Pryti – Tales Of A Melancholic

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Tales Of A Melancholic is the debut album from Pryti, an emerging British solo artist already making a striking mark, with her seriously accomplished and captivating fusion of heavy rock and melodic metal, on the national scene. Consisting of ten tracks which roar with the emotional snarl of the Deftones, cast a Lacuna Coil like creative theatre, and smoulder with the melodic prowess of Paramore, all over dramatic landscapes sculpted by voracious riffs and predatory rhythms, her new release is startling in its potency and skilled in its expressive persuasion. Also embracing elements of alternative and varied rock flavours, the album grips the imagination and leaves a deep rooted want to hear more.

Bringing all the guitars and bass on the release to her captivating songwriting and vocal strength, the Birmingham singer songwriter is no stranger to garnering acclaim and attention. Her last EP Welcome To Pariahville, also the name of her own label, was a big spark to an increasing spotlight and acclaim from the Rock/Metal community. Magazines like Kerrang! and Rocksound were close on the heels with coverage and praise too whilst radio airplay was soon embracing Pryti’s sounds, especially for more recently released single Abyss. Produced by Justin Hill from Sikth, Tales Of A Melancholic casts a broader and greater lure to that awakening attention, one easy to anticipate being reciprocated in greater praise and focus.

A portentous ambience brings opening song Insomnia into view, a sonic haze wrapping ears as thick prowling beats and caustic riffs follow in close attention. They all relax as the instantly flavoursome vocals of Pryti open the song’s emotional narrative, only the rhythms holding the same shape of their initial pungent presence. Vocally Pryti soars with a substantial yet harmonic roarPromoImage.jpg which alternates with an elegant seduction. It is a blend across song and the album which can be best described as Dolores O’Riordan of The Cranberries sings Deftones but with a much feistier and fascinating presence then that suggests. The song itself continues to breach new climactic heights and strengths, guitars and keys a riveting proposal against the rousing voice of Pryti.

The Pessimist follows and straight away grips ears with its opening graze of dirty raw riffs swiftly aligning to evocative vocals. Melancholic yet warmly radiate within its increasing shadows, the song is a brooding tempest which eventually erupts with muscularly swung rhythms and a spicy sonic enterprise which has senses and imagination bound and bewitched. The track continues the impressive start to the album; the first two songs backed again, and eventfully surpassed by the previously mentioned single Abyss. Sculpting a web of intensive emotional and sonic turbulence, courted by a melodic radiance, the track is a moving tide of personal angst and melodic intimacy within a stormy atmosphere. It is an enthralling and anthemic incitement, and there is no surprise that it turned a great many heads on its first appearance.

As the second song, the next up Purge opens with a gritty edge to its opening chords, bait contrasted and complimented by the increasingly siren-esque tones of Pryti. Shadows wrap the balladry of the song whilst a creative bellow drives its heavier tempestuous turns of pace and intensity. The result is another intriguing and captivating exploration emulated right after in the solemn beauty of Bitter Pill and the haunting Amnesia. The first of the two is a flame of bracing vocals and melodies caught on a passionate sonic wind, but equally prone to reflective calms within its provocative dip into dark drama. Its successor merges a sinister ambience with emotional anxiety, both aspects cultured by an unpredictable musical landscape and vocal intimacy. Though the song does not quite live up to its predecessors, it increasingly engages and enthrals before making way for the fiery storm of Angst. Boldly carnivorous compared to other songs as riffs and spiky grooves are immediately predatory, the track soon shows wider enterprise and invention by luring in melodic and harmonic caresses to temper and unite with the imposing ferocity of one more major highlight on the album.

The potent energies and creative tenacity of Battle Wounds brings its volcanic endeavour and emotion forward next before the melancholic beauty of Ghost takes the listener on a harmonic cruise across a melodic sea carrying an increasingly compelling raw and aggressive edge to its lapping temptation. Both tracks bond ears and thoughts with ease though are overshadowed by the outstanding closing song Burden, a song which epitomises and sums up all the instinctive strengths and exciting inventiveness bringing Tales of a Melancholic to life.

Pryti most likely to most would have been an unknown name let alone quantity before Tales of a Melancholic, but from this moment she is surely destined to be a name on the lips of and stirring up the British heavy rock scene. This is one album all should take a close listen to.

Tales of a Melancholic is released digitally on Welcome To Pariahville on February 16th

https://www.facebook.com/prytigatgemusic

RingMaster 16/02/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard from http://www.thereputationlabel.today

 

 

 

Arbitrator – Indoctrination of Sacrilege

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If you speak to the right people there are always good, often great things said about any new and emerging band. The confirmation is always only in the music of course and just as often as words are proven, anticipation is left in unintended deceit. Arbitrator since the release of The Consummate Ascendancy EP in 2011 has been a band often talked up and recommended from certainly Canadian and North American sources. Their debut album Indoctrination of Sacrilege is our introduction to the quartet and all promise and suggestions of their growing might have been convincingly proven.

Indoctrination of Sacrilege is a beast of a release, an intensively atmospherically soaked death metal bred proposition which from making an impressive first impression grows into one striking and fascinating theatre of imagination. Fusing in textures and essences from electro and industrial climates to progressive and ambient flavouring, the six track release engulfs and stirs ears and thoughts with skilled and increasingly rewarding adventure. The band itself is the brainchild of Robert Kuklaand, its emergence starting in 2010 and announced by the release of The Consummate Ascendancy the following year. It was an acclaimed proposal from the band but just a tester in many ways for the exploratory might of Indoctrination of Sacrilege. With a line-up of Myles Malloy (lead guitar), Connor ORT Linning (programming), and Soilwork drummer Dirk Verbeuren (ex-Devin Townsend Project, ex-Aborted) alongside Kuklaand (rhythm guitar, bass, vocals), Arbitrator put themselves forward now as one of the more intriguing and exciting progressive death metal prospects. They also still feel like they are still only just scratching the first few layers of their potential despite the weight and success of their album, a potential and prospect of even greater things ahead quite exciting.

The Sacha Laskow (ex-Divinity, Every Hour Kills) produced and Jens Bogren (Opeth, Katatonia, Amon Amarth, Arch Enemy) mastered album, swiftly has the imagination engaged as the entrance of opener They Will Worship This Fire of Agony comes through scenery of portentous bells and death feasting flies as church seeded chants seemingly offering final guidance as a dark pestilential cloud looms nearer and nearer. That sonic threat is realised a muscular wall of riffs and punchy rhythms veined by enchanting keys. It is an immediately incendiary and compelling persuasion enhanced by the guttural growls of Kuklaand and spicy persistent grooves. Samples are soon briefly mingling with the cavernous presence and intimidation of the song too but it is the infectious hooks and melodic winery which most captivates against the evolving and enlarging drama of the keys. It is an imposing and enthralling encounter, and as the album subsequently shows itself to be, a pleasingly unpredictable one.

The potent start to the album is solidly continued by Stillborn Bastard of The Nazarene, it straight away binding the appetite with intensive riffs and rhythmic swings whilst thoughts are provoked by its atmospheric colouring. Kuklaand again impresses as he binds words and syllables with a gripping impassioned tenacity which provides additional potent focal points amidst many on release and track. Samples and keys again paint additional inciting scenes in the ferocious and threatening landscape of the song, though it is the superb melodic enterprise of Malloy which steals more of the glory.

Through each song the album just gets better and creatively bigger, the next up For That Which May Appease Lions unleashing black hearted rock ‘n’ roll in a hellacious offering of grooved and addictive contagion aligned to corrosive and oppressive malevolence. The track transfixes from its first moments, the predatory nature and sound of the bass a delicious stalking within the maelstrom of rancor whilst clean vocals add a different shade of temptation to the voracious soundscape. Keys and guitar endeavour similarly vein the tempest with their own unique and engrossing narratives, everything seamlessly flowing and combining together to enslave ears and imagination. Unpredictability is rife across the track, and reveals more twists and subtle ideation with every listen, an exciting trait just as potent in Serpent of The Styx. The song’s electronic opening is a melodic drift of keys and radiant melodies yet it all comes with a solemn and melancholic charm courted by a slowly brewing dark side. An eruption of that heavy menace is eventually unleashed yet the song still continues to radiate melodic expression within a web of carnivorous grooves and enjoyably volatile rhythms. There is also a cinematic ambience to the track, its ‘warmer’ and calmer moments apocalyptic in suggestion as the track’s muscular and rabid side trespasses and challenges the senses. As its predecessor, the track is a mouth-watering incitement which just gets more addictive and anthemic with every passing minute, hook, and barbarous swing from Verbeuren.

       Profaned and Perfected whilst not quite matching the heights of the previous two tracks, has its own persuasive agenda of spiny grooves and spiky beats to contemplate, and an anthemic swing to drool profusely over. It is an out and out death metal ravishment but also one unafraid to explore warmer climes through the often spellbinding invention of the industrial spiced keys and climactic guitar. The song is still a bruising and commanding predator keeping body and emotions invigorated and fearful before the ‘epilogue’ like instrumental adventure of The Burning Sands of His Kingdom brings the album to a fine close. The electronically driven piece draws a cold and stark wasteland yet equally suggests hope with its melodically epic and intimately expressive tones within rugged scenery.

Over a handful of listens in and there is still more revelations coming forward within songs as Indoctrination of Sacrilege continues to reward, that in itself a strong reason with the diversity of sound and invention to check the album out. Wrapped in the excellent artwork of Colin Marks (Exodus, Scar Symmetry, Jeff Loomis), the release has been suggested for fans of Bloodbath, Dismember, and The Project Hate but also it is easy to suggest that those with a taste for bands such as Opeth, Mercyful Fate, and Escapethecult could do far worse than taking a plunge into Arbitrator and their first album.

Indoctrination of Sacrilege is available from February 13th @ http://arbitratorofficial.bandcamp.com/album/indoctrination-of-sacrilege

https://www.facebook.com/Arbitratorband

RingMaster 12/02/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard from http://www.thereputationlabel.today

 

Gorelust – We are the Undead

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It is fair to say that there has been a feverish and increasingly growing appetite for Canadian death metallers Gorelust since they disbanded in 1996, a hunger and attention as new genre fans discovered and devoured the band’s one and only album Reign Of Lunacy which was released the previous year. The acclaimed encounter became a hard to get, desperate to have proposition; that, fan clamour, and no doubt a personal passion for the band in PRC Music owner Rémi Côté leading to a long awaited re-release at the end of 2012 with the label. Now twenty years after their debut’s original release, Gorelust return with its successor and it is as if the band has never been away.

Feeling as if it comes from a time only moments after its predecessor but offering a fresh and modern brutality, We are the Undead is a ravenous beast of a proposal. Consisting of songs written before the band came to an end alongside new offerings, the album is old school death metal at its invigorating predatory best; arguably not loaded with major surprises but still sheds plenty of shadow over similar genre driven releases from younger and newer bands. When there is skilled craft and creative hunger inherent in a band it does not go away with time, the evidence right here in the cold embrace of We are the Undead.

With four of the five which released Reign Of Lunacy back on board, the Québec quartet open up We are the Undead with Lunacy Still Prevails…. It is a scene setting intro primarily, but a viscerally haunting coaxing with a threatening atmosphere and textures drawing ears and imagination into the raw turbulence of the following Rape the Rapist. The drums of Francis Marmen are an immediate flurry of intimidation and brutality, their threat matched by the throaty tones of Pascal Chevrier’s bass and the still distinctive and recognisable guttural roars of Jean Beaulieu. It is a thick and ferocious combination bound in the coarse riffery and sonic enterprise of guitarist Martin Fournier, it all uniting for a nostalgic come modern fury.

The imposingly solid start to the album is pushed on again by Entering the Kill Fest, its initial tenderising of the senses a tasty appetiser for the striding stalking of riffs and rhythms which take rein of the track soon after. There is a swing to the grooves and in less open declaration the delivery of Beaulieu, whilst the sonic invention of the guitar is a searing captivation. Mostly though, the track is pure anthemic temptation, a gripping persuasion emulated in the contagion of There Is No God. The song mixes its gait with fierce charges and more intensively threatening saunters accosting the senses, that alone inescapable bait though it is the primal growls of Beaulieu which put the tang in the poison, especially in the closing seconds where surely his throat lining was torn to shreds.

The album’s title track steps up next providing vicious smog of malevolence and musical savagery, as well as one of the loftier peaks within We are the Undead. Like a hell bred hound with a glint in its eye before ripping out its victim’s throat, the track sizes up and devours ears and psyche with addictive rhythmic bait and a torrent of unpredictable and swiftly changing riffery. It is a fascinating and blistering incitement, vocals and guitar ideation both an enthralling and flavoursome colour to the primal trespass of the listener.

The pair of Penetrating the Weak and City of the Cannibals keep this new plateau firmly prowled by the album; the first offering a rapacious and tenaciously attentive examination of the senses. Once more hell for leather onslaughts are fluidly led in to slower intrusive crawls and just as seamlessly out again. Every second of the track is a descent into the bowels of emotional corrosion and aural violation. Its successor has a more tempestuous almost bedlamic nature and enterprise to its body. Marmen as everywhere batters and bludgeons the senses with tremendous spite and inventive craft whilst musically the song is a maelstrom of sound which never settles in one thought for long. This ensures intrigue and pleasure is high and expectations left empty apart from being swamped by an old school sound which heavily satisfies every constant want from a death metal tempest.

Decapitate the Holy Whore and Farewell to the Flesh both have ears and appetite licking lips again. The first of the two is another delicious stalking with riffs and grooves as infectious and venomously bullying as the deep caustic scowls of Beaulieu and the rugged and salacious tempting and swings of Chevrier and Marmen respectively. Farewell to the Flesh is similarly sculpted in its template but soon spinning a web of sonic enticement and alluring colour through Fournier’s adventure and arguably the most compelling and tasty bassline on the album. Another pinnacle of the excellent release, it again has a more chaotic potency to its design and intent, and maybe it is telling that the very best songs on the album are those with this looseness and slightly experimental character.

We Are the Undead is completed by the hellacious Wretched Life, a final tsunami of death metal voracity to bruise ears and ignite the emotions. It is simply a fine end to an excellent encounter. As suggested earlier, Gorelust and We Are the Undead are not rewriting death metal or really challenging its boundaries, but without doubt both are giving it a thoroughly enjoyable treat.

We Are the Undead is available now via PRC Music @ www.prcmusic.com/store/index.php?route=product/product&product_id=1249

https://www.facebook.com/gorelustband/

RingMaster 12/10/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard from http://www.thereputationlabel.today

 

Bloodscribe – Prologue To The Apocalypse

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Formed in 2004, US death metallers Bloodscribe have taken their time getting around to unleashing an album, presumably due to circumstances rather than intent, but a decade after emerging they uncage Prologue To The Apocalypse. It is a ten track ravaging running for less than thirty minutes of senses blistering ferocity. Released through Los Angeles’ Gore House Records, the tempest brings death, grind, and slam essences into one accomplished and solid violation, and though ultimately it strongly impresses without igniting any massive excitement, the album puts Bloodscribe firmly on the radar.

Hailing from Boyle Heights, the quintet draw on inspirations from the likes of Dying Fetus, Through the Eyes of the Dead, Origin, Devourment, and Terror for their sound but as their debut assault shows, their sound also holds plenty of invention to not exactly set them apart from the pack but certainly make Bloodscribe a visible proposition live and on record within the local and broader scene.

The album’s 40 second title track starts Prologue To The Apocalypse off, providing a tempting incitement of ravenous riffs and equally imposing rhythms. It is a good entrance but not around long enough to be or offer much more before Pantheon Of Lies invades ears and personal space. Spicy inviting grooves make the first potent impression amongst another raw flurry of sound. Their presence is subsequently an intermittent offering as the voracious heart and muscular riffs, with similarly intensive beats, take over and prowl agreeably over the senses. With the occasional outburst of warlike hostility, the unsurprising but highly enjoyable track ensures the album leaves a swift good impression.

It is a strong imprint continued through Enslaved By Deceptions and Burning Bridges. The first is a predator, every caustic riff and heavily swung beat a natural threat and each grouchy growl of the bass and gutturally swinish vocal roar, viciously engaging. Again it is hard to declare anything new going on but plenty to get teeth and appetite into for a satisfying experience, matched by its successor. The fourth track is a more volatile confrontation, stalking and going for the jugular with alternating intent whilst ‘creaking’ with its flavoursome hooks and tempting via lumbering grooves.

Demons is a deliberate predacious stroll, with a great thick throated bassline for company and acidic sonic stabs of guitar for flirtation. It has little trouble enlisting full attention, rewarding bloodscribewith a more unpredictable character compared to other onslaughts within the album, though it is soon overshadowed by the excellent Annihilation. If other songs can be called predatory, the song is sheer bestial insidiousness. Riffs and rhythms cage and bully from the off even though they come bound in corrosive yet contagious grooves. As all the tracks there is a swing and underlying infectiousness, but here it is given full rein to seduce; just a shame the song is so short at barely over a minute. The juices start flowing and it dumps them and departs, though the next up Kingdoms Fall is not shy at bringing a catchy inhospitable climate and savage maliciousness to bear on ears, even if it lacks the compelling virulence of its predecessor.

Both the sinister fuelled Shadows and the sonically rabid Castrating Humanity trespass ears and psyche with proficient and pleasing rancor, the first breeding a noir lit atmosphere around its insatiable and captivating brutality. The second of the duo similarly entangles the imagination in black hearted scenery of suspicion and demonic oppression, bass and drums especially picturesque in their rapacious endeavour around the ever composed yet rabid vocals.

Completed by the resonating presence of In Ruins, another lingering assassination of hope and light with additional creative cruelty, Prologue To The Apocalypse is an increasingly enjoyable and impressing proposition. As mentioned it has enough to make Bloodscribe a prospect worth paying continued attention to, even if right now they and album do not manage to quite light a blaze of excitement. It is impossible not to recommend its investigation though.

Prologue To The Apocalypse is available now digitally @ http://bloodscribe.bandcamp.com/album/prologue-to-the-apocalypse and on CD via Gore House Productions @ http://store.gorehouseproductions.com/

https://www.facebook.com/bloodscribe

RingMaster 12/02/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard from http://www.thereputationlabel.today

 

Bonz – Broken Silence

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With Stuck Mojo deeply entrenched in the passions maybe it is no surprise that Broken Silence, the debut album from BONZ, immediately felt like an old friend returning to stir up trouble and the passions. Led by the original frontman of the former, and welcomingly dosed with all the recognisable tones, raps, and roars vocalist Bonz offered in the major protagonists sculpting and ferociously driving rap metal forward, band and album swiftly set a lively spark in the passions. Around him though the sounds offer plenty more than an echo of former glories; twisting rap, nu, and southern bred groove metal into one riveting and ridiculously contagious proposition. Think Stuck Mojo, Body Count, and (Hed) PE in a passionate collusion with The Union Underground and you get a colour of the creative blaze of BONZ. It is familiar in many ways but still dramatically fresh and best of all, ridiculously anthemic and instinctively compelling.

The band came about after Bonz played with ex-Primer 55 guitarist/bassist Curt Taylor in Killer in the Workplace in 2009. With the band coming to an end in 2011, the pair wanted to continue working together and BONZ was the outcome. Early demos suggested something tasty was brewing, a realisation now openly unleashed on the world through Broken Silence. Last year saw the band sign with Germany’s Eternal Sound Records and the creating of the band’s imposing full-length debut, showing in the words of their bio that “the “Mouth of Mojo” is indeed back in fine form.”

If any album in recent times has started with as potent and irresistible a stomp as Broken Silence we missed it. Opener Sinister Grin is pure virulence, from the wonderful earthy lone bassline which sets it in motion, the song is the seeds to addiction. It is almost rockabilly in tone at the start but just the simple lure into the furnace of rap metal tenacity which explodes upon the listener soon after. Grooves are as immediate in appearance and captivation as the distinctive provocations of Bonz, their united bait framed by the punchy rhythmic trap laid by drums and bass. Body and thoughts are increasingly seduced as the track romps with anthemic fury and enterprise, every lyrical spit and tangy hook the inescapable kindling to a fiery ardour for the punk infested 4PAN1Ttempest.

Such a powerful gripping entrance was bound to be followed by a slight dip, not that Comes Over Me gives it much room to breed with its mustier breath and heavier rock infused protestation. Slim but strong diversity from the vocals adds to its inviting drama whilst the guitars scrub up a great dusty atmosphere to the riled encounter. It keeps the potency of the album high as does the excellent Godshine which follows. A thick vine of southern rock flaming veins the track, infusing the stormy attitude and intensity of the encounter with a sonic colour which flames nicely against the infectious vocal conflict.

The album’s title track like the opener is baiting and binding ears and imagination within seconds, this time with another delicious toxic groove which is belligerently unrelenting in its persistence. It cores the track from start to finish, shifting its shade of colour only as Bonz almost duels vocally with the listener. The rhythmic stomp of the track is just as gripping and incendiary, beats punching ears with a middleweight’s consistency and accuracy as bass and guitar prowl and flirt respectively. There is no denying you cannot escape the Stuck Mojo comparisons but it is hard to remember that band finding the same depth of swagger and epidemic like temptation in as many songs on a single release as already shown upon Broken Silence.

30 Seconds To Swat is a punk metal brawl, the bass providing a dirty groove whilst riffs blister and inflame the air with a budding fury. Not as unique as other tracks but a thoroughly absorbing incitement to neck muscles, the song makes way for the exceptional stalking that is Take It Personal. Bass and riffs prowl around the listener, leery and combat ready. They do step back for the rap of Bonz though, the bass accompanying his vocal contention as beats equally slow their assault. It is going to erupt at some point of course and does in the ridiculously addictive chorus which has voice engaged in its call within one round of its rivalry. The track sets another pinnacle in the heady heights of the album, easily sparking thoughts that if live audiences bellow for one song it would be this mighty antagonist.

There is enough diversity to the album to make Broken Silence more than a rap metal revival, the great melodic charm and chant of Sour Diesel teasing with a bluesy groove and Insane Clown Posse like vocal sway whilst Bad News stamps and seduces with a feisty fusion of hard and melodic rock. Jared Gomes and Co come to mind during the song but equally a loud whisper of P.O.D. shows itself, both mere spices to the rock ‘n’ roll roar. Their pleasing successes are surpassed by the great punk causticity and dirty rock ‘n’ roll bellow of Bad Love, where essences of hardcore and melodically infested rapcore collide within the furious climate of the song.

Completed by a great live version of Take It Personal, it is easy to suggest Broken Silence will be sheer joy for fans of rap and nu metal, and for sure those of Stuck Mojo even as BONZ unravel their own identity with their debut. If you are looking for flaws, maybe not enough striking diversity to the delivery of Bonz could be offered, though why change something which works, and surprisingly the release never gets as nasty and spiteful in its anger as expected. When it is this much fun and thrilling though, it simply does not matter.

Broken Silence is available now via Pavement Entertainment/ Eternal Sound Records @ http://eternalsoundrecordsshop.bigcartel.com/product/ltd-cd-digi-pack-pre-order-bonz-broken-silence-ltd-cd-didi-pack-2015-release-date-13-02-2015

http://bonzband.com/

RingMaster 11/02/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard from http://www.thereputationlabel.today

 

Nervous Impulse – Time To Panic

Nervous Impulse Band Photo

Even the most battle hardened grind fan might burst into cold sweats during listening of Time To Panic, the new album from Canadian sonic assassins Nervous Impulse, but equally they will bask in the rewards of one hellacious and viciously compelling treat. The fifteen track fury is pure aural violence yet has an addictive character and contagious underbelly which lures you back time and time again into its excruciating bedlam. It has few charms to lure anyone with passions lying outside of death grind it is fair to say but for those with the right appetite, band and album are destructive manna.

Formed in 2007 by drummer Yan Chamberland (ex-Empathy Denied/Obscene Crisis), Nervous Impulse was soon stirring up sweat and tears with their ferocious sounds and debut album Enough for Dementia in 2009. With a line-up completed by vocalist Eric Fiset (ex-Empathy Denied/Obscene Crisis) , and guitarists Robert Guimond and Vincent Malo, the Montreal band swiftly drew potent and praising attention with the release. On its inception Chamberland had a clear vision of the band’s intent, “to produce the most insane and destructive musical achievement he could ever imagine in his extreme musical mind.” Enough for Dementia successfully went a long way to achieving the aim though hindsight now shows it was merely a starting point for greater hostilities. Live too the band left no one standing without support, bringing fans to their knees and bliss with shows which probably should have carried a health warning, much like Time To Panic. Line-up changes saw bassist Felix  Bourcher and guitarist Bruno Mercier join the band before in 2013  Nervous Impulse signed with Nova Scotia based label Blast Head Records who now uncage their latest pestilential treat.

Recorded again with Hugues Deslauriers, who worked on their debut, Time To Panic opens with the bedlamic Intro before tearing out senses and psyche with Oil Spills. A battery of riffs and beats pummel from the first breath whilst vocals are a tirade of squalling rage. Whatever they are venting about who knows but there is no escaping their malice and rancor even within the strenuous winds of the sonic tempest. It is not all sheer violence though as grooves come with a virulent contagion and rhythms despite their insidious nature, are instinctively anthemic. The track is simultaneously insufferable and infectious just as the following Prorogued Democracy, an even more brutal and noxious confrontation. Gutturally swinish vocally and with an inhumane swagger, the track lurches with addictive magnetism as it tears the senses asunder with rapier swings of the drums and violates with carnal grooves amidst searing sonic enterprise. There is no Nervous Impulse - Time to Panicsense, as across the whole album, of what is coming next or from what direction but whilst whimpering in sore bliss, the hunger for more overrides the suffering.

Both the visceral carnage of Syrian NATO Meat Grinder and the toxic antagonism of Wing Clipper keep ears and imagination enthralled, both with individual characters working from a similar template, as most songs to be honest. They are soon spreading unique infestations of sonic abuse and rhythmic vehemence deep into the psyche, the latter of the pair developing a delicious bestial groove from which a melodically cast antipathy squirms whilst inviting richer involvement from its victim.

The insidious enthralling reflections of Nostalgic Memories, a track with more twists then a nightmare of slinkies, sets down a new plateau for the album. It is a web of varied vocal expulsions and tantalising grooves relentlessly bewitching the senses whilst the album’s following brief title track is sheer pain, and totally ravenous much as 9 Meals to Anarchy-Riot Solves Everything which follows and My Right to Medicate straight after. The first of the pair savages with drooling riffs and covetous grooved intent, every second and grunt an iniquitous temptation whilst the second is smog of evil and corrosive tenacity. For every tsunami of malignant noise upon the album though there is a whirlpool of fascinating invention and unpredictability, stronger in some than others but always working away seducing as impressively here or again in the barbaric onslaught of Eclipse of Personality with its rhythmic enterprise and predatory imagination.

As the heavy-duty malefactions of the deceptively catchy Overwhelming Positive Vibe, the aurally fearsome The Last Call, and the punk brawling of The Neighbor’s House Is on Fire come and go, thoughts and emotions continue to be buffeted and incited, the middle of the three especially gripping with its excellent bass endeavour. The final one of the trio is a hardcore/grind bred fest of hate and bad blood offering more diversity to the enmity of the album.

Completed by the excellent Dead Jeremians 2014 with its blood soaked twang and a fine cover of Vexed from Agoraphobic Nosebleed, Time to Panic is grind at its insatiable and creative best, and certainly in its most addictive form. Technically too, and at times hidden by the sheer erosive turbulence cast in songs, the band is a striking and impressive proposition. It is easy to understand the buzz around Nervous Impulse listening to their second album, but not so easy to remove the ringing in the ears and the bad dreams it inspires.

Time to Panic is available now via Blast Head Records @ http://blastheadrecords.bandcamp.com/album/time-to-panic and http://nervousimpulse.bigcartel.com/product/nervous-impulse-time-to-panic

https://www.facebook.com/NervousImpulseGrind

RingMaster 11/02/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard from http://www.thereputationlabel.today

 

Hereza – Misanthrope

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Offering a thickly promising and swiftly engaging slab of groove infested death metal, Croatia band Hereza make a rather appetising introduction to their presence with debut album Misanthrope. It is not a release to set a cat amongst the pigeons of extreme metal but with additional punk encrusted tenacity and blackened fury, it certainly makes for a very flavoursome base for the band to push on from.

Formed in 2014, the duo of Slobodan Stupar (guitars, bass, drums, backing vocals) and Ivan Kovačević Kova (vocals) take their seeds from the old school origins of death metal but vein their creativity with the potent essences previously mentioned resulting in a familiar but persistently enticing onslaught. Seemingly embracing the inspirations of bands such as Entombed, Entrails, Misery Index, and Marduk, Hereza take little time in gripping attention with Misanthrope and its opening title track.

The song flies at the senses with sonic nostrils flared and rhythms hungry to inflict intimidation. It is a furious and pleasing proposal enhanced by grouchy vocals and emerging predatory grooves, each a fresh threat from the song’s malevolence. With especially its intensive beats ringing in ears, it makes way for the similarly voracious tempest of Grob. Leaving little time for a breath to be swallowed, the track is a hell for leather assault with the skilled craft and enterprise of Stupar impressing. There is a potent rawness to song and indeed album which accentuates the hostile and unforgiving nature of release and sound, an intensive tonic emulated in the broader caustic rock ‘n’ roll of Kraj and the darker toned Unholy Flame of Eternity. The blend of both sets of vocals amidst a spicy melodic adventure lures potently within the first of the two songs whilst the second is marked by a more classic metal infestation of hooks and a contagious swing to beats and riffs alike.

We Are the Disease provides a major pinnacle to the album, its feisty and lighter swagger of sound and character instantly anthemic without defusing the vicious roar and violent heart which HEREZA_Misanthrope_COVERlies within its infectious breast. Grooves are just as insatiably addictive too, and though the track is really barely scratching the surface of something truly new it rocks like a bitch taking body and emotions with it. Its catching infectiousness is matched in Objesen which emerges from a sinister intro to flex muscles and rhythmic animosity with bestial potency. Grooves again make the difference between a good and a great song but are in turn impressively backed by the vocals and simply the energy of the track to swiftly recruit eager submission to its lures.

    Whole World Burn with its opening Michael Caine sample stalks ears next, lurching over and snarling at ears with predatory maliciousness while both the corrosive hardcore corruption that is Bullet Storm and the tangy sonic adventure of Cancerous Demise keep album and satisfaction boiling quite nicely. All three offer some inventive and appealing twists to their savage bellows, each individual to the next and employing well used but in the band’s hands, tasty creative ingredients.

That variety continues in the punk driven Pills, the song taking the genre’s raucous antagonism into its death metal foraging of the senses with a furious chorus to match, whilst Noc Zivih Mrtvaca unearths a delicious dirt encrusted bass rapacity to prowl its bruising and volatile belligerence fuelled rock ‘n’ roll. Each leave healthy impressions and pleasure in their grudge loaded wake, the rhythmic lure of the latter powerful bait, before the excellent Death Army March stomps over senses and into the passions with a heavy footed animus. Another peak of the album, it is pure militant bad blood with vocal and creative spite to match.

Closing with the outstanding Erase the Disgrace, a song with the best entrance by far, a haunted sepia lit climate which subsequently erupts into a voracious tempest of aural ravishing, and finally the peddle to the metal charge of Mud, the album inspires full satisfaction with its proposal. Misanthrope is not loaded with surprises apart from being a striking unexpected debut, but succeeds in igniting only good feelings and reactions to its potential soaked presence, and that is more than enough to warrant an investigation by all extreme metal fans.

Misanthrope is available now via PRC Music @ http://www.prcmusic.com/store/index.php?route=product/product&product_id=1242

https://www.facebook.com/herezametal

RingMaster 11/02/2015

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