Tyranny Is Tyranny – The Rise Of Disaster Capitalism

TyrannyShout_credit_Bronson_Karaff_Reputation Radio/RingMaster Review

The time between 2013 debut album Let It Come From Whom It May and its successor The Rise Of Disaster Capitalism has certainly seen no change or lessening in the ferocious incriminations and outrage at the current world and its masters from its creators. Musically though, Tyranny Is Tyranny has used it to evolve and explore bolder and more expansive sonic landscapes and ideation. The US post noise rock band has openly grown in songwriting and sound without losing any of the compelling turbulence and ire which sparked within their first pleasing offering. Indeed the Madison quartet has possibly turned their anger into an even more corrosive and uncomfortable trespass this time around but woven it into sparser yet intimately imposing, and inescapably immersive soundscapes clad in caustic and emotionally stark atmospheres. It is another imposing confrontation which will scare as many as it seduces, and further evidence of Tyranny Is Tyranny emerging as one of rock’s exciting uncompromising challenges.

Inspirations to Tyranny Is Tyranny comes from the likes of Neurosis, Explosions In The Sky, and Fall of Efrafa, essences once again laying as clear seeds in the tempest of The Rise Of Disaster Capitalism, whilst lyrically and emotionally the unjust, corruptive landscape governing our lives is again the influential cancer. Opener Or Does It Explode?, brings swift evidence that musically we are into new territory evolved from the band’s previous successes. The guitars of Jason Jensen and Russell Emerson Hall cast the first descriptive hue, chords a cold and ominous lure as well as the spark to an infectious canter of rolling rhythms and dark yet inviting riffs. Shadows drape every aspect of the lively encounter, coating the raw tones of the Hall’s vocals and fuelling the magnetic post punk bred bassline offered by M. Guy Ficcioto. The song fluidly moves through slow, doomy elegance and raucously aggravated energy across its provocative terrain with the rhythms of drummer Jonathan Brown a perpetual incitement. It is a heavy and welcoming, explosive and fearsome journey for song and ears, an adventure which never settles into one scenic provocation for long and has emotions and imagination riveted from start to finish.

DisasterCover_Reputation Radio/RingMaster Review   The following She Who Struggles is an instantly sombre affair, guitars and vocals a low key coaxing of emotive unrest courted by punchier rhythms. As it opens up its narrative and nature a surf spiced tang colours sonic endeavour whilst an agitated and emotionally unbalanced raging overwhelms vocals and riffs. Soon song and listener is in a dark place but there is a constant light and escape through the sultry craft and imagination of the guitars. The bewitching nature of the encounter is ravaged and pulled this way and that across the seven minutes of tempestuous imagination, but never gives way or loses its potency as the album continues its impressive start.

Pillar Of Cloud, Pillar Of Fire makes a similar proposal but with the smouldering enticement of Ficcioto’s trumpet a swift success and enthralling lure in a cauldron of volatile textures and emotions, the song is soon sculpting its own unique and extensive questioning. Brown is the protagonist crafting and roaming a tenaciously unpredictable canvas, the guitars and vocals the rich unsettling passion, but it is even in brief moments, the coaxing of trumpet which tugs on thoughts and emotions with the strongest toxicity.

The album’s best track twists and bellows next, Kabuki Snuff Theater a post punk expulsion of creative drama and raw emotional disquiet. It is glorious, bass and drums building an inescapable rhythmic trap which shards of guitar and sonic causticity shape and colour with even more virulent temptation. For all of its easy contagiousness though, there is a ferocity and abrasive challenge to it igniting the passions and setting up the listener perfectly for the closing epic fifteen minute conflict of Victory Will Defeat You. The final song takes ears and thoughts from a raw calm through an emotional and vocal confrontation before luring them into a severely restless and ireful cyclone with a creative turbulence to match. Though finding it slightly too long, the track is a massive and stirring finale to one simply excellent encounter.

The Tyranny Is Tyranny sound has grown up, not come of age as you sense there is still plenty more within band and song writing to develop, but evolved into something masterful and dynamically striking. That has resulted in an uncomfortable and richly enjoyable new offering which will undoubtedly reward the brave.

The Rise Of Disaster Capitalism is available from June 13th via Phratry Records digitally and on CD and vinyl and @ https://tyrannyistyranny.bandcamp.com/

http://tyrannyistyranny.com/   https://www.facebook.com/TyrannyIsTyranny

RingMaster 12/06/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard on Reputation Radio @ http://www.reputationradio.net


My Baby – Shamanaid

Pic Bart Heemskerk

Pic Bart Heemskerk

A few weeks back, preparing to be stirred up by the ever compelling dishevelled gentleman of blues, Seasick Steve at London Apollo Hammersmith, a majestic and fiery blues hex descended on ears and emotions in the shape of My Baby. Hailing from the Netherlands, the trio of Cato van Dyck, Joost (Sheik) van Dyck, and Daniel (Da Freez) Johnston were the announced support but unexpected intoxication infesting body and imagination with their delta blues seeded, rousing funk fuelled prowess. Fair to say My Baby rocked the walls and all between that night and sparked hungry attention on their just as recently released second album, Shamanaid. It has proven to be a proposition which more than lives up to the promise and anticipation bred through the forty minutes or so of their company that evening whilst revealing much more of the depth and adventure in the My Baby sound.

With its members bred in a Dutch and New Zealand climate, My Baby came together with a mutual lust for “fingerpickin’ guitars, voodoo, roots, funk, gospel and Southern swampy blues”. 2013 saw the release of debut album My Baby Loves Voodoo! via Embrace Recordings, its emergence greedily received and devoured and the spark to a global tour and shows from Texas to Tokyo, London to Lichtenvoorde, and Vienna to Wellington. My Baby also found itself embraced by radio stations and invited to support Henny Vrienten, as well as play on his latest release. The recent tour with Seasick Steve has enveloped the unveiling of Shamanaid, My Baby nudging the broadest fevered attention yet for their psyche inciting sound through said live adventure and even more potently with the provocative shamanic lures of the album.

The exceptional Seeing Red sets the spellbinding experience in motion, its first touch enslaving bait alone as dulled but pungent beats escort a spicy strum of guitar. Their combined lure embraces the magnetic tones of Cato next; her delivery and syllables dancing on the strands of rhythmic and acoustic coaxing like a temptress. The repetitious core of the song proceeds to bounce like a metronome inside ears and head, trapping both as melodies flirt with thoughts through their picturesque craft. The Louisiana air of the band’s sound is just as spicy as the enterprise if breeds, the song increasingly binding the listener in inescapable charm and seduction whilst it’s infectious shuffle, well that has the body enthralled from its first moment.

01_front_digipack_Reputation Radio/RingMaster Review   The thrilling start is matched by the calmer but sultrier melodic waters of Meet Me At The Wishing Well. From the first moment a bewitching hook shines from within another minimalistic but pungent rhythmic and riffs lined stroll. Whereas live the band roared like a lioness, the record sees My Baby explore more their acoustic imagination and skills, the second song a radiant affair for ears and emotions. The shimmer of sound and richness of vocals make for a reflective hug which has body swerves and foot taps as eager as ears and thoughts are at the hands of the lyrical and vocal painting.

Variety and potency is kept ablaze by Uprising next, its blues flaming and dub infused tenacity an incendiary proposal which whether the song swims on a melodic breeze or erupts in an impassioned furnace, only intensifies and incites with blues alchemy. The track has been a thick lure into the album, an easy to see success such the unstoppable and fierce mesmerism on ears and emotions fuelling every aspect and twist of its triumph.

A mellower but no less tempting kiss comes next with The Doors Of Your Mind, its smouldering air and reflective blend of words and vocals a tantalising croon which simply slips under the skin. Offering more evidence that My Baby is as skilled and poetic laying a gentle evocative hand on ears as they are stirring up blood and energy, the song makes way for the similarly delicate Mary Morgan. There is a livelier vivacity to the richly hued encounter but matches its predecessor in vocal adventure as well as brewing a melodic tonic as colourful as the lyrical tale exposed by Cato.

Remedy flirts with an initial spatial coaxing next, rhythms adding alluring shadows as Cato’s harmonies inflame the air. Eventually a slight but definite tribalistic tenacity merges with a fascinating web of blues expression created by guitars; the slide version a lip smacking tangy seducing against the darker hues of bass and the ever anthemic rhythms. There is an intensive varying of styles and persuasion across the album, far more than found in the band’s first full-length; all songs making fascinating and empowering propositions, and especially here providing an unrelenting lifting of spirit and energy for the listener before the poetic elegance of Hidden From Time lies down beside ears and envelops them in its beauty.

The rhythmic saunter and sonic temptation of 6X2 slips in next, voice and guitar entwining with a blend of gospel and blues rooted serenading. As ever there is an edge to it all though, a raw and uncorrupted essence taken from the roots of all flavours woven into song and album. Once again musical hypnotism is at work as, like all songs within Shamanaid, it removes the listener from the real world for an instant or two before handing them over to the just as potent escape of Marching. With a relaxed but inescapable swing and an anthemic might to its seductive chorus, the track is a puppeteer to body and soul, only releasing its lingering grip when the closing Panggajo brings its worldly mystique and spirit to arrest ears and imagination.

The song is an enchanting end to a treat of an encounter more than living up to hopes seeded seeing My Baby live. Shamanaid does not have the fierce roar and volatile energy of their live show but ventures into a just as thrilling and gripping acoustic/melody exploration. It also shows a big leap in sound and imagination from its highly pleasing predecessor. My Baby is aural voodoo indeed with the sweetest toxicity.

Shamanaid is out now via Embrace Recordings @ https://mybaby.bandcamp.com/album/shamanaid

http://www.mybabywashere.com https://www.facebook.com/MYBABYMUSIC

RingMaster 11/06/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard on Reputation Radio @ http://www.reputationradio.net



Thirteen Shots – Black Smiles

Thirteen Shots - Promo Picture_Reputation Radio/RingMaster Review

With every release since they emerged in 2011 and unleashed the instantly captivating track Danzig, UK rockers Thirteen Shots has evolved their sound, each encounter seeing the Birmingham quartet infuse richer and broader flavours and styles into their core tempest of horror bred rock ‘n’ roll. Each step has also come with an increasing amount of acclaim but fair to say that Thirteen Shots have easily outdone themselves with new album Black Smiles. It is a dramatically eclectic mix of songs and genres honed into one increasingly captivating and addictive proposition, and what it might lack a touch in consistency it more than makes up in riotous contagion.

Since whipping up attention with the horror punk sculpted Danzig, Thirteen Shots has been on a creative and attention grabbing roll. Shows with the likes of Demented are Go, The Peacocks, Rezurex, Howling Wolfmen, and Graveyard Johnnys helped establish the band as one of the UK’s most exciting horror/garage punk newcomers and now a band whose shows and releases are constantly highly anticipated. Previous albums Vaudeville and Tales That Start With A Whisper certainly pushed the band’s sound and presence forward but it was last year’s White Noise which made the biggest step in bold adventure and diversity. Hindsight though shows its potent success and contents were just an early hint for bigger and more ambitious things now ripening within Black Smiles.

Recorded with Paul Hughes, Black Smiles is based on the old school movie experience of double features with each song playing part in a cinematic experience. It all starts with Cobradeer, which acts like a promotional trailer to the other tracks which are like serial episodes within the main feature of the album. The opener is an immediate rush of fiercely slapping rhythms and ferocious riffs, the song blasting ears into keen attention before relaxing into a more tempered stroll as the distinct vocals of Johnny Rose open up the narrative. The chorus kicks the adrenaline switch again with the song swinging between both attacks as it provides an increasingly spicy musical/lyrical introduction to the album.

Thirteen Shots - Black Smiles- Cover_Reputation Radio/RingMaster Review   It is a strong and enjoyable beginning quickly surpassed by the following Run and Hide. From the great initial throaty bassline cast by George Chick and the quickly joining equally predatory beats of drummer Tom Fenn, the track has imagination and appetite hooked. The surf shimmer of guitar and controlled tones of Rose only increase the potency as drama and sinister seduction blossom their tempting too. Subsequently a more hard rock enterprise is spun by guitarist Lewis Machip as the encounter’s chorus roars, contrasts swapping moments in the lengthening landscape of the excellent song. With its weave also knitted with garage and melodic rock as well as punk and blues tenacity, it is a swift unveiling of the variety and diversity destined to continue through sound and album.

Next Cupid´s Dead romps through fresh scenery too, its punk/garage rock devilry seemingly bred from a mix of The Clash and Blitzkid. At not much more than a brain munch past a minute in length, the track is a punk stomp to breed an addiction for and quickly matched in its individual way by the dirty rock ‘n’ roll revelry of Warewolf Party. A spicy groove is the first infection with the song’s raw air and fiery sound the second, it all united in a riveting and easy persuasion lorded over by the honest tones of Rose before it then makes way for the anthemic rampage of Garage Crew. Chick once again is the kindling to a feisty blaze with his opening dark bass prowl, every note a resonating treat leading ears into the brawling surge of riffs and rabid rhythms fuelling the song. That bass becomes even more bestial in tone as the song lurches from one explosive assault to another premeditated predatory stroll and back; punk, horror, and subsequently blues rock entwining in its anthemic contagion.

Night of Sin doses itself up with a big shot of blues guitar and rock ‘n’ roll next, Machips’s enterprise tangy liquor in the heavy intimidating embrace of the rhythms. The ever unpolished punk delivery of Rose ensures an alluring earthy feel is always present o the album, even here where strings reveal their most accomplished and intoxicating beauty. It is a constantly rewarding mix again in evidence, after the tantalising refreshment of the melodic and acoustic croon that is Interlude, in the psychotic Skitzo. A delta blues tang coats the guitar’s endeavour bringing the incoming stomp into view, the flavouring a persistent tempting as the song erupts and blazes with persistent blues punk tenacity.

A enticing swagger comes with Black Eyed Girl next, the song like a moonlit seductress swinging its melodic hips as the more restrained and continually impressive voice of Rose introduces the moment’s protagonist. It is a gripping danger and intrigue which retains its potency as the song expels another bluesy flame of raw energy and sound. The entwining continues until the song can contain itself no more and reveals itself as a dirty raucous rocker for a bellow of a persuasion.

The swinging hips of Punk Betty flirts in a similar vein to its predecessor, its saunter a punk infused hard rock bait but with the same catchy resourcefulness. It does not admittedly have the same spark as previous songs, that inescapable lure but with one delicious bassline and the anthemic mischief of the vocals, it only keeps appetite and satisfaction eager before passing attention over to the album’s title track. It too is missing something to set, as earlier tracks, personal tastes ablaze, a particular uniqueness to spark their lust but once more its dark hearted rock ‘n roll and lyrical enterprise, not forgetting predation bass and sonic veining, is nothing less than rousing.

Lost Soul is soon a full seduction though. Its surf and horror rock romance is a sultry incitement of ears and imagination, undiluted persuasion caressed by a garage rock smoulder and flirted with by a ska seeded tempting. To be honest there is an even richer tapestry of flavours in easily the best song on the album, plenty to be discovered as the track alone sparks real excitement and anticipation for the continual and increasing potential and growth of Thirteen Shots.

There is a final raw explosion of punk and garage hostility in the shape of Friday 13, a bracing and unpolished finale to another thoroughly enjoyable and riveting adventure with Thirteen Shots. As always with a record from the band there is a dramatic potential of even bigger and major things ahead, the foursome getting closer to their pinnacle each time but equally raising that bar with every offering too. They have a classic within them for sure and it will have its day but right now we all have the opportunity to go on a rigorously enjoyable romp in great exploits like Black Smiles.

Black Smiles is released on June 29th and can be pre-ordered via https://thirteenshots.bandcamp.com/ and https://itunes.apple.com/gb/album/black-smiles/id994668019 in various options.

Http://www.thirteenshots.co.uk/     https://www.facebook.com/thirteenshotsband

RingMaster 10/06/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard on Reputation Radio @ http://www.reputationradio.net

Fight Amp – Constantly Off

Pic Freddie Ross

Pic Freddie Ross

Whether they call themselves Fight Amp or Fight Amputation, Philadelphia’s keg of noise rock ferocity have returned with a blistering roar of an album in the shape of Constantly Off. Imposing and at times bordering on carnivorous, the release is the band’s first new recordings in over three years and their heaviest most virulently cantankerous offering yet.

Once more the trio pour grunge tenacity, sludge oppressiveness, and punk predation into their creative vat for the album, twisting and honing it into a tempest of irresistible and rousing noise rock. Equally though Fight Amp has cultivated their most infectious and seductive melodic tempting too. It has resulted in songs which rhythmically stalk, sonically abrase, and melodically romance the senses whilst creating an infestation which as suggested earlier sees the band at a new plateau of invention and sound. Think early Melvins and Torche meets KEN mode with rigorous incitement from the likes of Nirvana, Black Flag, and Dope Body, then think of that being something original again, and you have the addictive might of the Steve Poponi (American Heritage, Ladder Devils) recorded Constantly Off.

Ex Everything sets things in contagious motion, the opener stepping forward in a breeze of portentously predacious sound with the guitar of Mike McGinnis creating sonic smog. A whisper of a relaxation follows before rugged bass and guitar riffs collude with punchy beats in casting a more intensive examination of ears. The vocals of McGinnis and bassist Jon DeHart, whilst being just as imposing, offer a more harmonic temper to the heavy weight of the song, simultaneously sculpting prowling grooves through their individual string craft as hostile as they are magnetic. It is a beast of an encounter, a flirtatious predator which shares its traits with the following Survival Is Strange.

CO_COVER_WEB_Reputation Radio/RingMaster Review The second song is a much more lively and volatile proposal from its first breath. The guitar spins a web of scathing riffs and enticing grooves around vocals which again come with an infectious swing and raw attitude. The contagious essence of the song is emulated just as resourcefully, amidst the resonating lures of bass, in the swinging sticks of drummer Dan Smith too. The encounter is noise addiction for ears and appetite matched quickly after by Leveling In A Dream. Its initial bluesy coaxing is liquor to the senses, a minute plus of suggestive toxicity which eventually spawns a rhythmic and vocal stroll of forthright attitude. Subsequently a reserved but antagonistic wind of sound with rhythmic punches fill ears, the closing minute of the track a bracing bellow which still never catches fire but smoulders perfectly for potent success.

Smith with his rhythmic and rapacious enterprise sets You Don’t Wanna Live Forever rolling next, his jabs increasing in pace and virulence until guitar and bass cannot hold back any longer and jump in with dirty riffs and boozy grooves, which are matched in turn by the raw and catchy variety of the vocals. Agitation and discord add to the captivating revelry, the song a perpetual eruption of off kilter tenacity and bouncing energy, not forgetting ingenuity.

Contrasting the leaping persuasion of its predecessor, I Perceive Reptoids employs another threatening prowl in its proposal. It comes with a post punk shadowing, a solemn toning which continues to cloud the corrosive expulsions of vocal and sonic ire aligned to another riveting and intrusive rhythmic enticement. Once more the song is an incitement bred from colluding contrasts and opposing textures, and again ears and imagination are twisted into subservience.

Final track Happy Joyful Life brings a last tempest to devour greedily. The bass of DeHart is almost bestial in its voice and addictively savage basslines, the beats of Smith rapier like, whilst McGinnis’ guitar breeds a maelstrom of senses tearing hooks and toxic grooves. Together it is a tempestuous and ridiculously infectious affair driven by scowling vocals and just outstanding.

The track makes an absorbing end to an incendiary release on ears and emotions, Constantly Off brewing its own terrain of noise rock which explores all the essences making up its DNA with such imagination that it ensures its appeal will go far beyond one or two specific genres. Quite simply Fight Amp creates irresistible noisy rock ‘n’ roll and in their new offering one of the real treats of 2015.

Constantly Off is available now via Brutal Panda Records digitally and on vinyl @ http://www.brutalpandarecords.com/products/fight-amp-constantly-off-12 or https://fightamp.bandcamp.com/

https://www.facebook.com/FightAmp   http://www.fightamp.com/

RingMaster 10/06/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard on Reputation Radio @ http://www.reputationradio.net


Nightslug – Loathe

Promo_Reputation Radio/RingMaster Review

If there is any glimmer of hope for humanity and the world as its falls further into decay, it is an escape you will not find in the sound and new album of German band Nightslug. The seven track encounter is a crushing swamp of sound and ill-will, a soundtrack for and after the apocalypse which thickly and ravenously consumes any hint of light. It is ugly, increasingly voracious, and viciously suffocating but also irrepressibly compelling.

Formed late 2011 in Düsseldorf, Nightslug was bred in and emerged from the country’s hardcore-punk scene. As their demo 12” that first year and debut album Dismal Fucker in 2012 revealed, the band’s sound immersed that hardcore and punk breeding into a tsunami of sludge seeded hostility and nihilistic expression. Both releases startled and spawned potent attention for themselves and the band, but now their brand new album Loathe takes everything to a new grotesque plateau with, easy to suspect, a similar growth in awareness and success soon following.

Nightslug Loathe cover _Reputation Radio/RingMaster Review     From the initial sonic violation of Vile Pigs, band and release is a hellacious resonance in ears and spiteful provocation for the imagination and emotions. The opener swiftly welcomes a savage bassline and telling vocal samples as its climate becomes a piercing and even more inhospitable prospect. Dirty doom spawned riffs add to the trespass almost as instantly as the insidious tones of the vocals, everything united in a corrosive smog of noise and intent. As with many destructive proposals, there is an underlying tempting and swagger leading to contagion, the song’s coming through that increasingly infernal bass bait matched in rancor by riffs and a riveting repetitious essence permeating all aspects.

The song’s departing sonic abuse transforms into the sonically violent start of the album’s title track. It is also the spark to a rage of intensively striding riffs and scything rhythms as a filthy rock ‘n’ roll swing cores the tempest of physical and emotional abuse. The storm though is soon turned into an inferno of noise and indeed loathing through the maelstrom of guitar and the ravenously merciless vocals before it too seeps into its successor, The Thrill Is Gone: Repulsion. There is nothing but hatred and bad blood running through the lumbering vitriol posing as a song, predatory riffs and rhythms alongside contaminated grooves and effect despoiled vocals colluding to get under the skin and devour the listener from within. As much as it is sludge, hardcore, and sheer aural cancer, that deep rooted infection is working away with noise rock and industrial tempting too and never has antipathy and the end of personal days been so seductive.

The excellent Under a Bane is a short unbridled savaging churning up body and feelings with every rancorous note and barbarously spewed syllable whilst Disease straight after, as its name suggests, is a lingering and inescapable sonic and emotional malady slowly working away at the senses with its insatiable distemper. Ears and thoughts simply get lost in its immersive depths and suffocating claws, its sludge crawl clad in an esuriently scarring sound for a gradual and cumulative persuasion.

Animalistic is the best way to describe the brilliant alchemy of Pure, its tribal beats undiluted temptation crawled over by wretchedly bred vocals and a seesaw of sonic enticing. As the gorgeous assault enslaves you can almost feel reality and the surrounding world crumbling into dust, before closing song Tainted Throne drags the listener into its own realm of carnal tones and hideous sonic landscapes lorded over by the most depraved sounds and creative imaginations.

The final song epitomises the nasty and beauteous decay of Loathe, an album it has to be said that simply enthrals and thrills from start to finish. It is obviously not going to ignite a greedy appetite and excitement in everyone but as life and humanity putrefies in our hands, Nightslug present one delicious soundtrack.

Loathe is out now via Lost Pilgrims Records (FR), Dry Cough Records (UK), and Broken Limbs Recordings (USA) and digitally @ http://nightslug.bandcamp.com/

https://www.facebook.com/nightslug   http://lostpilgrimsrecords.limitedrun.com/products/551006-nightslug-loathe

RingMaster 10/06/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard on Reputation Radio @ http://www.reputationradio.net


No Consequence – Vimana

No Consequence press shot

It is probably not too far from the mark to suggest that Vimana, the new album from UK progressive/tech metallers No Consequence has been one highly anticipated offering, and right on the money to say it is one strapping beast of sound and creative attitude. The release takes an already highly flavoursome and attention grabbing sound to new pastures of imagination and voracious intensity, aligning the established technical and aggression of the band to a more concentrated brew of melodic and expressive adventure. It is their most rounded and gripping proposition yet with just the hint that they and we are still nowhere near the finished article of their potential and sound.

Renowned as one of the most impressive live acts on the European metal scene, listing the sharing of tours and stages with the likes of TesseracT, Chimp Spanner, Carcer City and just recently Monuments and Murdock on their CV, No Consequence follow up their previous acclaimed albums In the Shadow of Gods and IO, of 2009 and 2013 respectively, with an incitement which seduces as it tears strips of the senses and relentlessly fascinates as it casts a roar of uncompromising aggressiveness.

NC-Vimana-packshot   Vimana begins with the short persuasion of Acala and an immediate hint of dramatic climates and textures within a harmonic embrace. An intro come scene setter, the appealing opening is soon departing for the more rugged and emotionally intensive Our Time Has Come. Restrained yet rich grooves wind around ravenous riffs and a sonic turbulence as the rawer aspect of vocalist Kaan Tasan comes to the fore. He too though is soon showing an adept range as a cleaner presence entwines with his dustier snarls. As the guitars of Dan Reid and Harry Edwards flirt and abrase ears with craft and enterprise, the song’s tempest provides a persistent challenge and enticement of progressive and technical tenacity. It is equally a weave of varied metal and melodic toxicity, it all colluding in one magnetic lure holding attention and appetite firmly in its hands alongside enjoyment.

The following Is This A Way To Live has a calmer if no less energetic presence, though vocal squalls and cantankerous riffs as well as a grooved taunting offer disagreement. Subsequently the song slips into a mellow reflective passage within a still tempestuous atmosphere, the bass of Tom Parkinson a prowling shadow in the growing web of wiry grooves and hooks whilst the rhythmic animosity of drummer Colin Bentham is barbarous in the norm and bestial, like the bass, in the track’s most agitated state. With a Middle Eastern suggestiveness emerging in its thick ambience and unpredictability driving every twist and turn, the track has ears and thoughts thoroughly captivated before making way for the more rigorous examination of Resistance and in turn the cyclonic energy of The Turning Point. There is a carnal essence to the savage riffs and technical predation of the first of the two, but countered by and aligned to a constantly evolving landscape of immersive melodies, heart driven vocals, and a blustery fury. Virulently contagious and intrusively dynamic, the track is the first major pinnacle within an already seriously impressing album and quickly matched by the inventive theatre and hostile temptation of its successor. It is another song which merges contrasts and contradictions in sound and energy in a riveting emotional and breath-taking physical turmoil. Though arguably not as technically busy as previous releases but certainly as skilfully dynamic and inventive it, as all the songs within Vimana, reveals new corners and depths with every listen, ensuring every flight of the album’s raging adventure is increasingly rewarding.

The elegant caress of brief instrumental Half Light comes next, its evocative beauty courted by a vocal sample before Citizen with a similarly warm charm and presence takes over. Of course things get more heated and agitated soon after, guitars spinning a trap of sonic predation matched by heavy rhythms though almost as quickly, a melodic tempting returns to seduce once again. The vocal variety of Tasan leads an eventual merger of both aspects as the song becomes a bewitching trespass on ears and passions.

There is something familiar about the following Speechless especially when vocals and song are in full roar but ultimately it casts a uniquely inflamed presence rife with emotional ire and sonic adventure. The lead track from the album and another highly satisfying encounter, it still does not quite take ears and emotions on the same thrilling ride as other tracks upon the album or indeed Disconnect which straight after unveils a worldly melodic emprise within a creative bellow and an imposing persistently evolving incitement.

Vimana is drawn to a close by firstly the cauldron of diversity and extremes that is Signs and finally its title track and its mellow croon on ears. Also equipped with a rhythmic stalking, the last song increasingly spawns brighter and bolder voracious flames throughout but without ever catching ablaze; a restraint which you have to say superbly works.

Both tracks bring Vimana a fine and absorbing finale, the album ending as potently as it began. There are moments where personally there was a wish for the band to go further with its melodic explorations or inhospitable endeavour but no moment when No Consequence just do not seriously impress. Bottom-line is that Vimana is an unbridled recommendation for not only technical/progressive metal fans but for the broad attention of metal itself.

Vimana is available now via Basick Records digitally and on CD @ http://music.basickrecords.com/album/vimana and http://basick.supplies/collections/no-consequence

https://www.facebook.com/noconsequenceband   http://www.basickrecords.com/bands/no-consequence

RingMaster 09/06/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard on Reputation Radio @ http://www.reputationradio.net


Threatpoint – Careful What You Wish For


An album you may have missed but certainly need to know about is Careful What You Wish For, the second album from US groove predators Threatpoint. It is a fury of an encounter infusing varying flavours of metal and heavy rock into a snake pit of grooved hostility, and though there are thick strands of recognisable influences and essences, band and album incite nothing less than greed and thick enjoyment with its brand new proposition.

Hailing from Scranton, Pennsylvania, Threatpoint emerged in 2012 and quickly drew potent attention and praise for their voracious live presence and a similarly hungry sound which further stirred up the local and US metal scene through debut album Dead to Rise the following year. It has been an increasing success now creating new waves further afield through Careful What You Wish For, an album over a year in the making and equipped with a torrent of irrepressible grooves, deeply rooting hooks, and a creative antagonism which just gets the blood surging.

The blistering tempest of sound and attitude begins with The Age Of Godlessness, its opening coaxing a provocative atmospheric scene of raw winds and solemn church bells. It is a portrait of ominous dark shadows and scenery from which the track subsequently bursts with ravenous riffs and heftily examining rhythms. The onslaught is torrential and instantly virulent, the raw and ferocious vocals of Chris James the perfect provocateur within a tsunami of aggression and caustic grooving. There is a feel of bands like Devildriver and Cavalera Conspiracy to it as the band mixes styles into a bracing tempest veined by melodic and sonic enterprise.

threatpoint album  It is an explosive and gripping start matched by the following Vultures Of Prey, an even more predatory and sinister corruption of the senses. Though the song has less of the physical and creative rabidity of the first, it is a just as rigorous and intimidating stalking of ears and emotions with a Static X like breath creeping in with vocals and riffs from the simultaneously enticing and savage guitars of Alex Olivetti and Mike White. Two songs in and fair to say Threatpoint would have to seriously go awry to lose the hungry appetite and inflamed satisfaction already ignited by the opening pair of rages. Though some tracks understandably impress more than others, the quintet continues to enslave with craft and diversity as the ferocious Divide & Conquer takes over. The great raspy tones of James prey on ears as the rhythmic hostility of drummer CJ Krukowski and the increasingly bestial qualities of Eric Ross’ bass lay down addictive bait within a flood of salacious grooves. A spicy solo adds further heavy metal magnetism to the torrent of sound and persuasion before it all departs for the sonic devilry of Mockingbird.

The fourth song is bred from a swirling of melodic enticing which seizes precise moments to magnetically flirt with ears from within another tsunami of impassioned intensity and creative voracity, vocally and musically. Once more strikingly different flavours are woven into its ravishment with its substantial melodic and heavy metal colouring employed further in an equally pleasing but darker terrain through Blessings and Curses where they court a black and death metal seeded trespass on the listener.

Collapse almost toys with ears initially, a bedlamic soaking of essences the first fierce hug before song and bands expel a flood of ravenous emotions amidst a brawling collusion of tangy grooves, dogged riffs, and rapier like swings from Krukowski. It is a beast of an encounter, an irresistible ravaging unafraid, as all songs, to mix up its attack and presence to leave expectations redundant and the imagination feeding on more familiar but openly fresh confrontation. It is a brutal highlight springing to another in the hellacious stalking of the senses that is Stronger Than Death. It is yet another offering where vicious hostility and sonic adventure collide in an invigorating raging. As the music is a maelstrom of flavours and styles within each of the album’s cyclones, so are the vocals of James and the band as a broad diversity and delivery shares the singer’s similarly uncompromising and hard hitting lyrics.

The thrash and death spawned Mark My Words has the pulse and emotions racing next, the imagination seduced by a great progressive melodic twist around two thirds in, whilst Devil You Know and Tree Of Sorrow are both rancorous hurricanes eroding the senses but rewarding with more creative infusions and twists of sub genres within metal and rock. Though all songs provide strong individual characters and presence there is a unity in sound and invention which ensures all are audibly Threatpoint, even with the strong feel of a Killswitch Engage or Hatesphere across these particular offerings.

The album’s title track unleashes its carnivorous might and potency next. Sharing its merciless grudge in an irresistible multi-flavoured cyclone of grooves, scarring antipathy, and sonic devilry, the track ignites another wave of greed and satisfaction but finds itself shadowed slightly by the even greater animus and punk infused raw beauty of Secrets. From the deliciously nasty bassline cast by Ross in its first breath, the outstanding song is an insidious and unstoppable seduction with every element and second of its presence sheer carnal temptation.

It all comes to a close with firstly the masterful and sinister menacing of Hatebox, where James finds a Dez Fafara like grievance to his tones, and lastly the compelling When Karma Comes. The final song emerges with an acoustic melodic beauty which simply transfixes as the background sneakily brews up a sonic grievance which eventually erupts in hostile weather embraced in a bad blooded climate.

Given the luck and attention that Careful What You Wish For deserves, it is easy to see Threatpoint making their presence a global one if not now certainly on a near horizon. Their new proposal is not a game changer for the metal scene but gives it a new protagonist to get excited over and that is almost as good.

Careful What You Wish For is out now from most online stores.

http://www.threatpointofficial.com https://www.facebook.com/threatpoint

RingMaster 09/06/2015

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