The Simpletone – Angels’ Share

the-simpletone-band-pic_RingMasterReview

There are some releases which just demand success. Whether they get it in the increasingly fickle attention of the modern music fan is never a given but Angels’ Share, the new album from British rockers The Simpletone, does all the right things to make that commanding statement.

There is little we can share about the 2010 formed band other than its line-up is made up of John Davison, Craig Seymour, Glenn Eastoe, and Tom Cahill, it hails from St Neots in Cambridgshire, and has previously released the albums, Rampenny in 2012 and Dark Matter two years later, both seemingly well-received propositions. A UK tour with New Model Army in 2014 has been one of many live highlights for the band built on their stirring fusion of heavy and melodic rock with grunge, stoner and numerous other essences. It is a mix of flavours making for a striking proposition and imaginative proposal in Angels’ Share and songs which just roar with anthemic majesty and fiery enterprise.

The first of the ten cuts gripping ears and an early appetite for the band’s invigorating rock ‘n’ roll is Outta Control. Instantly a spicy groove winds around ears, leaning in closer as tenacious rhythms and riffs join its opening bait. Effect coated vocals equally lures keen ears as the song swaggers along with steady but rapacious grooves and a suggestive melody. The restraint stopping the track from exploding as it hints it might throughout is an inspired move, the song teasing and almost taunting along its enterprise shaped body. The heavier throb of bass and flames of harmonies only add to the lure of the song with guitar craft similarly as magnetic.

The following Love Street (Modern Mystery) keeps the rich enticement going with its punk folk lined stroll, simple but potent riffs colluding with swinging beats as vocals paint a suggestive picture. Its catchiness is a swift persuasion rapidly backed by the boisterous antics of the guitars as the track carries on the great variety already showing in the band’s sound, diversity more than confirmed by their mighty new single Storm Chaser. At over eleven minutes it is an epic persuasion which serenades the senses with melodic and harmonic caresses initially before building a bolder energy amidst an addictive rhythmic prowess. Weaving strands of space and progressive rock among other textures into its ever evolving adventure, the song is a kaleidoscope of melody heavy rock drawing on an array of decades while creating its own fresh, individual, and ever changing landscape of imagination. Like a mix of Skyscraper (the nineties UK band), Life of Agony, and Voyager, the track barely feels like its length and relentlessly has the listener compelled.

angels-share-cover_RingMasterReviewThe fact that next up Black Box still manages to eclipse it slightly shows the quality of its own exceptional design. A spirit stoking beast from its first touch, the song canters with muscular tenacity and fiery invention bred to virulent proportions as its mix of hard and heavy rock consumes ears and imagination. The track is exceptional, as punk in many ways as it is feisty rock ‘n’ roll with a drama of character and craft that demands attention and involvement.

Fire in the Sky steps up next with a growl in its basslines and a contagious swing in its rhythms, guitars and vocals dancing within their addictive tempting as soulful blues lined grooves bring an incendiary heat to the proposal. Like a seventies inspired union of Therapy? and Reuben, to try and offer a comparison, the song forcibly hits the spot before making way for the slower stoner-esque prowl of Nehemiah, an incitement pulling sludgy textures into its increasingly exotic and suggestive theatre. It is seriously compelling stuff, another song blossoming through an array of twists and flavours as it grows in ears.

The melodic charm of Day by Day is a similarly riveting proposition, the graceful yet sinewy instrumental finding a place between XTC and Tool as it seduces the imagination, setting it up for electrified air and nature of As Above so Below. Courting ears with a rapaciously formidable core in its raw riffs and bold rhythmic, the track wraps it in a melodic spiciness and mellower harmonic seducing which echoes elements of bands like Bush, Alice In Chains, and Sick Puppies yet sounds little like any.

If we tell you that Easy Come lacks the same galvanic sparks of its predecessors do not mistake it for a weak link within Angels’ Share; the song a highly persuasive slice of rock ‘n’ roll with guitar craft which shines like a beacon as the bass uncages a funk inspired personality. The fact the track is outshone by others is down to their might, a strength revelled in again by album closer Hunters. Whether by coincidence or design, there is a Horslips feel to the song certainly early on, and of fellow Brits KingBathmat but as across the album, things are soon woven into an addiction of sound and creative hooks roaring The Simpletone.

It is a glorious end to one treat of a release which deserves all the praise and attention it should and surely will get. Angels’ Share is another rousing encounter to add to our lustful favourites of 2016 list and no keener a recommendation we can offer.

Angels’ Share is out now across most online stores and on iTunes @ https://itunes.apple.com/album/id1169473074?ls=1&app=itunes

http://www.thesimpletone.com/    https://www.facebook.com/thesimpletoneband/

Pete RingMaster 16/11/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Finding Kate – If I Fall

finding-kate-promo-shot_RingMasterReview

With eager praise surrounding debut EP Inside Out, British melodic rockers Finding Kate are now pushing for wider recognition with their first album and fair to say that If I Fall is twelve tracks of melancholy soaked and emotionally powerful rock which just demands attention.

The brainchild and creative outlet of alt-rock vocalist/lyricist Kate Pavli, her London hailing project has earned a potent reputation for its live presence to match that earned by that first EP. Linking up with pianist Chris Charalambides who wrote all the music for the album and a host of additional contributors to If I Fall, Kate is ready to tap into bigger spotlights with a release which ripples with skilful songwriting and strongly enterprising sounds.

Influences listed include Deftones, Flyleaf, Avril Lavigne, Karnivool, The Pretty Reckless, and Evanescence and there is no escaping a comparison to certainly the latter for the Finding Kate sound though you can add Forever Still like essences also helping shape the band’s potent first full-length. If I Fall opens up with the swiftly impressive Drowning, a track soon luring ears and appetite into its imaginative landscape. Little time is needed either to embrace the emotional fuelled voice of Kate, her presence and qualities catching eager attention  within seconds of her opening melodic cries. As often common to the album’s character, the song is a fiery simmering of intensity, an emotional cauldron which ignites from time to time but seduces rather than blazes within ears as guitars and keys especially echo the drama of Kate’s vocals.

White Lies follows the strong start, opening up with a rhythmically feistier coaxing which shapes its subsequent infectious character and energy. As with the first, there is something familiar about the song drawing those comparisons earlier mentioned yet both tracks develop a personality of sound and invention built on the potential of uniqueness.

finding-kate-cover-artwork_RingMasterReviewNew single, Forever is next, its sombre breath and emotional intimacy bred from the alluring voice of Kate and the plaintively shadowed melodies of Chris’ piano alone; their potency backed by the expansive suggestiveness of guitars and strings as rhythms court a darker climate. It is equally a template behind the emotive theatre of next up Don’t Let Go which is taken to even more intimate depths as Kate’s voice flames across another enticing tapestry of flavours and textures. As strong as its predecessor was, the track easily eclipses it.

Both Get Over You and Inside Out leave ears richly satisfied, the first creating another fiery landscape of sound and heart felt declaration matched by the second in its imagination seducing web of sounds and invention. Strings again add a sublime texture and presence to both songs, especially the former while its successor enthrals through that unpredictable and mouth-watering array of invention. It makes a great claim for best song honours within the album though quickly rivalled by Did It Again with its cinematic stringed beauty and the melancholic union of keys and voice.

Through the album’s dynamic yet tender title track and the magnetically sorrowful yet hope lit I’ll Save You, band and release only cement their hold on attention while Semper Fi explores arguably the album’s most adventurous creative scenery in its impassioned roar. It is fair to say there is a bit of a surface similarity which wraps many of the songs within If I Fall, though digging deeper frequently reveals a kaleidoscope of real individual imagination, but this track is an openly unique proposal to stir ears and enjoyment.

The dark vocal/piano romance building It’s Over captivates from its first breath and note straight after; a beguiling ballad hard to be anything but taken with before Gone brings the album to a fine and memorable close with its emotion soaked roar which pleasures with ease.

If I Fall shows that Finding Kate may have yet to find a truly distinct voice in their sound but the potential is a loud promise within their first album and its enjoyment rather easy to find.

If You Fall is released November 18th with pre-orders now taken @ https://findingkate.bandcamp.com/releases

http://www.findingkatemusic.com/    https://www.facebook.com/FindingKate    https://twitter.com/FindingKate_

Pete RingMaster 16/11/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Suicidal Tendencies – World Gone Mad

suicidal_tendencies_-_world_gone_madSuicidal Tendencies - World Gone Mad

Many elements make up the success of legendary punk/thrashers Suicidal Tendencies, an array of qualities which has gripped and thrilled across three and a half decades and eleven previous studio albums. One potent trait is, within a sound which roars Suicidal Tendencies from its first breath, unpredictability; an essence which in varying degrees has made all of the band’s offerings memorable and easy to devour. New proposal World Gone Mad is no exception; a seriously rousing and thunderous affair of crossover ferocity inescapably Suicidal Tendencies which twists through new adventures while flirting with the imagination.

The successor to the well-received 13 of three years ago, World Gone Mad is a tempest of infectiously aggressive and creatively imaginative escapades equally drawing on the kind of punk fuelled exploits which marked out the band from its early days as one of metal and punks most vital propositions.  The new album also sees the band’s newest line-up in place with founder and vocalist Mike Muir and guitarist Dean Pleasants (ex-Infectious Grooves) linking up with guitarist Jeff Pogan, bassist Ra Diaz, and master drummer Dave Lombardo (Slayer, Phantomas, GripInc, Dead Cross). It is a unit which across the board has forged a new aspect to the Suicidal Tendencies personality without losing its prime character and appeal. Produced by Muir alongside Paul Northfield (Rush, Dream Theater, Queensrÿche, Ozzy Osbourne, Hole, Marilyn Manson) who also engineered and mixed the record, World Gone Mad snarls and stomps, providing an incitement as bruising and confrontational as it is a riotous funk grooved infestation of ears and body.

Latest single Clap Like Ozzy sets things off; its fuse and explosion prime Suicidal Tendencies. Lombardo’s catchy beats first catch ears, a grumbling bassline quickly adding to the thick coaxing as guitars send sonic scythes across the lure. Swiftly the song uncages a venomous yet ridiculously catchy assault, wiry grooves and rhythmic tenacity an anthemic roar of punk ‘n’ thrash virulence ridden by the unmistakable presence and tones of Muir. As hooks collude with the flirtatious antics of the bass, Pleasants winds trails of melodic lava around it all, his strings a heated siren within an already irresistible calling.

The New Degeneration takes over finding even more irritability in its tone and individual elements. Riffs and rhythms almost stalk the senses as Muir leads the defiance; group calls a great backing to his instigation. An undercurrent of animosity brews throughout the attack, eventually igniting as Lombardo flicks the switch to a full-out ravaging of ears with his magnetic swipes. Again the track is ‘typical’ Suicidal Tendencies but rippling with fresh twists and turns to leave satisfaction rich and full before Living For Life appears to eclipse its success. Unsurprisingly moments of Infectious Grooves like juiciness appear within World Gone Mad, the third track unapologetically embracing their funk metal swing for its initial flirtation before crashing ferociously upon the senses with its punk scented epidemic of ravenous riffs and on rushing rhythms again led by the twisted beat alchemy of Lombardo. The track is glorious everything you could wish from a Suicidal Tendencies encounter and more as it seduces and inspires body and spirit

The gentle melodic opening of Get Your Fight On! is a suggestive pull next which intrigues more than ignites the imagination but soon leads into the waiting rhythmic prowess of Lombardo and the sonic enterprise of Pleasants and Pogan. It too works its way from a relatively calm tempting to an incendiary blaze where it really grabs the appetite and passions as heavy metal flames unite with punk and thrash dexterity for an anthem which might not hold all the sparks of its predecessors but leaves only an eager want to delve into its cauldron all over again.

The album’s title track is another which takes its time to convince to the same level as the opening tracks, showing itself a slow burner which by the fifth or sixth lessons is one of the moments of the album which lingers the longest. A perpetual prowl which ignites onto a consuming fire of sound and aggression, the song has a touch of Insane Clown Posse to its most intense fire and Red Hot Chili Peppers to its relentless groove but as expected roars with nothing other than the voice of its creators.

The excellent Happy Never After fingers lustful reactions next, its gait also a prowling incitement crossed with sonic tendrils and pushed by steely riffs courting militant beats. Muir is the ringmaster to its determined intent and nature, whipping up the heart and imagination of track and listener alike as the rest of the band spins a riveting and increasingly addictive web.

From one major highlight to another as One Finger Salute stands bold and aggressive with punk rock insatiability and thrash driven intensity straight after to create a deliciously imposing and hungry proposal. Diaz’s bass is a treat of a bestial lure, its resonating flirtation aligned to the jumping beats of Lombardo, both enslaving attention soon bound in the sonic potency of the guitars.

Straight after Damage Control is a threatening infestation of wonderfully toxic and gripping grooves as rhythms again take on a preying animalistic potency whilst Muir and riffs stir with their punk ‘n’ roll cattiness. The outstanding track keeps the album’s pinnacle point going in feverish style, bass and drums especially irresistible though all parts of the incitement leaves a new hunger installed in ears and appetite for the release.

The sonic metal tapestry of The Struggle Is Real equally sparks a zeal for song and album, its punk call and rhythmic swagger a captivating irritant on peace and clam while successor Still Dying To Live sees the quintet embarking on a smouldering melodic venture equipped with alluring throaty bass tempting and psych rock shimmers around the warm coaxing of a kaleidoscope of magnetic hooks and surprises. At over seven minutes, the track is a masterfully invasive seduction romancing ears and imagination and a compelling finale to World Gone Mad capped by the stripped down magnificence of This World and its evolution and continuation of the closing track of the same name upon 13.

The track is a fine end epitomising the growth and riveting blossoming of sound and imagination between the two albums seeing World Gone Mad a powerful and thrilling new turn in the band’s history.  Whether it will be considered the band’s best release will down to the individual but without doubt the album is destined to be right there as a true favourite.

World Gone Mad is out now across most online stores through Suicidal Records.

http://www.suicidaltendencies.eu/   https://www.facebook.com/suicidaltendencies   https://twitter.com/OFFICIALSTIG

Pete RingMaster 15/11/2106

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Boundless lifescapes; exploring the realm of Lucid AfterLife Interview

lucid-afterlife-pic_RingMasterReview

With a sound as eclectic as the themes within its imagination driven walls, Vancouver hailing Lucid AfterLife has earned loyal attention and support at home and across a global landscape. Renowned as one of Canada’s more impressive and memorable live propositions, the progressive groove rockers are luring bigger spotlights their way with their new EP, the successor to their well-received debut album I Am, expected to spring a new wave of invention hungry fans the way of the quartet. We recently had the pleasure to find out more about the band, that upcoming EP, and the creative heart of Lucid AfterLife with guitarist Thom Turner

Hello and thanks for sharing your time to talk with us.

Hello, Thom from Lucid AfterLife here.  Thank you so much for having us!

Can you first introduce the band and give us some background to how it all started?

In the beginning our vocalist Nat Jack was floating through the aether contemplating the purpose and form of existence.  He then came upon our drummer Matt.  The two of them forged a great alliance. From this union a great universe was born. It was one of never ending inspiration and possibilities. To round out this vision myself, Thom, and our bassist Miles were sought. Together we are take these rough shapes and turn them into the most honest and kick ass songs that we can.

Have you been or are any of you involved in other bands? If so have they had any impact on what you are doing now, inspiring a change of style or direction maybe?

I am a current member of the band Freya as well as being a professional musician for the last 15 years.  I have played in numerous groups.  The work ethic and attention to artistry that I got from that band is immense.  Sonically they are very different.  Miles is a member of Riftwalker and Hallux. Matt has played with many groups as well.  As for Nat Jack…He simply is.  All of us take our experience and add it to everything we do. That is one of the best things about LAL. Genre does not factor in. Whatever mood serves the lyric or vibe is what it needs to be.

What inspired the band name?

As a group we feel that reality is in an illusion…More than that it is malleable. Life, death they are merely shades on a continuum.  So through our music we transcend.  To be able to visualize and experience multiple levels of existence is.  We can experience multiple worlds through our songs and live shows.  That is what Lucid Afterlife means to me.

Was there any specific idea behind the forming of the band and also in what you wanted it and your sound to offer?

There are always stories that come to us…things that may be inspired by every day.  Some come from deeper more existential places.  All of them are important to us.  As we have toured we have been lucky to see that these topics hit home with so many people.  So we continue to write them.  As for the sound it is meant to be inclusive.  To be the heaviest thing ever when the emotion is deep and powerful then, turn around and be very clean and melodic to represent another story or character is as honest as we can be.

Do the same things still drive the band when it was fresh-faced or have they evolved over time?

Constant evolution…we are all about that.  That said though most of the same principles are the corner stones of what LAL is.  Relatable honest music that is served with all the energy we have live.

Since your early days, how would you say your sound has evolved?

Since I was brought on I would say that the sound has evo-loved.  We still love Sabbath and Monster Magnet.  On top of that we explore our mutual love of progressive music.  Things like Kansas and Yes and Porcupine Tree and Kings X.  It adds a broader pallet to the stories we can tell. Really though it all comes down to the live show for us.  Nat Jack is a wild man on stage and we push out the sound track for the listener’s experience.

Has it been more of an organic movement of sound or more the band deliberately wanting to try new things?

Extremely organic I believe.  We work to service the songs that come out.  Our sound is extremely diverse.  Yet, when you hear it you know it is LAL.  It all comes from that point of honesty in the lyric and music.

You mentioned some already but presumably across the band there is a wide range of inspirations; are there any others in particular which have impacted not only on the band’s music but your personal approach to creating and playing music? As I said before Black Sabbath, Led Zeppelin, Monster Magnet, Yes, Kansas, Porcupine Tree.  Also Ministry, Cream, Dream Theater, Kings X, Hendrix, A Tribe Called Quest, Wu Tang Clan, Body Count, MF Doom.  Soooo much music goes into what we do.  From rock to jazz to metal to Hip-Hop, it all moves us.

Does the band have a particular method to its songwriting?

We work in very brotherly way.  I will write some things, pass them to Nat and a lyrical idea will usually pop out.  From there Matt and I go to work on fleshing out an arrangement and Miles lays down the bass.  So far it has been all hands on deck movement.

Where do lyrical inspirations more often than not come from?

Everyday life through the lens of existential global truths…A lot of our songs have to do with relationships.  Not really with people per se, more archetypes.  If we do a song that is very obviously about sex then you can bet it isn’t at all about sex.  We like to lead people, through the parlance of our time to deeper truths.

lucid-afterlife_RingMasterReviewCan you give us some background to your latest release?

Our new EP Occult Mafia Mistress is an opening salvo into what is coming next for LAL.  With this line-up we have 4 great singers so we wanted to put that to use.  Most songs really take advantage of all of us.

How about an insight to the themes and premise behind it and its songs?

This record focuses on themes of transcendence.   Be it through love, sex, meditation or sheer elation.  They are explained in somewhat adversarial roles.  Some characters and ideas want to hold you down from your potential.  Others are the inner explorers rupturing out into being against that oppressive force.  We are able to do this through the use of many styles and genres, from hip hop on a song like Time Killaz (feat. Merkulese) to the pure rock and roll of Retarded Owl, the voice of the song blends seamlessly with the lyric.

Are you a band entering the studio with songs pretty much in their final state or prefer to develop them as you record?

The frame of a song is all done by the time we get in there.  Because we play the crap out of the songs live and see what goodness comes out. So when we get into the studio what happens is we add all the touches; layering and vocals.  A record should be a piece of art unto itself.  Music is ephemeral.  It changes depending on your mood; where you listen to it, even through the course of the song.  Then it is over.  That time has passed.  So when we are in there recording and mixing everything is fluid.  What comes out is even more magical then what went in.

Tell us about the live side to the band, presumably the favourite aspect of the band?

Live we are a completely different band depending on Nat Jack.  His mood and character shape our live performance…never the same thing twice.  We reach out to the audience and invite them in…literally.  They play with us.  We feel that the live stage is a conversation so we go all out.  We breakdown our bodies and minds while we are up there and show the people they can too.  We do a lot of improv along with our normal songs as well.  We ask the audience for suggestions on style and lyrical content.  And we go at it…all within the confines of a normal set.

It is not easy for any new band to make an impact regionally let alone nationally and further afield. How have you found it your neck of the woods? Are there the opportunities to make a mark if the drive is there for new bands?

With the internet EVERYTHING IS REGIONAL; we have many devoted fans and neighbors in BC.  They are amazing and we love them.  But, we also have some amazing fans all over the world just looking for the same stuff we are.  The impact is right there.  The days of $500,000 an album contracts are gone.  We are out there just to make these connections…One person at a time.  Art drives life; even if only one person listens to us and passes it onto one friend.  That is growth and the conversation continues.  As long as you are creating you are growing.

Do you see the internet and social media impact you mentioned destined to become a negative from a positive as the band grows and hopefully gets increasing success or when or if it happens it is more that those bands have struggled to use it in the right way?

The internet is reality for many people.  So ignorance on how to use it to your advantage doesn’t seem to make very much sense.  Every tool is right there for you.  It can be no different from handing a demo to a person on the street.  As long as that person passes it on you are good.  I really think it is a matter of perspective size.  Many musicians hold themselves in light of Metallica and Sabbath and Kanye and Adele or whoever Enormous star.  These standards can be so daunting that you quit creating.  This is an atrocity.  Look, did you know that Platinum albums are now 500,000 albums instead of 1,000,000?  That proves that the old system is dying.  That level of “success” is meaningless without a real connection with people.  That is what the internet affords you…The ability to connect with THE WORLD.  We all want to be able to make a living off what we love to do.  But, that can’t be the end goal.  We all have a world of art inside us and we owe it to ourselves and humanity to get it out there.  So go into it with the goal of making great honest art, whatever that is and, people will take notice.

Once again Thom, a big thanks for sharing time with us; anything you would like to add or reveal for the readers?

Myself (Thom) and all of LAL want to tell you and your readers that we are so thankful for you to be participating in all this with us.  We are looking forward to meeting all of you.  Remember to keep your head up and your mind open.

Occult Mafia Mistress is released digitally and on CD December 9th @ http://lucidafterlife1.bandcamp.com/

https://www.facebook.com/lucidafterlife/   http://lucidafterlife.ca/

Pete RingMaster

The RingMaster Review 15/11/2106

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Sam Ray – Next To You

sam-ray-pic-5_RingMasterReview

Creating and recording in his home studio in Portsmouth, Sam Ray is a singer songwriter beginning to make a potent impact from the alluring shores of England’s south coast. Earlier this year he drew attention with debut single Modern Art, a success now set to be backed and pushed on by its successor Next To You.

A power ballad with the infectious energy of indie pop amidst tempting eighties inspired nostalgia, Next To You is a warm caress on the senses just as able to light up the dance-floor with it instinctive catchiness. Ray’s influences include the likes of Bruce Springsteen, M83, The Cure, The 1975, and The Killers; all flavours heard within both of his singles to date though equally his new offering carries an essence of Tears For Fears within its “both super sad and danceable” proposition.

sam-ray-next-to-you-art_RingMasterReviewA “love song about a guy who can’t tell a girl he likes her”, Next To You slips into ears from a distance, swiftly waking their attention once in full presence with warm atmospheric melodies around an electronic simmering which springs the song’s subsequent catchiness. A melancholic undercurrent openly brings shadows to court the infectious elements driving the track, that sadness at the heart of its emotion a temper and incitement to the body engaging adventure lifting the encounter.

Next To You is a captivating mix of old and modern endeavour; a nostalgic yet fresh proposal which hearts for eighties and current pop will find a flavour to whet their appetite for Sam Ray.

Next To You is released November 18th.

http://www.samraymusic.com/   https://www.facebook.com/samraymusic/   https://twitter.com/samraymusic

Pete RingMaster 15/11/2106

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Into the Storm – Where the Merfalo Roam

Photo by Ken Lapworth (2015)

Photo by Ken Lapworth (2015)

Into the Storm is a band which gate-crashes your senses with a sound as savagely compelling as it is venomously intrusive. It is equally a proposal layered with an enterprise which ensures releases like the Seattle quartet’s new album, Where the Merfalo Roam, steals the imagination and defiles the psyche with ease.

Consisting of the band’s most adventurous and expansive tracks yet, Where the Merfalo Roam is an exploration or should that be fall into an abyss of “discontent, oppressive governments, dystopian eras, and the connection between the cycles societies go through.” A tar thick assault of sludge/doom rapacity unafraid to venture into bolder and starkly diverse strains of sound, the album is as openly inventive in its complexities as it is uncompromising in its raw animosity.

Produced, engineered, and mixed by Derek Moree, Where the Merfalo Roam opens with Truck Van Trailer, instantly trespassing ears with a dirty melody which subsequently ignites a barrage of bestial riffs and ravenous rhythms; yet there is a swing to them which tempers the violence and invites closer involvement. Dirt encrusted vocals bring their ire to the challenge just as quickly, scowling within the sonic and melodic toxicity cast by the guitars of Brant Kay and Matt Jahn and pure predacious ferocity sprung by bassist Oliver Reeves and drummer James Reeves. Becoming even more absorbing as the band break out a Cajun flavouring towards its end, the track is a mighty and riveting start swiftly matched across following tempests.

Ghostmaker is next, prowling the senses with ursine irritability and weight. A bruising punkiness adds to the track’s imposing weight and intensity reminding a touch of Pigs as it stalks and consumes as one primal entity yet reveals a tide of individually effective elements and textures. Its relentless tirade is contrasted by the doom lumbering of Seduced and Disappointed, a black melancholy again stalking the senses but in a slow, light vanquishing mass still prone to rabid eruptions. The two tracks show the variety fuelling the corrosive heart of the album, a diversity continuing within the torment ridden I Gotta Get the Bees Outta My Teeth and the bewitching unrest of Wellwisher. The first of the two sonically niggles and rhythmically pounds, combining both with emotional and multiple vocal antipathy as piercing guitars weave a web of captivating tension while the second is a melodic seduction around an emotional turbulence shared through the rasping angst of the vocals. The simmering beauty eventually boils up into a plaintive lava-esque squall with melodies still suggestively captivating as tempestuousness blossoms around them.

its-where-the-merfalo-roam_RingMasterReviewFeaturing the guest talent of trumpeter Alexis Tahiri, the following Maturin ignites appetite and imagination further. Starting out as a beguiling flame of Mariachi spiced sultriness, the track smoulders, feistily simmers, and eventually steps aside for a barbarous immersion of ears and spirit. Even then melodic suggestiveness is a heady incitement as rhythmic bad blood invades, the song leaving no minute short of unexpected and riveting drama; a weave just as potent within the cancerous air and emotion of Maths. Somehow the track manages to be mesmeric too, haunting the psyche as it defiles the senses and stirs the imagination.

Fell Off A Horse is next unleashing a few seconds over a minute of rabid punk rifled bitterness before Jobbernaught tantalises with inviting melodies and catchy rhythms on its way to infesting ears with its own emotional and sonic malignity. Both tracks leave pleasure thick and the soul blackened and prime for the closing brutal rock ‘n’ roll of the album’s title track. Where the Merfalo Roam strolls in with a vendetta to its swagger and open infectiousness to its enterprise even when turning into slow, psyche winding incursions upon body and emotion. With violinists Kim Pack and Sarah Pendleton bringing melancholic grace and beauty to the song’s emerging and all-consuming emotional and sonic volcanic storm, the track is sheer magnetism; a mighty end to a similarly impressive release.

Where The Merfalo Roam punishes as it rewards, withering body and emotions as it invigorates them. It is not going to be for everyone but for invasive sludge/doom/hardcore hearts, it is a must.

Where The Merfalo Roam is released November 11th via Alive and Breathing Records and @ https://intothestorm.bandcamp.com/album/where-the-merfalo-roam

https://www.facebook.com/rideintothestorm/   https://twitter.com/intothestorms   http://rideintothestorm.nfshost.com/

Pete RingMaster 09/11/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Eyes Wide Shot – Back From Hell

EWS_RingMasterReview

Part of any success is down to grabbing attention and that is a quality the new album from French outfit Eyes Wide Shot certainly has. It offers a dynamic and rousing blend of alternative metal and melodic rock with many other varied strains involved too. Uniqueness is maybe a less obvious essence to Back From Hell but it and its ten captivating songs just grab ears and imagination leaving thick enjoyment behind.

Hailing from Jarny in the north-east of France and formed at the beginning of 2013, Eyes Wide Shot released their debut EP in their first year which helped firmly establish them in the local music scene. The following year saw the current line-up settled when drummer Anthony Marra linked up with vocalist Florent Curatola and guitarists Nicolas Menus and Kevin Guernane, further expanded since recording the album by bassist Jeremy Machado. Soon after Marra’s addition, the band came to the attention of producer Charles Kallaghan Massabo (Falling In Reverse) who subsequently flew to Los Angeles to record their debut album with them.

Back From Hell quickly commands ears and thoughts as its themes of life’s setbacks and obstacles, its manipulations and addictions, shadow songs which leap from the speakers with energy and enterprise. Heavy rhythms and hungry riffs collude with electronic revelry throughout; that mentioned fusion of rock and metal familiar yet unpredictable and ultimately always intriguing.

It all starts with Waiting In Vain and an instant confrontation of imposing sound and niggling riffs. Soon hitting a formidable stride still leaning heavily upon ears, the song lightens slightly for the potent tones of Curatola, his entrance aligned to inviting melodies and an infectiousness which lines every aspect of the proposition awakening ears. With an element of bands like Avenged Sevenfold to it, the anthemic roar of the track is a convincing persuasion as melodically imaginative as it is aggressively biting.

Cover_RingMasterReviewThe following A Glimpse Of Me is a similarly textured offering, riffs and grooves a rapacious proposal with rhythms an even more irritable aggressor. Their attack though is tempered by the catchy prowess of vocals and harmonies and the warm melodies wrapping their proposal. Together it is an engaging invitation easy to get involved in as too that of My Redemption which initially seems very similar to its predecessor but soon shows a potent vein of electronic twists and anthemic tenacity in a body which wakes easy participation but keeps the imagination busy with its varied flavours from djent and technical metal to alternative and electro rock.

It is an excellent highlight within Back From Hell quickly emulated by the fiery smoulder of Lost For You, a track which simmers with a volatility given its head in a chorus which blazes without exploding. Its melancholic calms and melodic mists only add to the song’s beguiling presence though, a success in turn breached by both Lisp Off My Lips and the album’s title track. The first of the pair is another which may not have major originality on its side yet from its first moments to its last and especially in a chorus which seduces the passions, the increasingly tempestuous song creates a fixed bond with pleasure. Its successor shares crystalline electronic melodies as riffs grumble, slipping into mellow reflection before brewing an emotional intensity which in turn sparks a contagious swing to the song’s gait. It is a real grower becoming another big moment in the album over listens.

Another pinnacle to Back From Hell is the virulently catchy Under The Knife, a song which hits like an old friend and has body and voice enlisted in mere moments of its inescapable arousal. Melodic metal and rock in rampant collusion, the track is a boisterously fiery and anthemic encounter impregnated with suggestive tendrils of melody rich enterprise.

Both Living The Dream with its underling irritable volatility beneath emotive flames and the poppy aggression of See What I’ve Seen pile on the enjoyment, the second especially tempting before Watch Me closes the album off in fine style. The song is a proposition which it some ways should not work. It is bedlamic in a ‘messy’ way, certain textures from its first second crashing into each other rather than aligning seamlessly yet it all makes for exciting harmonic disarray around concussive antagonism which increasingly captures the imagination, rap styled twists only adding to the off kilter landscape.

Eyes Wide Shot is without doubt a band well worth taking time out to investigate. Their sound is yet to find bold uniqueness but as Back From Hell shows it demands attention while thickly satisfying; success easy to recommend.

Back From Hell is out now across many online stores and @ http://ewsband.bigcartel.com/product/back-from-hell

https://www.facebook.com/Eyeswideshotband/

Pete RingMaster 09/11/2016

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