Gelato – Self Titled EP

Gelato _ Reputation Radio/RingMaster Review

Do you equally miss the days when Queens Of the Stone Age first teased and taunted ears and appetites with raw and undiluted rock ‘n’ roll cast in their inimitable manner? Then welcome to Gelato, a UK band openly wearing inspirations from Josh Homme and co in their feisty sound but only as one spicy ingredient in a contagious mix of punk and indie pop infused rock ‘n’ roll. Personally the biggest similarity is simply the thick tingle of excitement hearing the bands for the first time, the London trio rippling with an indefinable essence which leaves those around them seeming a much paler proposition.

The evidence to such claim comes with the band’s self-titled debut EP; three tracks of quirkily individual and addictively tenacious encounters fuelled by invention and soaked in creative devilry. Gelato consists of bassist Phil, drummer Ben, and vocalist /guitarist Drew, the latter previously of the excellent Hitchcock Blonde. 2014 saw the band make a potent breakthrough with low-key gigs across the London live scene with matching reactions and receive airplay via BBC6. Their EP though is the first major lure into broader awareness and attention, and the first step to big things we suggest.

Gelato EP cover _Reputation Radio/RingMaster Review   Recorded with Tobin Jones (Bo Ningen, Twilight Sad, Cold Specks), the EP kicks off with Get My Way, a track instantly flirting with ears as a wiry guitar hook repeats keenly on the senses amidst a thick prodding of beats. It is appetite raising bait which becomes a feisty stroll with the same sonic lure now embraced by crisp rhythms and a darkly wicked bassline. The vocals of Drew as just as inviting once they emerge too, whilst the QOTSA bred harmonies add a smiling extra to the contagiously engaging adventure. The song continues to snarl and seduce in equal measure, band and sound bounding around like a young colt with the maturity and craft of a rock veteran.

The band’s new single Room Service follows and again has ears and a now hungry appetite locked in with its first touch, this a dirty grizzled bassline which simply resonates in the senses before a spicy weave of guitar and brewing harmonies caress it and a fresh anthemic lure of beats. As its predecessor, the track from a slimmer start broadens into a heavier bewitching tapestry of sound and textures, it all infested in a contagious revelry and charm. As catchy and tangibly poppy as it is though, there is a dark predatory edge to the song especially in backing vocals and rhythms, which lights up air and imagination with further unpredictable adventure.

Ruffians brings the band’s introduction to a close, two minutes of punk filtered pop rock which has an underlying aggression as riveting and majestic as the warmer melodic tendencies wrapping its rugged spine. Arguably the least dramatically sculpted offering, the song still has little difficulty in firing up pleasure and a want for more, the band showing they can rock out or design a seriously involved temptation with matching potency.

As with any brief but impressive offering, there is only a needy want for more by the EP’s close, a wish to dive with haste into further endeavours but that is for the future. Right now we have a seriously impressive and thrilling start to devour from a band in Gelato, which one day might just be spoken of with the same stature of their prime inspiration.

The Gelato EP is available now digitally and on CD via https://gelatomusic.bandcamp.com/releases

http://www.facebook.com/GelatoMusic

RingMaster 17/05/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard on Reputation Radio @ http://www.reputationradio.net

Red Spektor – Self Titled EP

Red Spektor Promo Shot Reputation Radio/RingMaster Review

There is a rich flame burning away in the Potteries, and it goes under the name Red Spektor. The UK trio are poised to release their self-titled debut EP, a blaze of psychedelic, stoner, and classic rock which fascinates as it engulfs ears and imagination, and unrelentingly thrills as it provides further evidence that heavy and fiery British rock ‘n’ roll is heading towards a fresh heyday.

Hailing from Stoke on Trent, Red Spektor emerged at the end of 2012 drawing on inspirations from the likes of Black Rebel Motorcycle Club, Led Zeppelin, and Black Sabbath. Once the threesome had honed their sound, they proceeded to hit the live scene with swift success, sharing stages with bands such as Carousel Vertigo, Attica Rage, Texas Flood, and Lawless along the way. Every step drew more eager ears to their growing fan base, accelerated by festival appearances whilst the band never letting a week seemingly go by without igniting a venue somewhere. 2014 saw the band record and release their EP via Bandcamp, a 5 track encounter recorded live and straight to tape over two days. Now it has its full digital unveiling and it is easy to expect Red Spektor stoking up a new wave of close and acclaiming attention.

The band draws on essences of “dark pre-war blues right through to the British blues explosion of the sixties and the heaviness of the seventies albeit with a modern and dirty twist” according to their bio, a mix swiftly seducing the senses and igniting the air through EP opener Hard To Please. A lone vocal guitar awakens instant attention, its rich spicy lure soon joined by a solemnly brooding bassline and crispy beats as the song quickly settles down into a feisty tempting. The guitar of John Scane virtually dances across the senses, every riff and hook incendiary and leaving a sultry residue like the trail behind Marvel Comic’s Ghostrider. Vocally he has a mellower but no less potent air, clean and alluring against the sizzling of blues/psyche invention and Rob Farrell’s dark basslines.

Red Spektor Cover Artwork Reputation Radio/RingMaster Review   It is a seriously gripping start quickly backed by the slower, more intensive presence of Transcending. The thick and freely swinging beats of drummer Darren Bowen cage ears and anticipation as an almost melancholic bass coaxing prowls; both sparking swift appetite for the song’s impending offering. A sinister seducing comes with the enterprise of the guitar, and indeed vocals, as sixties and seventies sounds collude with a modern creative rapacity to bewitch and crawl over the listener. The track is a relentless smoulder rather than the blistering eruption of its predecessor but just as persistently magnetic and irresistible.

Third song Everywhere puts a higher gear in motion for its rich persuasion of blues rock; rumbling and strolling along whilst melodic vapours intoxicate ear and air alike. Rhythms cast a dirty tempering shadow and compliment to the searing enterprise, keeping the psychedelic croon earthbound as once more the band has attention bewitched. The exploration of the dirtier textures within the song continues with greater focus and revelry within the next up Redemption, Red Spektor tapping into the purest vat of blues distilled rock and adding their own not exactly unique but certainly distinct flavouring to another transfixing and highly enjoyable proposal.

The song probably does not quite match those before it though, whilst all of the songs before also find themselves in the shadow of the glorious closer Earth Mother. From its first beat and eager riff, the track bursts into a masterful and virulent swagger. An anthemic and delicious groove leads the way, courted by similarly lively and bold rhythms aligned to a throaty bass invitation. The song relaxes a touch in urgency as the vocals add their easy persuasion to the mix, picking its knees and tempo up again between verses and around the fiery enticing which subsequently seeps from every melody, hook, and resonating bass groove. As across all songs, Scane’s solos just burn their way into the psyche, but it is the overall swing and insatiable tenacity to the song which helps it take best song honours.

Many like us missed the Red Spektor EP first time around, and indeed the band’s emergence, but its new full digital unleashing ensures there are no excuses now in not exploring band and sound. No excuses only rich rewards.

The Red Spektor EP is digitally available from May 18th via all online stores.

https://www.facebook.com/redspektorband    http://redspektor.com/

RingMaster 17/05/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard on Reputation Radio @ http://www.reputationradio.net

 

We-Are-Z – Walkaway

pic by@AndyWillsher

pic by@AndyWillsher

The song might be about “taking a journey into the recesses of consciousness, exploring perceptions and angles that don’t add up”, but musically Walkaway is just one inescapable funk ‘n’ roll devilment of indie pop come new wave virulence. The song is the new single from We-Are-Z, a UK band which on the evidence of their new release, springs a sound on the senses as agitated and warped as it is infectiously magnetic. It incites body and imagination with tribal like rhythms amidst paranoia kissed sound, each racked with St. Vitus dance like activity within theatrical melodies and mellow washed vocals. The track is pure temptation, like Shriekback meets Late Cambrian in a Two Door Cinema Club embrace, yet different again.

The London based Anglo/French quintet formed in 2012, with its line-up already seasoned musicians bringing experiences of playing with the likes of Beyonce, The Waterboys, and James Morrison into the mix. Debut track Airbrush swiftly drew strong attention and support from media and fans alike, whilst the band since then has lured in diverse comparisons from Vampire Weekend to Devo and Franz Ferdinand to XTC. Inspirations are equally varied within We-Are-Z, the likes of David Bowie, Serge Gainsborough, Talking Heads, Blur, The Clash, and Static cited but as their new single shows, the band ultimately emerges with something yes a little familiar but perfectly peculiar to them.

Walkaway from its first touch is a rampant shuffle of jabbing beats and a dark flirty bass lure from Guillaume Charreau and Marc Arciero respectively. The guitar of Drew Wynen adds a lively temptation to the attention grabbing start also, little but gripping hooks and slithers of melodic spices a flirtatious tempting adding to the instant magnetism. Seductive and quirky keys are colouring the song further next, Clement Leguidcoq bringing a smouldering coaxing seeping around and within all the other tenacious textures at play whilst vocalist Gabriel Cazes has a drama and flirty quality to his insatiably vibrant tones and harmonies. There is no escaping the enslaving effect of the song, the puppeteer like lure of rhythms on limbs and the addictive contagion of everything else on voice and emotions, a proper feel good treat.

According to reliable sources, with an energetic and irrepressible live presence to match the adventure of their new single alone, it is easy to suggest we will all be hearing and devouring a lot more of We-Are-Z from hereon in.

Walkaway is available via Sputnik Records from May 18th

http://we-are-z.com/   https://www.facebook.com/WeAreZmusic

RingMaster 17/05/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard on Reputation Radio @ http://www.reputationradio.net

Panic Island – Cabin Fever EP

Panic_Island_Cabin_Fever_EP

First track catches ears and imagination by excited surprise, the second has both locked in a blaze of pungent rock ‘n’ roll, and by its third, Cabin Fever the debut EP from Panic Island has made a clear statement that UK rock has another potential ridden and magnetic proposition emerging from its midst. The three track release is a magnetic roar of alternative and melodic rock, a weave of pungent riffs and sinew swung rhythms entwined with creative and anthemic dexterity. Maybe not yet the release to suggest that Panic Island will be amongst those to the fore driving the ever changing face of British rock ‘n’ roll, the EP is definitely an impressive introduction for the band to spring on from and tempt those kind of heights.

image003     Panic Island is centred round the North London songwriting duo Arron Sans and Vinnie Shimia, two musicians which first met at a gig by The Cult in Spain in 2012. Sans had already “dabbled in acting and film production” before exploring music and songwriting whilst Brazilian born Shimia had developed a romance with the guitar since the age of 13, and moved to the capital from his homeland to pursue his aspirations in music. Their individual abilities and strengths going by Cabin Fever have certainly gelled and openly flourished musically and lyrically since the pair creatively united, openly evidenced by their first release. Produced by Paul Tipler (Idlewild, The Horrors, Eighties Matchbox B-Line Disaster), the EP is a storming adventure of sound and dark emotional exploration, a release which has you sonically gripped within a few choice moments and persistently thought provoked across each infectious proposal.

The EP starts with the outstanding We Start Fires, a thick lure of bass the first enticing quickly joined by jabbing beats and in another breath, an electronic teasing. Coming cold into the band and letting the music be the first indication of their sound, the latter element immediately sends expectations down the wrong avenue, with punchy beats the almost techno like tempting sparking thoughts of a dance-floor escapade to come. The great vocals of the pair soon begins dispelling that, their attention grabbing presence the trigger to a more volatile lure of rhythms and a stroll of pungent riffs and striking heavy rock hooks. There is a slight punk edge to things too, whilst grooves and vocals increasingly cast a more aggressive and flavoursome web of hard rock and melodic tenacity. The early electro devilment also continues to flirt with the imagination, from time to time coming to the fore but never for long as the unpredictable and thrilling anthemic stomp of a track continues to bound through and ignite ears.

The excellent start is followed by new single Temples, a song providing a more settled landscape of melodic rock but one equally as fiery and alluring from the off. Because of its more uniform canvas of sound, the emotive potency of word and voice has a stronger and clearer sounding board to spring its passion and angst from. This aligns perfectly with the just as magnetically imposing drama of melodies and craft of guitars. It is a combination offering a feel of Bristol band Mind Museum to the provocative nature of the song which excels again within closing song City Screams.

As the previous encounter, it too is a swiftly catchy and enticing proposition with raw feeling in the vocals and raucous enterprise in the heart of the music. It also shows that any of the three songs upon Cabin Fever can be a potent single for the band, each in their individual ways intense and incendiary slices of drama with the emotional climate expected in the consuming premise of the EP title.

Panic Island do everything right with Cabin Fever, and though their sound is not yet holding a truly unique character it is not an issue, just part of the evolution of the band’s creativity to that expected success. Anyway the release is a gripping slice of exciting rock ‘n’ roll and that more than works for us.

The Cabin Fever EP is available from May 18th via Flat 4 Records at http://amzn.to/1QTpAQH and http://panicisland.bandcamp.com/releases

http://www.panicisland.com     http://panicisland.bandcamp.com/releases

RingMaster 17/05/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard on Reputation Radio @ http://www.reputationradio.net

 

 

 

Bold silences and whispering landscapes: talking Native Construct with vocalist Robert Edens

bySamHarchik_02

You can expect to be impressed by a flood of releases across a reviewing year but to be actually startled is a less regular occurrence but something that Quiet World, the debut album from US progressive metal trio Native Construct achieved. Consisting of vocalist Robert Edens, guitarist Myles Yang, and bassist Max Harchik, the band has crafted a creative emprise of sound and invention which is as fascinating as the background to the album. Quiet World was an album from out of the blue, a mouth-watering, technically gripping landscape of imagination spinning diversity and creative adventure which ignited ears and thoughts. Soon offered the chance to explore the birth, heart, and depths of band and release, we took little time in throwing a torrent of questions at the band’s vocalist.

Hi, and thanks for sparing time to talk with us.

Can we start by looking at the beginnings of Native Construct? The three of you were fellow students at Berklee College of Music in Boston, Massachusetts; you were studying the same courses?

Rob here–thanks for reaching out to us!

Max and I are both Electronic Production and Design majors, and Myles a Composition and Contemporary Writing and Production dual major. While we studied many of the same core courses, our major courses of study were quite different. The band originally formed in the Berklee dorms, with Max joining on bass later.

When did friendship start to become idea collaboration and subsequently the creation of Native Construct?Photo 3_Cinematic

Myles and I had been playing and recording music together since middle school, and we’d planned to form a prog metal band once we got to Berklee since getting our acceptance letters. Shortly after arriving at Berklee, Myles and I joined with our friend Gabe Salomon to start writing what would become the Chromatic Aberration demo. So, the band formed pretty early on in our Berklee careers, after spending some time jamming with numerous other students.

Do you all come from a background of musical tastes with a common bond? I ask because of the diverse flavours and variety to your music.

We all share a common background in progressive music of many forms, but certainly prog metal most notably. Myles and I having had grown up together, our musical developments have been very similar. Our respective studies at Berklee have definitely brought a lot of the variety to our music, however, since you’re exposed to quite a lot as a student there.

Once beginning to write together etc., how quickly did the premise and direction of your music emerge?

We decided we wanted to write a concept album pretty much from the get-go. After Chromatic Aberration was written, we started writing the rest of the album around this first song, which would eventually become the end of our story.

From reading the accompanying press release to your debut album Quiet World, I understand the writing of songs, the album, and indeed its recording was between your on-going studies? How did you find the time and you could use the college’s facilities?

Finding the time, let alone the creative energy, to completely compose and co-produce this album along with our school studies was quite difficult, but it was something we were passionate about. We really believed in this project, and wanted to take the time and effort to make it the best we could. We were able to make use of Berklee’s facilities on occasion, but the vast majority of the work was done at our home studios.

You have now finished your studies?

Myles and myself graduated this past December, but Max is a couple years younger and has a few semesters left.

Tell us about the recording of Quiet World. It happened over an extended period?

Yes. Like the rest of the album production, the recording process took a long time due to school. We were very meticulous with every aspect, as well. We wanted to make sure everything sounded perfect, so we’d even go back and re-record sections several weeks later just to improve one small aspect of the take.

CoverIn its production etc. was there any others involved or it was a solo effort by the three of you until the signing with Metal Blade?

The album was largely self-produced. All tracking and programming was done at our home studios in Boston, MA, with the exception of vocals, which were recorded with Jamie King at The Basement Studios in Winston-Salem, NC. The album was mixed by Rich Mouser at The Mouse House Studio in Los Angeles, CA, and mastered by Jamie King.

How did that link up with Metal Blade come about, what brought you to the attention of Brian Slagel of the label?

We got in contact with Tommy Rogers (vocalist of Between the Buried and Me) once the record was finished, who liked it and wanted to help us shop it to labels. Metal Blade, BTBAM’s own label, got back to us with an offer upon hearing the album from Tommy. We’re eternally grateful for him having given us this opportunity!

The vocals to Quiet World were as you mentioned subsequently recorded with Jamie King. How was the experience?

Working with Jamie was a blast. He’s an extremely patient and helpful guy, and really great to work with. It was also really exciting for me to get to record Quiet World inside the same vocal booth I’d seen in the BTBAM studio videos!

Were there other tweaks, evolutions to the album around this point too?

With the exception of Chromatic Aberration between its demo version and now, not much on the album has ever changed. Our vision from the onset remained fairly constant, with changes affecting primarily the sounds in the album rather than the writing.

I think it is fair to say that Quiet World has been enthusiastically received. Did you have any particular hopes for it, especially once Metal Blade was steering its release?

We’ve been nothing short of floored at the overwhelmingly positive response to the album. We knew Metal Blade would be able to get our music out there, but we never could’ve known how well-received this album was going to be–it’s been quite surreal. We’re so excited that people have been enjoying it and can’t wait to bring it to them live!

Tell us about the premise between the lyrical concepts of Quiet World? bySamHarchik_03

The lyrical concepts were intentionally connected in many different ways, not necessarily all relating the same over-arching story to the album. We don’t like to talk about our own interpretation of the story too much since we want listeners to be able to find their own meaning in the music, but I can give some background on the concept. The main source of conflict in the story stems from an unrequited love. Mute, an outcast, escapes into a world of his own creation where he maintains complete control, until a struggle for freedom begins to mount against him. The musical and lyrical content work together to tell many different stories following this concept throughout the album.

What inspired the narrative?

The music and story of Quiet World are largely interdependent, each influencing the other constantly throughout their creation. When we set out to come up with a story to write the album around, we knew we wanted something emotional and eclectic enough for the musical ideas we already had. We also took influences from everything we’d taken in and appreciated throughout our lives: from videogames to fantasy novels to classic prog rock concept albums, Quiet World truly came from all over.

As we mentioned the album has a strikingly diverse and adventurous landscape to its music, are there any bands or artists you would say have inspired the ideation within Quiet World most notably, and in your own personal craft?

The album clearly has several major influences (musical theatre, Queen, Between the Buried and Me), but the main inspiration behind the sound of Quiet World has been to create something strange and interesting through the conglomeration of all these different styles. Through jazz harmony studied at Berklee, vocal writing inspired by Queen, and the emotional storytelling of musical theatre, we were able to put together this album that really felt like its own unique sound.

Is there a live presence to Native Construct?

Absolutely! We’re rehearsing with an additional guitarist and drummer to bring our live line-up to a five-piece, and will be playing shows soon.

What is next for the band? Is the Metal Blade union on-going?

Our agreement with Metal Blade lasts for at least three major record releases, so we’ll likely be buckling down on our next album after the summer.

Big thanks again for talking with us, any last thoughts you would like to share?

I know I’m not Trolzaan. I’ll never be Trolzaan.

https://www.facebook.com/NativeConstruct   http://www.metalblade.com/nativeconstruct/

Read the Quiet World review @ https://ringmasterreviewintroduces.wordpress.com/2015/04/23/native-construct-quiet-world/

Pete RingMaster

The RingMaster Review 16/05/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard on Reputation Radio @ http://www.reputationradio.net

Wild hooks and inescapable persuasions, introducing Threatpoint

Threatpoint Reputation Radio/RingMaster Review

There has been very good things coming out of America about a “raw, no gimmick pure groove metal band!” They are called Threatpoint and after checking out their sound it is hard to offer a better description though it does not quite hint at the full variety of sound and texture within their magnetic assaults. This is a band we instantly thought we need to know more about so grabbed the opportunity to corner the band with a few questions.

Hello and thanks for taking time out to talk with us.

Can you first introduce Threatpoint and to your furiously diverse assault of groove/metal what would you describe as your biggest inspirations?

Chris James (vocals), Alex Olivetti (guitar), Mike White (guitar), Eric Ross (bass), and CJ Krukowski (drums). We draw from so many different ideas and genres… But a few that we all like are Devildriver, Testament, Soilwork and Killswitch Engage.

What predominantly inspires the roar to the lyrical side of the band?

Lyrically Chris writes about life. Sometimes struggles we endure or stories of situations people have gone through. There’s always a positive note in them. You’ve got to read into them. There’s a spiritual sense to him.

How does the songwriting process work within Threatpoint?

Songs generally start with a vocal melody or a guitar inspired cut. With the two new guys now everyone writes in the band. Chris and Eric also play guitar. So there are a lot of ideas floating around constantly!

You just touched on it, you have had a line-up change recently, how has this impacted on things like indeed songwriting and where has it invigorated the band most?

Mike and Eric are very good friends that played in a band together prior. So that helps with the ease of transition. Both of them bring massive energy to the band as well as writing skills of different types. We finally feel a sense of completeness with the addition of them.

Careful What You wish For Cover-Reputation Radio/RingMaster ReviewTell us about your album Careful What You Wish For…about its theme, recording etc.

That album took us a year and four months to finish. Among working full-time jobs, doing shows and writing the material we were stretched and burnt out. Originally it was supposedly to be 10 songs, which turned into 20 then was cut to 14. We record at JL Studios in Olyphant Pennsylvania. Joe is a mastermind. His skills are amazing. We say can you get this sound and he does.

CWYWF is a collection of ideas …no one theme…Different real stories or views on our take of life.

How would you describe the evolution in your sound and differences between the new album and its predecessor Dead To Rise?

Definitely more advanced on this album. You strive to get better as you go. Find out what works and what doesn’t go over so well. Some songs are great to listen to on disc but live they don’t go over as well. So it’s always a learning curve.

The band, as readers look at this interview, is undertaking an intensive tour along the Southeast of the US. What can people expect from a Threatpoint show and will you be airing Careful What You Wish For in its full might?

We are currently playing quite a few tracks off it live. Expect high raw energy from the stage. No gimmicks!

Yea, we go to southeast and then out to west coast in the fall. Lots of shows coming up. Hope to see and meet lots of new peeps!

You can stream our full album on our website www.threatpointofficial.com

Once more big thanks for chatting with us, any last words?

Thank you to our fans and anyone helping us to grow. Please stop by our Facebook page and give a LIKE…

https://www.facebook.com/threatpoint     http://www.threatpointofficial.com/

Pete RingMaster

The RingMaster Review 16/05/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard on Reputation Radio @ http://www.reputationradio.net

Little Lapin – Remember The Highs

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It was only a couple of months ago when Little Lapin seduced and enthralled with the single Remember The Highs, its masterful coaxing of ears and imagination the wake-up call to the mesmeric sound and voice of the UK singer-songwriter for a great many. The acclaimed track also revealed inventive and bold songwriting, something her fans were already vocal about and now impressively confirmed by the artist’s debut album also called Remember The Highs. It is a fascinating and captivating collection of songs which with diversity and melodic resourcefulness simply leave thoughts and emotions spellbound.

Little Lapin is Lucy Hill, a Devon bred songstress now based in Bristol who has been entrancing audiences from the UK to New Zealand and New York since emerging round 2012. Musically her inspirations include the likes of Regina Spektor, The Cranberries, Florence & The Machine, Laura Marling, PJ Harvey, The Cure, and The Pixies, many providing creative whispers in what is a sound and songs which are openly distinctive to Hill. The swift proof comes with the last single, though before that she had bred a strong and loyal fan base through a tantalising live presence and releases such as earlier tracks Sound of Summer and Winning Is Losing, and more so a self-titled EP last year which sparked attention from the likes of Tom Robinson on BBC Radio 6 and regular online radio play. It is easy to assume though this was just the appetiser to more fevered responses and acclaim destined to be earned by Remember The Highs, the album a beacon of melodies and harmonies set to draw greedy appetites like moths to a flame.

a1696187169_16   The album opens with Magnet Eyes and an immediate inescapable tempting of warm guitar and keys taken to another enslaving level by the unique tones of Hill. Her voice has a quality of sounding familiar as well as freshly bewitching, but from person to person it seems we hear someone different as a reference, the likes of Laura Marling, Regina Spektor, Sinead O’Connor, and Chrissie Hynde just some references used, with the latter the closest for us as a descriptive hint. As the song stretches its melodic nature and evocative air, a shadow of darker resonance comes into play to catch the imagination all over again, whilst voice and keys especially almost flirt with rich expression and emotive radiance.

It is a captivating start, but also a potent teaser to the glories of the following Over The Draft and the album’s title track. The first of the two songs creases ears with an initial persuasion of guitar again quickly enhanced by the sultry tones of Hill. Eager rhythms then gently and enticingly march into the exotic landscape now being cast by keys, everything settling into a scenic lure of melodic mystique and catchy hooks with the voice of Hill one giant romance of a snare. Its successor remains as potent as the first time heard, and if there is an air of Chrisse Hynde in the second track, Remember The Highs wonderfully reeks of The Pretenders in its sonic groove and provocative melodic hooks. Vocally too Hill brings her spiciest tang to syllables and a slightly nasal croon reminiscent of the Ohio musician. The darker bred bass groove alongside the irresistible winy flames of guitar is equally as compelling, the song providing one delicious embrace of tenacious enterprise and beauty.

The acoustic opening to Go!Stop!Go! has ears lit and body swaying instantly but it is the brooding air of drama cast through keys and an orchestral breath which ebbs and flows across the track, that turns a potent encounter into a spellbinding one. It is a serenade with haunting shadows and dark aural reflections which offer a melancholic temper to the invigorating partnership and narrative of voice and melody. The song just blossoms with every listen, its slower initial smoulder, compared to the previous songs, soon as engrossing and seductive as anything upon the album.

Sound Of Summer rolls in next on a rumble of rhythms which quickly evolves into an embrace of seventies seeded Beatle-esque keys and the ever inviting vocals. Occasional crescendos of drums add to the expanding and again sultry canvas of the song, guitars and keys colouring its scenery with alluring and imagination inciting enterprise to which bass adds swarthy lines of juicy shadows. Once more there is no option but to sink into the depths of a song before being left face to face with the rockier acoustic persuasion of In My Mind. The song is barely a stroll across the senses but even in its low key gait reveals a tenacious and sturdier character in its absorbing balladry compared to its predecessor.

Both songs though get over shadowed by the outstanding Colour Blind, a track emerging as a definite favourite. It starts on a thoughtful and evocative persuasion of guitar, Hill in moments adding her reflective vocal spice for an engaging start. Soon though, everything erupts into a gently concussive belt of emotional and creative turmoil, agitated rhythms and clanging riffs consorting with fiery keys in a bedlamic expulsion. It is a striking and thrilling twist to an already highly persuasive proposition providing yet another major highlight in Remember The Highs.

The album finishes with firstly the melancholic but again vibrantly arresting Panic, a song which has an essence of the drama found within The Smiths songwriting to it, and finally the closing warm smile of A Nice Coincidence. Contrasting textures flirt from within the encounter, sombre strings find themselves courted by skittish rhythms and another seduction of voice and melodies. The lyrical side of songs, as once more shown here, is just as intriguing and enticing, Hill able to cast hope in dark experiences and show the shadows within the brightest adventures.

Remember The Highs is a musical love affair for the senses from an artist in Little Lapin, who has the potential to become one of Britain’s most exciting and innovative singer songwriters. Thinking about it as her album seduces once again, she already is.

Remember The Highs is released on May 15th @ http://littlelapin.bandcamp.com/album/remember-the-highs-2

http://www.littlelapinmusic.com/   https://www.facebook.com/littlelapin

RingMaster 14/05/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard on Reputation Radio @ http://www.reputationradio.net