High Moonlight Interview

From São Paulo, Brazil, High Moonlight recently gave us the pleasure to talk about and get to the heart of its unique sound…

Hello and thanks for taking time out to talk with us.

Can you first introduce the band and give us some background to how it all started?

The band High Moonlight was formed in the late 90s among some friends of the school. All we wanted was to play a good old rock in roll as high as possible, that’s what united us in the beginning. The grunge scene was high at the time, bands like Nirvana, Alice and others dominated the rock scene of the time, we did not like that sound and we wanted to play the good old Heavy / Rock of all time.

We heard Dio, Sabbath, AC / DC, Rainbow … so they were the bands that inspired us. At first we were just a trio, guitar, bass and drums. Like all bands, we used to play several covers of bands we used to sing (Uriah Heep, Dio, Rainbow), but the goal was always their own songs.

Have you been or are involved in other bands?

No, I’ve never been involved with other bands. My focus has always been High Moonlight.

What inspired the band name?

I have always enjoyed mystical, magical, supernatural and related things. That was precisely what I wanted to address in my lyrics. And the moon is a very mystical symbol, both for wizards, enchanted beings, wolves and Lycans, so I chose it as the name of my band and added the word “High” to magnify it even more. High Moonlight is a tribute to this historical and mysterious symbol that is the moon and all the mystical beings that exist or existed and are part of our history.

Do the same ideas and intention still drive the band from when it was fresh-faced or have they evolved over time?

Yes. I still preserve the same principles, the same ideals and the same goals since when I decided to take the music and the band seriously. The initial change was in relation to the members that have been changing over the years.

Since your early days, how would you say your sound has evolved?

At first I made heavy metal with a mix of progressive, the songs were longer. Over time, I have been refining my playing technique and understanding the type of sound I wanted to play. Today my music comes down to an authentic heavy metal and a lot of quality and good taste. All my songs revolve around many original and creative riffs.

Has it been more of an organic movement of sound or more you deliberately wanting to try new things?

No. My sound is defined and based on heavy rock or simply heavy metal, some call it Hard rock but I do not consider it that way.

You have already mentioned some inspirations; are there any in particular which have impacted not only on the band’s music but your personal approach and ideas to creating and playing music?

At first I listened a lot to Rainbow and Ronnie James Dio. This did not impact my sound but it always helped me a lot when composing, because I always wrote or composed my songs wondering what it would be like to have Dio, as a vocalist that is, singing my songs. Blackmore also showed me how to create things out of the ordinary inside Rock n Roll.

Is there a particular process to your songwriting?

First I create the riffs, then I compose the whole song and then I write the lyrics on top of what I just played. Nothing too complicated or different. This is my creative process.

Where do you, more often than not, draw the inspirations to the lyrical side of your songs?

I do not hear much heavy metal when I’m in the process of writing. Instead I prefer to listen to Eastern culture or classical music.

Could you give us some background to your latest release?

Our first EP that is available (for now) only on SoundCloud and as a demo, is a compilation of seven compositions that define well the High Moonlight, both sonorous and thematic. It is a Heavy Metal / Rock n Roll of the best quality possible and really innovative. It’s a way of telling people that it’s still possible to make quality music and good taste and that Heavy Metal, Rock n Roll still has a lot of firewood to burn, you can believe!!! I’m sure that after hearing “Arcturians”, “Storm” or “Inovaya” for example, many will say, “Dude, what’s this sound ?! I’ve never heard anything like it” or else: “Rock is still alive, that’s very good!!!”You can be sure!

Give us some insight to the themes and premise behind the songs.

The lyrics deal with mystical themes, conspiracies and adventures. The sound is based on creative riffs with great melodies and beautiful guitars solos. Worth checking out, yes!

Do you go into the studio with songs pretty much in their final state or prefer to develop them as you record?

Yes. I’m already in the studio with the songs developed in their final stage, practically defined.

Tell us about the live side to the band, presumably a favourite aspect of the band?

Simply play and do shows. This is the living side that motivates us to move on. We do not play for money or fame, we just like to play and period.

It is not easy for any new band to make an impact regionally let alone nationally and further afield. How have you found it?

I do not intend to please anyone with my music. Touch, compose and record for personal satisfaction. That’s what keeps me going as a musician. I’m happy when people share the same musical tastes that I hear and hear, sing and praise the band.

My space as a band is still searching and it is through communication vehicles like this that things happen little by little. Whenever I can try to spread my work around the world anyway, I just need people to pay attention to what I’m talking about and start listening to my songs so they can know and evaluate the work.

How has the internet and social media impacted on the band to date? Do you see it as something destined to become a negative from a positive as the band grows and hopefully gets increasing success or is it more that bands struggling with it are lacking the knowledge and desire to keep it working to their advantage?

I think that ended with creativity in general. But unfortunately it was the way that humanity resolved then I followed what? We need to adjust to these new conditions if we want to play our songs, there is no other way, but this for me is only degrading music in general.

Once again a big thanks for sharing time with us; anything you would like to add or reveal for the readers?

I thank you for the opportunity of this interview and I hope that people who read this can give a check on my work. I’ll leave the link here:

https://www.facebook.com/High-moonlight-1969283040044628/

SoundCloud: https://soundcloud.com/user-478894939

YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC9zSetoGXolPDAtl9eM5PWw

Pete RingMaster 12/04/2019

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Obey – Swallow The Sun

Obey have not exactly been hidden in the shadows of the UK metal scene in recent years, finding acclaim and success with increasing intensity but now the Midlands outfit is surely poised to really demand and receive major attention with the release of their new album, Swallow The Sun. Offering nine tracks of the band’s firmly individual fusion of heavy rock, groove metal, and doom bred intensity, though that only hints at the flavours involved and it all wrapped in progressive metal individuality, the band’s fourth full-length takes the listener on a creative and emotional journey shaped by fascinating imagination and potent craft.

Formed in 2008, Obey has established themselves with increasing success within the British metal scene live and across a trio of previous albums starting with their debut, New Day Rising in 2009. If that first release for the Staffordshire trio tickled strong attention, Doom Laden in 2012 and Maelstrom four years later gave it a bigger jab to reinforce a redoubtable reputation earned by their live prowess and successes. As suggested though Swallow The Sun is a proposition which swings a mighty dextrous hook at ears, swiftly revealing itself not only the band’s finest moment yet but a release which easily grabs attention away from the majority of releases to grace the year so far.

With ex- Generations and Molly Leigh drummer Ryan Gillespie completing the band’s current line-up alongside guitarist/vocalist Steve Pickin and guitarist/bassist Dan Ryder last year, Obey joined up with producer Sam Bloor at Lower Lane Studios to record Swallow the Sun and immediately the album takes a robust hand on ears with opener Back Home. Riffs straight away nag at the senses, they soon entangled in the sonic intimation of a solar thread of guitar. The band describe the album as a “sonic journey dealing with the cruelty of Dementia and the devastation it leaves, melding that together with themes of fantasy and folklore” and from its first few seconds there is a haunting dark hue to sound and atmosphere even as the track quickly collects its attributes to create tides of rhythmic and sonic enticement. Like the band’s sound is a blend of open styles skilfully united, the song is a web of textures as voracious and often predatory as they are melodic and frequently seductive; an encounter as unpredictable as it is captivating for a simply superb start to the album.

Drive follows and it too simply seizes ears from its first wiry throes before opening up its kaleidoscopic landscape, one tempestuous and as unsettled as it is creatively magnetic but a maelstrom of enterprise fluidly consuming and exciting ears. Classic hues join modern and progressive essences as the song blossoms by the twist and turn, Pickin’s vocals a strong and emotionally disturbed match for the cauldron of sounds around him. Both the opening pair of tracks has an inherent catchiness to them which is just as instinctive within next up Call Of The Judderman. Initially there is a common wiring between the third song and its predecessor, a core asylum of sonic endeavour but it soon unveils its own unique character and presence across three minutes of compelling confrontation.

Star Crusher takes the imagination on a swift heavy doom laden cruise across celestial space, its fuel imposing intensity before landing ears and appetite at the siren presence of Esmeralda And The Doom Blues. Instantly seductive verging on the salacious, the track soon reveals its medusa-esque heart in sound, endeavour, and threat whilst simply ambushing any possible resistance to its melodic bewitchment before the album’s title track romps across the senses and instincts with its flirtatious rock ‘n’ roll. Defiance to its bounce and swing was futile; submission to its virulent scheme unsurprisingly inevitable as the song rivalled and at times eclipsed the already thrilling escapade of the album so far.

A calmer air embraces ears next as The Mountain looms up, the song soon ensnaring them in its own commandingly creative lattice of guitar as rhythms manipulatively infest. Even so it is a less volatile proposition though it carries certain tempestuousness in its outstanding body of sound and imagination while snarls and wonderfully harasses the senses with its technical mastery and physical agility. Both tracks keep the lofty heights of the album in place with ease leaving Emerald Eyes to bring Swallow The Sun to a similarly fine close if it took a touch longer to elevate to the stature of other tracks.

It does though simply epitomise the band’s craft and imagination and the wonderful unpredictability of every essence making up one addictive album; Swallow The Sun announcing Obey as one seriously striking proposition.

Swallow The Sun is out now @ https://obeyuk.bandcamp.com/album/swallow-the-sun

https://www.facebook.com/Obeyuk/   https://twitter.com/obeyuk

Pete RingMaster 11/04/2019

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Erica Drive – The Hate, The Hurt, The Healing

Having introduced themselves in fair style with their self-titled debut EP, UK outfit Erica Drive have provided an even more potent roar for ears to enjoy with its successor The Hate, The Hurt, The Healing. Offering up four tracks built on a blend of pop punk and alternative rock, the new EP is an easy to embrace affair showing revelling in the growth in the band’s sound and songwriting since its predecessor.

Formed in 2017 when vocalist/guitarist Matt Underdown and guitarist Frank Harding started working on song ideas, the Bournemouth hailing band soon became a quartet with the addition of guitarist/vocalist Sam Firmin and drummer Damien Carter. Already stirring up the local live scene, the band released their first EP which subsequently earned over 10,000 plays on Spotify.  The four then became five with the addition of bassist Damian Bruton, the quintet soon after joining producer Mike White (Wolf Culture) to record The Hate, The Hurt, The Healing, with its mastering duties eventually handled by John Naclerio (My Chemical Romance).

The EP swiftly grabbed ears with opener All We Are, the EP’s lead track which does exactly that, leading the release in sound, adventure, and enterprise. As rhythms place a sturdy hand on the senses, guitars cast a dextrous web of riffs and sonic endeavour, a formidable fusion quickly commanding attention. Things relax a touch as Underdown’s vocals add their melodic tones, the song hitting a lively stride inflamed with pop punk boisterousness. Carter’s bold swings drive the captivating encounter with relish, the guitars shaping its body for the equally alluring vocals with Firmin providing potent backing to Underdown’s lead.

The following Better Man almost teases with its opening union of chirping guitar and reflective voice; a calm start growing in drama and muscle with every passing second before hitting its own tenacious stride. Imagination and enterprise accompany its every move, it too simply impressing and pleasing by the listen.

The final pair of Anchor and The Fall provides a just as enjoyable second half to the EP, the first a punchy infectious affair as catchy as it is rousing. Our favourite moment within the release, the track mixes a vociferous snarl with virulent catchiness but equally a composed restraint at times which emphasizes its melodic prowess. In turn the closing track maybe did not stir the appetite as fully as its predecessors, but with its intimate heart and melodic caresses provides a highly satisfying conclusion; the fire in its belly only adding to its enjoyment.

It is fair to say that the Erica Drive sound is not truly unique yet but it has freshness and vitality which added to the band’s instinctive imagination provides a thoroughly enjoyable listen whilst suggesting they could have a rather exciting future ahead as they breed real individuality.

The Hate, The Hurt, The Healing is released April 12th.

https://www.facebook.com/ericadriveband/   https://twitter.com/ericadriveband

Pete RingMaster 11/04/2019

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Matt Finucane – Vanishing Island

As uncertainty consumes an isle through Brexit confusion, Vanishing Island sees the troubadour of disharmony, Matt Finucane is back to confront, provoke, and captivate in his unique way. As all its predecessors, the new album is a release which comes soaked in physical and emotional discord whilst wrapped in melodic dissonance. It is another complete lure of fascination from the Brighton alternative singer songwriter and without doubt his most pop infested outing without losing any of the disharmony which gives his music its richness;  a proposition which without quite putting a finger on the actual ingredient it has added alongside a general blossoming, is easily his finest incitement yet.

The past couple of years or so has seen Finucane especially lure attention and acclaim through the likes of the Disquiet and Ugly Scene EPs, though neither success has exactly been a stranger since the release of previous album Glow In The Dark six years back. Through singles and EPs since, his sound and songwriting has thickly enticed as it has continuously grown but as suggested Vanishing Island has something extra which truly set it apart as it boisterously got under the skin.

The album carries the raw jangle of early Orange Juice, the pop disharmony of Josef K, and the sonic dissonance of Swell Maps whilst lyrically and vocally Finucane again embraces the inspirations of Mark E Smith and Lou Reed but all essences warped and mutated into its creator’s own imaginative and individual proposition. Vanishing Island opens up with War on Pain and immediately is baiting keen attention through a rhythmic pulsation swiftly joined by the inimitable tones of Finucane, his vocal delivery as maverick as his music. As the song expands with real catchiness to its swing infested hips, drone inspired melodies weave patterns in its sky colouring the route to the subsequent turbulence which from a simmer bubbles up and over.

It is a great magnetic start to the album but soon eclipsed by the following pair of Submissive Pose and Menace. The first similarly tempts with a potent rhythmic beckoning, its first lure continuing to steer the track as its pop roar and rock antics collude. Openly virulent, almost taunting ears like a blend of Television Personalities meets Marc Riley and The Creepers, the song is delicious pop cacophony and one of the albums major highlights but soon matched by its successor, The third track prowls the senses, crawling over the psyche with its singular sonic intimation but again there is an inherent catchiness in voice and character which easily seduced from within its devious drone.

Next up, Looking for a Genius is no lightweight in temptation either, its bass strolling alone enough to bait attention and more than ably assisted by the relatively calm but corrupted melodic clamour of the guitar and the general pop nurtured balladry at its heart while in turn Perilous Seat explores its own low key yet boisterous intimate clamour; both inescapable epidemics of sheer catchiness.

The dark, haunting summoning and provocative fingering of Offertory provides yet another shade to the crepuscular depths and adventures of Vanishing Island before Expensive Habits infests hips once more with its inherent pop sway; the latter carrying a hint of bands like The Only Ones and The Freshies in its eager breath.

Through the sonically suggestive, untamed croon of Yr Own Way and the seared rock ‘n’ roll of Safehouse Rules, the album expands its creative landscape further with the conclusion of the creative tour of Vanishing Island being cast by the siren sigh of Time Begins. A slow burner compared to many before, the song is an evocative shimmer on the ears and imagination, a sail into the sunset off of the album’s creative shores.

Matt Finucane is a one of a kind proposition and Vanishing Island an inimitable offering in his own creative adventure.

Vanishing Island is released May 3rd with pre-ordering available @ https://mattfinucane.bandcamp.com/album/vanishing-island

 https://mattfinucane.net/   https://www.facebook.com/Matt.x.Finucane/

Pete RingMaster 08/04/2019

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Impulsive Compulsions PPCO SAMPLER02

This month sees the next issue of the ever irresistible In The Club Magazine, the online celebration of all things DIY by Herts based Indie label Perfect Pop Co Op. This copy also includes the second volume of Impulsive Compulsions, a free album presenting more sounds and members of the Perfect Pop Co Op family in their enterprising glory.

As its predecessor, the album is a tantalising and intriguing not forgetting rousing proposition and reminder that the real heart and organic pleasures within music still breed and reside in the DIY fuelled underground. In no particular order allow us to tease you with what is on offer within another real treat from Perfect Pop Co Op, well a second treat as the magazine itself is a rather fine and fun thing too.

Earlier this year, ears and imagination were over excited by the new EP from She Made Me Do It. The band is the duo of Shaheena Dax (Rachel Stamp) and Will Crewdson (Rachel Stamp, Adam Ant, Scant Regard and many more) and the Drenched EP four tracks of their uniquely seductive and multi-flavoured ever blossoming sound. Impulsive Compulsions 02 features one of the EP’s tracks in Broken Morning; a song from its first strum of tantalising guitar which had ears attentive and then swiftly enslaved as it opened its magnetic arms to a richer sound and the mesmeric tones of Dax. Instinctive catchiness and creative eagerness roam the song, sharing a contagious indie rock swing around one compellingly persuasive chorus. Irresistible moments with She Made Me Do It are certainly not a rare thing but few times have been as delicious as this.

 Alongside and around it, the goodness is just as potent as epitomised by tracks like I’ve Had Enough and Superslider from Tagas and Venus Overload respectively. The first is a lively simmer of electro pop rock, a bubbling slice of melodic radiance echoed in similarly warm vocals, a track which just nags at the senses with its teasing harmonics. Tagas is a solo project, an intimate exploration and reflection of its creator and the track here an embrace of melancholy and warmth with a great early Depeche Mode hue to its temptation. The second of the two is a band which released a self-titled album back in 2012 from which their contribution to the sampler comes. Their sound is a collusion of experimental and noise rock, a challenging and rewarding mix which had us mesmerised. It is raw, abrasive and persistently compelling with a great whiff of Buñuel to it.

No compilation from PPCO would be complete without a track from Reverse Family, and Sampler 02 offers up Friction from the solo project of Dermot Illogical. Melancholy also soaks the heart of this song, it a riveting piece of the individual post punk meets noise pop which escapes the imagination of its creator. The track haunts ears and imagination from start to finish but with an infectious momentum which infests hips and spirit.

Another electronically bred enticement is offered by The Scratch, the Logical PV Remix itself almost itch like in its temptation; repeat listens the only relief to its electro/indie pop antics while Andreas And The Wolf course the instincts to rock with their own wonk punk sound. Public Domain is a sizzling lure of unapologetically untamed rock ‘n’ roll but crafted with a mischief and imagination which hones it into one devilish tempting.

Even more feral in its own way is Valerie Leon (Queen of Neon) from The Bleeed, a band arising from the offshoot creativity of members of The Tuesday Club a couple years back and a song which is punk rock in its honest purity but unafraid to embrace other bold essences including a Swell Maps-esque irreverence.

Talking of The Tuesday Club, they stamp their inimitable presence on proceedings with an extended mix of their song Beat Oven. First appearing on the Boo Hoo EP, the now fully grown track is a boisterously swinging slip of the band’s eclectic rock ‘n’ roll, a sound which dips into the spices of a host of decades to create its own unique virulent recipe.

The D.O.D.O tell us it is Just a Game to stand just as tall as its sampler comrades, the song one also unafraid to lean on flavours past and present to create its provocative incitement and ear grabbing catchiness; an infectiousness just as ripe within the electronic resounding of Interesting Times from Dislocated Flowers. A dark, haunting verging on apocalyptic throb behind an evocative sample, the track simply resonates from first to last breath.

Completing the line-up of pleasure on the album is Jordan Thomas (though tagged as In The Evening on the promo sent over to us) from Jordan Thomas maybe better known as J-Rod to fans as a former member of The Tuesday Club. This too is an infective piece of sound, Thomas easily getting under the skin with his melodic amble of enterprise and craft.

And that is Impulsive Compulsions PPCO SAMPLER02, another very tasty and highly pleasurable parade of bands and projects past and present so go check out the new In The Club Magazine now @ https://perfectpopco-op.co.uk/magazine/ after all that is a damn fine read too.

https://www.facebook.com/perfectpopcoop/

https://www.shemmdi.com/   https://www.facebook.com/shemademedoitpage

https://www.facebook.com/tagasmusic/

https://thevenusoverload.bandcamp.com/

https://www.facebook.com/reversefamily/   https://reversefamily.co.uk

https://www.facebook.com/thisisthetuesdayclub/   http://thisisthetuesdayclub.co.uk/

https://www.facebook.com/pg/dislocatedflowersmusic

Pete RingMaster 05/04/2019

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Left For Red – Human Complex

Approaching their ten year anniversary on the UK metal scene, Left For Red are poised to uncage their new album, Human Complex. Offering ten voraciously toned, imaginatively woven tracks, it is a record which highlights all the reasons why the Midlanders have earned their strong reputation and support to date and many more why the next decade could be even more exciting for them and definitely for us.

Since emerging in 2009, the Stourbridge quintet has lured acclaim for early releases which only grew eagerly richer for their 2015 unleashed debut album, All Things Known and Buried. It is success echoed in a live presence which has equally brought thick praise and an increased following, the band sharing stages with the likes of Chimaira, Crowbar, Beholder, and Breed 77 amongst many more as well as make highly successful appearances at numerous festivals such as Bloodstock, Hammerfest, and Mammothfest. It is now very easy to expect and assume that Human Complex will bring even greater attention such its potent character, bold sound, and rousing snarl.

Recorded with Tom Gittins of Monochrome Productions, Human Complex explores the human psyche, focusing on “why people can be so arrogant and careless with their actions, and the effects they have on themselves and others.” It opens up with Dancing With Misery, a suggestive crawl of provocative sound and dark intimation. It is a shadow draped serenade, a caliginous enveloping of ears and imagination with the potent tones of vocalist LC Decoy bringing a physical head to its atmospheric Deftones hued pea-souper of a haze.

It is a start which had attention and thought deeply enthralled, the body soon as tightly engaged as Switchblade Romance followed. With its initial wiry groove enough alone to entice further eager scrutiny, the guitars of Aaron Foy and Philip Smith entangled and enthralled with ease, the senses lashing swings of drummer Rob Hadley pining down an already keen appetite as the track rises to its striking feet. Like a blend of Fear Factory and Fuckshovel, the song quickly burrowed into the psyche, providing a lingering creative toxicity ensuring many swift returns even in the face of the inescapable lures of its successor Slaves To Causality. Less grievous in its breath but just as virulent in its grooving, the third track soon placed a firm hold on attentiveness, the tantalising voice and touch of Daniel Carter’s brooding but infectious bass to the fore. Again LC enticed as inescapably as the resourceful sounds around him, the track maybe not as unique as the previous pair but equally as magnetic.

The outstanding Leech is next up and instantly throws a web of rapacious grooves and contagious rhythms around ears, its contagion invigorating and body increasingly adventurous to give The Circus which follows, a ready-made platform to tempt with its classic metal lined, groove metal fuelled show. With a potent alternative metal swing as eagerly involved in its ever evolving roar, the track stands side by side with its predecessor as one of the peaks of Human Complex before Hand Of God more than ably backs them up with its own sinuous, emotionally torturous uproar. Serpentine in nature, fractious in breath, it too is a multi-flavoured metal trespass with grooves as melodically alluring as its rhythms and irritability are invasive.

The Storm brews next, its relatively calm flesh and emotive air carrying a volatility which never ignites but brings a riveting threat and discord to the track’s captivating croon while Journey Within straight after had the body bouncing and spirit swinging through its instinctively and manipulatively catchy ingredients and enterprise. Again the band’s smart fusion of flavours to a groove metal seeded breeding makes for a greedily devoured proposition, one even more hungrily devoured within the just as individual Tame The Tides. The track is a ravening predator of a song but carrying just as delicious melodic enterprise as numerous textures unite to match the mix of metal spices; both tracks further major highlights within the album.

Human Complex closes with the evocative balladry of Sunrise Bring Serenity, a strongly engaging temptation which blossoms and fascinates with each passing moment of time and imagination. With hope and optimism lining it’s still tempestuously suggestive climate, the track brings the album to a fine conclusion.

As much as we enjoyed and were impressed with previous releases and especially the band’s first album, Left For Red has cast their finest moment yet through Human Complex, a release which could and should set the band down in the biggest spotlights.

Human Complex is released April 6th

https://www.facebook.com/leftforreduk   http://leftforred.com/   https://twitter.com/leftforreduk

Pete RingMaster

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

RingMaster Reviews Interviews – Skies Turn Black

Who started the band, where and when?

Jamie Jordan (Vocals/Guitars) – Me and Adam had played in bands around Manchester for years when we were teenagers. I guess this line-up really started when me and George met Danny while we were studying music at Huddersfield University.

Who plays in the band now and what are they playing?

JJ – Our current line-up is: Jamie Jordan on lead vocals and guitars, George Turner on guitars and backing vocals, Dan Woodhead on bass and Adam Jones on drums. The music is primarily written by Jamie and produced by George.

Who has inspired you?

JJ – The biggest influences on my songwriting are bands like Metallica, Avenged Sevenfold and Bullet For My Valentine. These bands really taught me the importance of strong melodic material in heavy music. In terms of my guitar playing, I learnt a lot from Jeff Loomis’ (Arch Enemy/Nevermore) solo records, learning his material really took my playing to the next level.

Adam Jones (Drums) – Matt Halpern of Periphery is by far my greatest inspiration (even though we don’t have that much sort of stuff implied by our music) for his creativity in unique uses of parts of the kit, groove and learning how to make the most of what you have in front on you, which is what drumming’s all about at gigs.

Dan Woodhead (Bass) – Rush are the band that started it all for me. They really got me into how bass guitar can fit into progressive music and not just be a background instrument. All through the career, even in the synths 80’s period, bass is such a prominent part of the band. From the grooves in Working Man all the way up to the latest Clockwork Angels album. I find it all musically inspiring. Bands from around my era have growing up still stick with me though, A Day To Remember and Four Year Strong being the big ones that made things in a life a little heavier for me.

Why this name? And tell us the meaning of it.

JJ – The name actually came from a British band called Malefice, they had a song called “As The Skies Turn Black” and I thought it sounded really cool!

Have you released any albums? If so, when and what’s the name of it?

DW – Our debut album was out 19th October, titled ‘No Place Like Home’. It’s a 13 track album and we have just released the first single from it, ‘Let You Down’, which did really well! We are just really excited to get the album out; you can pre-order it now from our webstore. We love it.

Have you played with some famous band?

DW – We’ve been on line ups with bands like Crazytown and supported a band called E.Y.E once that had supported Metallica, Evanescence and Anathema in their home country, so that was pretty cool. The dream is to be on a support tour with Avenged or Bullet; that for me would be perfect.

JJ – Although when we played on Kerrang! it was between Alice in Chains and Slipknot which was pretty cool

What’s the plans for the future?

DW – Keep going. We love what we do, and we want the band to do well, but the only way we can have a chance of this happening is by going strong constantly, there’s no resting for us. The album is out now so check it out on iTunes, Apple Music, Spotify, Amazon Music and loads more.

https://www.facebook.com/SkiesTurnBlack/  https://open.spotify.com/album/5u3bXkJvReEbxQ8VnjQ3Lb

Questions by Elliot Leaver