Armageddon – Captivity and Devourment

Photo by John Fell

Photo by John Fell

 

Over a decade since their last foray into ears and imagination, Sweden/American metallers Armageddon return with new album Captivity and Devourment, their most compelling and fascinating work to date. As to its strength against the band’s previous albums, that will be down to the individual and their appetite for the different stages of the continually evolving and exploratory invention of the band, but it is a creativity imposing and magnetic proposition which even when its persuasion ebbs a touch simply enthrals and when in complete tantalising majesty is a sonic masterpiece.

Formed in 1997 as a studio project by then Arch Enemy guitarist Christopher Amott, the Halmstad hailing project swiftly grip attention and fevered support with the release of cult album Crossing the Rubicon that same year. A sci-fi themed concept album, its lure and success was followed by the potent presences of Embrace the Mystery and Three of 2000 and 2003 respectively. Each release saw new line-ups in their individual persuasions and a shift from the bands initial melodic death metal explorations into power metal coloured landscapes. With another new line-up alongside Amott and a fresh creative emprise across technical and heavy melodic metal pastures, the now New York City based band and their album turn on ears and imagination to Armageddon once again with a bewitching tempest of emotion and sonic intrigue.

The album’s title track explodes in ears first, grooves and riffs an instantly virulent savaging as a hellacious rhythmic assault keeps pace with the track’s ferocious yet infectious start. The guitars ofarm Amott and Joey Concepcion swiftly cast a web of melodic and technical temptation as the raw caustic tones of vocalist Matt Hallquist abrase with varied and potent hostility. It is an impressive and gripping start to Captivity & Devourment, the dark hearted basslines of Sara Claudius and the unrelenting and creative swings of drummer Márton Veress adding antagonistic depths and appealing shadows to the dominant lure of grooves and the sonic ingenuity. Technically in craft and invention, song and band fascinate and seduce; the theatre of the song, as in most tracks, providing inescapable persuasion alone.

The great start is backed up if not quite matched by Locked In next, the portentous emergence of the encounter the appetiser to scenery of blackened malevolence courtesy of the vocals within a sonic tapestry of melodies and emotive colour. Carrying a classic heavy metal air at times, the track flirts and entices with every wash of melodies and bait of restrained rhythms with only the again caustic and this time not so adventurous squalls of Hallquist a tempering factor. It is enough though to accentuate the missing spark in the song compared to its predecessor, and the indefinable but prevalent essence which ignites the following Rendition. The third track, as the first, is a colossal beast in ears and attention within its first breath. The vocals are back on diverse form and riffs a rampant predation as they unite with the just as brutal rhythmic provocation. It is a formidable and addictive intimidation which finds a new plateau with the burst of impressive clean vocals from Amott and his subsequent tendrils of breath-taking sonic invention. The song is magnificent, everything about it as engrossing and seductive as it is venomously inhospitable, every flaming groove, unpredictable twist, and barbed hook a theatre of ingenuity and passion sculpting a canvas for body and emotions to greedily immerse in.

Its epic persuasion though casts a shadow which neither Fugitive Dust nor Conquer can evade next, though each provides plenty to keep an already potent appetite for the release satisfied. The first of the two rumbles with a great throaty bass threat from Claudius as guitars again burn air and sear the senses. Again though the vocals of Hallquist reveal little enterprise, certainly in comparison to the previous song, and dampened the seventies psych rock and progressive climate of the encounter. Its successor challenges and assaults with another breed of toxically enchanting and malicious intent where this time vocals find that enjoyable and inventive extra as they help enhance the internal conflict of the track where rage and melodic seduction entwine like creative lovers. The relatively short but exciting track makes way for the masterful drama of Thanatron. A gorgeous opening of acoustic guitar beauty swiftly has ears and emotions enthralled, and still tightly gripped as riffs and rhythms emerge from within its light to prowl and stalk the psyche. Equipped with seriously addictive grooves and scythes of melodic tempting, the song simultaneously bullies as it spellbinds, another incitement where every predacious shadow and melodic coaxing comes with thick virulence.

One triumph leads into the instrumental beauty of another, Background Radiation a warm yet haunting caress casting its own sublime provocative spell before making way for the scintillating and epically weighted grandeur of The Watcher. Brutal rhythms and riff driven scourges assault the senses with rapacious tenacity but have to submit to the welcome return of the clean vocal flames which erupt within the tempestuous soundscape. It is another mouth-watering tsunami of invention and craft which seems to grow broader and more impressive with every listen, just like next up Equalizer with its cantankerous threat of sinew sculpting rhythms and melodic exploration. Dipping into a mix of progressive and heavy metal, power and folk seeded enterprise, the track also captivates without restraint even though the viciousness it offers is held down by the warmth elsewhere in comparison to the absorbing turmoil of the last track.

Completed by Giants, though the CD version of the album has bonus track Stone Worker included, Captivity and Devourment is an invigorating confrontation and temptation. The last song is another missing that final intangible ingredient which turns great songs into insatiable treats within the album, but it is still a fine end to a release that can only be heartily recommended. As we said previously, you can expect differing views and tastes when comparing the might of the album against Armageddon’s previous offerings, such their open uniqueness to each other, but for us it has to be seriously considered as maybe their finest moment.

Captivity and Devourment is available from January 26th via Listenable Records @ http://www.shop.listenable.net/fr/143_armageddon

https://www.facebook.com/armageddonbandofficial

RingMaster 26/01/2015

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Feral Sun – Evacuate

 

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The final week of January sees the debut album from UK rockers Feral Sun getting a well-deserved reboot, a re-release sure to mop up the unsuspecting appetites and fans that were not netted the first time around by the band. Evacuate is quite simply a collection of emotive and sonic anthems which come in varying forms and all roar with a snarling angst. They are also propositions which seem as familiar as they are fresh, the band weaving inspirations from the likes of open Stone Sour, Karnivool, Alter Bridge, and Trivium into their own distinctive designs. It plays like an old friend re-groomed, revitalised, and with a new found individuality.

Formed in 2009, the London quartet spent time honing their sound and live set before unleashing themselves locally and gaining a swift reputation and potent following for their stage ferocity and similarly impacting sound. Next came the creating of their first album, an imposing but feistily seductive encounter which again embraced a strong and acclaimed acceptance upon its first unveiling. With anticipations keen thanks to a trio of singles from the release, Evacuate is now poised to inflame the country with its national outing, with an inevitable success it is easy to expect thanks to its stirring and imaginative body of sound and enterprise.

Evacuate takes little time in awakening ears and attention as opener Find A Way follows its initial jangle of guitar with a wall of heavily swung beats and predatory riffs. It is a formidable entrance given greater potency by the instantly magnetic vocals of Mick Burns and a broader coaxing of guitar from himself and lead guitarist Marco lo Coco. That earlier mentioned familiarity is soon apparent but it only spices up the dramatic weight and character of the song. At times essences of Seether make a suggestive whisper and in others a mix of Stone Sour and Mudvayne, but all colouring which increases the reach and appeal of the impressive start.

There is also a raw quality to the track and a ‘raggedness’ to riffs which only increases the texture and lure of the proposition, revealing one aspect of the band’s sound to which the next up Alone Feral Sun covershows another. Also offering an aggressive touch at first, the song soon slips into a mellower melodic landscape, Burns opening up an emotive narrative with increasingly impressing vocals as lo Coco tantalises with an elegant melody against the darker provocative tones of Alex Nikitin’s bass and the skilfully fluid rhythms of drummer Jay Stephenson. His rhythmic incitement ebbs and flow in attack and weight perfectly as the song croons with passion and intensity as a 3 Days Grace like persuasion spices the unique theatre of Feral Sun’s invention and fiery craft, the band entwining melodic and hard rock with a more classic bred adventure.

The album’s excellent title track is stomping with teeth bared and passions inflamed next, prodding and swiping at ears with antagonistic attitude wrapped in a sonic and melodic tempering. Feet and voice are swiftly recruited by the song, its anthemic qualities as potent as the intimate drama colouring the track before it passes the listeners over to the alluring charm of People Are Dying. Its opening balladry within a sultry climate, leads senses and imagination into evocative scenery of acoustic led persuasion when subsequently opens up into an expanse of fiercer fiery incitement in sound and vocals. A slow burner compared to its predecessors and arguably never reaching their plateaus, the song still impresses and thrills much as One More Day after it.

With no song leaving ears and satisfaction wanting, there is a shallow dip in the album caused by the might of its start and impending closing stretch. This song for example a seriously compelling stroll of brewing anger and militant intensity with a craft individually and united from the band to match, yet it just misses the final spark to emulate the heights of the early songs. Nevertheless with lo Coco spinning a web of impressive skill and adventure around the ever striking vocals, it leaves a lingering pleasure and impression just as the Audioslave scented Into Pieces and the enslaving Long Road. The first of the two almost stalks ears and thoughts with its predacious gait and aggravated riffery whilst the second finds a similarly imposing leer to its sound and emotion bound in another strapping of sonic intrigue and vocal might, especially in the latter passage where the whole band unveil an irresistible vocal call to arms.

Breathe continues the strong diversity to Evacuate next with its distinctive and rigorously engaging balladry. Its highly pleasing flame of melodies and harmonies is followed by the equally potent emotional reflection of Take This Away. The track aligns resourceful calm and expression with raw blazes of angst soaked aggression from guitars and rhythms, providing further evidence of the maturity and imagination within the band’s songwriting and its fascinating realisation.

The album ends as mightily as it began, with firstly Caught In The Act exploring a mouth-watering blend of hard rock revelry and dirty rock ‘n’ roll tenacity. It results in the most inventive and unpredictable treat on Evacuate. The whole album is a heady peak of quality and temptation, but its start and finish provide the pinnacles with this song a tempestuous march of hungry riffs, hostile rhythms, and grooves to drool over. Its successor Falling is just as exhilarating with its virulent stroll of vocals and hooks interspersed with gripping rock pop devilry posing as a chorus. The album’s final song leaves ears and appetites, which are already full to bursting with highly enjoyable sounds and enterprise, just that little bit hungrier and greedier for more.

Evacuate is a roaring stomp of a release, not always as unique as it might be but for the main using the recognisable flavouring in fresh and contagious ways. For a riot of thoroughly satisfying and invigorating rock ‘n’ roll, it is hard to imagine too many over shadowing Feral Sun’s debut in the coming months.

Evacuate is released on Monday 26th January through all good stores and @ http://www.feralsun.bigcartel.com/

http://www.feralsun.com/

RingMaster 26/01/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard from

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Desert Storm – Omniscient

Photo by Matt Winyard.

Two years on from their acclaimed second album Horizontal Life, British heavy blues metallers Desert Storm unleash a new cauldron of ridiculously addictive temptation in the ravishing shape of Omniscient. Before listening to the new release we would have been ecstatic to announce that the album was an equal to its brilliant predecessor. But it is not; just like the last album was a fascinating and thrilling step forward from the band’s outstanding debut full-length Forked Tongue, the glorious Omniscient is a leap to new plateaus. Everything about the encounter is a gripping evolution of adventure and maturity; riffs are dirtier, grooves keener edged, and it has a contagion which borders on slavery, all without losing any of the blistering uniqueness and raw power which has always soaked Desert Storm’s sonic invention.

Where many similarly styled bands seem like servants to the riff, in that it predominantly consumes their songwriting, Desert Storm enslave that feature of their sound and twist it into a web of just as forceful and potent grooved and melodic exploration. As proven by their previous album it means each track has a distinct character and creative emprise of its own, and in Omniscient all songs come from an even broader canvas of imagination and craft. Since forming in 2007, the Oxford quintet has challenged and lit ears right through to the passions with their persistently gripping releases. Equally they have earned a formidable reputation for their live presence through shows and tours with the likes of Karma To Burn, Nashville Pussy, Peter Pan Speedrock, Honky (ft. members of Down/Melvins/Butthole Surfers), Orange Goblin, Red Fang, and American Head Charge, not forgetting igniting festivals like The Bulldog Bash, The Desertfest, Brisfest, and Roadkill. Their stature and reputation already goes before them but now with Omniscient global recognition and spotlight has to be on the cards.

The band’s fans are sure to break into a broad smile as opener Outlander instantly collides with ears through excited rhythms and imposing riffs. As spicy grooves swiftly join the revelry it is prime Desert Storm psych blues flavouring, intent on seducing senses and imagination with concussive beats and intoxicating sonic temptation. Already there is a sense of new adventure though, OMNISCIENT_FCbackground melodies and atmospheres adding their suggestiveness as vocalist Matt Ryan roars. His voice is as bracing and gruffly coated as ever but also seemingly carried on a new clarity and variety. As expected it is impossible to escape the lures of guitarists Chris White and Ryan Cole or their weave of sinew driven riffs and toxic grooving, every note spilling temptation and virulence to match the similarly seductive dark throated tones of Chris Benoist’s bass and the anthemic heavy footed swipes of drummer Elliot Cole. It is an enthralling and incendiary start to the album, body and emotions already aflame from its creative bait and blues spirit.

The following more predatory Queen Reefer is just as irresistible. The source of the band’s new video, it is a ruggedly charming temptress with bulging beats and acidic invention. Far heavier and threatening compared to its more devilish predecessor, it casts a darker more volatile demonic air in its breath around a corrosive touch. In saying that though, the song is still irresistibly catchy and commanding, and with a mesmeric slip into a gentle embrace of expressive melodies and low key drama cast by guitars and bass at one point, mouth-wateringly adventurous.

Horizon continues to spread thick almost doomy textures of intensity and emotion next, drums creating a clash of percussive disorientation which only adds to the power of Elliot’s swings and the tangy blues grooving binding song and senses. It is just one part of the track’s scenery though as halfway it explodes into an explosive rhythmic tango which in turn seems to incite greater energy and venom to flush through the brawl of vocals and sonic enterprise. The track never quite ignites into the fury you suspect it might but is the better for it, the relative restraint adding to the dramatic tension of the song, a scintillating theatre which again turns Sway of The Tides into a battlefield of hostility and contagion, and Home into a folk ballad of sheer beauty. The first of the pair comes with flared nostrils and a rhythmic blood lust as heavy metal and stoner-esque blues rock clash in ears. The song is breath-taking, especially when it switches to a folkish pasture of cleaner vocals and a simple but expressive melody midway. It only impresses more as the scene and sounds start building back up to another fire of intensive emotion and searing grooves. Its successor is even more tantalising and enslaving. Voice and guitar again align to create a mesmeric smoulder of blues folk and southern tinged melodic rock which simply delights. Whereas the last album had the transfixing unexpected melodic delights of Gaia, Omniscient has this absorbing treat to wrong-foot, surprise, and thrill.

Not that the album has a moment where it does not do all those things in varying degrees anyway, as proven by the boozy swagger of House of Salvation which stomps in next. The track with its bar room like blues grooving and abrasing riffery reminds of N Ireland band Triggerman in some ways, especially in the melodic toxicity veining the devilment and the magnetic flame of a groove which has the appetite licking its lips and body swerving in subservience. The excellent temptation is matched straight away by the funk nudged stroll of Night Bus Blues. Making the perfect soundtrack to those times after a show where the cold flirts as you wait for the over-due conveyance to take you home and that is only part of the recognisable drama, the track proves humour is never a missing ingredient in the recipes Desert Storm conjures. Obviously it is not lacking addictive sounds either, an adjective which perfectly fits both Bandwagon and Blue Snake Moan which follow.

The first revels in a seventies blues rock seeding, spawning its sonic tempting from a psychedelic scent as fresh as it is familiar. The song provides yet another shade of colour and striking originality to the album, Omniscient easily the bands most excitingly and enjoyably diverse and expansive offering yet. The second of the two bristles and bellows with the heavy rock ‘n’ roll sound that the band has always bred its imagination through. Again though, it is widely spiced and commandingly robust with an array of rock bred flavours inviting feet and soul to roll with its rigorous devilry.

The album closes with Collapse of The Bison Lung, a summing up of things in a way as ripe grooves and intimidating riffs collude with rampant rhythms and snarling basslines to bind attention and light fires in the passions. A masterful end to a mighty release it reinforces and confirms what Omniscient suggests and we declare, that Desert Storm should be mentioned in the same breath as bands like Black Tusk, Red Fang, The Sword, and yes maybe even Mastodon.

Omniscient is released worldwide via Blindsight Records on January 26th.

Following the album’s release Desert Storm will be going on a short European tour:

Fri 6th Feb – Antwerp Music City, Antwerp BE w/ Atomic Vulture

Sat 7th Feb – Rock Cafe Jinx, Zaandam, NL w/ Millstone

Sun 8th Feb – Bassy Club, Berlin, DE w/ Samsara Blues Experiment

http://www.desertstormband.com/

RingMaster 22/01/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Tripod – Devil Feeder

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You just have to like a release which makes a more than solid first impression but then almost sneaks up on you song by song to present itself as one seriously enjoyable and impressive slab of rock ‘n’ roll. This is what Devil Feeder does. Consisting of thirteen stoner and grunge bred roars, the new album from Norwegian metallers Tripod is a sizeable proposition from its first play but over time and as mentioned almost track by track, becomes something irresistible. It is not an encounter stretching boundaries or redesigning templates but it is an album to leaves ears and pleasure full to bursting with its enterprise and inspiring passion.

Formed in 2002, its Nordfjordeid / Trondheim hailing creators have been stirring up appetites and attention for a long time and especially since their Trøndercore Records released debut album Nevermind This Black Album came out in 2008, though it was with its successor Four Coins in 2012 that Tripod awoke even broader awareness of their sound. In saying that though, the quintet did already a successful tour of China under their belts before it’s unveiling. A subsequent remix of the album came next after producer Beau Hill (Warrant, Ratt, Twisted Sister, Alice Cooper) approached the band with that intention, followed by a line-up change which saw guitarist Jørgen Sporsheim Berg link up with vocalist Knut Arne Lillestøl, guitarist Stein-Inge Øien, bassist Espen Bjørnholt, and drummer Åge Solheim. The recording of Devil Feeder began in 2013 and here we are, with one increasingly thrilling and potent release from a band it is easy to suspect will breach even richer attention through it.

The release opens with Safe Place and a gentle inviting stroking of guitar. It is a coaxing soon lifting its restrained skirt to unleash rampant rhythmic kicks and a muscular dance of guitar and great varied vocals. It is an instantly gripping and infectious proposal revealing that Tripod has a sound which embraces both grunge and stoner with the urgency of tenacious rock ‘n’ roll. There is also a melodic charm and enterprise to the song which only captures the imagination as the opener launches the album off in fine and robust style.

The following Love Stake reveals a great predacious tone is lurking within the bass of Bjørnholt and ready to enslave emotions as a blues kissed sonic weave escapes the craft of the guitars. There is a hard rock essence to the song as well as a Stone Temple Pilots blaze to its sonic and emotive textures, two rich spices aligning to the potent vocals of Lillestøl. The song as the first, roars in its own individual way before letting the album’s title track throw some heavy metal ferocity and folk metal like drama into the maelstrom of adventure brewing up within Devil Feeder. The track bewitches with every twist and fusion of those respective fiery and melodic flavours, leaving thoughts and passions engrossed before making way for the more reserved and gentle I Used To. It and the following Possible open up more varied colouring to the album, the first of the two a soulful croon under blues rock shaded gradually tempestuous skies and the second a song venturing into rock pop scenery with rumbling rhythms and also a changeable melodic climate. Both songs lively simmer in the passions compared to the earlier songs, but each still holds attention and appetite for the album firmly in their enterprise.

The next up Zubr is something different again, a bordering on bedlamic swagger of rhythms from drummer Solheim within a tantalising weave of groove metal enticing, immediate incendiary bait for ears and emotions. It is when the song flirts with a System Of The Down like invention and devilry that the track explodes into an even greater breath-taking and thrilling beast. The best track on the album, it leaves ears and desires greedily hungry for more, something not as forcefully provided by Meant to Be, though it’s piano and stringed ballad like beauty is still a pleasure embracing the senses. Breaking out emotional and physical sinews the deeper into its presence it goes, the track reveals yet another facet to the songwriting and imaginative songwriting of Tripod, with increasing enjoyment coming with every listen.

Ride is next and straight away it is stirring the air with raucous riffs and a throaty bassline within a web of jabbing beats. On top of this appealing proposition Lillestøl provides a flame of passionate and lyrical energy but it is the brush of strings and ever shifting landscape of the song which impresses and excites the most. We said earlier that the album does not exactly set new unique markers down but with songs like this and of course Zubr it is a thought challenged at times.

The pair of Inside My Head with its blues rock spiced bellow and All for Granted fascinates and pleases if without rising to the heights of the previous and other songs t. The latter features some magnetic female vocals to rival the strength and range of Lillestøl and easily leaves ears wanting more, a request fed to some degree by the rebellious rock ‘n’ roll of What You Wanted where grunge and rock pop collude to design another contagious success within Devil Feeder.

The excellent We Own the Night stands before ears next with an intensity which is not exactly a brawl in attitude but certainly has a rebellious nature to its muscular flexing and sonic creativity. There are moments like here where Tripod remind of fellow Norwegians Pigeon Lake in the ability to fuse varied styles in one confrontational yet welcoming storm of enterprise, a craft shown again in the closing If I Die, a piece of emotional and melodic melodrama with a beauty and imagination which ignites the imagination and seduces ears.

It is a potent and masterful end to a quite refreshing and inescapably enjoyable album. Rock ‘n’ roll is there to be anthemic, invigorating, and passionate, all things fuelling Devil Feeder with high grade potency. With the additional inventiveness and devilment which Tripod also adds though, it becomes a must search out and enjoy recommendation.

Devil Feeder is available now!

https://www.facebook.com/Tripodofficial

RingMaster 21/01/2015

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Kirra – Run Away

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With the release of their Sounds from an Empty Room EP last year, US rockers band Kirra suggested they were a prospect with the potential to make great strides in the rock world. Now the release of debut album Run Away compounds that theory whilst showing some of the strong evolving steps expected. The twelve track encounter is a seriously accomplished and forcibly solid proposition, aspects alone making Kirra a band to culture an appetite for and the album something to thoroughly enjoy. With moments of inspired invention and explosive imagination on board too though, it also shows a promise and ability to light addictive fires. If you are looking for a hard rock proposition with a freshness and increasingly striking adventure to spark the day, then Run Away is worth a long hard look.

It is fair to say that the Oklahoma City quartet has been healthily feeding an increasing spotlight and growing fan base at home with a live presence which has seen them play across America whilst taking in shows with the likes of 3 Doors Down, Primer 55, Puddle Of Mudd, Kill Devil Hill, Screaming for Silence, and Saving Able along the way. With its seeds coming in the wish of lead guitarist Daxton Page, after leaving a rock school program, to start a band, Kirra began coming together once drummer Zach Stafford was introduced to Page through friends. Subsequently bassist Ryne McNeill was found through an ad, who in turn suggested vocalist and rhythm guitarist Jesse Williamson to the band. With the line-up completed, Kirra worked on songs and released that first EP in 2014, with the single from it, Downfall finding strong acclaim and support from online media and social media fans alike. Run Away is the band’s offering to the bigger picture of the rock scene, and a sizeable nudge on their awareness and attention the self-produced, Ricardo Sasaki mixed is.

The electronic opening of first song Tappy Gilmore instantly livens up ears and imagination, its initial lure soon bolstered by sinew driven rhythms and a strong caress of riffs. It is a bright Kirra_Cover_1600X1600-2opening enhanced again by the vocals of Williamson and a slight Alter Bridge like enticement in the muscular and welcoming proposition. It is also a punchy introduction to the album with great flare-ups of aggression and energy in the melodic landscape of the song.

A darker predatory intimidation comes with Fly next, especially through the great throaty bassline of McNeill and the raw brush of riffs. Swiftly putting the previous song in its shade, it prowls ears as vocals again provide a pleasing if less incendiary colour to the antagonism. With alluring craft and sonic enterprise from Page igniting the imagination and senses as the song relaxes into further inventive temptation, it continues to impress and like the album as whole, gains greater strength and potency over subsequent listens. It is a definite grower much as the following Lies and its successor Lay You Down .The first of the two has a Chevelle spicing to its potent persuasion whilst the second is like a boxer jabbing away from its first breath before building a pungent stroll of darkly tempered and fiery rock ‘n’ roll. Though neither song finds the same level of energy in emotions and praising, each leaves ears fully contented and thoughts hungry for more, a want straight away encouraged by the album’s gentler title track and fed fully by the outstanding stepping forward of Chemicals.

     Run Away the song, is a great croon with another imposing bass sound to match as emotional and sonic flames provide a lingering incitement but it is Chemicals where things catch fire, and for us the album offers it’s seriously stirring and thrilling moments. The song again through the bass, immediately opens up new provocative shadows. It is gripping dramatic bait soon complimented and expanded by the stomping beats of Stafford and an abrasing scrub of riffs. Just as impacting in the triumph though is the continually twisting and riveting ideation which veins the song, guitars and rhythms never staying in one place or offering any particular intent for too long. It helps create a predator of a song with a metal and sonically progressive breeding as flavoursome as its melodic rock enterprise.

This new plateau is continued through the mellower but no less exciting and dramatic Downfall and the sturdier confrontation of Should’ve Been Gone where muscles and textures show as much a threat as they do an inescapable seduction. Both songs reveal new depths and imagination to songwriting and sound, pulling every skill and inventiveness of the band members into enthralling and gripping scenarios. The latter for no obvious reason reminds of Bush at times but both tracks show an originality which lurks in Kirra and shows itself in varying strengths across the album.

Drown and Stay keep satisfaction and enjoyment high, even though neither can quite match the might and exploration of its predecessors despite showing more contagious sounds and courageous invention, especially through the devilish lures of bass and guitars. As in all songs the lyrical narrative comes packed with emotion and reflection on the two tracks, as evidenced again by the mellower and increasingly magnetic balladry of Forgive Me. The song ebbs and flows in its power a little, but with a chorus which just feel bigger and bolder with every roar it is another memorable pleasure from Kirra.

Completed by the brash energy and invigorating creativity of Too Far Gone, the album is a mightily promising and exciting full introduction to the band. It shows a few wrinkles which should naturally iron out in the band’s organic evolution, like the excellent vocals of Williamson lacking a rawer spark or snarl at times to match the more rugged sounds around him. There are songs too which never explode as they hint they might, and you wish they would, but all are things easy to expect being worked out as the band grows into the force their album suggests is in the making. Most importantly Run Away leaves nothing but fattening satisfaction and enjoyment in its wake, and a want to hear much more from Kirra.

Run Away is available from January 21st @ https://itunes.apple.com/us/album/run-away/id956087310

http://www.kirramusic.com/

RingMaster 21/01/2015

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Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard from

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Dethfox – Natural Media Teleforce

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Providing no hiding place for ears and senses, the new EP from Canadian anarcho-punks Dethfox is a furious incitement which is just as virulently seductive as it is uncompromisingly caustic. Bracing and abrasive, Natural Media Teleforce is a raw and addictive introduction to a band we are already finding it hard to get enough of. Consisting of five punk hostilities which rarely break the two minute mark, the release is dirty and fierce with a touch which can make ears cower, but it also has a repetitious nature to grooves and riffs which when aligned to barbarous hooks only makes one seriously contagious persuasion.

Scowling out of Montreal, Dethfox emerged in late 2012 working on their sound and attack before releasing their first demo in the October of the following year. Their live presence stepped forward swiftly after with the band making its first live appearance at A Varning from Montreal Fest late 2013 whilst last saw them year sharing stages with the likes of Cress, Rick Agnew, Kicker, Dekoder, Parasytes and many more. Released via Chaos Rural Records, Natural Media Teleforce is looking like being able to breed new attention and, in matching appetites to ours, hunger for the band’s continuing emergence. Certainly its uniquely challenging morose punk sound is not going to be manna for all, but it is an addictive provocateur all punk and noise rock fans should contemplate braving.

The EP’s title track launches at ears first, heavy riffs and matching rhythms an instant wall of noise and temptation pierced by a keen and infectious punk grooving. Just as raw and appealing vocal squalls swiftly join the quickly brewing contagiousness of the track, delivering what are, to quote the accompanying press release,   “Mysterious, dark and sometime incomprehensible lyrics exposing religious-media-space-traveling-matters and other obscure themes.” It only adds to the drama and irresistible tempest though, as does the post punk nagging which helps spice the web of inescapable and thrilling hooks and wiry grooves.

It is an outstanding start matched straight away by the slightly lighter but no less intensive examination of Fear Pope Departure. Once again hooks enslave from the first breath of the song whilst the lyrics are even more disguised by the great unpolished vocals. Short, sharp, and rigorously infectious the song evolves through a sonic rasp into Deathray Spec, another ridiculously addictive and viciously imposing track. As portentous in atmosphere and tone as it is catchy in imagination and enterprise, the song unleashes a harsh belligerence of attitude and a sonic rapacity which in itself is imposing and successful persuasion.

In many ways the nagging and addictive repetition sculpting grooves and riffs is akin to the early days of bands like Killing Joke and Gang Of Four. They are unrelenting and seductive, reeling in ears and passions with consummate ease whilst voice and other sounds bring their own corrosive incitement. The very short Amplified Truth Disclosure a prime example, its thirty eight seconds lust sparking insistence which is only here to savage the psyche.

The release closes as impressively and grippingly as it started; Run State Wrong coming forward as a seventies punk seeded anger with hardcore ferocity and Buzzcocks like hooks whilst spilling ravishing invention bound in noise bred majesty. It is a glorious end to a thrilling and enthralling encounter. To be honest Dethfox had us hooked by the time it’s first song departed ears and only compounded and broadened its slavery with each subsequent offering. Given the chance it is easy to expect the same happening to hordes of new drooling fans too.

Natural Media Teleforce is available via Chaos Rural Records from January 20th @ http://chaosruralrecords.bandcamp.com/album/natural-media-teleforce

http://www.dethfox.com/

RingMaster 20/01/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard from

http://www.thereputationlabel.today

 

Nachtreich/Spectral Lore Split: The Quivering Lights

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Like a compelling painting which draws eyes into vivid adventures and sparks thoughts to conjure complimentary background stories, The Quivering Lights, the split release from Nachtreich and Spectral Lore, takes ears and imagination on an equivalent exploration. Taking inspiration from the metaphorical struggle between Dionysus and Apollo whilst also investigating spiritual decay, the six-track release is a journey, at times a fall, through the darkest emotions and coldest climates whilst expressing a beauty which simply bewitches.

It is a split which offers much more than a trio of tracks from two bands; the proposition seeing Germany’s Nachtreich and Greek ambient black metallers Spectral Lore collaborating and entwining their individual explorations in one soul searching flight of blackened neo-classical drama. Challenging at times, bewitching in other moments, the album aligns the darkest corners of the soul to an emotionally startling landscape in an experience metal, progressive, and classical fans alike can immerse within.

Hailing from Koblenz /Nürnberg, Nachtreich was an instrumental band formed by the musicians P.H. and U.K. in 2003. Fusing dark metal with haunting harmonies and classical seeded orchestration, the band drew acclaiming attention with their intrusive dark romance of sound before splitting in 2010, though the two members continue to work together in different genres. Their companion on The Quivering Lights is the one man project of Ayloss which began in 2005. Spectral Lore is also no stranger to potent praise having released a quartet of intriguing and enthralling albums in I, II, Sentinel, and III. Now the two projects have united in arguably one of their most inspiring and gripping exploits yet. Released via the creative union of Bindrune and Eihwaz Recordings, The Quivering Lights is a perpetually shifting beauty, a soundscape of emotive and provocative imagination which not only evolves from moment to moment and track to track, but from each individual listen to listen.

Nachtreich begin the creative theatre with Lights, an instant seduction of piano and strings which whilst soaked in melancholic seduction also express radiant charm and soulful elegance. The instrumental piece is sheer mesmerism and equally adept at provoking thoughts as well as transfixing them with its potent shadowed expression and haunting touch. Climbing in weight and emotional intensity as raw air washing over the inventive poetry of sound, the track eventually simmers down again and drifts away to allow Spectral Lore’s Quivering to step forward, also on a piano sculpted embrace. Similarly there is a melodic beauty caressing ears but also an underlying coldness which shares a starker scenery further into its length; a chill become subsequently frostier and harsher as vocal squalls and doom laden terrains loom on ears and emotions. The track continually ebbs and flows with its imposing climate, exploring quieter darker corners as well as uncaging squalls of intensity.

Greyness and Ghost Lights from Nachtreich come next. The first ‘sings’ like a lone soul in a mournful field of reflections and doubts with a viola seducing for comfort. Its successor retains the grace and melodic classiness of the band’s other pair of tracks but takes it into a more sinister and predatory climate, epitomised by the low vocal growls which rub with torment against the evocative narrative of the keys. Both tracks are captivating and emotionally inciting, gloriously haunting and impressive shadows from the imagination.

Spectral Lore bring the album to a close with firstly the eleven minute of Vanishing, which opens with its own intriguing web of guitar imagination within an enticing yet slightly tempestuous calm. It is an atmosphere which is increasing in turbulence all the time, eventfully twisting into a broader and more hostile canvas of vocal sorrow and atmospheric causticity sculpted by heavy rhythms and corrosive riffs. There is a veining of sonic adventure and light though which pierces the revolving tortuous landscape of the song and adds stronger descriptive ambience.

Final track Reflection is musically as its name suggests, a sombre and thoughtful self-investigation brought by a sultry dance of fingers on guitar strings. It leaves the listener engrossed and equally as involved in their own thoughts as much as those proposed by the album. Making an immersive and dramatic proposition, the track brings the impressive release to a similarly potent close.

The Quivering Lights is something different from the usual few tracks from one artist and a few from another styled split release. It is a stunning travelogue of emotion and sound from bands combining and merging their individual investigations in one fluid and seriously rewarding journey. This is one album all black, ambient, neo-classical, and progressive metal fans should investigate.

The Quivering Lights is available now digitally @ http://nachtreich.bandcamp.com/ and on limited edition 12”vinyl @ http://eihwazrecordings.com/distro/index.php?main_page=product_info&cPath=2&products_id=1534

https://www.facebook.com/pages/Nachtreich-Official/134636053320790

https://www.facebook.com/spectral.lorebm

RingMaster 20/01/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard from

http://www.thereputationlabel.today