Coquin Migale – LUV

Evolution 2015_RingMaster Review

With the release of LUV, 2015 has seen three tantalising reasons why 2016 might just be the year of Coquin Migale. The band’s new single continues where its predecessors left off, providing a mesmeric blend of shoegaze, Brit pop, and ethereal atmospherics, and just like the previous pair, it sublimely lights ears and tempts the imagination.

Formed in 2013, Coquin Migale has been no strangers to attention and acclaim, certainly over the past twelve months or so. Early on their live presence earned strong support and a swiftly growing fan base whilst the EPs, Yellow Room and Feel, sparked even broader awareness and praise lit recognition of the band. This year, the singles Gold and Socotra took things to another level with fresh fans lured and media acclaim garnered whilst showing more of the rich hues within the band’s sound. Expectations were that maybe things would settle now, that the band has shown us all it currently had in its inventive locker but no, LUV swiftly offers another strain of mellow seducing amidst an intricate weaving of flavours in one fascinating and alluring serenade.

The song opens with a single guitar and a melody which seems to wink as it invites ears to grab its trailing elegance. It is just the first turn in a maze of intriguing endeavour and sonic imagination, its House of Love meets Maff beckoning soon broadening into a melodic painting of Brit pop revelry, melodic rock drama, and psych rock exploration. That again is only a slither of where LUV ventures and takes willing ears, the track almost tempestuous in its enterprise and masterful in its seductive persuasion.

Arguably their most inventively adventurous song yet, LUV epitomises everything about Coquin Migale that is getting folk very excited, and yet it is easy to feel that the quartet of Alex Soper (vocals/ guitar), Jack Brooks (guitar), Stevie Kane (bass), and Josh Holmes (drums) are still only just beginning to tap into their potential. Happy days!

LUV is released November 20th via End Of The Trail Records/Rough Trade Distribution.

Pete RingMaster 20/11/2015

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The Sneaky Nixons – Sex

LisaJamie_RingMaster Review

UK band The Sneaky Nixons describe themselves “as an angry, semi-political, semi-religious, part-feminist sloppy activist group who play riotous, steam-train guitar music.” From one song alone much of that is maybe not so obvious but there is no denying that new single Sex is one mighty vehicle of mass seduction. Sauntering through ears in a flirtation of punk, ska, rock ‘n’ swing, and vaudevillian theatre, the song is a confrontational mischief on ears and imagination, and quite bewitching.

HFartwork-2_RingMaster Review     Taken from the forthcoming eponymous compilation album from Across the Ocean Waves Productions, which features the most exciting bands active on Liverpool’s vibrant music scene, Sex is a slice of rock ‘n’ roll to incite and inflame. It follows a clutch of singles released this year and The Coup de Grace EP which spawned most of them, each offering tracks which reveal a different strain of The Sneaky Nixons’ sound with Sex the most devilishly impressive of the lot so far.

The single strolls in on stabbing riffs and crisp beats beneath a sultry sky lit by the blazing temptation of brass. Settling into a gentler canter initially, with a touch of Brit pop and alternative rock to the melodies and vocals, the track is soon rising up to eye ball the listener with its creative revelry and punkish intent, both bound in more of the thick ska bred infectiousness.

Like Libertines meets The Talks meets The Vox Dolomites, Sex is an aurally salacious treat with a hard hitting video to inflame the senses further, and another mightily impressive step in the rise of The Sneaky Nixons’

Sex is released November 20th via Across the Ocean Waves Productions @

Pete RingMaster 20/11/2015

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Various Artists -This is the sound of Sugar Town

Artwork _RingMaster Review

Not only lighting our ears this November with another thrilling Horse Party EP, Seymour Quigley of the band and R*E*P*E*A*T Records / Pure Deadly have compiled and unveiled a striking compilation offering some of the best bands helping to make the Bury St Edmunds underground DIY rock scene one of the most exciting to emerge in recent times within the UK. Twelve bands providing a dozen, without exception, ear pleasing tracks, This is the sound of Sugar Town is a magnetic and thickly enjoyable invitation to explore a host of great new bands whilst helping a great cause with all its profits going to Bury St Edmunds Women’s Refuge.

Wrapped in the artwork of local artist and musician Kate Jackson, once of Long Blonde, This is the Sound of Sugar Town opens up with the alternative rock quintet Voter Kernel and instantly has ears and attention gripped. The band covers the senses in a web of sonic guitar bait before relaxing into a vocally rowdy and rhythmic inviting incitement laced with acidic enticement from the guitars. Into its stride Unnatural Gathering Of Animals blows a punk wind with anthemic simplicity and potency, perpetually confirming itself as one of those inescapable roars that just grabs full involvement of the listener.

The same applies to the darker post punk bred What I’d Do from Horse Party. The guitars of Ellie Langley and Seymour Quigley tempt as the beats of Shannon Hope entice, each warming ears for the ever siren like voice of Langley. It is a mix that breeds the great diversity to drive the band’s releases over the past year or so, but also a unique presence to the band’s sound which is no better epitomised than in this tantalising song.

As the third track comes in view, already there is a glimpse of not only the quality in the Bury music scene but the diversity too, The Few adding to that subsequent realisation across the album, with Bury’d Alive. Not to be confused with the truck load of other bands with the same name, especially in the US, the Bury hailing proposal is an indie punk quartet which as its predecessors, soon has appetite and imagination held with an opening lure of guitar and firm beats. Carrying a tasty seventies DIY punk tone to its sound with layers of bluesy spicing amongst it, the track whips up rich bait somewhere between Swell Maps and Outcasts.

The Machismo’s has already ignited lust in these ears with their releases, and do so again with their offering Rise Again and its punk infused seduction. The trio of Sam Marsh, Rachel Marsh, and Karly Stebbings cast a web of flavours and textures bred in varying styles, creating their own temptation which again comes in varied hues as it prowls with mischievous relish through twanging bass groans, sonic sighs, and scything beats. Lyrically the open humour of the band brings a thick smile to the face as its adventure of drooping hopes and their resurrection hit, as the sound, the sweet spot.

As mentioned the variety within the album and the town’s scene is a refreshing enjoyment, continuing with the great tempestuous sound of Rats as Big as Dogs. Their track, Same Difference, is a mesh of harmonic warmth and mesmeric calm aligned to explosive raw energy and aggression. It is only around for two minutes, but a dynamically eventful and captivating time before passing the baton of temptation on to Scare The Normals and their track Tomorrow. Stalking ears with its sinister electronics and prowling rhythms, the song grows into a compelling infestation lying somewhere between Autopsy Boys and Naked Lunch; an electronic/sonic exploration also carrying an alluring scent of Fad Gadget to its creeping enterprise.

A fascinating embrace of psychedelic grooving greets ears in Sky Dance from the quartet Pale Fires next, its sultry shimmer and flowing harmonic tenacity an immersive celestial delight whilst site favourites The Vitamins saunter in with their highly flavoursome rock ‘n’ roll, The Present (Stairway) to entice with a riveting canter of potent vocals and melodic enterprise laced with a grunge/alternative rock toning. Expectations expect the trio to provide a full meal of texture and expression and the track does not disappoint with its virulent shuffle and vibrant personality.

Some growling heavy rock with punk belligerence erupts in ears next courtesy of Tryal of Witches, its Motorhead meets Kyuss meets XII Boar roar Sweating Rum, a dirt crusted pleasure contrasting well with the melodic, ambience scented enticement of alternative quintet Cathedrals and Cars. Posterity Measure is a hug of melancholy and tantalising melodic beauty becoming more energetically aroused and in turn enthralling with every passing minute.

Fortunato provide a track from their well-received Under Your Teeth EP next, Utopia a fuzzy and dynamic croon of voice and sonic imagination with a healthy line in hooks and jabbing rhythms. Its flavoursome charm parts to leave Eleanor Lou to bring the album to a fine close with Ring The Change. Hailing from the market town and currently based in Manchester, the songstress dances on ears and imagination with voice and song, the acoustic hug a mesmeric reflection further honed by the elegant tones of the singer/songwriter.

From start to finish, This is the sound of Sugar Town is a thrilling discovery of Bury St Edmunds’ underground musical heart. Some bands were familiar, many brand new, and each contributing to a release worthy of everyone’s investigation whilst at the same time helping others.

This is the sound of Sugar Town is out now via R*E*P*E*A*T Records / Pure Deadly digitally and on 12” vinyl @

Album track listing…

VOTER KERNEL – Unnatural Gathering Of Animals 03:59

HORSE PARTY – What I’d Do 03:42

THE FEW – Bury’d Alive 02:38

THE MACHISMO’S – Rise Again 02:53

RATS AS BIG AS DOGS – Same Difference 02:00

SCARE THE NORMALS – Tomorrow 06:15

PALE FIRES – Sky Dance 04:47

THE VITAMINS – The Present (Stairway) 03:03

TRYAL OF WITCHES – Sweating Rum 03:35

CATHEDRALS AND CARS – Posterity Measure 03:52

FORTUNATO – Utopia 03:33

ELEANOR LOU – Ring The Change 02:32

Pete RingMaster 18/11/2015

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Everyday Sidekicks – The Things I’ve Seen

Everyday Sidekicks _RingMaster Reviewhot

Everyday Sidekicks is another UK band emerging from the hot bed of fresh and exciting music that is Bristol, and another prospect leaving a want to know and hear more in its wake. Their sound is a fiery and gritty post-hardcore proposition and their new EP, The Things I’ve Seen, a potent nudge on national attention. Listening to the six track encounter there is the feeling the band is still on a journey of discovery with their sound, tracks often weaving in recognisable and at times expected flavours and hues to its undoubtedly inventive heart. That familiarity and lack of major uniqueness though, rather than providing a dampener on the EP’s lure, just adds more substance to the release and excitement to the potential of where the band can take their music and imagination.

Formed in 2012, Everyday Sidekicks soon became a keenly followed and supported prospect on the local scene spreading outwards, though it was with the release of the single Hometown Hero in 2014 that they began flirting with national awareness. Live the quintet has shared stages with bands such as Marmozets, Shvpes, and Coldrain; increasing their reputation simultaneously over the past couple of years whilst also drawing attention from new fans and media alike. The Things I’ve Seen is the next potent nudge to awaken thicker and stronger attention, a success easy to see coming as its sextet of tracks tempt and sear the senses.

Everyday Sidekicks Cover Artwork _RingMaster Review    Opener F.T.B is a minute long lure into the release but much more than an intro, its belly of craft and passion a potent roar on ears and indeed and already brewing appetite. Its strong coaxing is quickly matched by the punchy swagger of Mirrors. Straight away the anthemic swings of drummer Mat Capper and the dark alluring tone of Sam Hughes’ bass grip ears as a spiralling of sonic enterprise escapes the guitars of Tim Brown and Josh Pasley. It is a rousing entrance that continues to entice as the enjoyable varied vocal attack of Archie Hatfield blazes away with angst and passion. He shows a diversity and imagination in this song alone which is echoed throughout the band and song, and though Mirrors offers familiar spicery, it makes for a stirring slice of post-hardcore bred rock ‘n’ roll.

It’s All Smiles and Laughter rolls in with a lighter and brighter air, its infectiousness aligned to elegant keys and a cleaner vocal presence to Hatfield. Also embracing a pop rock ingredient, the song soon brews up a more volatile intensity and intent, its eruption stirring and when the track especially hits full potency. Across its length though, imagination and craft is a magnetic lure but it just lacks the same striking spark as its predecessor and indeed the following Pitch Black. It too merges emotive calm and beauty with a tempestuous irritability and angst, this time crafting a more balanced and perpetually stirring proposition with a healthy scent of Billy Talent to it.

The melodic enterprise already lighting tracks is given a full canvas with Rosa where guitars and keys converge in a misty coaxing before uniting for a contagious incitement which punctuates and at times inflames the emotive balladry driving the song. Beats are punchy and the bass a throaty tempting, even as their shadows become bound in the sonic tendrils spun by the guitars. It is a potent affair with moments of gripping adventure and though the clean vocals are not as impacting as they are in other moments in the EP, it is fair to say the raw charm of the song pleases whilst offering more variety to the release with its cleverly aligned textures.

The Things I’ve Seen is closed by How We Survive, a raucous and dynamic onslaught of fierce punk ‘n’ roll. it ensures the EP ends on a high, even if it lets its ferocious roar and in turn creative intensity ebb and flow a touch. Nevertheless it is a great end to a heftily satisfying proper introduction to Everyday Sidekicks. It is early days but the band has plenty going for them in sound and invention and a potential hard to dismiss.

The Things I’ve Seen EP is released November 20th through all stores.

Pete RingMaster 19/11/2015

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Dream State – Consequences

Dream State Promo Shot _RingMaster Review

Approaching their first birthday as a band, South Wales post-hardcore band Dream State make a potent introduction of themselves to broader national attention with their debut EP Consequences. The quintet has already offered an enjoyable little teaser in the shape of previous single Burn Them Down, its catchy roar a strong enticing to a great many but fair to say it is the EP which provides real insight into the songwriting and sound of the band. Consequences might not be an encounter to turn the UK rock scene on its head but it does suggest that Dream State is a nicely brewing prospect to take a keen interest in.

Since forming, the band has become a potent live proposition too, shows with the likes of The Dirty Youth and Fearless Vampire Killers only helping their emergence and reputation for rousing slices of alternative rock/post-hardcore incitements. Inspirations include bands such as A Day To Remember, Funeral for a Friend, Bullet for my Valentine, and Alexisonfire; essences which maybe right now colour their songs more than originality but as proven by Consequences, it does not stop them providing thoroughly enjoyable exploits for ears and appetite to indulge in.

Cover _RingMaster Review   The EP opens with Burden, a track growing from an initial sonic mist punctured by firmly swung beats into an energetic and boisterous canter led by the quickly impressing vocals of Charlotte-Jayne Gilpin. Nicely backed by the more raw throated tones of rhythm guitarist Sam Harrison-Little, she is a potent focal point from which the magnetic shuffle of Danny Rayer’s bass and the melodic intrigue rich enterprise of the guitar spring. The track continues to entice and please, its body unsurprising but character and heart dynamic as it provides a thickly satisfying start to Consequences.

Individual craft is also a swift persuasion, the sonic endeavour of lead guitarist Aled Evans at times a fiery proposal always matched across the band, as shown straight away again with Burn Them Down. Opening on a robust stride with the rhythmic swipes of drummer Jamie Lee immediately shaping the entrance, the song slips into an infectious stroll of hungry riffs and melodic prowess with a great hook out of the Billy Idol songbook. Again there is familiarity to the track as it rumbles with aggression and sonic seduction, but once more recognisable hues only work in the song’s favour as Gilpin gives every syllable striking energy and passion.

Consequences is a release which satisfies throughout but gets stronger with every passing track, Try Again continuing that great trait with its reflective bellow and rapacious prowl. The rhythms almost dance with their restrained but open intimidation whilst twists and vocals create a drama between them which has ears and imagination quickly involved. The most inventive song so far, with great moments of unpredictability, it provides a tenacious outpouring of sound and emotion matched by the following Relentless. From its first acidic breath, vocal squalls blow and grooves entwine; Gilpin driving things with vocal flames as predacious rhythms have her back. Maybe it is a more formula offering than its predecessor but the song is a fire of emotive intensity and creative energy which only leaves enjoyment full and a wish for more.

That want is fed straight away by the excellent Rebuild, Recreate; a song soon proving to be our favourite. Initially caressing ears with an acoustic kiss aligned to the tantalising warmly emotive voice of Gilpin, it simmers then boils into a sultrily aired tempest of emotion and angst wrapped in just as impassioned and adventurous sound. Again drama lines every roar and twist, the guitars crafting a web of expression and enterprise to match the vocals whilst bass and drums add further potency to its tempting, especially when they subsequently become more agitated.

The track is a mighty end to a persistently enticing and enjoyable incitement. It is fair to say that Dream State is still working towards finding its own voice as a band but heading in the right direction as proven by Consequences. It is easy to assume that they have a very bright future ahead of them if they can really build on this rewarding first proper glimpse at them.

The Consequences EP is out November 20th through all platforms and stores.

Pete RingMaster 19/11/2015

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False Heads – Steal and Cheat

FALSHEADS _RingMaster Review

There was without a doubt a rich twinge of intrigue and anticipation when UK rockers False Heads got in touch about a new single coming out. It was a surge of excitement inspired by memories of the band’s still impressing and thrilling previous pair of EPs and soon fiercely lit again by the actual rousing temptation of Steal and Cheat itself. The single is a thumping stomp of indie rock tenacity amidst grouchy rhythms and punk seeded invention; a track which whips up ears and enthused involvement as easily as it awakens a greedy appetite for more.

artwork _RingMaster Review     East London bred False Heads made its first steps in the opening month of 2014 and quickly began enticing attention and whipping up a loyal and quickly increasing following. Around the summer of that first year, the trio released the Tunnel Vision EP, a rousing quartet of tracks more than doing its bit to lure further and greater focus the way of the band. It also provided a strong base from which the band could expand and explore its songwriting and sound, and that they had by the time its successor, the Wear and Tear EP, had leapt into ears this past April. Whereas the first encounter was a grunge hued affair, its successor revealed a dirtier and heavier rock tempest to its enterprise and invention. Steal And Cheat shows another strong twist in sound from those before it whilst carrying the increasingly distinctive False Heads character and voice.

Steal and Cheat is quickly into its punk ‘n’ roll canter, the guitars and rhythms colluding in a boisterous canter as the trio of Luke Griffiths, Jake Elliott, and Barney Nash get to work on the imagination with theirs. This time around, the threesome weaves a more restrained and minimalistic proposal of, as suggested earlier, indie and punk enterprise bound in a wind of virulent energy and vocal revelry. The bass is a hefty lure, its throaty swing and presence a cantankerous incitement alongside the sonic web of guitar and the invitingly anthemic vocal delivery. With the drums leading the tempting, it is fair to say that everything about the song is an incitement of catchiness though, and increasingly irresistible over its length and every play.

Like a fusion of Houdini, The Vibrators, and Libertines, whose Gary Powell releases the single on his 25 Hour Convenience Store label, Steal And Cheat is instinctive manna for the ears and easily the finest track from False Heads yet.

Steal And Cheat is released December 4th via 25 Hour Convenience Store @

Upcoming False Heads live dates:

November 27th – Cult Cafe in Ipswich

16th Jan – Stag and Hounds in Bristol

Pete RingMaster 19/11/2015

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Asylums – Missing Persons

asylums _RingMaster Review

There is no escaping that UK indie rockers Asylums continue to impress and excite as they reveal more aspects to their kaleidoscope of sonic contagion through their releases. Further evidence of that success is now to be found in new single Missing Persons, their mellowest hug of melodic enterprise and off-kilter prowess yet. The song is also another tenacious roar of the energy and infection soaked revelry that the Southend hailing quartet is becoming richly renowned for and a reinforcement of the eager accusation we are not alone in casting, that Asylums is one of Britain’s truly exciting bands.

artwork _RingMaster Review     The foursome of Luke Branch, Jazz Miell, Henry Tyler, and Michael Webster introduced us to their scintillating creative credentials through the exceptional Wet Dream Fanzine EP this past February. It was a three track collection of the band’s singles to date, and a slightly deranged explosion of angular noise pop to get lustful over. Released via the band’s own Cool Thing Records, the EP was an inescapable wakeup call later backed by the single Joy In A Small Wage. Play-listed by Radio One amongst thick support and attention all round, the track opened up the more seductively mellow side of the Asylums sound whilst accentuating a busy summer of success which saw the band playing a host of UK and European Festivals including Glastonbury. Now it is the turn of Missing Persons to light a fuse to swift acclaim and hungry new appetites for more; success hard to see being escaped such the persuasion of the richly dynamic song.

From its opening strand of spicy guitar, Missing Persons simply lures ears and imagination; that initial hook replaced by similarly effective bass bait as the song slips into a Weezer meets Supergrass stroll with grinning melodies aligning with matching vocals. Bounding along with restraint and eagerness simultaneously, the song is arguably the most straight forward track from Asylums yet, but a deception as essences of Dickies like devilry and Post Adolescence meets Sonic Youth melodic revelry lines its rousing seducing throughout.

The song continues to enthral and ignite, persuading the body to swing to its canter and thoughts to breed lusty praise for its warm psych pop fun. It also confirms that Asylums have many strings to their warped pop bow and a continued fusion of all will only ensure we will all have a thrilling adventure ahead with them.

Missing Persons is released November 20th via Cool Thing Records through most online stores.

Upcoming Asylums live dates:


20th London Forum (with The Enemy)

21st Coventry Empire (with The Enemy)

22nd Portsmouth Wedgewood Rooms (with The Enemy)


2nd Bristol Bierkeller (with Ash)

3rd London Shepherds Bush Empire (with Ash)

5th Newcastle Riverside (with Ash)

6th Glasgow ABC (with Ash)

8th Manchester The Ritz (with Ash)

9th Wolverhampton Leadmill (with Ash)

12th Norwich Waterfront (with Ash)

13th Brighton Concorde 2 (with Ash)

14th Cardiff Uni Students Union (with Ash)

15th Dublin Olympia Theatre (with Ash)

Pete RingMaster 19/11/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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