Spunk Volcano & The Eruptions – Ram Raid

As if the early excitement of 2017 could not get better with the release of the new Dirt Box Disco album, it undoubtedly did with news of a new EP from DBD guitarist and his cohorts, Spunk Volcano & The Eruptions. It was a year ago that the band released their acclaimed second album Shit Generation, though it seems only a couple of months back thanks to its constant airing in the offices. It and the band’s punk rock rebel rousing firmly set the band not only as a wholly different proposition to Spunk’s ‘day job’ but on the British punk scene full stop. Ram Raid cements that uniqueness whilst revealing the most aggressively raucous and virulently dirty sound from the band yet.

Ram Raid also sees new guitarist Stu Page alongside lead vocalist Spunk, fellow guitarist Tom ‘G Force’ Batterbee, bassist Deadbeatz Chris, and drummer Maff Fazzo, the latter pair also part of the DBD devilry. With the band in the midst of a run of live stomps sure to confirm the band’s reputation as one breath-taking and bruising live proposal, Ram Raid simply brings a fresh incitement and spark to the UK punk scene.

Its title track opens things up, almost stalking the listener from its first breath as its predatory riffs and imposing rhythms prowl the senses. Having sized things up it bursts into a muscular stroll with Black Flag like animosity and the infectious aggression of The Damned.  As already established over previous releases though, SV & The Eruptions embroil ears and imagination in their own unique exploits, an enslaving rather than inviting chorus demanding participation as riffs and rhythms trespass and punish the senses respectively. It is one thrilling encounter, an outstanding start to the EP which already has itself and listener all fired up.

There is no moment to calm down either as the belligerent punk rock of Stop Looking At Your Phone roars in ears, its antagonistic charge and dispute irresistible. It is a wall of sound and protestation, a torrent of violent riffs and equally uncompromising rhythms driven by the vocal antipathy of Spunk and the band. At barely a breath over a minute in length, the song is like being given the juiciest steak and only allowed one bite before it is whipped away, but what a mouthful it is.

Hanging Round The Shops is a collusion of punk and hard rock with a metallic lining and just as vociferously seductive and uncompromising as those before it.  It also has a pop punk devilry to its swinging grooves and lusty chorus; body and throat swiftly enjoying subservient participation before sharing just as much zeal with the contagion fuelled clamour of I Think Her Name Was Tracey?

The two tracks alone, but just like the EP, have something for all rock ‘n’ roll fans; whether of bands like Dead Kennedys, The Ramones or UK Subs, Turbonegro or Motorhead, indeed even New York Dolls to Gene Vincent there is plenty to relish. Ultimately it is punk rock at its voraciously ballsy best as proven one final time by EP closer Snap Backbone, a seriously catchy and tenacious slab of hook lined rip-roaring enticement.

Though only five songs running at twelve minutes, Ram Raid is the band’s most stirring and rabid yet rounded creative howl yet putting so many others and their offerings firmly in the shade.

The Ram Raid EP is out through STP Records on March 31st with pre-ordering available @ http://www.stprecords.co.uk/page3.htm

Upcoming Live Shows:

Fri March 31st – Rotherham – Cutlers Arms

Sat April 1st – Uttoxeter – The Old Star

Fri April 28th – Gateshead – Black Bull

Sat April 29th – Glasgow – O2ABC (Scotland Calling)

Sun April 30th – Wakefield – Warehouse 23

Sat July 1st – London – Tufnel Park Dome (Wonkfest)

Fri July 28th – Derby – Hairy Dog

Sun July 30th – Manchester – Star and Garter (Rebellion Warm Up)

??? August 3-6th – Blackpool – Rebellion Festival (day tbc)

Sat August 19th – Cambridge – Portland Arms

Sat September 30th – Northumbria Students’ Union (NE Calling)

Sat December 23rd – Manchester – Star & Garter (STP Xmas Show)

http://www.facebook.com/svate   http://spunkvolcanoandtheeruptions.bigcartel.com

Pete RingMaster 16/03/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Empty Lungs – Don’t Get It

Becoming the first European artist to sign with Canadian based label Hidden Pony Records, Northern Ireland hailing outfit Empty Lungs celebrate with the release of their new EP Don’t Get It. Consisting of three punk/indie/power pop blended roars, the release is a fiercely engaging and rousing proposition more than suggesting reasons why the band is so highly regarded by a great many.

Formed in 2011 by vocalist/guitarist Kev Jones, the Belfast hailing Empty Lungs has proceeded to become a potent force in their country’s live scene and make potent inroads across the UK, Europe, and the US. Along the way they have shared stages with the likes of Japandroids, Alkaline Trio, and The Subways among many and released a host of singles and EPs. In regard to Don’t Get It, Jones has described it as “by far the best 3 songs we’ve ever written”; a suggestion hard to disagree with as its songs romp through ears and capture the imagination.

The EPs title track bursts through ears first, riffs and rhythms making a commanding and forceful invitation quickly followed by vocal unity from bassist Conor Langan and drummer Mykie Rowan led by Jones. As things settle without losing that initial energy and contagious aggression, the instinctive infectiousness of the song infests its hooks and tenacious rhythms, recalling essences of bands like The Motors and The Starjets within its own fresh proposal.  With a title repeating chorus a trap impossible to resist getting involved in, the track makes a rousing start to Don’t Get It.

Next up Losing It. Finding It. ventures into more pop punk seeded territory compared to the ballsy rock ‘n’ roll of its predecessor but equally has a muscular touch and attitude to its hook lined incitement. Rhythms jab and pound as riffs growl and vocals warmly unite, tender melodies emerging from within the lively engagement of ears as the track unveils a varied and magnetic nature.

Completing the release is Fragile, a song instantly attracting an appetite for grumbling basslines with Langan’s cantankerous lure before growing into a hearty and cleverly varied blaze of sound and attitude. It mixes fiery emotion and earthy riffs with smouldering harmonies and earnest melodies, a contrasting blend creating a fluidly adventurous enticement.

It is a fine end to a richly enjoyable release, one impressing as much with the potential in its sound as the rousing prowess pleasing ears.

The Don’t Get It EP is out now through Hidden Pony Records on 7 inch vinyl and digital download through all usual retailers.

Upcoming Live Dates:

01/04 – Belfast, The Barge

07/04 – Limerick, The Loft

08/04 – Ballina, Emmets

Don’t Get It video directed by Ross Johnston at Caught In The Headlights.

https://www.facebook.com/emptylungsni/   https://twitter.com/emptylungsni

Pete RingMaster 15/03/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

And the Wasters – State Of Repair

The State Of Repair EP is the first offering since UK band Will Tun and the Wasters became simply And the Wasters last year. The change seems to have sparked a new fresh swing and adventure to their sound too; the band’s new release a vibrantly infectious romp with lyrical insight and worldly reflection in tow. It is ripe with the fusion of ska, folk, and punk with dub and Latin overtones the band has also seen acclaim for, but in their boldest most rounded and adventurous proposal yet.

Already with a clutch of well-received releases and a fine reputation for their live antics under their belts, And the Wasters followed their moniker change in 2016 with attention grabbing main stage appearances at festivals such as Bearded Theory and Boomtown Fair, an extensive Europe tour, and now with the name your own price release of State Of Repair.

It is a celebration of cosmopolitan sound with attitude and a snarl in its heart as songs reflect on the “sense of sadness, anxiety and uncertainty faced in the modern world, while also promoting an empowering message of solidarity, friendship and collective action.” As suggested, it also finds the band involve their broadest wealth of flavours and imagination yet for a rousing and infectious escapade sure to edge And the Wasters closer to major attention.

The septet of Dan Kemp, Ivo Johansen, Jared Dyer, Celeste Cantor-Stephens, Danny Epstein, Jack Kitchen and Jo Dobraszczyk, who we truly thank for bringing the EP to our attention, gets things stomping with opener Lion’s Share. Vocals and melody tempts ears first, their warm invitation soon joined by boisterous rhythms and strolling riffs as brass and the alluring charms of Dobraszczyk’s accordion flirt. As swiftly as the sounds engage ears, the track’s swing has feet shuffling and hips grooving, its individual ska/punk mixed proposal carrying essences of bands like Faintest Idea, By The Rivers, and Gogol Bordello to great effect.

It is a stirring start straight away matched by the dynamic throes of Small Victories. In some ways the song is a mellower proposition than its predecessor yet has a rivalling bounce and lively passion leaving exhausted pleasure in its wake. There is a touch of French band Les Négresses Vertes to the swagger and flavouring of the track but equally its punk edge hints at the likes of Operation Ivy and Sonic Boom Six; more evidence of the new diversity in the band’s sound.

Thoughts of the Paris outfit are prompted again with Reduce, Reuse, Rebel, especially as it enters with a captivating dance of accordion spun melody. Diversity of vocal aggravation and incitement is a potent temper to the charm of the sounds gaily strolling around them, attitude and beauty uniting in a magnetic collusion. Unpredictability is also a ripe trait; the unexpected slip into sombre calm with the siren-esque lures of a trumpet for company wrong-footing but an enjoyable lead into the folk bred canter which has body and spirit launched with zeal once again, rowdy punk intent subsequently to the fore.

Bound as One is another kaleidoscope of sound and texture, a boisterous stroll with the heart and liveliness of a carnival as voice and word call on unity. It is a captivating close to an increasingly rewarding and enticing release; though State Of Repair actually ends with the two minute sway and pulsing of Intro Dub which you wonder might have been rewarded with better attention if placed earlier within the EP, as the urge at the end of its fourth song is primarily to leap back to its first.

And the Wasters are ready to breach the biggest spotlights with a sound which, as the thoroughly pleasurable State Of Repair suggests, is blossoming into something rather special.

State Of Repair is available now @ https://andthewasters.bandcamp.com/album/state-of-repair-and-the-wasters as a free/ pay as you feel download.

https://www.facebook.com/willtunandthewasters

Pete RingMaster 15/03/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Gelato – Weird

Pic Chris Patmore

Continuing to invite fresh attention and praise, UK trio Gelato recently released their third EP in the highly flavoursome shape of Weird. Offering three varied slices of the band’s increasingly individual sound, the EP is another potent step in the London based rocker’s rise upon the national rock scene.

Formed in 2014 by vocalist /guitarist Drew Wynen, Gelato swiftly excited ears and attention with a powerful live presence and the release of their self-titled debut EP in 2015. Inspirations from the likes of Foo Fighters and Queens Of The Stone Age were open hues in its striking introduction to the band, but flavours less leading in their second release, the Daydream EP as the band’s sound quickly and boldly revealed its own character. Weird is an even stronger realisation of that individuality, a mix of alternative and garage rock with punk and psych rock among many additional traits for extra spicing.

With bassist Jacob Roos and drummer Callum Green alongside Wynen, Gelato gets down to business upon Weird with You Ain’t No Match. As jabbing beats set the tone and gait, wiry riffs lay tempting fingers upon ears, their intermittent lures soon a constant bait of intrigue loaded persuasion. As vocals join with variety and energetic persuasion, things mellow out a touch but still with drama and bite to keep the song sparking in ears. Warm harmonies and tangy grooves all add to the magnetism of the impressive opener and its web of creative seduction.

Breaking the Spell follows, initially caressing the senses with a melancholic shimmer. From within the evocative coaxing, a network of steely hooks ensnare ears, their flirtatious appeal only leading to matching lures found in vocals and melodic infection. There is still a touch of Josh Homme and co to the song and Gelato sound but entangled in the band’s own imaginative theatre they build another riveting and strongly enjoyable proposition matching, even eclipsing its predecessor.

The EP closes with The Optimist, a sultry seduction wrapped in melodic psych rock heat and suggestion. Its touch is a smouldering call but with livelier depths which bubble and flame as heavier rock textures brew to infest the track’s heart. More of a slow burner than its companions, the track further blossoms in pleasure with every listen, its further layers and adventure unveiled with every listen to provide a tantalising close to another highly persuasive and enjoyable moment with Gelato.

The band is looking at another healthy year in their emergence upon the British rock scene; indeed Weird suggests it just might be their biggest yet.

The Weird EP is out now through iTunes and other stores.

https://www.gelatomusic.com/   https://www.facebook.com/GelatoMusic/   https://gelatomusic.bandcamp.com/

Pete RingMaster 15/03/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Idles – Brutalism

Photo by Stephanie Elizabeth Third

An infestation of the senses, a raw roar on all our responsibilities, and a contagious noise fuelled trespass on everything in between, Brutalism is one of the essential incitements of not only 2017 but we would suggest the decade as a whole. The debut album from British quintet Idles rips into personal and social issues with the insatiable attitude and defiance unleashed in the late seventies, its irritable sound as much punk rock rage as it is a post punk/noise rock  enslaving of the imagination and psyche.

Each song from the Bristol five-piece of Joe Talbot, Mark Bowen, Lee Kiernan, Adam Devonshire, and Jon Beavis is a creative growl, a visceral antagonism with an infectious edge and mischief just as bruising and incisive. Dedicated in part to the loss of Talbot’s mother, who adorns the record’s cover, Brutalism is stretched with such invasive treats, from start to finish a mordant adventure, challenge, and accusation as witty as it is vicious, as devilish as it is ferocious. With Idles in the early days of an UK tour, their first album is sure to see it’s already eagerly devoured and anticipated 25 dates embraced by even greater fevered support.

Straight away band and album show uniqueness within a proposition which also swiftly inspires thoughts of bands such as The Fall, Swell Maps, and early The Horrors. There is so much more to it though as that originality shows, opener Heel_Heal cantankerously striding from an initial dispute with an intrusively nagging riff and rhythmic tenacity which alone lures keen attention as Talbot’s equally confrontational vocals snarl. Punk rock infested with crabbily textured noise, the track rumbles and grumbles; band vocals as anthemically rousing and spiteful as the general character of the outstanding starter.

Fellow Bristolians, The St Pierre Snake Invasion also come to mind with the song and successor Well Done, the second a sonically twisted and lyrically spiky shuffle making use of body and imagination like a peeved puppeteer. Its persistent jabs tenderise the senses for the scourges of sound which erupt to further scorch, Idles pressing all the right buttons for lusty reactions before uncaging the equally enslaving Mother. An irresistible bassline cores the next track, its dark tempting soon surrounded by swinging beats and scuzzy riffs, all uniting with Artery meets Gang Of Four scented tempestuousness. Again no punches in sound and word are pulled, one of numerous traits within the Idles sound which leaves there little to be taken lightly but plenty to find a seriously keen appetite for.

Date Night reveals a tango loaded with a rhythmic incitement which barely stays in the same place more than a second or two, its beats on hot coals but with a composure which aligns perfectly with the monotone growl of the bass. As guitars saunter and blaze, Talbot magnetically assaults with word and character, the volatile squall of the track then emulated in its own way by Faith In the City and its post punk ‘n’ roll causticity. A rousing irritant exposing essences hinting at bands such as again Artery and The Nightingales, submission to its lively acerbic inducement is quick and just as rapid as next up 1049 Gotho waltzes with irritated intent and pounding beats into ears and psyche. For all it and the other song’s choleric probing and inventive dexterity, sonic squeals a delight, there is a melodic lining which as subtle as it might be at times just inflames the catchiness and adventure of all escapades.

Wiry tendrils have ears encroached and alive as Divide & Conquer rises with its own particular grumble of sound, the guitars creating a web of raw enticement as bass and beats prowl with a testy air, Talbot stalking it all with his increasingly compelling tones. The increase in energy and ferociousness only adds to the captivation before Rachel Khoo and Stendahl Syndrome irascibly serenade and fractiously critiques respectively; both unloading their sonic and lyrical venom with snappy and quarrelsome devilry.

Next up Exeter has a slightly lazier gait but still imposes its punk ‘n’ roll canter with addiction forging rhythmic cunning as guitars and vocals get under the skin with their respective exploits like a Fatima Mansions/ Big Black collusion exploring creatively fresh impositions. Both tracks leave an already greedy appetite hungry for more, a lust more than fed by the kinetic stomp and sonic psychosis of Benzocaine and equally by the punk grumble and waspish word prowess of White Privilege.

Idles leave their arguably greatest moment for its final track, though each listen only elevates another moment to drool over. Slow Savage is a haunting dyspeptically lined embrace living up to its title as keys and voice fill the low-key and stark atmospheric mist hugging the imagination as a heartbeat of rhythm throbs. It is a dark, melancholic rapture violating as much as seducing the senses and a thrilling end to one exceptional release.

Being truly excited by something new or unique is a treat rarely found these days, Idles though have cracked that desire in fine style with Brutalism.

Brutalism is out now on Balley Records through iTunes and other stores.

Upcoming Dates on the Brutalism Tour…

March 2017

Thursday 16th – Brighton – The Prince Albert

Friday 17th – Tunbridge Wells – Forum

Saturday 18th – Bedford – Esquires

Monday 20th – Oxford – The Bullingdon

Tuesday 21st – Sheffield – The Plug

Wednesday 22nd – Newcastle Upon Tyne – Think Tank

Thursday 23rd – Aberdeen – Tunnels

Friday 24th – Dundee – Buskers

Saturday 25th – Edinburgh – Sneaky Pete’s

Monday 27th – York – The Crescent

Tuesday 28th – Hull – The Adelphi

Wednesday 29th – Nottingham – The Bodega

Thursday 30th – Liverpool – O2 Academy 2

Friday 31st – Wakefield – Unity Hall

April 2017

Monday 3rd – Stoke-On-Trent – The Sugarmill

Tuesday 4th – Preston – Guildhall

Wednesday 5th – Cardiff – Clwb Ifor Bach

http://www.idlesband.com/   https://www.facebook.com/idlesband    https://twitter.com/idlesband

Pete RingMaster 14/03/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Blacktop Mojo – Burn The Ships

The past four years since forming has seen Texan rock band Blacktop Mojo court a potent reputation for their sound and live presence, all the time increasingly nudging global attention to turn their way. The release of second album Burn The Ships is the moment that awareness just might happen, the release a striking and thickly accomplished slab of highly flavoursome, sinew moulded rock ‘n’ roll.

Formed in September 2012 by vocalist Matt James and drummer Nathan Gillis, Blacktop Mojo swiftly leapt into the live scene with the intent of playing as many shows and tours as they could. It is a hunger which prevails to this day, the Palestine, TX quintet sharing stages with the likes of Bon Jovi, Candlebox, Drowning Pool, Aaron Lewis, Saving Abel, Puddle of Mudd, Whiskey Myers, Dirty River Boys, and The Bigsbys among a great many others over the years. Debut album I Am stirred things up at home with its release in 2014, similarly inviting broader notice of the band’s hearty hard/melodic rock sound. Burn The Ships though is a wake-up call to bigger spotlights upon the band, the Philip Mosley produced and Austin Deptula mixed and mastered encounter a fiery roar very hard to ignore or avoid finding a healthy appetite for.

The Blacktop Mojo sound is arguably not the most unique, the band drawing comparisons to the likes of Shinedown, Black Stone Cherry, and Soundgarden yet has an individual character and diversity which lifts it from the crowd with ease. All the evidence lies within Burn The Ships and its inventive and impassioned rock ‘n’ roll; a proposition hitting the ground running with its majorly rousing opener Where The Wind Blows. A lone melody with a country rock twang makes the first beckon, a sister lure swiftly by its side before muscle bound rhythms loom over ears amidst the continuing invitation of that initial welcome. Soon into its thick and potent stride with the growling tones of Matt Curtis’ bass rich bait alongside the meaty swipes of Gillis, the track has its infectious claws firmly around ears and appetite with James’ delivery leading the way and in turn the listener into one peach of a chorus impossible not to get fully involved in. With the riffs of rhythm guitarist Kenneth Irwin equally steering the temptation as lead guitarist Ryan Kiefer spins wiry grooves, it is a seriously compelling proposal,

The following End Of Days is just as formidable and satisfying, its robust rhythms and gnarly grooves alone gripping body and an instinctive passion for heart bred rock ‘n’ roll. As its predecessor, the song carries an irresistible chorus to back up the already successful lures at play and the album’s powerful start, success its title track continues. As provocative guitar temptation wraps its flame lit charms around ears, Burn The Ships quickly shows itself an equal to those before in enticement, gaining even greater strength in that trait as its groove takes on a nagging quality as it meanders around the vocal potency of James. With Seether-esque hues involved, the song croons and roars; flexing its muscle as it spins its inventively intoxicating sonic web with each passing second. The track is pure drama and the pinnacle of the album though challenged throughout.

The earnest strains of Prodigal follow, its Staind lit serenade a mellow emotive caress allowing for a breath whilst enjoying its melodic heat, suggestive flames building  into a bigger blaze before Shadows On The Wall smoulders and erupts in a 3 Doors Down scented fire next, subsequently  followed by the virile throes of Sweat. The trio do not quite teach the heights of the first three tremendous tracks but each with their individual natures and temptations leave plenty to embrace and firmly enjoy.

The snarling properties of Pyromaniac bring the album back to its loftiest heights, the song as heated as its title suggests with irritability in its riffs and a bass grumble so easy to grow lustful for. Melodically, there is a 3 Days Grace air contrasted and complimented perfectly by the grungier textures at work on the senses, both linked by an instinctive catchiness  which again features in potent form within the predacious 8000 Lines, a song stalking ears with rapacious riffs and antagonistic beats as sonic enterprise and vocal drama ignite. The track is outstanding; its unpredictability enhanced by melodic beauty as an oasis of calm shares ears with its tempestuous heart.

Both Dog On A Leash with its red-blooded plaintive call and the reflective cries of Make A Difference leave satisfaction full, each revealing further twists in the album’s make-up and enterprise while Chains brings a web of athletic grooves and beefy rhythms in a burly persuasion raising the ante again. It is pure captivation preying on an already eager appetite for sound and encounter.

Concluded by the emotionally charged Dream On and the melancholic musing of Underneath, the impressive Burn The Ships has plenty to see the band make the next step towards global recognition. Its songs are shapely and sound rich if not always on the truly unique side. Its craft and imagination more than compensates though as ears embrace the open potential also lying within a triumph of a listen.

Burn The Ships is out now through Cuhmon Records @ https://blacktopmojo.bandcamp.com/releases or http://www.blacktopmojo.com/store

http://www.blacktopmojo.com/   https://www.facebook.com/BlacktopMojo   https://twitter.com/blacktopmojo

Pete RingMaster 15/03/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Freakings -Toxic End

Proud in their old school thrash instincts and inspirations, Swiss metallers Freakings continue their prowess at unleashing imposingly tenacious and compelling thrash furies with their new album. Their third full-length, Toxic End is a tempest of openly familiar and rousing textures, a proposal bold in its recognisable breeding. This though does not make for something lacking a fresh and compelling character, in fact within Freakings finest offering yet, it all goes to offer one mouth-watering, energy sapping, and fiercely enjoyable assault.

Formed in 2008, the Basel hailing trio of vocalist/guitarist Jonathan Brutschin alongside the brothers Toby Straumann on bass and drummer Simon, Freakings nudged broader attention from their already local success with 2011 debut album No Way Out. In turn, its successor Gladiator only brought new hungry ears and richer praise the way of the band three years later. Toxic End will simply inspire another wave of support and acclaim, its raw virulence and old school seeding raw magnetism.

Opener Hell On Earth courts ears and instincts for voracious metal within seconds, riffs and rhythms a hellacious onslaught breeding carnally catchy tendencies in the respective grooves and swinging antics which follow as vocals, singular and united roar. There is no escaping Slayer/Exodus bred influences or the severely infectious surge running through the song’s core, lures helping forge a thrilling start to the album quickly supported by the snarling assault of Future Vision. Rawer in air, arguably even more imposing in nature than its predecessor, the song brawls with the senses whilst uncaging its own venomously enslaving sonic bait. As the first and many of those to follow, it is hard to say there are major surprises involved yet the track just grabs ears and thickly satisfies with forceful ease.

Violent Disaster is a matching success, its antagonistic rhythmic trespass bone snapping and waspish grooves addictive as Brutschin’s vocals brawl with the listener. It is a torrent of wiry riffs, bass predation, and scything beats blended with undisguised belligerence and anthemic instincts; every element leaving thick marks on its victims before TxWxNxD sets loose its brutal rock ‘n’ roll. Though offering a few strains seemingly reaped from tracks before it, the song is a thrash anthem to lose inhibitions and swiftly pledge allegiance to, especially once it hits it’s ridiculously infectious swinging stride.

The album’s title track follows, rampaging with ill-intent devouring all before with hostile rhythmic rapacity and the cyclonic dexterity of Brutschin’s guitar. Simultaneously corrosive and catchy, it is an infestation of ears and spirit accentuated further by the ravenous rabidity and predatory charge of Friendly Fire, its body entwined in toxic enterprise flaming out of the guitar. As much as it is an infernal roar, the song has the hips grooving with its seductive swing, a dual invasive tempting impossible to evade.

Through the caustic sonic tirade and rhythmic pillaging of Brain Dead and the vehement siege of the senses that is Price Of Freedom, with its own crippling volley of incendiary beats, band and album savage and bludgeon leaving nothing less than major pleasure behind.  Wave Of Pain straight after is similarly satisfying, its barbarous nature and air a close match to the song before but soon unfurling an individual web of melodic enticement and sonic ire.

The album finishes with arguably its fiercest offerings, and in the case of first up Beer Attack, its most breath-taking raid. Never relenting in its acrimonious blunt trauma causing incitement, the track leaves the senses reeling, prime meat for the final vindictive menacing of No More Excuses which also punishes as it thrills; the body broken and elated in its wake.

Toxic End makes it very easy to find real pleasure in its storm. Certainly there is an element of similarity between some tracks or definitely specific elements making up their tempests but little to deter a lust loaded appetite growing with each and every listen. There is something particular about old school thrash which never relinquishes its potency and Freakings exploits it to the full.

Toxic End is out now digitally as well as on CD and vinyl.

http://www.freakings.ch    https://www.facebook.com/freakings

Pete RingMaster 14/03/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright