The Life Underfoot Interview

Hello and thanks for taking time out to talk with us.

Can you first introduce the band and give us some background to the band’s beginning?

We’re Life Underfoot from Owego New York. Our guitarist and vocalist Andre and bassist Emory went to school and graduated with each other so we’ve known each other awhile. James our drummer we met through local shows and just clicked!

Have you been in other bands before? If so has that had any impact on what you are doing now, in maybe inspiring a change of style or direction?

We all have different musical interest, James is more of a progressive kinda guy, Emory listens to a lot of underground and grunge music, Andre listen to a lot of music a lot of punk/emo stuff. We’ve all been in other bands as well. James is currently in this rad band called Tom Jolu; check them out.

What inspired the band name?

Our 10th grade bio teacher had a poster on the wall of a cut out section of the ground. On the side it said Life Underfoot and Andre always thought it was a sick name for a band.

Was there any specific idea behind the forming of the band and also in what you wanted it and your sound to offer?

We all just really wanted to be in a band where everyone is dedicated and wants to play shows and tour!!

Do the same things still drive the band from when it was fresh-faced?

We haven’t been a band very long so it’s still pretty fresh faced! But you do start to understand it is not as grand as it always seems!!

Since your early days, how would you say your sound has evolved?

Hard to say cause we’ve only been a band for going on 2 years, but we played with this awesome band called Vitamin K from Iowa, check them out cause we wouldn’t mind going that route eventually.

Are changes within the creativity of the band more organic or deliberate moves to try new things?

Everything is organic, Andre brings his ideas and demos to practice then we just kinda go from there. James has a lot of knowledge in music so he really helps shapes and perfects our songs.

Presumably across the band there is a wide range of inspirations; are there any in particular which have impacted not only on the band’s music but your personal approach and ideas to creating and playing music?

A lot of the Warped Tour band from like 2001-2006; we’re big fans of just timeless music that everyone loves and can sing along to. Bands like Taking Back Sunday and Brand New have songs that when they come on everyone sings and has a good time.

Is there a process to the songwriting which generally guides the creation of songs?

Typically Andre write the music, then Emory and Andre sit down to write the lyrics, then James gives pointer where to tweak and make the songs flow better. Really nice process that seems to work for us.

Where do you, more often than not, draw the inspirations to the lyrical side of your songs?

Well it could be anything; Emory and Andre tend to work on the lyrics together, one line could be from Andre’s life or Emory’s life. From a song either of us really likes. Or just something one of our friends wrote and thought it we’d like it!! Andre’s friends Orion and Connor have both written lyrics for some unreleased songs we’re still working on!

Give us some background to your latest release.

Peaks and Valleys EP…We recorded it at the Lumberyard in New Jersey. Really great EP and had a blast recording it. Wanted to go for an acoustic sombre emo vibe.

Give us some insight to the themes and premise behind it and its songs.

Andre wrote it as a story, not a love story but about any relationship ending in track 1, Our Swan Song, then the protagonist starts to talk about it in track 2, Clock Face, and finally with track 3, Chroma, the character moves on and realises that no matter how hard life hits ya don’t lose ya shade of color that makes you special, hence the line “through all the hardship and pain, that only stain black and grey, think all of that you can gain, just gotta look to the next day.

Are you a band which goes into the studio with songs pretty much in their final state or prefer to develop them as you record?

We like to have our idea for the song complete and ready before we hit the studio but are always still open to ideas, that’s how great songs are made! Everyone has something that can always bring and take away from parts of a song so never be afraid to at least try out suggestions.

Tell us about the live side to the band, presumably a favourite aspect of being in a band?

We just like to have a good time on stage and rock out! That’s our favorite part and biggest reason for being in a band! Just that feeling of being on stage and people watching is thrilling.

It is not easy for any new band to make an impact regionally let alone nationally and further afield. How have you found it?

Well where we’re from Emo and Punk music are the most popular. Mostly Country, Bluegrass, or cover bands. But Binghamton and Syracuse have always been great to us and the scenes are awesome. Same with New Jersey and Connecticut we’ve had more shows out in those states than Owego.

How has the internet and social media impacted on the band to date?

Social media is a great thing for musicians, bands, and artists!! Without that we wouldn’t have had as many of the opportunities we’ve gotten. We’ve gotten the chance to talk to and work with many of our idols because of things like Bandcamp and Facebook!

Once again a big thanks for sharing time with us; anything you would like to add or reveal for the readers?

Check us out on Bandcamp all our music is free on there!!

https://lifeunderfootny.bandcamp.com/  https://www.facebook.com/Lif3Underfoot/

Pete RingMaster 07/12/2018

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Perfect Pop Co Op Sampler – Impulsive Compulsions 01

 

As we all look for the perfect gift for loved ones this time of year, the irrepressible UK indie label Perfect Pop Co Op are giving one to all music lovers. Free with the December issue of their magazine, Impulsive Compulsions 01 brings together 13 tracks from six unique bands and seven projects past and present borne from within the Perfect Pop Co Op family; quite simply a baker’s dozen of the best and most mischievous songs and artists you could wish dangling from the stocking on your various speakers.

From start to finish, the album teases and flirts with the imagination as it dances with ears; getting off to a mighty start with Scant Regard. The band is the solo project of London-based guitarist/writer/producer Will Crewdson renowned for his work with the likes of Adam Ant, The Selecter, Johnette Napolitano, Flesh for Lulu, Bow Wow Wow, She Made Me Do It and Rachel Stamp, which he co-founded. Taken from his snare of an album, the wonderful Skipping Over Damaged Area which was released earlier this year, Destroy (We’re Here to) is a salacious flirtation of electro punk/ synth pop intimation; a viral infection which could even have the walking dead dancing to its hook spun, groove strung, guitar driven, funk sprouting machination.

It is a glorious start which sets the tone to the sampler, each track unapologetically individual in sound and character but united in DIY imagination, devilish intent, and sonic goodness as proven immediately by next up Impulsive Compulsions by Pony Virus. The band is the original incarnation of The Scratch and the track a tantalising piece of post punk shoe gaze as haunting as it is infectious. The song is a slice of weird with hues of eighties bands such as The Passage, The Wonder Stuff and Inspiral Carpets; teasing with these somewhat familiar spices in a whole new recipe sounding as fresh now as it did back in the day.  The Scratch itself provides its own piece of temptation later in the album’s playlist with Teen Idol, itself a ridiculously magnetic encounter which had us hooked from the first rumbling growl of bass. Currently on hiatus after releasing a quartet of greedily devoured albums, the band’s sound s pure pop/indie punk romping blessed with seventies DIY adventure and inescapable contagion.

Through the sinister dark electronica bred dystopia of Age of Control in a remix by creators Rogue Sector, a track which also haunts ears and thoughts whilst teasing hips to gather momentum with its electronic dissonance, and the wonk pop punk bred Limited Ambition swung through ears by Andreas And The Wolf, temptation and captivation to the album only deepened. Both bands have debut albums in the works and each has been given a rich teaser through their contributions to Impulsive Compulsions.

Andreas And The Wolf also provide the radio show which this album has mutually sprung from with Perfect Pop Co Op, all favourite artists being greedily featured over time, none more so than the following pair of Dislocated Flowers and The Tuesday Club. The first of the pair gives AudioBiological to the parade of aural independence, an invasive psych rock track inciting the body to erupt as it corrupts the senses with its imposing and invigorating instrumental incitement. Unshakeable favourites and friends to The RR, The Tuesday Club simply infested the passions with Too Pure To Live, a slow swing of a creative virus directing hips and imagination like a puppeteer. The band has unleashed numerous gems over the past few years but this track alone shows they are creating not only their finest escapades but some of that fuelling the independent rock scene.

And the goodness just kept coming, just confirming already the thought we had rattling around the brain that this is an essential, indeed must have release.  The Venus Overload kept the suggestion bubbling with their encounter Without Doubt, a sixties nurtured psych pop lure echoing the band’s major inspiration, The Velvet Underground, but with its own compelling persona.

Further into the album, the poetic drama and stark atmospheric breath of Sometimes When I Dream simply infested thought and appetite, the dark soundscape from Southdown Laundry Club, a  project created by Pete ‘Joyless’ Jones (Department S) and Andrew Trussler (Rogue Sector) as mesmeric as it is chilling.

In its own way, Dead Marchers is just as tenebrific and haunting, the track by Bleeding Soul Angels an inviting smog of psych and dark pop with a raw edge to its contagion while the following Dream boy doin’ well had the body bouncing with its punkabilly stomp. The Bleeed is an offshoot of four members out of The Tuesday Club when it was a seven strong rascal, and features the devious swings of drummer and gentleman Terry Super Cockell, who since its creation has passed away. The band has vowed to return this year and on this scoundrel of a track we for one cannot wait.

The album is finished off by firstly Waiting for the Walls to Come Down from The Dodo. A band made up of Andy Scratch, Steve Filth and John the Bassist, who released one album in 2010 before the side project was put aside, they had the body bouncing like it was on a string with their contribution. Mixing sixties pop and seventies new wave to try and describe its epidemic of temptation, the track is another in a perpetual line of major treats, the last coming with album closer Way it goes. From Reverse Family, a project headed by the reported missing but maybe we know better (wink wink) Dermot Illogical, the band have just completed their 2018 epic task of releasing 365 songs over 365 in weekly EPs, an epic adventure in sound and pleasure we are still catching up on such its size. Way it goes gives all the reasons with its Adam & The Ants-esque, swing spun chicanery for you to go check it out too and the band’s debut album it comes from, My Songs About Life – Mid Crisis.

There are a host of truly great independent labels out there right now and Perfect Pop Co Op stands right there on the frontline and as mentioned all songs and artists have been featured on the Andreas and the Wolf radio show which equally we can only heartily recommend; the album in celebration of one year of their shows and fifty issues of the Perfect Pop Co Op magazine.

The Perfect Pop Co Op Sampler – Impulsive Compulsions 01 is out December 11th free with the new issue of the Perfect Pop Co Op magazine.

https://theperfectpopco-op.bandcamp.com/   https://perfectpopco-op.co.uk   https://www.facebook.com/perfectpopcoop/   https://perfectpopco-op.co.uk/magazine/

Pete RingMaster 5/12/2018

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Oxygen Thief – Confusion Species

As a year rapidly draws towards its festive close and best of lists are being considered there is always a few gate crashers to make you think again. One sure to make the biggest noise demanding consideration is the new album from UK outfit Oxygen Thief. Unleashing eleven instinctive roars which simply command greedy attention, Confusion Species is the third album from the Bristol based band and one of the year’s most essential, voracious rock ‘n’ roll releases.

Imagining harnessing the core essence and ingenuity of Reuben, Therapy?, and Max Raptor, then mixing them with a catalyst which breeds and evolves a whole new and unique intoxication and you get a good idea of the rousing holler that is Confusion Species. It is that originality amidst openly imaginative writing and craft which ensures the album simply invites attention and we for one did not need asking twice; one listen enough to be hooked on one of 2018’s most exciting moments.

Lyrically bred and embroiled in the life entangling social and political issues of today, Confusion Species uncages its heart driven blast from its first breath, opener End Of The Pier Pressure instantly and forcibly strolling in with muscle and confrontational intent. Yet there is a devilish imagination to its purpose, ebbs and flows of intensity accentuating the drama which fuels every note let alone twist and turn. The vocals of guitarist and band founder Barry Dolan are pure magnetism, his words accentuating the lure which is echoed in the throaty trespass of Neil Elliott’s bass and the hefty swings of drummer Ben Whyntie.

The track is superb and quickly matched in strength and captivation by Atheist Dior, a song which challenges as it incites; its attack a nagging persistence built on a web of hooks and grooves and ridden by just as rousing vocals alongside a bassline as cantankerous as it is tempting.

The following Uncommon People looms on ears with a metal hued trespass, its prowl a heavy invasion easily devoured as too it’s blossoming visceral tango of wiry sounds and emotive intimation. Earlier mentioned Rueben comes to mind often across Confusion Species, this track especially prompting that reference before the punkier pop rock of Troublethink pounced and ingrained itself on senses and passions with defiance as raw energy fuels its creative animation.

The following pair of Suspension Bridge Of Disbelief and Rubbish Life Is Modern simply escalated the impressive start and lure of the album so far; the first a punchy slice of punk ’n’ roll swinging with uncompromising intent springing hooks which dig deep and riffs which worm under the skin with ease, especially the dirty lures escaping the bass. Its successor shows a more composed attack though the intensity and dynamics of its predecessors are just as eager to infest another compelling moment with post punk echoes adding to its masterful persuasion.

Both I Used To Be Elephants with its stalking riffs and irresistible vocal grooving and Lost In The Post, a track with more insatiable lures than a red light district, enthral, excite and examine body and energy with their individual manipulations. Each also highlights the great backing vocals and harmonies which collude with Dolan’s very fine lead as well as the melodic prowess behind the heavy roars of songs across the release; a tapestry exploited in great style once more within Graffiti; Irony; Lists. The bordering on carnivorous track teases with raw guitar caresses initially; lures soon joined by the earthy strains of a brooding bass and Whyntie’s ever dynamic swings as things gather to hungrily grab ears and imagination.

The album concludes with firstly You Snooze You Lose, a rebellion of sound, texture and word which left ears impatient for plenty more, and finally Practice Makes Perspex. The last track is a maze of enterprise; every way you turn ears confronted by a kinetic eddy of sonic and rhythmic dexterity slightly crazed and just a touch anxious and completely irresistible.

Those last two words sums up Confusion Species perfectly if without sharing all of the magnificence making up its whole. From start to finish it is musical alchemy, so much so that we could not choose a favourite track; all seizing the honour.  So if there is one release you simply must explore between now and any deadline you wish to choose, Oxygen Thief have it ready and waiting to devour you and for you to devour.

Confusion Species is out now via Xtra Mile Recordings; available @ https://oxygenthief.bandcamp.com/album/confusion-species-2

https://oxygenthiefmusic.com/   https://www.facebook.com/oxygenthief666   https://twitter.com/oxygenthiefyeah

Pete RingMaster 30/11/2018

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

The Howling Lords – Texas Medicine

Providing some blues rock liquor to re-invigorate sometimes complacent ears, Scottish trio The Howling Lords signed off November with the release of Texas Medicine. The band’s second album, it provides a captivating rumble and grumble of dirty blues bred tracks which plenty of blues and heavy rock fans should find an instinctive taste for.

Hailing from Isle of Lewis, The Howling Lords emerged late 2015 and within a handful of months lured keen ears with debut single Bad For Me. Just as eager attention and praise followed with a busy 2017 seeing the release of their self-titled debut album and the Dead Letters EP, the latter seeing the band’s sound further defined in craft and individuality which Texas Medicine now fully embraces.

From the first tease of opener Looking At Me, the album is a boozy tantalising of ears mixing the familiar with the band’s own fresh invention. The first track writhes with the intoxicated swings of a temptress, the guitar of vocalist Felix Saunders shaping its melodic inebriation as the heavy rhythmic stroll of bassist Jens Johansen shares its swagger to the crisp beats of Eoghainn Lapsley.

It is a potent start swiftly matched and indeed eclipsed by the contagious prowl of Black Dog. For two and a half minutes it as good as stalks the listener but with an invitation to its welcoming lair in every groove, vocal tempting, and rhythmic incitement.

As tracks reveal their individual prowess with garage/blues rock nurtured sounds there is no escaping thoughts of bands such as The Black Keys, Black Pistol Fire and indeed a heavily set Creedence Clearwater Revival; flavours which entice as much as The Howling Lords own raw and dirt encrusted breeding. That feral aspect is a prime essence of the excellent Moves To Keep Me, a punk blues roar which swiftly got under the skin.

Through the likes of the calmer whisky blooded Talk Like That and Green Dress with its rock ‘n’ roll ruggedness, band and album only tightened their hold on attention while subsequent tracks such as the sonically baying Howling At the Moon and the salacious She Devil brought further shots of temptation the way of ears and enjoyment.

For us it is fair to say that Texas Medicine needed a few plays for tracks to truly expose their richness and emerging individuality but more because of our less instinctive appetite for blues rock compared to other genres but with every listen came fresh pleasure as the final trio of Still Waters, Soul To Sell, and God On The Stairs proved. All three made for a firmly enticing proposition but grew by the listen, the first through its almost invasive weight and incisive grooving and its successor with melodic flames which erupt from a perpetual white hot smoulder to singe the senses.

The final track of the free is a melody bred ballad revealing another hue to the band’s creativity and sound; a track epitomising the magnetic touch of the band’s music. It completes an album which from a good impression has blossomed into one highly enjoyable and easy to return to offering.

Texas Medicine is out via all platforms on 30th November.

https://www.facebook.com/thehowlinglords   https://twitter.com/thehowlinglords

Pete RingMaster 30/11/2018

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Zedi Forder – I Don’t Want To Set The World On Fire/Ditties 1 EP

For us one of music’s best adventures over the past decade has been the creative emprise of songwriter/vocalist/drummer Chris Kerley; an escapade taking in acclaimed releases from bands such as Tricore, An Entire Legion, Rind Skank, Kid Golhum and now Zedi Forder. It has been a journey Kerley has for the main taken with guitarist Mark Carstairs but is now just the songwriter with new creative mischiefs on board for the latest encounters from the latter of that long line of great projects.

Ahead of a new single released this December, Zedi Forder recently unveiled the Ditties 1 EP, a collection of tracks which did not quite fit the alt metal/rock palette of the band but more than deserved a full airing. It is fair to say that each has the inimitable touch and character of a Kerley song, his distinctive tones and melodic prowess unmistakable as too the devilish humour which always lurks around his compositions and often takes over the driving seat, but just fall outside the palette of the band’s previous offerings.

With guitarist April Cox and bassist Rich Tomsett alongside Kerley and more of an indie pop/rock sound to its contents, Ditties 1 opens up with Fine Wine. It is a song which as soon as its initial bass lure is joined by a similarly enticing guitar hook has the body swaying, a bolder bounced incited by its lively and increasingly bold, defiant and tongue in cheek stroll. With a Queen-esque hue to its captivation and imagination, the track needed barely a play to get under the skin and have mutual participation involved.

Teasing hooks and sultry shimmers accompany the entrance of Forget about me next, one of a couple of songs which would not have glaringly been out of place within the bands outstanding debut album of last year we would suggest but certainly have their own particular flavour. It too swiftly and easily had attention and involvement hooked, Kerley just as adept at breeding pop songs as more predacious encounters.

I Am with its piano elegance and intimation as well as Cox’s great harmonic backing tones simply beguiled especially as its opening arms brought a virulent rock ‘n’ roll saunter while Sit and Wait provides an relatable intimate croon which again had body and thoughts swaying in pleasure and recognition before Something Else shines with its crystalline balladry and emotive charm.

The EP also features two bonus tracks in Football in the park and Spookums though the latter is not listed, songs which share the same reggae/folk devilment and indeed tune as too Reeves and Mortimer like humour and released previously during the World Cup and Halloween periods respectively; tracks which dare you not to join in with the biggest knowing grin.

As mentioned the EP was released ahead of a single; that track being a cover of The Inkspots classic I don’t want to set the world on fire. Embracing the forties nostalgia of the original with their own particular misbehaviour, the track bewitched ears and vocal chords, again rather quickly and enjoyably. It is a track which makes the perfect Christmas song if you have no appetite for the infernal creative clichés and bells most have to come with.

With a highly anticipated new album slated for next year, both Ditties 1 and I don’t want to set the world on fire make for a great appetite pleasing slice of Zedi Forder; a one of a kind treat few can emulate.

The Ditties 1 EP is out now as a pay what you want purchase via https://tricore.bandcamp.com/album/zedi-forder-ditties-1-indie-rock-punk-ep with I don’t want to set the world on fire released December 7th.

https://www.facebook.com/zediforder

Pete RingMaster 01/12/2018

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Dead Retinas – Divine EP

Though they made a pretty instant splash in the pool of attention and praise with their debut, the Dead Retinas vs. The World EP back in 2012, it is fair to say that the UK band has simply grown in strength, sound, and in luring praise ever since. Each subsequent release from that potent first has provided a rousing proposition with the Manchester band’s most striking yet coming in the shape of their new creative offensive, the Divine EP.

Without doubt there has been a fresh attack and imagination in the band’s writing and hardcore/punk bred sound with every release but now real maturity and a deviously manipulative essence has emerged. It was intriguingly hinted at within the 2017 released Coup De Grâce and now has become an uncompromisingly stirring force within its successor, Divine. An unscrupulous fusion of hardcore and noise punk, the new Dead Retinas offering provides three tracks which stalk the senses and bait the spirit whilst revelling in that new breath of adventure in the band’s sound. The EP is also the first release with the band’s new line-up in full antagonistic roar, a creative holler seeing Dead Retinas stalking the reputation of punk’s heavyweights.

The Laurie Morbey produced Divine opens up with Gold in Monochrome and immediately descends on the senses and nerves with a predatory rhythmically prowling groove. The vocals of CJ Smith are just as swift, bawling almost brawling in ears with his usual potent presence. The guitar of Jack Thompson springs his scything lures and nagging hooks soon after as the swinging beats of Chris Heath batter already beleaguered but devouring senses. With the bass of Chris Gaduzo continuing its almost guttural tempting, the track writhes and twists as it rages; raw flirtation and invasive invention fuelling it’s unpredictable and seriously enjoyable enterprise.

The following You Go Glen Coco is just as compelling and insatiable in its antics. It too moves with the lust of a whirling dervish but with a composure which just accentuates its carnivorous intent. Again the band casts grooves which easily and quickly got under the skin, rhythms voracious with their own infectious animosity and all combined creating an increasingly expanding and imaginative infestation of sound and dissension.

By no means left behind in creative prowess, final song An Exercise in Bad Taste erupts in ears with immediate hostility, Smith again leading the trespass as rhythms malevolently dance and the sonic toxicity of Thompson’s strings blazes. Once more imagination soaked unpredictability infests the track, its movements often bordering on the spasmodic but with a fluidity which makes for an unrelenting molestation and pleasure.

As seems to be the trend with Dead Retinas releases, Divine reveals new growth in their sound and creative adventure but one which easily overshadows anything before it and so much so that the band might struggle to eclipse it next time but then again this is Dead Retinas…

The Divine EP is out November 30th, available @ https://deadretinas.bandcamp.com/album/divine as well as Spotify, Apple Music etc.

https://www.facebook.com/DeadRetinas/   https://twitter.com/DeadRetinas

Pete RingMaster 30/11/2018

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Owl Company – Iris

Courting the richest essences of metal and heavy rock for a roar which resonates like an invigorating air clearing storm, Brazilian rockers Owl Company have just released their new album. A thirteen track anthemic holler, Iris has an eye on the intimate and worldly explored through sounds which are equally as broad as they are inwardly nurtured; it all resulting in a record which simply thrilled and impressed at every turn.

From São Paulo, the foundations for Owl Company began when vocalist Enrico Minelli and guitarist Felipe Ruiz began writing together, the pair soon bringing in drummer Thiago Biasoli. 2017 saw the release of debut album, Horizon, and the recruitment of guitarist Bruno Solera and bassist Fabio Yamamoto. A flame of attention upon the band was soon burning bright, Owl Company touring the US, and only intensified by the release of their single Pieces which led to them signing with Eclipse Records earlier this year. Now the band is poised to strike internationally with the release of the Matt Wallace (Maroon 5, Faith No More) mixed and Paul Logus (Stone Sour, Pop Evil) mastered Iris.

It opens up with the breath-taking One Last Time. Instantly the great bearish growl of Minelli is melodically snarling in the hug of voracious riffs and tenacious rhythms. A break in its trespass brings spicy grooves and a magnetic swagger bred in a collusion of melodic metal and heavy hard rock. As each song proves, there is an array of flavours entangled in the band’s rousing sound, each spicing united in open craft and hearty endeavour.

It is a thumping start to the album more than backed by the following Boogie Man, the track unleashing its groove from the first second and never relinquishing its lusty grip thereon in. From the earthy grumble of the bass to the voracious enterprise of the guitars, the song is a masterfully animated incitement; Minelli’s tones the ringleader to its anthemic prowess as it grabbed best track honours.

Next up, Rise brings a calmer proposition but one just as earnest in its heart and captivating in its layered dynamics building small crescendos which erupt in emotive intensity. As with all tracks, there is drama in every note and syllable which compels attention, its successor, Antagonist, just one echo in that respect. The band’s new single, it initially badgers and harries the senses before twisting into a flirtatious trespass full of unpredictability turns and stirring imagination. In a clutch of seconds it can stalk and prey on ears and within another few hug its victim with melodic caresses as it proves itself another major peak within the album.

The previous and lead single from Iris is the next,  Shattered Dreams igniting ears and appetite with its own tapestry of styles and textures in an inviting web bordering battlefield of enterprise while Dawn of Days in turn provides a mellower but still fiery offering with Minelli imperial, in a Rasputin way, within the enthralling wiry net of grooves and melody cast by Ruiz and Solera. The big swinging beats of Biasoli as ever provide an imposingly arousing incitement as Yamamoto’s bass springs a sweet spot hitting groove to complete the track’s manipulative persuasion.

Through the big boned, contagious southern rock lined enticement of Broken Paradigm and the predacious emotionally strained lures of Disconnected, the album’s hand only tightens on praise and enjoyment while Forbidden Ground stirs another eddy of full pleasure with its deviously grooved, Clutch-esque bellow. All three hit the spot with the third another pinnacle in an encounter proving an addictive encounter.

The Other Side soon shows that Owl Company are just as adept at emotion woven balladry, the song a tantalising croon with a great mercurial character to its volatile landscape; one especially blossoming on the craft of bass and voice.  Maybe not as immediately striking as those before it, the track only grows by the listen rising to be another big moment within Iris.

The final trio of Shades, with its enlivening dynamics, the intimately reflecting Doors, and the impassioned Angel bring the release to a powerful and stirring close, the final track especially bewitching. Each adds a new shade to the creative palette of Iris and all as rousing in their singularly individual ways as the earlier vociferous anthems.

Among a host of truly impressive and more importantly thrilling encounters to escape 2018, Iris ranks with the very best and Owl Company will soon have to deal with being under the biggest spotlights. Something you can only see them grabbing with eager hands.

Iris is out now through Eclipse Records across most stores.

https://www.facebook.com/owlcoband/

Pete RingMaster 16/11/2018

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright