single Too Late/The Promise in 2013 grabbed the attention of fresh fans and radio stations across the UK, subsequently backed by second single Waiting later that same year. Live the Teeside seven-piece has bred a strong reputation playing with the likes of Happy Mondays, Primal Scream, Dexy’s Midnight Runners, Spiritulized, Kodaline, and Skaters alongside their own successful shows. Now with its video as mentioned already setting down a marker, Black Swans, ahead of a highly anticipated EP confirms Abel Raise the Cain as a band destined to welcomingly hit your radar at some point.

The single gently but keenly sweeps in with synths and keys a provocative coaxing around the plain but inviting tones of vocalist and rhythm guitarist Sean Crichton. As the anthemic beats of drummer Adam Hicks stirs things more energetically and the violin seducing of Saerla Murphy adds more emotive and suggestive hues, the song becomes a compelling fusion of different and you would imagine conflicting textures but everything unites and flows seamlessly. The track continues to roar with melancholic emotion and lively passion with each passing minute, the keys of Gaz Murray a warm and emotive incitement to the sonic enterprise cast by guitarists Phil Bailes and Andy Grange whilst the bass of Gary Hughes tempers it all with a dark tone which reflects the heartbreak fuelled the lyrical and emotive hue.

The track is a symphony of sound and emotional turbulence; not a song which initially grabs as potently as it eventually grows to do and one maybe missing a moment or two of wrong-footing the listener to bring further drama and strength to an already climatic presence. To be fair though that is just nit-picking to please personal tastes, for Black Swans only and increasingly satisfies, suggesting the forthcoming For Strangers Only is going to be something well worth checking out.

Black Swans is available from July 27th

http://www.abelraisethecain.com/   https://www.facebook.com/AbelRaiseTheCain

RingMaster 27/07/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard on Reputation Radio @ http://www.reputationradio.net