Wanton – Harmageddon Get-Together

After their recent introduction as the newest member of the Undead Artists family though the label’s compilation album Monster Mash-Up, we had real eagerness to check out the new album from Finnish psychobilly outfit Wanton. Their track was a potent teaser to their forthcoming second album, but only hinting at the bloody fun and raw adventure which was discovered within Harmageddon Get-Together.

Hailing from Rauma on the Finnish west coast, Wanton infuse a healthy dose of punk and instinctive rock ‘n’ roll in their psychobilly bred sound, a mix giving it a strain of individuality which sparks the imagination. and creates the visceral captivation cast by the Häiriö Piirinen recorded and Toni Randell mixed and mastered Harmageddon Get-Together. Wrapped in the artwork of Saara Jansson, the album casts its horror bound Intro before hitting the ground running with Fun ‘n’ Gore. With swinging beats from Eetu Ritakorpi aligned to the plucked throbbing of Santeri Toivonen’s double bass, the track is swiftly into its darkly aired stroll with swagger as compelling as the suggestive melodies and scything riffs from the guitar of Oskari Nieminen.  There is no escaping the predacious tone of the song, its gait never forceful but more a stalking of ears as the grisly growl of vocalist Santeri Kero prowls. Even so, its catchy swing is openly lively and persuasive, leading ears to a truly seductive chorus and more flirtatious enterprise. Like a mix of Demented Are go and Zombie Ghost Train, it is an irresistible full start to the album quickly matched by its successor.

Censor This! is just as tenacious and catchy, Toivonen driving the temptation with his resonating strings as a rockabilly seeded guitar jangle courts the vocal growling of Kero. It is an easy going and simple to get involved in roar leaving a lingering snarl even as the excellent theatre and rapacious intent of Bump In The Night brings its ghostly haunts to bear on ears and imagination quickly after. Shadows line its corners, infection its vaunt as body and spirit bounces to its eager twists and turns. Nieminen’s guitar again spins a web of intrigue and melodic adventure, keys just as keen to toy with the senses as they spook the atmosphere.

DAG again comes to mind as 21st Century Haunting stomps through ears next, riffs and grooves compelling incitement within a web of imagination before Town Of Nihilo serenades with its suggestive caresses. Of course that initial smoulder is soon a feisty blaze as riffs and rhythms escape their restraints. Throughout the song they are caught and escape again and again as the western air of the song coats the senses with its sultry embrace.

There is a touch of cowpunk to next up Cyanide & Arsenic too, the song featuring a duet between Kero and an unknown but seductive female companion. It is like a bend of The Hillbilly Moon Explosion and The Only Ones when vocalist Peter Perrett dueted with Penetration front woman Pauline Murray and quite captivating, charming ears ready for the rhythmically skittish and hungrily infectious Meteors scented Scare Tactics And Human Frights. As in all tracks, Wanton soon sculpt their own creative character, an identity subsequently turning the outstanding Hyde into an insatiably addictive proposal with Ritakorpi ‘s anthemically stabbing beats and Toivonen’s pulsing riff the virulent heart to the enticing tangle of varied guitar and vocal devilry.

From one big highlight to another as Dystopia romps and rumbles with riotous intent and contagious endeavour straight after. It carries all the ingredients and zeal to ignite instincts and revitalise the spirit; psychobilly to leave the body and soul uninhibited. It is a prowess just as impressively found within the raw mouth-watering quick step of Second Coming and the passions nagging rockabilly bred Front Row Ticket. Imagine The Comets under the leadership of P Paul Fenech and you get a sense of the joy found in the latter alone.

Drama and attitude fuel the escapades of Vendetta next, where melodies and grooves are just as dangerous as the rhythmic and vocal trespass enslaving the appetite, while Infected is a corpse strewn infestation of senses clipping beats, brooding basslines, and sonic clang, all dripping decay and raw temptation as putrefied raw vocals scowl. Both are a trespass to devour and on their own a reason to declare Harmageddon Get-Together is a must.

The album’s fine conclusion is provided by the cleaner cut presence of The End; a warm and seriously enticing slice of boisterous balladry which may be missing some of the sparks of those before it but only leaves behind a lingering greed for more.

Psychobilly is blessed with some truly exciting potential loaded bands at this moment in time but, such the mighty assault of Harmageddon Get-Together, it is easy to suggest that Wanton have stolen a march on them all.

Harmageddon Get-Together is released April 1st through Undead Artists with pre-ordering available now @ https://wantonpsycho.bandcamp.com/music

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Pete RingMaster 17/03/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Dirt Box Disco – Poppycock

To date every Dirt Box Disco album has been a reason to romp and stomp, to unleash the instinctive punk and rocker inside with the British band’s own devilish intent. Of course their new proposal, Poppycock, is no different, a fifth album which turns body and spirit into a mischievously brawling blur of flying limbs, riotous fun, and lustful habits.

The Burton on Trent quintet has long established its own punk ‘n’ roll sound across four voracious albums and a host of EPs and singles. Fair to say that Poppycock brings more of that belligerent rock ‘n’ roll rascality but yet again the band manages to tap into something fresh. It is not necessarily a definable essence though the STP Records released album has a pop catchiness to its attitude loaded, middle finger raised rampage, but something which just gives the album its own character and the DBD sound a new twist.

In another year seeing the band relentlessly cause live havoc across the UK and Europe, DBD set it all up perfectly an album leaping upon ears with the same hunger as opener The Bullshit Kids bursts into life. Rambunctious rhythms and voracious riffs join group calls to get things started, a wiry vine of guitar temptation from Danny Fingers escaping the roar as the track spreads its bait. With lead vocalist Weab.I.Am standing antagonistically but invitingly astride the muscular stroll, band and track barge around with contagious revelry, DBD instantly showing they are still kings of the rebel rousing, listener involving chorus.

The following Finger Blast opens up with a Stiff Little Fingers like air, Deadbeatz Chris’ burly bassline and the swinging aggression of drummer Maff Fazzo courting the spicy hook and subsequent surge of caustic riffs set loose by Fingers and Spunk Volcano. Raw pop punk relishing its inbred rowdiness and sonic enterprise, the song has the body rocking and primed for the immediate incendiary incitement of Punk Rock Riot, a track as you would expect living up to its title with virulent aggression and anthemic contagion. With a slight whiff of The Adicts to it, the track is an inescapable persuasion to raise hell.

The excellent Little White Lie romances the senses with its multi-vocal union and warm textures next, all fuelled by the wilful and headstrong energy and sound expected of the band while its successor, Working For Wankers, has vocal chords at full volume in unity with its sentiment and defiance. Blending explosive and calm pastures, choppy riffs and melodic teasing leading to ferocious expulsions, the song has ears and appetite hooked within seconds, success equally found by the snarling Fat Kid with its carnal metallic riffs and toxic grooves.

DBD show their pure rock ‘n’ roll instincts with Snorting Crack From A Girls Top Rack, a virulent and raucous UK Subs/Sham 69 meets Showaddywaddy roistering providing an almost two minute spirit stirring yell. A pinnacle amongst only peaks, the track leaves body breathless and attitude inflamed ready for the lighter but still imposing incitement and swing of Lazy Bastard, its raw captivation subsequently eclipsed by the metal infused rock of Slapdash And Haphazard. Part pub rock, part hard rock, and all punk, the third of the three roars with creative zeal as sonic tendrils offer a scorching flame within the aggravated air of vocals and song.

The tenacious and uninhibited exploits of Geronimo are a bruising addictive charm to persistently knock around, as too the bolder poppy shenanigans of Imaginary Friend; both raffish sing-a-longs that vocals chords yearn for. The vociferously grouchy and rousing Somethings Are Better Left Unsaid is no different, its lures more metal nurtured but instantly involving rock ‘n’ roll to stride through the world with.

Poppycock closes with the tantalising swing and shuffle of I Hate This City, a ska/reggae kissed stroll with a touch of The Members and Ruts to its initial saunter. Boiling up with every passing second, the track hollers and thrills, and though it is not the best song on the album it leaves an irresistible and lingering imprint just impossible to shake off.

Upon the first listen or two of Poppycock, as impressive and highly enjoyable as it was, it seemingly did not make the same immediate impact as predecessors. That suggestion was soon dispelled as songs imposed their infectious claws in thoughts far away from their home in no time, returning as they pleased. Poppycock creeps up on you as well as creating a thrilling clamour in its presence while again Dirt Box Disco create musical havoc, emotional incitement, and the kind of rock ‘n’ roll that has body and heart stomping and howling with sheer pleasure.

Poppycock is out now through STP Records @ http://www.stprecords.co.uk/page3.htm and https://dirtboxdisco.bigcartel.com digitally and on CD with its vinyl release April 5th

Upcoming live shows:

 

http://www.dirtboxdisco.co.uk    http://www.facebook.com/pages/DIRT-BOX-DISCO/129060477115572    http://twitter.com/dirtboxdisco

Pete RingMaster 16/03/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Blacktop Mojo – Burn The Ships

The past four years since forming has seen Texan rock band Blacktop Mojo court a potent reputation for their sound and live presence, all the time increasingly nudging global attention to turn their way. The release of second album Burn The Ships is the moment that awareness just might happen, the release a striking and thickly accomplished slab of highly flavoursome, sinew moulded rock ‘n’ roll.

Formed in September 2012 by vocalist Matt James and drummer Nathan Gillis, Blacktop Mojo swiftly leapt into the live scene with the intent of playing as many shows and tours as they could. It is a hunger which prevails to this day, the Palestine, TX quintet sharing stages with the likes of Bon Jovi, Candlebox, Drowning Pool, Aaron Lewis, Saving Abel, Puddle of Mudd, Whiskey Myers, Dirty River Boys, and The Bigsbys among a great many others over the years. Debut album I Am stirred things up at home with its release in 2014, similarly inviting broader notice of the band’s hearty hard/melodic rock sound. Burn The Ships though is a wake-up call to bigger spotlights upon the band, the Philip Mosley produced and Austin Deptula mixed and mastered encounter a fiery roar very hard to ignore or avoid finding a healthy appetite for.

The Blacktop Mojo sound is arguably not the most unique, the band drawing comparisons to the likes of Shinedown, Black Stone Cherry, and Soundgarden yet has an individual character and diversity which lifts it from the crowd with ease. All the evidence lies within Burn The Ships and its inventive and impassioned rock ‘n’ roll; a proposition hitting the ground running with its majorly rousing opener Where The Wind Blows. A lone melody with a country rock twang makes the first beckon, a sister lure swiftly by its side before muscle bound rhythms loom over ears amidst the continuing invitation of that initial welcome. Soon into its thick and potent stride with the growling tones of Matt Curtis’ bass rich bait alongside the meaty swipes of Gillis, the track has its infectious claws firmly around ears and appetite with James’ delivery leading the way and in turn the listener into one peach of a chorus impossible not to get fully involved in. With the riffs of rhythm guitarist Kenneth Irwin equally steering the temptation as lead guitarist Ryan Kiefer spins wiry grooves, it is a seriously compelling proposal,

The following End Of Days is just as formidable and satisfying, its robust rhythms and gnarly grooves alone gripping body and an instinctive passion for heart bred rock ‘n’ roll. As its predecessor, the song carries an irresistible chorus to back up the already successful lures at play and the album’s powerful start, success its title track continues. As provocative guitar temptation wraps its flame lit charms around ears, Burn The Ships quickly shows itself an equal to those before in enticement, gaining even greater strength in that trait as its groove takes on a nagging quality as it meanders around the vocal potency of James. With Seether-esque hues involved, the song croons and roars; flexing its muscle as it spins its inventively intoxicating sonic web with each passing second. The track is pure drama and the pinnacle of the album though challenged throughout.

The earnest strains of Prodigal follow, its Staind lit serenade a mellow emotive caress allowing for a breath whilst enjoying its melodic heat, suggestive flames building  into a bigger blaze before Shadows On The Wall smoulders and erupts in a 3 Doors Down scented fire next, subsequently  followed by the virile throes of Sweat. The trio do not quite teach the heights of the first three tremendous tracks but each with their individual natures and temptations leave plenty to embrace and firmly enjoy.

The snarling properties of Pyromaniac bring the album back to its loftiest heights, the song as heated as its title suggests with irritability in its riffs and a bass grumble so easy to grow lustful for. Melodically, there is a 3 Days Grace air contrasted and complimented perfectly by the grungier textures at work on the senses, both linked by an instinctive catchiness  which again features in potent form within the predacious 8000 Lines, a song stalking ears with rapacious riffs and antagonistic beats as sonic enterprise and vocal drama ignite. The track is outstanding; its unpredictability enhanced by melodic beauty as an oasis of calm shares ears with its tempestuous heart.

Both Dog On A Leash with its red-blooded plaintive call and the reflective cries of Make A Difference leave satisfaction full, each revealing further twists in the album’s make-up and enterprise while Chains brings a web of athletic grooves and beefy rhythms in a burly persuasion raising the ante again. It is pure captivation preying on an already eager appetite for sound and encounter.

Concluded by the emotionally charged Dream On and the melancholic musing of Underneath, the impressive Burn The Ships has plenty to see the band make the next step towards global recognition. Its songs are shapely and sound rich if not always on the truly unique side. Its craft and imagination more than compensates though as ears embrace the open potential also lying within a triumph of a listen.

Burn The Ships is out now through Cuhmon Records @ https://blacktopmojo.bandcamp.com/releases or http://www.blacktopmojo.com/store

http://www.blacktopmojo.com/   https://www.facebook.com/BlacktopMojo   https://twitter.com/blacktopmojo

Pete RingMaster 15/03/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Freakings -Toxic End

Proud in their old school thrash instincts and inspirations, Swiss metallers Freakings continue their prowess at unleashing imposingly tenacious and compelling thrash furies with their new album. Their third full-length, Toxic End is a tempest of openly familiar and rousing textures, a proposal bold in its recognisable breeding. This though does not make for something lacking a fresh and compelling character, in fact within Freakings finest offering yet, it all goes to offer one mouth-watering, energy sapping, and fiercely enjoyable assault.

Formed in 2008, the Basel hailing trio of vocalist/guitarist Jonathan Brutschin alongside the brothers Toby Straumann on bass and drummer Simon, Freakings nudged broader attention from their already local success with 2011 debut album No Way Out. In turn, its successor Gladiator only brought new hungry ears and richer praise the way of the band three years later. Toxic End will simply inspire another wave of support and acclaim, its raw virulence and old school seeding raw magnetism.

Opener Hell On Earth courts ears and instincts for voracious metal within seconds, riffs and rhythms a hellacious onslaught breeding carnally catchy tendencies in the respective grooves and swinging antics which follow as vocals, singular and united roar. There is no escaping Slayer/Exodus bred influences or the severely infectious surge running through the song’s core, lures helping forge a thrilling start to the album quickly supported by the snarling assault of Future Vision. Rawer in air, arguably even more imposing in nature than its predecessor, the song brawls with the senses whilst uncaging its own venomously enslaving sonic bait. As the first and many of those to follow, it is hard to say there are major surprises involved yet the track just grabs ears and thickly satisfies with forceful ease.

Violent Disaster is a matching success, its antagonistic rhythmic trespass bone snapping and waspish grooves addictive as Brutschin’s vocals brawl with the listener. It is a torrent of wiry riffs, bass predation, and scything beats blended with undisguised belligerence and anthemic instincts; every element leaving thick marks on its victims before TxWxNxD sets loose its brutal rock ‘n’ roll. Though offering a few strains seemingly reaped from tracks before it, the song is a thrash anthem to lose inhibitions and swiftly pledge allegiance to, especially once it hits it’s ridiculously infectious swinging stride.

The album’s title track follows, rampaging with ill-intent devouring all before with hostile rhythmic rapacity and the cyclonic dexterity of Brutschin’s guitar. Simultaneously corrosive and catchy, it is an infestation of ears and spirit accentuated further by the ravenous rabidity and predatory charge of Friendly Fire, its body entwined in toxic enterprise flaming out of the guitar. As much as it is an infernal roar, the song has the hips grooving with its seductive swing, a dual invasive tempting impossible to evade.

Through the caustic sonic tirade and rhythmic pillaging of Brain Dead and the vehement siege of the senses that is Price Of Freedom, with its own crippling volley of incendiary beats, band and album savage and bludgeon leaving nothing less than major pleasure behind.  Wave Of Pain straight after is similarly satisfying, its barbarous nature and air a close match to the song before but soon unfurling an individual web of melodic enticement and sonic ire.

The album finishes with arguably its fiercest offerings, and in the case of first up Beer Attack, its most breath-taking raid. Never relenting in its acrimonious blunt trauma causing incitement, the track leaves the senses reeling, prime meat for the final vindictive menacing of No More Excuses which also punishes as it thrills; the body broken and elated in its wake.

Toxic End makes it very easy to find real pleasure in its storm. Certainly there is an element of similarity between some tracks or definitely specific elements making up their tempests but little to deter a lust loaded appetite growing with each and every listen. There is something particular about old school thrash which never relinquishes its potency and Freakings exploits it to the full.

Toxic End is out now digitally as well as on CD and vinyl.

http://www.freakings.ch    https://www.facebook.com/freakings

Pete RingMaster 14/03/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Enamel Animal – Unfaith

Few rock bands have raised the same level of anticipation for their next move than Queens Of The Stone Age with their full-length debut but that kind of reaction is exactly what UK rockers Enamel Animal have poached with their first album Unfaith. It is an enticingly dirty, fuzzy proposition with instinctive adventure in its veins and contagious often grouchy sounds in its arsenal but with a melodic fire which just as easily grabs a natural appetite for imaginative rock ‘n’ roll. Imagine a rawer Soundgarden meeting a mellower hearted Mastodon with the rousing punk like aggression of Reuben riling things up and you have Enamel Animal.

There is so much more to the imaginative proposals on offer than that though, the album’s songs as adept at creating, with varying but always compelling results, more progressive psych rock explorations.  It makes the Liverpool based quartet of Philip Collier, Barry McKeown, Glen Ashworth, and Ryan Mallows an unpredictable proposition which only adds to the fun of Unfaith. Already carrying a potent reputation through shows alongside the likes of FOES, Bad Sign, Rival Bones, and Ritual King, Enamel Animal give it another big nudge with an album getting down to persuasive work straight away with opener Surrender Reverence. Initially coaxing ears with a lone shadowy riff, the track soon flares up with a dazzling sonic wash of guitar, darker rhythms strolling through the midst of the sunspot as grungy and psychedelic hues merge. Soon a fuzzy groove wraps ears and appetite, warm harmonic vocals rising with them, they like the sounds around them taking on grungier tones by the second. It is a tantalising wash of sound, simultaneously earthy and spatial and quite riveting.

War Machine follows with a bigger muscular presence but also its own sultry smog of melodic psych rock intoxication which opens up into calmer passages of harmonic seduction. That Soundgarden like essence is a rich flame across the track but with its dirtier lining and rapacious groove, nineties English band Skyscraper is also reminded of.

Similar textures unite for the melodic pyre that is Horrified; the track growing more inflamed and tempestuous as wiry melodies entwine tenacious rhythms but also ebbing and igniting again like a sonic fire. There is a certain Foo Fighters air to the track while its successor I Love Creationists taps into Nirvana inspirations for its outstanding and bracing punk ‘n’ roll. It is an agitated treat with the boldest mischief and imagination at play yet within Unfaith, ensuring it’s less than two minutes of devilry is unforgettable.

The already budding diversity of the release and Enamel Animal sound continues into the predacious stalking of ears by Death To The Destroyer. Its hungry rumble wears Josh Homme and co essences like a cloak as the song growls in its belly and menacingly flirts with its own unique metal/heavy rock bred tenacity. Together the pair of tracks provides the pinnacle of the album but closely backed up by the likes of Greetings Earthlings with its creative snarl. There is a great irritability about the song in sound and voice, the track facing up to the listener with an enjoyably grubby air and Stone Temple Pilots scented nature enhanced by more of the band’s psych fuelled flames.

Things calm down as The Thousand Years slowly and gracefully entices the senses and imagination with increasingly widening tendrils of fuzzy melody. In time eager sinew loaded rhythms bring their anthemic almost tribalistic lures to the radiant entrance of the song, textures around them becoming more granular as melodies explore exotic realms. It is absorbing stuff growing more captivating with every listen, a trait shared by the album itself and next up Red Is For Danger. To be fair, its heavy blues lined rock ‘n’ roll pretty much hits the spot straight away but just increases its potency over time as grooves wind around ears and song with incendiary temptation.

As the melody woven beauty of Eintracht simmers, bubbles, and ignites with emotive intensity and the following, A Praying Mantis Does Not Pray makes its own persistently evolving journey of boisterously inventive sound, the album just cements its impressive persuasion. Neither quite reaches the heights of those before them but both only grow in strength as new layers or imagination are found  listen by listen to add to the rich enjoyment of the release.

Unfaith ends with its title track, an emotionally charged flight of progressively honed post rock infusing grunge and stoner textures but suggestively elegant with a raw edge intensifying its heart.

Produced by Jon Lawton who also plays across the album, Unfaith is strapped with potential and ripe with craft and real temptation.  It is a full introduction to Enamel Animal suggesting a band with a great future ahead of them if they continue their growth whilst providing a pleasure to be savoured right now.

Unfaith is available now as a name your own price download @ http://enamelanimal.com/album/unfaith

https://www.facebook.com/EnamelAnimal/    https://twitter.com/anenamelanimal

Pete RingMaster 08/03/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Undead Artists presents Monster Mash-Up

Always one to push his music family and label’s adventure, founder and owner of Undead Artists, Johnny Rose (Thirteen Shots) set the task for his bands to record a cover of a track from the other label companion he paired them up with. It was not just to be a simple version though but a task with the remit to make the song their own helped by Rose’s sly move of matching up different genre bred bands and their contrasting textures and sounds. What emerged is the ten track treat of Monster Mash-Up; eight songs not to be found anywhere else as well as a pair of additional slices of very appetising goodness.

The compilation gets off to a flyer with The Bloodstrings and the track Dead In Berlin. Grabbing the song from horror punks Cavaverman with relish, the German quartet swiftly grip attention as the throaty upright bass twangs of Nick waggle a beckoning finger. As the swinging melodies and rhythms of Manuel and Fest respectively, only add to the growing lure soon led by the captivating tones of vocalist Celina, the band fully infuses the track with their punkabilly touch and contagion. In no time hips are swaying and feet a skittish blur in union with the excellent start to the album and just as enthused by next up Motel Transylvania, and indeed the rest romping across the already appetite pleasing release.

The 2015 formed Italian horrorbilly outfit get their claws into Stolen By The Night from Silpha and The Corpseboners next, gnarly riffs and firmly kissing beats from stand-up drummer/vocalist T.Ghoul prowling the senses before sparking a ferocious roar led by the sonic fire of The Wolfman and the grumbling bass of Fish”The scarecrow”. Within that raw dirty confrontation, warm suggestive melodies radiate and deceptive calm seduces until the blaze is ignited again. As those around them, the band live up to instructions and make the outstanding fan favourite song of its creators into something distinct to themselves, the texture of male instead of female vocals alone giving it a new carnivorous air.

It is truly fair to say it is a success all the swaps achieve, the bloody punk ‘n’ roll prowess of Dr. Hell taking Don’t Say The Z Word from Lupen Tooth’s debut EP and infesting it with punk vivacity and aggression as well as a delicious almost ska inspired devilment half way in. A repetitious chorus backed by group vocals demands involvement to top one virulent stomp to keenly embrace before we get an alternative version of a song recently part of a release already exciting the year. From Hamme in Belgian, horrorpunks Deadite recently released their album The Damned, a compelling slab of ravenous rock n’ roll within which its haunting Tiger Army-esque title track provided one of many major highlights. The trio offer an alternative take for this album, a just as captivating and in many ways even more seductive temptation with its cleaner cut yet thicker smoulder, a twist giving it a more Dommin like air.

Bremen hailing Jamey Rottencorpse and The Rising Dead are next to step forward, laying their hands on I Sold My Soul Tonight by Raizing Hell, a band sadly no longer with us who split up before they could return the favour. The enjoyably scuzzy horrorpunk of Jamey and co easily infuses into the original’s more punk based rock ‘n’ roll, giving it a dirtier toxicity without losing the boisterous virulence which just hits the spot like a doppelganger to its counterpart.

The UK’s Lupen Tooth ignites the senses yet again straight after, the Bristol band grabbing the visceral punk of Hamburg’s Dr. Hell found in the track Carl The Metrosexual Werewolf to give it two minutes plus of their horror punk revelry, resulting in an insatiable slab of infection loaded rock ‘n’ roll. In the often rare climate of every track within a compilation being as equal in quality and invention as any other, bigger favourites did still arise with personal instincts, this one of them but persistently challenged with every listen by all with Silpha & The Corpseboners proving the fact with Go Psycho. The Stein/Nürnberg based three piece led by the temptress tones and presence of Silpha Obscura bring their bloodlusting horrorpunk trespass to the Motel Transylvania track. As ever, theirs is a sound with a glorious schizophrenic nature; sax and keys sultrily toying with jazzy intent as the band deconstruct and rebuild the track in their own devilish design to bewitch ears and imagination.

From one treat to another as we get a glimpse at label newcomers, Wanton next. Undead Artists is poised to release the Finnish band’s new album Harmageddon Get-Together in the near future. Censor This! is taken from that encounter, a psychobilly roar quickly taking body and spirit on a ruggedly tenacious and contagious romp. With a flavoursome spurt of punk in their caustically catchy sound and a vein of melodic temptation, the Rauma hailing band makes a thrilling introduction to label fans, one sure to incite plenty of anticipation for their second album.

The Bloodstrings get their song In Love With A Monster devoured and ignited again in their own way by Italian horror punks Cavaverman right after, the band blending English and their homeland tongue in a fiery and energetically rousing version luring air lashing limbs and aroused vocal chords as easily as the original.

The album is completed by Somewhere Under The Graveyard, the Jamey Rottencorpse and The Rising Dead anthem seized by a host of musicians from the Undead Artists Family and given their own seriously rousing punk and rock ‘n’ roll zeal. It is a riotous and fiercely enjoyable end to a release which not only has you bounding feverishly around the room but hungry to check out its occupants even closer.

Last year was a big and successful year for Undead Artists with Monster Mash-Up suggesting we and they have seen nothing yet.

Undead Artists Records Monster Mash-Up is released March 24th with pre-ordering, also for Limited Edition CDs and T-Shirts/CD packs, available now @ https://undeadartists.bandcamp.com/album/monster-mash-up-2

http://undeadartistsbooki.wixsite.com/undeadartists   https://twitter.com/ArtistsUndead   https://undeadartists.bandcamp.com/

Pete RingMaster 07/03/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

1919 – Bloodline

This is a moment no one likes to contemplate let alone undertake, reviewing something from an artist and exceptional musician who has sadly just been untimely taken from music and the world. It also though gives fingers and thoughts a chance to pay homage especially when the subject of the piece is such a striking and rousing slice of creativity.

Bloodline is the new album from gothic/post punks 1919, a band formed at the tail of 1980 which proceeded to break the charts with a trio of singles, record one of the genre’s inspirational albums, and make appearances on the John Peel sessions twice before disbanding. Founding guitarist Mark Tighe

Mark Tighe RIP

began bringing the band back to life in 2014, its line-up sealed the following year with original drummer Mick Reed and bassist Karl Donner joining Tighe and vocalist Rio Goldhammer; the quartet subsequently releasing the ‘Madness Continues Sessions’ live album and in turn the self-released Death Note EP.

This past night of January 27th, Mark passed away; a deep loss for family, band, and fans but equally for music generally. His playing was distinctive, like a single individual colour in a vast palette of hues, able to create haunting melodies and moments as evocative and captivating as the incisive grooves and hooks from him which so freely and uniquely gripped body and imagination. The evidence is no more powerful and true than on Bloodline. He was also a wholly loved man to whom music was his life’s fuel and a true gentleman for all those who knew and met him.

Bloodline is a thrilling way to remember and enjoy Mark’s craft and potent presence; an album which grips physically and imaginatively from its first breath, increasingly winding appetite and lust around its creative fingers track by track. The foursome quite simply cements themselves as still one of the essential post punk incitements with it, almost as if they had never been away as a presence yet pushing themselves into new fresh realms of creative drama and aural adventure.

The album’s title track is first up, chugging riffs swiftly turning into wiry tendrils as percussion teases. Once the brooding bassline enters, things become eagerly catchy with the song blossoming into a PiL meets Leitmotiv like lure with Rio’s tones showing a certain Lydon-esque tinge to them. Feet and hips cannot avoid being involved as sultry melodies weave their temptation and a repetitious Killing Joke scented nagging growls in its belly.

Drama seeps from the electronic coaxing bringing next up This Vanity into view, its raw industrially kissed smoulder continuing to hug the senses as the bass unveils a gorgeous lure. Alongside, Mark’s guitar spins a spiral of melodic suggestion as Mick’s rhythms instinctively roll, a Gene Loves Jezebel like breeze soon floating over the provocative landscape to seep into every emotive crevice as vocals plaintively croon. Quickly absorbing the senses, the track makes way for the outstanding, rhythmically tenacious canter of Inquest. There is no escaping thinking of Jaz Coleman and co as Karl and Mick unite their flirtatiously anthemic designs but as throughout Bloodline, 1919 soon breed their own distinct character of sound and imagination. Magnetic harmonies and intoxicating melodies proceed to vine the ridiculously virulent encounter drawing the listener further into its creative theatre where just as riveting treats lay like its successor Retrograde. Like a puppeteer, it has the body bouncing while its spicy maze of melody is a sunspot of temptation contagiously matched by the snarling bass and hungrily leaping beats; Rio the ringmaster to its rousingly provocative and exhilarating waltz.

Even darker depths are drilled by the bass next in Legacy, its gnarly breath echoed in the caliginous air of the song though it too has a rampant catchiness which tempers and suits its shadowy presence. Imagine Bauhaus in league with Play Dead and the song can be visualised but still only a glimpse of its invasively compelling adventure, success matched by that of the wholly different presence of Zeitgeist. Again the first of the just mentioned pair of references is a prime clue to its tenebrific air and almost vampiric temptation, Rio carrying a Pete Murphy air to some of his persistently highly enjoyable, ever moving delivery. Mark’s imagination spins another labyrinth of melody and haunted sound too, evolving textures as radiant as they are emotively darksome to seduce and ensnare.

Through the galvanic punk rock of Disassociation and the intrigue soaked flirtation of Waiting For God ears are thrilled and the album’s variety stretched with the latter revolving its charms in ears and imagination like a temptress whilst wearing Theatre of Hate/ The Danse Society sourced inspiration as another alluring spice to its own spellbinding and tenacious revelry. Both tracks whip up body and spirit with sublime yet forceful ease, being quickly and as boldly matched in results by the slightly calmer and heavier fascination of Trespass. Maybe the most pop lined song on the album it just as openly shares raw shadows whilst boisterously serenading the listener, and as those before, it only sparks emotional and physical participation.

Bloodline closes with Life Is.., its tribal incitement of rhythms alone enough to incite allegiance, bewitchingly assisted by the fuzzy glow of melodies and variety coated vocals. Something akin to a fusion of Calling All Astronauts and Inca Babies but not, the wonderfully niggling song saunters and swings with increasing infection; an aural epidemic from which there is no escape as it brings one very fine release to a tremendous conclusion.

You cannot evade sadness listening to Bloodline but neither the joy sparked by its simply stunning presence.

Bloodline is out now through Westworld Recordings.

Video Dir. Carl Arnfield / ChalkmanVideo.com

https://www.facebook.com/1919official/

Pete RingMaster 06/03/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright