Nature of Wires – Modus

photo by Russ Dalen

Some releases shine like a beacon attracting ears like moths to a flame. One such lure for us is the new album from UK synth pop outfit Nature of Wires. Almost straddling every decade of its prime genre whilst teasing of future exploration but most openly seeded in eighties influence, the album proved a swift magnet of sound and temptation firmly commanding current attention.

Formed in 1986 by vocalist Andrew Stirling-Brown and synthist/programmer Gary Watts, the Herefordshire band followed the 1993 release of their debut album, Modus Operandi, by going on hiatus the following year until reforming in 2015.  A year later the band unveiled their second album, Cyber Rendezvous, with CountessM on lead vocals and now the band has Modus to tempt the imagination, a collection of songs which harken back to those early years having been written between 1986 and 1993 but carrying a modern edge though being “recreated using 21st century technology.” It is also a dual album in one package, with a second CD featuring re-imaginings of the release’s tracks from an array of inspiring artists.

Straight away Modus embraces ears like an old friend yet just as quickly establishes a presence and character which is solely Nature of Wires. As soon as opener Feel the Hunger spreads its electronic arms, there is no escaping teases to the likes of Erasure, Heaven 17, and Blancmange but the song quickly breeds its own individuality in sound and enterprise led by the alluring tones of Stirling-Brown. Striking melodies are fuelled by infectiousness whilst rhythms as good as nag with their eager canter. Fair to say we were caught up in the song’s contagion in short time, vocal chords and body swings adding to its own eager endeavours.

Time is Come steps up next, again its initial coaxing shadow lined before bursting out with radiant melodies and vocal encouragement. Equally keen pulses core the lively croon with the song’s gait and energy as bold as it is spirited, a whiff of A Flock Of Seagulls only adding to the song’s infectious captivation before Negative Resolutions emerges with a darkwave breath, bubbles of pop soon joining the tempting before synths weave a tapestry of melodic intimation over an electro grumble. When its poppiness catches the song infested the body while its darker melancholic calmer moments are alone pure fascination.

Through the crystalline design and dark throb of Seagull and the reflective heatwave of Every Single Sun, captivation with Modus only escalated, the first a spirited seduction and its successor a weave of melodic flames and balmy caresses while Harry’s House eclipsed both with its creative drama and dance-floor animation.

It in turn was slightly outshine by Madame Serena, a song with electro rock essences which reminded of bands such as Original Mirrors and Modern English whilst hinting at the pop instincts of Orchestral Manoeuvres in the Dark. With emotive shadows and a great lining of dark threat, the track soon rises as another unique Nature of Wires temptation very easy to greedily devour.

The first CD closes with the immediately enthralling First Light, a song bringing yet another shade of flavour and enterprise to the album with its rich entangle of electronic and electro rock hues. Bringing the release to a potent close if not quite igniting the passions as those before it, though ears and imagination were firmly in its charge all the same, it potently  concludes the first adventure of the release before Modus turns to the second.

CD 2 embraces that collection of remixes and re-imaginings of its songs starting with the Atomzero Nightlife Remix of Feel the Hunger. Given a darker almost tenebrific air, the track takes on a whole new persona as it does with the NoW AT4 version which takes it to the opposite light with equally enjoyable effect.

Among the host of truthfully ear pleasing encounters, the untamed rock ‘n’ roll brought to Time is Come by The Cowls, the dramatic theatre sparked within the Klammer Remix of Harry’s House, and Leaether Strip’s voraciously virulent trespass of Madame Serena especially caught the imagination. Fair to say though that Cyferdyne’s Glass Half Full Remix of Negative Resolutions, Workings of a Madman Remix of Seagull, the St Lucifer reworking of Every Single Sun as well as the Mesh Remix of First Light and Room 1985’s progressive rock interpretation of Time is Come all left pleasure rich.

And that is a declaration which tenaciously applies to Modus as a whole, a release to hungrily spend time with as we eagerly await the next chapter and exploration in the adventure of Nature of Wires.

Modus is released August 16th through Analogue Trash across most stores and @ https://natureofwires.bandcamp.com/album/modus

Upcoming Live Dates

Sep 20 BERLIN – The Mazen (with The Pink Diamond Revue, LegPuppy & e-bit)

Sep 21 LEIPZIG – Noch Besser Leben (with The Pink Diamond Revue & LegPuppy)

Oct 12 COLOGNE, Germany – Wachsfabrik (with Bandmachine)

Oct 18  BIRMINGHAM – The Mill, Digbeth (with Among the Echoes & Toyah)

Nov 8   BIRMINGHAM – Scruffy Murphy’s (with Vieon, Among the Echoes & Vain Machine)

Nov 9   LONDON – Beat:Cancer Festival 2.0, Electrowerkz

http://www.natureofwires.com   https://www.facebook.com/natureofwires/   https://twitter.com/natureofwires

Pete RingMaster 16/08/2019

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

The Dollyrots – Daydream Explosion

A party in the ears, romp with the body, and riot with the imagination; descriptions which can certainly be suggested upon the sound of the Dollyrots to date but definitely and strenuously applies to the band’s new release, Daydream Explosion. Across fourteen slices of the band’s inimitable fusion of punk, rock, and pop, the album incites and captivates but equally fascinates more than anything from the Los Angeles duo yet as diversity and adventure fuel an eclectic mix of contagious goodness.

With previous album, Whiplash Splash, one of the rousing treats of 2017, vocalist/bassist Kelly Ogden and vocalist/guitarist Luis Cabezas have pulled out all the creative stops to outshine that acclaimed release with Daydream Explosion. From the moment it gives its first eager breath we can declare aim accomplished and an irresistible slab of infectious enterprise bred.

Produced by the band with long-time producer John Fields, Daydream Explosion immediately had ears and attention in its hands, a teasing hook bringing in the pop ‘n’ roll of opener Animal. Ogden’s seductive tones swiftly join the broadening stomp of the track; Cabezas’ soon after and as magnetic as the rhythms and riffs which collude in a charge of flirtatious punk nurtured hooks. As catchy and inescapable as barbed wire, the song effortlessly gets the album off to a rousing start.

With beats swinging, riffs nagging, Everything steps up next and just as devilishly infests body and spirit. Again vocals simply incite participation as easily as the rhythms manipulate feet, the song’s chorus a heightened exploitation of an already fired up appetite for the record and eager subservience to its pop persuasion.

In Your Face comes with a steadier gait after but even in its shimmering sway there is a zeal and energy keen to break out which it does in another contagion of a chorus, the song’s seductive pop increasingly volatile and riveting before Naked uncages its alternative rock devilment like a pop infested Blood Red Shoes. With a rock ‘n’ roll shaped heart the track quickly builds its own character and grinning escapade to be unique Dollyrots.

As expected hooks escape the band like rocker instincts bound in one listening to the album, next up Last Ones on Earth relishes its own host of ear snaring conjuring. With a pop breath seemingly taking inspiration from an array of decades the song commands air and attention while exploring more eighties pop seeded breeding I Love You Instead follows to get the body popping all over again and sap the lungs just a little more of their willing breath. With all songs, but here especially, you can almost feel the fun and big broad grins the pair should have had creating one devilish encounter.

Through the ear smooching sixties girl group toned Watching the Storm Go By and the frenetically stomping I Know How to Party, band and album only pulled attention further away from reality, both tracks major moments among only highlights with the latter carrying a mischievous nod towards Andrew W.K. in certain moments while Kat’s Meow more than matched their glories with its virulently frisky stroll.

There is no decline in pure temptation as No Princess springs its own individual pop punk epidemic straight after nor as Flippy In My Red Dress infests hips and passion with its rampant rock ‘n’ roll seduction.  Like a mix of The Hillbilly Moon Explosion and Stray Cats but pure Dollyrots, the song is sublime, a major favourite track challenger though tested throughout the album for that honour as proven by the feisty Oblivious and Talk Too Much with its senses taunting hooks and melodic dance, a combination far too potent to resist.

The album closes up with Daisy’s Song, a final slice of punk ‘n’ rock temptation as instinctively sinful as it is masterfully manipulative and simply beguiling. And that pretty much describes Daydream Explosions as a whole, creatively wicked and unapologetically infectious and most likely the best piece of pop punk you will embrace and devour this year or possibly next.

Daydream Explosions is out now via Wicked Cool Records/ The Orchard; available @ https://thedollyrotswcr.bandcamp.com/album/daydream-explosion

http://www.dollyrots.com/    https://www.facebook.com/thedollyrots/    https://twitter.com/thedollyrots

Pete RingMaster 13/08/2019

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Arcade Messiah – Hell By Default

After two years of pretty much silence since the release of previous release, Trilogy, Irish musician John Bassett has returned with a new slice of Arcade Messiah temptation. Hell By Default is that offering, the declaration of a new captivating breath to his sound and songwriting and an ear grabbing EP making a rather potent teaser to a new album in the works.

Already renowned before Arcade Messiah as the frontman/songwriter of KingBathmat, Bassett himself says that ‘After a couple of very difficult years, I’ve finally managed to get back to making music, the new Arcade Messiah sound is more song focused with vocals…” That was the first surprise as previously the Sligo based songwriter/multi-instrumentalist/producer’s project has been an instrumental adventure and news which immediately intensified the intrigue as fruitful experiences with KingBathmat and SΔCRED ΔPE as well as an acoustic album under his own name proved vocals was another potent string to Bassett’s creative bow.

Equally there is a new hue to the Arcade Messiah sound, a lighter multi-flavoured flume of melodic imagination and contagious hookery which comes with something of a KingBathmat lining but one which colludes with and enhances rather than defuses the established progressive shadow haunted explorations of Bassett’s project. Its first three albums and their union as Trilogy in 2017 provided a cathartic venture for the imagination within a kaleidoscope of suggestive sounds for ears. Hell By Default is no different yet with its broader palette of enterprise is a bold new trail of exploration for Arcade Messiah.

The EP opens with its title track, a song taken from that new and fourth album planned for release later in the year. Hell By Default rises on a siren sonic call, a lure within which a teasing melodic hook soon beckons and the tones of Bassett coax. With every note and second, the song gently but firmly accelerates its urgency and temptation, soon hitting a keen stroll soaked in drama and fiery intensity. Rock and metal essences blend in the post rock nurtured flames which boldly consume and ignite upon the senses, dark almost rapacious tints soaking the creative trespass swiftly igniting imagination and appetite. It all unites for a thickly magnetic proposition and a greedy devouring of the return of Arcade Messiah.

The following Death X-Ray strolls in with a calmer and lighter character and touch, one fuelled by an instinctive tempting and organic catchiness which instantly gripped attention. As melodic infectiousness, vocal intimacy, and rhythmic persuasion continue to flourish, the track blossomed with greater radiance. Even so a shadowy courting to the melodic radiance and emotive heart on offer brings an edge and drama which only highlights the nagging prowess of hooks and grooved melodies, the result another track which only compelled pleasure and attention.

Hell By Default concludes with its instrumental version, a piece of creative inference which led thoughts to a different adventure to that highlighted by the words of Bassett in the opener and that is another attribute proven to its creator’s craft, songs can have a dual aspect and has the imagination constantly conjuring.

It has been a perpetual pleasure for us to engage in any Arcade Messiah encounter so far and the new EP only repeats that experience though through it there is a feeling that that new album could be the biggest thrill of all.

Hell By Default is available now @ https://arcademessiah.bandcamp.com/album/hell-by-default as a name your price download.

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Pete RingMaster 09/08/2019

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Muskets – Violent Paradise

Providing another of the year’s more tantalising offerings is UK outfit Muskets, a band which is no stranger to keen attention but on the edge of greater recognition one suggests thanks to their latest offering. Violent Paradise is a captivating collection of songs fuelled by the alternative rock/grunge sound which has made the band’s previous releases very welcome but an EP venturing into richer and varied pastures as maturity, shadows, and a broader palette of flavours flourish within a bold landscape of sound and imagination.

The Brighton hailing band has persistently nudged success and full attention since the release of their debut album Chew in 2017 via No Sleep Records who now also bring us the new outing. Numerous tracks have received extensive radio support along the way but it is not too hard to feel that Violent Paradise could and should spark even bigger reactions and success the way of the quartet of Alex Cheung, Joe Phillips, Harry Steel, and Corey Eyres.

The EP opens with the swiftly irresistible Uncertain Purpose, a track which teased and hooked ears and appetite from its slightly manic opening alone. Quickly it hit its infectious swing, guitars and rhythms a feral incitement within and the dissonance of all glorious elements mischievous. The vocals of Cheung add to the devilment of the track’s contagious trespass as hooks and grooves collude in creative delinquency. It proves a rousing slice of grunge punk with a great Asylums-esque character placing a quick and firm grip on best track honours though its briefness does prove a frustration if one soon defused by the tracks to follow.

Detention is next up, the song also sharing instant teasing quickly joined by similarly tempting melodic guitar bait before it all erupts in a lusty clamour from within which those early lures still eagerly entice. Slipping into its relaxed stroll only brings greater catchiness as pop rock instincts breed more vital hooks and grooves. It is a delicious blend of enterprise and melodic imagination which as the first is only more keenly devoured by the listen.

It was hard not to be fully engaged in the slim but potent invitation bringing Empty on Cigarettes into view next; the surf lined swelter of guitar a calm but again thick enticement from which just as sultry harmonies and melodies hug the senses. The song’s seduction is total and its darker hues intriguing and with XTC like whispers to its breath and imagination makes for another lofty highlight of the release before the EP’s title track uncages its raucous holler. Grunge pop infused rock ‘n’ roll, the track swings and stomps with inescapable tenacity, every infectious element a virulent excuse for body and vocal chords to join its boisterous romp.

The album is completed by Killjoy and Natural Selection, the pair among the most adventurous and compelling moments within the release. The first song brews a post punk climate through sonic lures and a moody bassline, drums adding to the Gang Of Four/Killing Joke hued opening. Soon the serenade of the track’s heart is smooching with the senses as again melodies and harmonies flourish in the brooding calm that follows. It is a volatile climate though which sees flames of guitar and emotive roars brewing and erupting, their senses scorching persuasion just as rousing and magnetic before the cycle thrillingly repeats.

The final track is an acoustic hug revelling in the band’s vocal and melodic prowess though it too has a tempestuousness in its heart which threatens more than escapes but brings gripping tension to the elegance and beauty breeding the transfixing encounter.

Both tracks provide an inspiring and captivating close to the EP with the latter especially beguiling, a release which has the temptation of the devil and the exploits of an imagination carrying an appetite to taste whole new adventures. Already we eagerly and greedily await the next temptation of Muskets.

Violent Paradise is out now via No Sleep Records, available @ https://muskets.bandcamp.com/album/violent-paradise

https://www.facebook.com/muskets   https://twitter.com/musketsuk

Pete RingMaster 09/08/2019

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

The Kreoles – Next Stop, The Madness

Rock ‘n’ roll obviously comes in numerous shapes and hollers and for us it is when that kind of diversity finds a home within one single encounter that we find the strongest fascination. The sound and new album of Italian outfit The Kreoles is one such proposition; an encounter bred upon a fusion of varied rock and metal flavours with a healthy punk ‘n’ roll roar for extra goodness.

Next Stop, The Madness is the third album from the Como based band which was founded by producer, songwriter and guitarist Ivan McSimon in 2011 and originally was a quartet with female vocalist Valentina Merlo. With a pair of well-received albums in the 2014 released Touch The Sun (Valery Records) and two years later Psycho (Sliptrick Records), the band revealed the potent sound which has only become more individual to The Kreoles ever since. 2017 saw the foursome reduced with Merlo leaving and McSimon adding vocal duties to his prowess within the band and as McSimon subsequently began working on the new album alone, he brought in bassist NIc Angileri and drummer David Cuomo to complete the line-up with no doubt their backgrounds in numerous styles adding to the rich mix within Next Stop, The Madness.

With Jeff Waters from Annihilator additionally providing a host of solos across its tracks, the album swiftly had ears seriously attentive with opener Shiver. A swirling melodic flume escapes a guitar straight away, rising eagerly from within the wall of sound carrying it. As quickly the song twists into its rock ‘n’ roll stride, riffs and rhythms almost stalking the listener as McSimon’s vocals stroll their tempting. Already the band’s sound sets down its individual character though there is an essence which reminds of Russian rockers Biting Elbow to the song and indeed many of its companions. Equally the track revels in heavy metal and progressive rock attributes; every second one of simple captivation as the song sets the album off in fine style.

Day After Day follows, bursting from the speakers with relish as swinging rhythms collude with sonic and melodic tenacity. Its spirit and energy never dips across another stretch of alluring enterprise, McSimon steering the adventure in voice and craft, and even in the moment of relative calm there is a vigour which prevails. With a solo which just beguiled, the ear gripping track makes way for the equally magnetic It’s Time to Go, a song with a dark lining to its drama and melodic intimacy to its creative narrative. As within its predecessors, keys add another compelling and tantalising ingredient to keenly devour.

Both Deep Inside with its robust dynamics and infectious intricacies and the more classic rock/metal bred Take Off hold ears and appetite firm, each a host of catchy and at times voracious enterprise while All Alone savours its metal breeding from its first breath as again classic hues unite with fresh textures and a punk infused ferocity. All three add their own independent imaginations and personalities to the album, the steely web of the last especially striking before We Make the History shares its potent balladry.

The album’s title track follows on an enthusiastic canter, once more the band aligning metal threads to a hard rock styled canvas to effortlessly ensnare attention. Though some tracks roused the passions more than others, every song within Next Stop, The Madness left a pleasure sparking mark, this one no less than any other with its multi-flavoured roar.

The album concludes with firstly the imaginative and stylish thunder of You Can Be Sure and lastly the bold rock ‘n’ roll of The Rain. Neither song quite sparked the ardour of many before them but each left a lingering mark and rich satisfaction which only drew ears keenly back.

Next Stop, The Madness certainly pleased straight away but it is with plays and time as more of its tapestry of melodic colours and varied flavoured textures came forward that it really impressed. So quite simply, The Kreoles is one of those bands which, as indeed their new release, should definitely be checked out.

Next Stop, The Madness is out now via Sliptrick Records across most stores and @ https://www.thekreoles.com/shop/

https://www.facebook.com/thekreoles/   https://www.thekreoles.com

Pete RingMaster 05/08/2019

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Phoxjaw – A Playground For Sad Adults

We are not sure what it is in the River Avon and water supply of Bristol but the city is one of our favourite and persistently fruitful sources of musical invention and ear grabbing artists. It has provided a lengthy list of striking propositions over recent years alone to which Phoxjaw has added their creative name. The band has just uncaged their second EP, A Playground For Sad Adults; a collection of tracks which are as dramatic and unpredictable as they are feverishly contagious.

Phoxjaw have a sound which rebelliously defies pinning down especially within A Playground For Sad Adults. It is alternative rock bred to give it a base which made for an appealing lure in the band’s last EP, Goodbye Dinosaur… released last November. Within its successor though, it has evolved into a whole fresh and bold proposition of flavour and imagination which firmly puts the band’s first EP as well as a great many releases this year in the shade.

Released through Hassle Records, A Playground For Sad Adults opens with the brief lure of its title track; the piece sepia toned coaxing which inspired intrigue alongside trepidation as to what lurked ahead. What was waiting was one of the best tracks heard, Melt, You’re A Face Of Wax emerging from the raw shadows of its predecessor with an immediately enticing melodic strand of guitar within calm but suggestively imposing beats. Quickly the web spun by guitarists Josh Gallop and Alexander Share wraps the imagination, the bass of vocalist Danny Garland prowling the already instinctively catchy and increasingly richer and bolder incitement. A momentary calm surrounds the opening moments of the latter’s magnetic voice, the beats of Kieran Gallop still a crisp encouragement as guitar wires share their temptation. Crescendos of drama and creative theatre only add to the rousing character and a soon eager appetite for the song’s animated adventure.

The track is superb and never matched but certainly rivalled by things to come starting with Monday Man. It too took barely a breath to grip appetite and attention, bass and drums united in delicious bait before guitars sprung their own virulent enticement. In no time a pop rock energy and catchiness floods the expanding encounter, Garland’s vocals leading the tempting with zeal as melodic and sonic invention collude in equally magnetic persuasion. By the second greater urgency and dissonance emerges, firing up the roar and intensity of the song but never lessening the pull of its contagion before Whale, Whale, Whale brings its own catchy wiring and ravenous appetite to the release. Instantly a ferocious intent accompanies the senses shaking surge of incitement, a nagging groove taunting and enslaving ears within the turbulence of sound and emotion. It is a tempest though which breaks for melodic intervention and emotional reassurance but ultimately stalks and harries pleasure into inescapable subservience.

Bodiesinthewall casts another slice of unique drama within the EP, its initial presence a shadow clad and portentous calm from which a poppy stroll and mischievously catchy seduction eagerly springs. Like a blend of Maximo Park and Fatima Mansions, the song was craftily under the skin in no time and manipulating participation with just as much relish right up to the nightmarish expulsion of all its fears and discord, though that too only leads to another contrasting climate, this time a carousel of melodic and vocal enchantment.

Bringing the release to a stirring close, The Curse Of The Button Man is a cinematic yet intimately stirring slice of creative imagination. As its predecessors, the song is a cauldron of flavours and hues which defy precise labelling whilst providing a drama and experience which eagerly lingers in thought and appetite. Dark and intimidating, predacious and relentlessly infectious it is a glorious nightmare bringing a stunning release to a mighty close.

Phoxjaw gave numerous reasons to keep a close ear upon them with that first EP but a suggestion which has now become a rabid demand through A Playground For Sad Adults, one of the year’s most compelling and thrilling moments.

A Playground For Sad Adults is out now via Hassle Records; available @ https://phoxjaw.bandcamp.com/album/a-playground-for-sad-adults

https://www.facebook.com/phoxjawofficial/   https://twitter.com/phoxjaw

Pete RingMaster 02/08/2019

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Torchbearer – Against The Tide

The press release accompanying Against The Tide, suggested that creators Torchbearer “are ready to set the world alight their new EP.” Whether that proves the case time will tell but certainly the five track encounter is one ear gripping, appetite rousing protagonist which demands attention.

With ex-members of Blowgoat and Collapse in their ranks, the South Wales quartet unleash a hardcore/punk sound unafraid to embrace other similarly fierce and intrusive flavours yet as their new release proves, it is a fury equipped with the keenest of hooks and fuelled by ravening melodic fire. An early EP, Pass In the Night, hinted at the potential of the band, one partly realised and fully pushed to greater heights by its rousing successor.

The swiftly magnetic and seriously compelling Time Served opens up Against The Tide, sweeping guitars and robustly animated rhythms instantly descending on the senses to lay potent bait. There is no time to reflect though as within a couple of seconds the band is a raging torrent of vocal ferocity and sonic trespass within which a glorious hook teases and taunts. Andy Mansell’s vocal attack is throat raw and heart driven, the sound around matching his intensity even when pulling back to the moment when it is his ire and the prowling menace of bass uncaged by Mohannad Mamoun Abdul-Rahaman Bashir Ahmed Meckey Ghuleb predominantly alone. Courted by the psyche rapping beats of Scott Harris, that moment sparks another rousing moment as the great clean vocal tones of guitarist Ollie Gould with those of Ghuleb alongside fill the magnetic air which in turn leads to a web of metal nurtured temptation before inherent animosity unites in their thrilling endeavour.

The track is superb, a definite favourite moment within the EP but more than matched by Paralysed and its equally creative examination. A touch less venomous and intrusive but just as inventive in melodic, harmonic, and toxic adventure with Mansell again a gripping fury, the song seized ears and appetite with ease and only tightened its hold by the eventful second.

Ascender provides a calm coaxing through its body and heart, Gould’s ever magnetic chords and hooks luring ears to a waiting nest of viperish grooves and devious hooks within a reflective wrath. As its predecessor, the song is a resourceful proposition, its lures unpredictable and inviting as its breath sears and provokes; qualities just as rich within the following Drown where its caustic air and touch is intensive and animated tapestry of flavours and invention ensnaring; Torchbearer bringing another fresh and darker shade to their sound.

It is a darkness though fearsomely intensified within the EP’s closing track, also called Torchbearer. Its gentle melodic opening has an edge in sound and voice, a fateful tone quickly exposed by Mansell and the rapacious sounds around him. The song’s fractious instincts soak its riffs and temptation but each a strong lure within the increasingly intensive and toxic mood of the track. So unique and opposite to the EP’s opener and just as riveting it gives a fine end to a release which just thrilled and impressed with greater strength by the listen.

Whether Against The Tide will indeed set ablaze the music scene we will find out but it certainly gives it a mighty nudge as to the presence of the rousing force that is Torchbearer.

Against The Tide is out now as a name your price download @ https://torchbearerlondon.bandcamp.com/releases

https://www.facebook.com/torchbearerlondon/   https://www.torchbearer.life/   https://twitter.com/torchbearerldn

Pete RingMaster 02/08/2019

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright