Frau Pouch – Biscuit Beard

fp_RingMasterReview

Having meant to do this a couple of weeks ago, we apologise to the band and to you all for the late lusty shouting out of one of the year’s most irresistible singles. The track is Biscuit Beard and comes from irrepressible noise post punks Frau Pouch. Since their outing with another of Medway’s essential bands Houdini in a split release, the trio of vocalist/guitarist Joe Wise, bassist Ollie Crook, and drummer Suzanne Freeman has invaded the psyche with the All Hail Space Chicken EP and invaded the senses with their lo-fi punk sound live. Their finest moment though comes now with Biscuit Beard, the kind of song and addiction we for one were born for.

From the first second of its insane grooving and rhythmic baiting, the track is in command of ears and imagination. It is a throwback to the late seventies/early eighties in some ways and a new unique beast of invention in others. Rhythmically the track is a cross between Gang of Four and The Mekons, Crook’s bass a deliciously grouchy growl infesting the psyche with its grooves whilst Freeman’s beats are a hypnotic tapping of the senses far too easy to succumb to. Alongside them the guitar of Wise teases and taunts with almost cancerous grooves and spiky cuts before spreading melodic discord over it all from time to time. With his vocals as distinct and wonderfully slim as the textures uniting for one rich incitement, Biscuit Beard is pure manna for ears and any punk heart.

To it all there are moments when eighties band The Dancing Did is parked in thoughts too, just one more rather enjoyable essence in easily a single of the year contender.

Biscuit Beard is out now via Skingasm Records on iTunes etc.

https://www.facebook.com/FrauPouch/   https://fraupouch.bandcamp.com/

Pete RingMaster 14/10/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Shit The Cow – The one with the devil

STC_RingMasterReview

The one with the devil is the fifth EP from “scrapyard rockers” Shit The Cow but our introduction to the Swedish quartet and boy are we kicking ourselves for that. The six track incitement is a furore of creative theatre and raw energy treating ears and imagination to an often ferocious and always compelling mix of alternative and hard rock with as forceful punk, stoner, and garage rock infusions.  Hindsight shows that it is a mix which has primarily fuelled the band’s previous exciting releases in their various characters of sound but is at a new pinnacle within this latest encounter.

From 2012 EP volume/cow, Stockholm based Shit The Cow has uncaged a sound which infests the imagination but as shown by our recent discovery of them, thanks to the band themselves, maybe not always awareness. Certainly subsequent EPs, Salt of the earth (2013), Rissna (2014), and 67p have drawn plaudits and a host of new fans but it might just be, with deserved luck, that it is The one with the devil which ignites real attention.

Produced by Ron Haven, The one with the devil swiftly grips ears and induces raw hunger with opener Warcow. At a few breaths over a minute in length, the song is a rampaging surge of infectious caustic punk pop; like a lustfully dirty blend of The Dickies and The Super Happy Fun Club, all fuzzy guitar and irresistible hooks driven by thumping rhythms. Vocalist/guitarist Peter Söderberg sits astride the surging drive of the track, his great vocals backed and surrounded by the guitar/bass enterprise of Daniel Kjellberg and Erik Rosenberg, the pair apparently sharing instruments across the EP. Short but ridiculously infectious, the song has ears and psyche enslaved in little time before the EP’s title track lays down its potent bait.

art_RingMasterReviewOne With The Devil has a slightly slower stride to its gait but a more imposing weight and tone as it as good as prowls the senses. A glorious hook within a superhero essence captures the imagination as swiftly as the magnetically firm beats of Robin Lindqvist court the instincts to rock ‘n’ roll. Like Eagles Of Death Metal meets Helldorado yet not, the song is pure rock alchemy, a primal solicitation of the passions snarling away with increasing potency

The following El Chupacabra has a similar template to its character, stalking ears as engaging vocals and imagination entangling grooves collude with nagging riffs and rapacious rhythms. Featuring the backing female vocal charm and beauty of someone apparently called Alex, the song is a tempestuous, almost volcanic fire of raw intensity and melodic seduction which tempts and insists on attention as repetitious beats and niggly riffs core the whole bewitching affair.

There is something familiar about next up The Villain, an essence we have not yet pinned down but only adds to the intrigue and enjoyment of the exciting encounter. Again a wealth of flavours and textures are woven into a song by Shit the Cow, those female vocals alongside Söderberg icing on another irresistible slice of multi-faceted rock ‘n’ roll.

The band whips up another punk infested gen with IGGY next, the track a stomping beast of insistent beats and antagonistic riffs aligned to a bass growl to drool over with band vocals which ignite the spirit and indeed the vocal chords. There is a Jello Biafra air to the song, more Lard than Dead Kennedys maybe but very tasty all the same though ultimately song and sound is little like anyone else’s.

The EP is closed by an alternative version of Warcow; a quite delicious and haunting seducing with Alex on vocals courted by a host of portentous sounds and melancholically enthralling keys. The song is quite wonderful, a stunning end to a riveting and exhilarating first listen, for us, to Shit The Cow, the source of a new musical lust we are sure we will not be alone in having.

The one with the devil is out now across most online stores and @ https://shitthecow.bandcamp.com/album/the-one-with-the-devil

http://www.shitthecow.com/   https://www.facebook.com/pages/Shitthecow/325694852733   https://twitter.com/shit_cow

Pete RingMaster 13/10/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Beauty and the thorn: exploring Scorching Winter

raf_RingMasterReview

Formed in 2012, Scorching Winter is a female-fronted quintet hailing from Melbourne, Australia. With a hard rock based sound which weaves in an array of flavours, Scorching Winter is beginning to lure proper attention beyond their borders. Ahead of their new album Victim, we were excited to have the chance find out more about the band and that upcoming proposition with guitarist Rafael Katigbak. Subsequently exploring the band’s background, heart, and more…

Hello and thanks for taking time out to talk with us.

My pleasure… Thanks for having me.

Can you first introduce the band and give us some background to how you came together?

The band started in 2012 when I got together with Nick (drummer) to jam on a few songs I have written. We liked the way it sounded so we decided to put a band together. The band has gone through a few line-up changes since but we’ve had our current line-up for almost two years now and the chemistry is the best it has ever been.

scorching-winter_RingMasterReviewHave you all been involved in other bands before?

We have all been in other bands and music groups previously but nothing serious. I was in an old school heavy metal band before this and there are a couple of songs I had written in while I was on that band that I carried over to Scorching Winter. Although we sound very different now, my time with that band will always have an effect on my playing and writing.

What inspired the band name?

We wanted a name that is ironic because our music and our artworks are somewhat like that. It is heavy music with melodic female vocals, beautiful and evil, brutal and elegant. It also has a bit of medieval / gothic sound to it which we really liked.

Was there any specific idea behind the forming of the band and also in what you wanted it and your sound to offer?

I am a fan of prog metal. I really like the technicality and the freedom to incorporate different styles of music. I think it is important that the music is first and foremost interesting to the musician playing it. But I also love melodic and catchy vocals which are characteristic to mainstream rock and metal bands. So basically the aim is to make music that is both interesting to play but also fun to sing.

Do the same things still drive the band when it was fresh-faced or have they evolved over time?

Yes. Making music is still the reason we do what we do. We keep it fresh by constantly pushing ourselves to take things further. Our last EP was a big step up from the single before that, and this album is a step above the EP again. There is a consensus within the band that unless it’s something we haven’t done before, we’re not interested in doing it.

Since your early days, how would you say your sound has evolved?

Our earlier works are probably a bit more hard rock / old school metal. As with a lot of musicians, there will be songs that will always be part of our set list and some songs which we’ll probably never play again. Our new album is heavier, darker, more progressive. When we first heard it we thought that this is the sound we’ve always been going for but we’ll probably say that with the next one as well when we change sound again. Haha.

Has it been an organic movement of sound or has the band deliberately set out to try new things?

Several factors affected the evolution of the music. There is the change in line-ups, maturity as a song writer, exposure to new music and just personal development as musicians. But there is also a conscious decision to change the style a bit to challenge ourselves and keep things interesting.

Presumably across the band there is a wide range of inspirations; are there any in particular which have impacted not only on the band’s music but your personal approach and ideas to creating music?

While we all have our different subgenres of metal that we are in to, there are bands that are common favorites such as Metallica, Dream Theater, Iron Maiden.

How does the songwriting work within the band?art_RingMasterReview

Our songs normally start out as instrumentals. I write a song and send a demo out to the other guys who then add their bits to it. The singer then writes the lyrics and vocal melody for it.

Where are the lyrical inspirations generally drawn from?

With our previous songs, the lyrics are based on the singers’ own personal experiences. Although the songs start out as instrumentals, the singer interprets what the song sounds like and relates that to her own personal experiences.

Give us some background to your latest release.

The new album is called Victim and it’s an 8-track concept album. The story is about a girl who is raped and beaten by a group of men but was saved by a demon who gives her powers to get revenge. However, nothing ever comes for free as she would later find out.

The album started out with the story line. It was then divided into different chapters which correspond to each song. The music was then written then the lyrics. While it is a concept album, we also made sure that each song is strong on its own so any of them can be listened to as a single.

Are you a band which goes into the studio with songs pretty much in their final state or prefer to develop them as you record?

Yes. We really like to be sure we are 100% happy with the songs before we book recording time. In saying that, there are still some minor things that you find doesn’t quite work when you get there so you have to make some adjustments.

Tell us about the live side of the band?

I know that the other members love the performing part the most. I personally enjoy the writing part more. Anyway, with regards to our live shows, our set-list is always dynamic. We arrange the songs so we take our audience on a journey from start to finish instead of staying at one level throughout. We like to start with something a bit soft and eerie to get the mood going and then come in loud and heavy to let everyone know this is the start of a rock show. It then goes through different levels throughout the show.

SW_RingMasterReviewIt is not easy for any new band to make an impact regionally let alone nationally and further afield. How was it for Scorching Winter?

Unfortunately, it is not an easy path with no certainty of reward. It is a big commitment financially and on your personal life. We’ve all heard of internationally known bands whose members live below minimum wage, or who lose tens of thousands of dollars on tours. If you really love making music and performing, you will keep doing it regardless. If you’re in it because you have ambitions of fame and fortune, you may need to be realistic about your expectations.

How about the internet and social media, what impact has it had on the band to date?

I think it is very positive. Most of the following we have built are overseas and we haven’t even toured there. It provides you an opportunity to reach people in places you wouldn’t normally get to. I remember the first fan mail we received from overseas, I think it was from Canada, that’s when we thought, this is getting real!

Once again a big thanks for sharing time with us; anything you would like to add or reveal for the readers?

Thanks for having me and please check out our new album Victim which is available for pre-order now through bandcamp. Official release date is on the 29th of October. You will not be sorry.

https://www.facebook.com/ScorchingWinter   http://www.scorchingwinter.com/

Pete RingMaster 13/10/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Bernaccia – Growl Peace Belief

lp-cover_RingMasterReview

Having followed with eagerness the progress of British band Bernaccia since the release of their debut EP in 2014, it has been a source of great enjoyment hearing the evolution in their striking sound. A proposition truly hard to pin down but openly flavoured by essences seeded in the likes of neo-psych rock, desert blues, and Eastern spices, the Newcastle band’s music has blossomed from the low key yet fully magnetic alternative/psych rock tempting of that first outing, the Cinema EP, to the rousingly haunting and spiritually anthemic soundscapes making up first album Growl Peace Belief. The nine track offering simply absorbs the senses, picking up the imagination with equal ease as tribal bred rhythms and melodic suggestiveness unite with harmonic flames and lyrical drama. It is one of those rare releases which comes and along and bewitches with aural alchemy; an album forcibly pushing the band to the fore of the UK rock scene.

Originally a quartet when forming in 2014 and more recently a quintet with the addition of vocalist Ellen Chetcuti’s charmed tones alongside the powerful delivery of vocalist/guitarist Jonny Noble, Bernaccia has increasingly drawn rich attention through a live presence taking in shows with the likes of Royal Blood, Lola Colt, Alabama 3, The Fall, Twisted Wheel, CUD, and Wolf People among many and releases like Cinema, its successor Light//-//Dark later that first year and singles such as Power To The Hills, Awake, and recently Angel. Each has revealed a new blossoming in the sound and imagination of the band, it all now coming to a head in the climactic Growl Peace Belief.

The album opens up with War Cry; a track emerging from an intriguing coastal sounding landscape as the listener is drawn by an exotic guitar melody with inviting tabla inspired beats courting the coaxing. Expanding its embrace with every passing second, an Echo and The Bunnymen feel caressing the imagination, Noble’s voice is the final pull into the shamanic bordering on erotic seducing of the senses. With the darker hues of Kieran Healy’s bass a brooding tone alongside the insistent repetition of Chris Cox’s drums, and the united roar of Noble and Chetcuti an inescapable engagement over their respective psyche entangling enterprise, the track is fiercely irresistible only imposing its persuasive weight further through the creative synth drama cast by Stew Falkous.

bernaccia_promo_photo_RingMasterReviewThe following Spiral is a slimmer proposal in terms of intensity, wrapping ears swiftly with an eighties synth pop welcome with just a touch of Bowie’s Heroes to it. As the synth bubbles and expels riveting mists of electronic enterprise into the air, guitar and bass begin weaving a tapestry of imagination which in turn seems to instigate a growing tempestuousness coming to a towering head as the vocalists expertly combine. Departing with the same masterful charm it started with, the song makes way for an equally thrilling proposal in Awake. Rhythms instantly trap attention with their tenacious dance, Chetcuti joining them with her firmly enticing voice backed by Noble soon after before the song drops into a mystique laden bellow of sound with the latter seizing ears as that shamanic prowess of the band again grips body and spirit. The imagination constantly has a field day with Bernaccia songs, this one like a flight across a cavernous and intimately spiritual soundscape.

Power To The Hills also provides eighties reminding hues, this time King Trigger with their similar rhythmic invention and Nick Cave through the song’s dark rock n’ roll graced theatre of word and tone suggested in thoughts. The track is another which builds dramatic crescendos which boldly ignite the senses, the build of melodic and rhythmic ingenuity leading to them just as rewarding and provocative as the fiery expulsions themselves.

As the ear enslaving captivation of Angel and the poppier shuffle of Vega come and go, band and album simply tighten their grip and further inflame an already discovered appetite for the Bernaccia invention. The first of the pair is arguably the least imposing of the band’s songs but just as virulent in its imagination and infectious psychedelically hued tempting while its successor has all the shadowy beauty and danger found in other songs but with a catchiness which infests the listener as a blues/psych flavouring similar to that conjured by My Baby arrests the imagination.

Every track within Growl Peace Belief is a treat with Murder one of the most thrilling next with its repetitive keys placed melody and volcanic intensity. Graced by another glorious vocal union between Noble and Chetcuti and the individual theatre of sound and suggestiveness crafted by all, the track is superb, it’s nagging quality alone manna for ears before Senorita consumes with its romancing Latin seduction and dramatic rhythms as keys and harmonies virtually swamp the senses.

Concluded by its invasively melodic and drama driven title track, another stunning pinnacle of the album deserving ears more than words to reflect its might, Growl Peace Belief is the realisation of the hard work, thick imagination, and spirited energy Bernaccia has spent and discovered these past two years. It is also the declaration of a band ready to have a big say on the British rock scene ahead.

Growl Peace Belief is out now and available through many online stores and @ https://bernaccia.bandcamp.com/

 

https://www.facebook.com/BernacciaMusic/  https://twitter.com/bernaccia

Pete RingMaster 13/10/2016

 

Eight Days – More To Life

eight-days-band-promo-shot_RingMasterReview

Seemingly tagged as melodic hardcore more often than not but showing a hefty side in hook laden punk rock in their new proposition, British trio Eight Days is one of those bands knocking on the door of broader attention. Since emerging on the first breath of 2014, the London based outfit has earned a reputation of being one of the more potent forces within the underground scene. Evidence of that strength linked with a generous invention for ears and imagination to embrace can be found in the More To Life EP, a release suggesting that Eight Days might soon be going above ground to tap into national attention.

With inspirations said to come from the likes of Norma Jean, Black Peaks, Blink 182, and Yellowcard, Eight days released their debut at the end of their first year. The well-received No Idols EP was followed by the band rampaging across the UK on numerous tours before sophomore EP, Surrounded By The Ones Who Want Me To Fail, was unveiled to greater acclaim, proving that the months had also seen the band’s songwriting and sound blossoming.

More to Life is another step forward in all aspects by Eight days, a quartet of songs as raw and emotionally intrusive as they are fiercely infectious with dramatic hooks and surprising twists to the fore. There are still areas where uniqueness is a less obvious proposal but continuing as they are, that is something easy to suspect being remedied in the future.

eight-days-cover-artwork_RingMasterReviewThe EP opens up with Was It All Worth It and straight away the track has attention hooked as a melody, with a mix of warmth and shadow in its character, wraps enticingly around ears. A rising storm of rhythms led by the feisty beats of  Lewis Fife with the brooding rumble of James Carty’s bass alongside soon join the invitation, it all taking the listener into the turbulent yet catchy heart of the song where the guitar of Ben Brazier casts suggestive melodies and inventive hooks around his emotion flushed vocal squalls. It is a potent mix captivating from start to finish, melodic and post hardcore textures engaging each other in an arguably less than original but certainly potent way for a strong start to the release.

The band’s imagination kicks up a gear from hereon in starting with Unclear as the threesome bring some stronger punk rock elements into their bruising dramatic roar. Carrying a touch of Cancer Bats to its bellow, the second song bounds through ears with venom and animosity though again the instinctive catchiness of their song’s gaits and swinging rhythms make it all very enticing. Spicy hooks and unexpected twist and turns in the imagination of the song makes it stand out in no time, group shouts and the predatory growl of the bass adding to a creative drama not as obvious in its predecessor.

It is a fresh invention and boldness even more persuasive in the following Counterweight. From its first breath, the song is throwing tangy grooves and virulent hooks at the listener while Brazier’s throat is raw through ire fuelled confrontation. The track is irritable rock ‘n’ roll, an irrepressible trespass on the senses and the biggest highlight of the already impressing release.

A growling grouchy bassline opens up final track Walls; hard and melodic rock spiced flavours mixing with the band’s instinctive aggressive enterprise. At times a twist away from taking best song honours from its predecessor, the song is a fine end to a very satisfying release.

More To Life is proof that Eight Days are something fresh in a crowded melodic hardcore scene and once they find that real uniqueness there may be no stopping them.

The More To Life EP is out in stores on Friday 14th October and @ https://eightdaysuk.bandcamp.com/album/more-to-life and http://eightdaysuk.bigcartel.com/

https://www.facebook.com/EightDaysUK  https://twitter.com/eightdaysuk

Pete RingMaster 13/10/2016
Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Merging cultures: exploring the music of Ian Carvalho

ian-carvalho_RingMasterReview

Ian Carvalho is a South American born, Europe raised musician who blends an array of genres and sounds around a lyrical suggestiveness nurtured by his upbringing, observations of life around him, and experiences had. Drawing more and more attention with every show and song unveiled, we took the chance to talk with Ian about his past, his music, and his approach to his solo work.

Hello Ian and thanks for taking time out to talk with us.

Thank you for having me here!

Can you first give us some background to your project?

The decision to go solo came after me and the member of the band I played with for 8 years decided to take a break.

So you have been in other bands before? Has that time and the music you played had any impact on what you are doing now, in maybe inspiring a change of style or direction?

I played the drums with the band called NOVONADA for a very long time; we explored different genres, experimented quite a lot and blended in our work very different sonorities. This kind of approach is still with me as a solo artist, but with the extra treat that I can follow my own feelings and make music 100% the way I want.

Was there any specific idea behind what you wanted you solo work to explore?

When I decided to start this project I wanted to try myself in an all new territory. Being the only one responsible for composing and writing is at the same time fulfilling and draining! I always played within a band so, of course, one has to reach some kind of compromise. Being on my own means that I have more freedom when it gets to the creative process. I can decide what to write about, how to express the emotion I want to convey, what rhythm the song will have etc. My aim is to offer an all-around experience to the listener. I want the audience to be fully involved, to reach their subconscious and evoke in them all the emotion I’m trying to communicate.

IC_RingMasterReviewDo the same things still drive you when you were musically fresh-faced or have they evolved over time?

Being the beginning of my solo career I reckon I still have a lot to give. There have been some evolutions in my music, especially in terms of lyrics and themes. I think that my music has a bit more of a social component to it now.

Has that been more of an organic movement of sound or more you deliberately wanting to try more new things?

I definitely wanted to try some new stuff sound wise, but in the same time I consider my work as an organic evolution. Not all the songs can be categorised under the same genre, but the themes and topics are closely connected, making it a unicum.

Are there any particular inspirations which have impacted not only on your music but your technical approach to creating and playing music?

For the most part my inspiration comes from human life, history, philosophy and from the outcome of their combination. Being something that has an impact also in my own existence (everyone’s life is even if we don’t always realise it) I feel the need to express these emotions and experiences, hoping to have an impact and to engage in these reflections also on the audience.

Is there a regular process to your songwriting?

Most of the time I start from an idea, a sentence from a book I find peculiarly intriguing etc….That works as an incipit, as something that gives me some food for thought, and from there I develop my writings and lyrics. Other times I simply get struck by sudden inspiration and the song comes flowing out of my head!

Where do you draw the biggest inspirations to the lyrical side of your songs from?

My own heritage is often part of my lyrics. I’m half Italian half Brazilian and had a quite confusing, but funny, childhood living and traveling between two continents. That always made me the “new kid”, so to speak I always saw the relationships, the society from a different perspective and that gave the chance to develop a certain sensibility toward different lives (in terms of society, traditions, religions and way of living). I write in English, Italian and Portuguese, sometimes mixing the languages in the same song, because each of them have a slightly different way to express a feeling or an idea. I’m fascinated by the evocative power of words and by how much a language can describe the history and the type of approach to life of the people using it.

Can you please give us some background to your latest release?

My latest release Morpheo in Eros is deeply influenced by the 70’s and 80’s history of the Chilean people under Pinochet dictatorship. My song writing is very influenced by South America’s history, culture and tradition.

The EP’s start has a dreamlike, soft taste to it. As it progresses it becomes more crude and violent while reaching the end exploding in the last song. The main theme is “the mistake”. It’s the error that can be either understood as the one of the single human being as well as the universal one.

Do you go into the recording of your songs with them pretty much in their final state or prefer to develop them as you record?ian-carvalho-2

I usually get to the studio in the final stage of the work and then go through all the necessary adjustments with the sound engineer. For my last work I collaborated with Andrea Nardoni, Relaxo Studio’s sound engineer, my co-producer and friend. (http://www.relaxostudio.com/)

Tell us about the live side to your music?

I love being on stage, there’s so much excitement in the air! I always give my 110% even if the sound may end up losing a bit quality wise, because I’m completely into the music and I have this need of making the audience feel it as much as I am.

It is not easy for any new band or project to make an impact regionally let alone nationally and further afield. How have you found it?

I reckon that unless you already have made a name for yourself and/or have enough money behind you, it’s going to be extremely hard. The drive is always necessary anyway, but having some extra will help you going against the odds and to pull through any circumstance.

How about the internet and social media? How has that impacted on you to date?

The internet gave me the opportunity to make my music available worldwide and to discover that my work and my former band were appreciated abroad. Thanks to the internet I managed to organise two tours in South America for example. I think of the internet and social media as an instrument, and you have to know how to use it if you want it to work to you advantage either you being already famous or a newbie.

Once again a big thanks for sharing time with us; anything you would like to add for the readers?

Thank you for having me here! The only thing I can add is: buy my EP, come to my gig (next coming up is 12th November at the Finsbury http://www.thefinsbury.co.uk/) and find out for yourself!

https://www.facebook.com/iancarvalhoproject   http://www.iancarvalho.com/

Pete RingMaster 13/10/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Bad Llama – Shedding Skin EP

BL_RingMasterReview

British alternative rockers Bad Llama have taken their time to find the right ingredients in their character and sound but on the evidence of their debut EP and its lead single, the Burton Upon Trent based quintet have found that moment and then some. The Shedding Skin EP is a powerful and emotively atmospheric proposal, all creative muscle and melodic fire, and its first single The Wolf You Feed, a slice of thick enterprise.

The current line-up of the band stepped forward earlier this year but under previous name, Wet Lettuce and the Magik Bean, Bad Llama formed in 2012. Taking their time to find the right vocalist, the first year was spent as an instrumental proposal before frontman Kyle Jordan and bassist Lewis Hutchings joined the band in 2013. Completed by drummer Gaz Waddell and guitarists Dan Houlbrooke and Sam Wyatt, the five-piece has reached the moment where real attention is taking notice of them and especially their new ear pleasing releases.

EP opener, The Healer slowly looms up on the senses, its atmospheric presence almost portentous even as lively rhythms and an inviting hook pave the way for the potent vocals of Jordan. Instantly there is a thick catchiness to the song, the bass of Hutchings swinging along as beats match its brooding stride. The slower chorus brings a darker ambience though again the band cleverly blend shadows with crystaline radiance as variation in voice and sound impress. It is a captivating start to the release; a song full of intrigue and twists suggesting it is going in one direction only to move in another and back again.

 The band’s new single strolls in next, The Wolf You Feed led by another hook lined melody before exotic hues escape the guitar, Jordan and Hutchings grabbing the imagination with their relative tempting. The bass is especially compelling though matched by the spicy liquor of Houlbrooke and Sam Wyatt’s melody fuelled exploits while Waddell’s arms swing with a creative tenacity which makes his beats magnetic. Fair to say that the great start to Shedding Skin just got better, the fiery solo within boiling sonic fumes a shot of additional goodness to flavour an emotional ride through depression and turmoil.

Paint in Sound steps forward next with a familiar yet indefinable air to its bubbly melody and contagious tone. Inspirations to the band include the likes of Incubus, Tool, Soundgarden, Jane’s Addiction, Korn, and Pearl Jam, and it is the first pair in that list which most come to mind though even with its seemingly recognisable nature, the song confirms that Bad Llama are developing a  sound distinct to them; something as here gripping ears and imagination.

A mellower proposition in many ways compared to its predecessors, 10 Years Time swiftly shows it too has a tempestuously emotive heart and rugged creative teeth to its body. The song is a volcano, bubbling up and erupting with emotion and intensity within a darkly lit reflective landscape, Jordan impressing again as he shares the song’s heart.

With their EP completed by the pleasure breeding Exile, Bad Llama has attention and imagination in the palms of their hand by the time Shedding Skin disappears. They have come a long way since their previous guise and sound, employing a maturity and invention which ensures each song has its moment of sole attention. You get the feeling there is still plenty more to come too, the band still on the lower rungs of their creativity meaning their next steps will only be eagerly awaited.

The Shedding Skin EP and The Wolf You Feed single are out now across most online stores.

UPCOMING DATES:

21.10.16 – O2 Academy 3, Birmingham

28.10. 16 The Leopard Inn, Burton

https://www.facebook.com/WetLettuceandTheMagicBean/  https://twitter.com/BadLlamaBand

Pete RingMaster 10/10/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright