Little Lapin – Remember The Highs

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It was only a couple of months ago when Little Lapin seduced and enthralled with the single Remember The Highs, its masterful coaxing of ears and imagination the wake-up call to the mesmeric sound and voice of the UK singer-songwriter for a great many. The acclaimed track also revealed inventive and bold songwriting, something her fans were already vocal about and now impressively confirmed by the artist’s debut album also called Remember The Highs. It is a fascinating and captivating collection of songs which with diversity and melodic resourcefulness simply leave thoughts and emotions spellbound.

Little Lapin is Lucy Hill, a Devon bred songstress now based in Bristol who has been entrancing audiences from the UK to New Zealand and New York since emerging round 2012. Musically her inspirations include the likes of Regina Spektor, The Cranberries, Florence & The Machine, Laura Marling, PJ Harvey, The Cure, and The Pixies, many providing creative whispers in what is a sound and songs which are openly distinctive to Hill. The swift proof comes with the last single, though before that she had bred a strong and loyal fan base through a tantalising live presence and releases such as earlier tracks Sound of Summer and Winning Is Losing, and more so a self-titled EP last year which sparked attention from the likes of Tom Robinson on BBC Radio 6 and regular online radio play. It is easy to assume though this was just the appetiser to more fevered responses and acclaim destined to be earned by Remember The Highs, the album a beacon of melodies and harmonies set to draw greedy appetites like moths to a flame.

a1696187169_16   The album opens with Magnet Eyes and an immediate inescapable tempting of warm guitar and keys taken to another enslaving level by the unique tones of Hill. Her voice has a quality of sounding familiar as well as freshly bewitching, but from person to person it seems we hear someone different as a reference, the likes of Laura Marling, Regina Spektor, Sinead O’Connor, and Chrissie Hynde just some references used, with the latter the closest for us as a descriptive hint. As the song stretches its melodic nature and evocative air, a shadow of darker resonance comes into play to catch the imagination all over again, whilst voice and keys especially almost flirt with rich expression and emotive radiance.

It is a captivating start, but also a potent teaser to the glories of the following Over The Draft and the album’s title track. The first of the two songs creases ears with an initial persuasion of guitar again quickly enhanced by the sultry tones of Hill. Eager rhythms then gently and enticingly march into the exotic landscape now being cast by keys, everything settling into a scenic lure of melodic mystique and catchy hooks with the voice of Hill one giant romance of a snare. Its successor remains as potent as the first time heard, and if there is an air of Chrisse Hynde in the second track, Remember The Highs wonderfully reeks of The Pretenders in its sonic groove and provocative melodic hooks. Vocally too Hill brings her spiciest tang to syllables and a slightly nasal croon reminiscent of the Ohio musician. The darker bred bass groove alongside the irresistible winy flames of guitar is equally as compelling, the song providing one delicious embrace of tenacious enterprise and beauty.

The acoustic opening to Go!Stop!Go! has ears lit and body swaying instantly but it is the brooding air of drama cast through keys and an orchestral breath which ebbs and flows across the track, that turns a potent encounter into a spellbinding one. It is a serenade with haunting shadows and dark aural reflections which offer a melancholic temper to the invigorating partnership and narrative of voice and melody. The song just blossoms with every listen, its slower initial smoulder, compared to the previous songs, soon as engrossing and seductive as anything upon the album.

Sound Of Summer rolls in next on a rumble of rhythms which quickly evolves into an embrace of seventies seeded Beatle-esque keys and the ever inviting vocals. Occasional crescendos of drums add to the expanding and again sultry canvas of the song, guitars and keys colouring its scenery with alluring and imagination inciting enterprise to which bass adds swarthy lines of juicy shadows. Once more there is no option but to sink into the depths of a song before being left face to face with the rockier acoustic persuasion of In My Mind. The song is barely a stroll across the senses but even in its low key gait reveals a tenacious and sturdier character in its absorbing balladry compared to its predecessor.

Both songs though get over shadowed by the outstanding Colour Blind, a track emerging as a definite favourite. It starts on a thoughtful and evocative persuasion of guitar, Hill in moments adding her reflective vocal spice for an engaging start. Soon though, everything erupts into a gently concussive belt of emotional and creative turmoil, agitated rhythms and clanging riffs consorting with fiery keys in a bedlamic expulsion. It is a striking and thrilling twist to an already highly persuasive proposition providing yet another major highlight in Remember The Highs.

The album finishes with firstly the melancholic but again vibrantly arresting Panic, a song which has an essence of the drama found within The Smiths songwriting to it, and finally the closing warm smile of A Nice Coincidence. Contrasting textures flirt from within the encounter, sombre strings find themselves courted by skittish rhythms and another seduction of voice and melodies. The lyrical side of songs, as once more shown here, is just as intriguing and enticing, Hill able to cast hope in dark experiences and show the shadows within the brightest adventures.

Remember The Highs is a musical love affair for the senses from an artist in Little Lapin, who has the potential to become one of Britain’s most exciting and innovative singer songwriters. Thinking about it as her album seduces once again, she already is.

Remember The Highs is released on May 15th @ http://littlelapin.bandcamp.com/album/remember-the-highs-2

http://www.littlelapinmusic.com/   https://www.facebook.com/littlelapin

RingMaster 14/05/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard on Reputation Radio @ http://www.reputationradio.net

 

Abrahma – Reflections In The Bowels Of A Bird

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It is not a rare event to immerse in a release of expansive and spellbinding imagination, to be taken out of the real world into a creative adventure for an hour or so. It is less often though that you get simply lost within a proposition of such complex and unrelenting ideation that you feel trapped, caught in a claustrophobic tsunami of creative consumption where only the brief gaps between songs offers a hint of escape. Not that you will want to break free from the fascinating and suffocating glory of Reflections In The Bowels Of A Bird, the new album from French rockers Abrahma. It is an irresistible and exhausting emprise of perpetually evolving sound and dramatic atmospheres, an experience as sombre as it is bewitching and as creatively ravenous as it is emotionally disorientating.

There is no real surprise that the album is so intensively and imaginatively imposing, its predecessor Through the Dusty Paths of Our Lives when released in 2012, a similar maelstrom of sound and invention, as described elsewhere as a “heavy odyssey peppered with Hindu mysticism and voodoo convolutions”. The new album has taken that canvas to new and even more expansive and hypnotic realms; every track an individual journey uniting for one colossal and wonderfully unpredictable landscape of senses examining, thought provoking heavy rock.

Released as its predecessor via North American label Small Stone Records, Reflections In The Bowels Of A Bird makes a low-key entrance as Fountains Of Vengeance comes into view on a wave of sonic noise and intrigue, eventually stepping from its presence with thick beats and equally tense riffs and grooves. A grungy air also lines their invitation as the sombrely delivered tones of vocalist Sebastien Bismuth bring a colder subdued presence to the already mesmeric encounter. His and the guitar of Nicolas Heller increasingly entangle and merge to cast a raw and magnetic web of sound, hooks potent and melodies fiery as the song creates a tapestry of Stone Temple Pilots like tempting with invasive post rock ambiences and psyche bred exploration. The song roars and seductively sways across its ever twisting adventure, keys from again Bismuth inventively caressing the darker prowling hues of bass and the predatory beats cast by Benjamin Colin.

Abrahma_album_Artwork     The following An Offspring To The Wolves is immediately a darker imposing character, the bass of Guillaume Colin resonating with menace and toxic enticement as a doomy air colludes with stoner-esque sonic expression. There is an underlying swing to the lumbering infection surrounding the captivating and varied vocal delivery of Bismuth, part of a slow smothering of the senses sparking with flames of sound and emotion across the consuming prowl of the senses. As all tracks upon the album, it is impossible to fully explain all of the textures, emotions, and dark almost meditative radiance oozing from the cauldron of sound and invention at work, but easy to say it is thoroughly absorbing.

Omens Pt. 1 comes next, its sultry climate and sweltering melodic intrigue lying somewhere between psychedelic and occult rock, its exotic lure almost shamanic on ears and thoughts. That of course is only part of the picture, rhythms at times a rapacious confrontation whilst melodies and vocals spill an evocative croon within the explosive causticity embracing ears. It is bewildering and fascinating simultaneously, needing as all tracks plenty of partaking of its proposal to come close to exploring its world. The same of course applies to equally dramatic and engrossing Weary Statues, the track a tapestry of carnivorous intensity, volatile textures, and emotion fuelled drama. It is all, with much more, woven into another transfixing and physically stifling tempest sculpted with creative ingenuity, bold unpredictability, and mouth-watering craft.

Next is the spellbinding Omens Pt. 2, a peaceful reflection of surf rock seeded beauty shimmering with melodic elegance and a haunted breath which becomes more unsettled and agitated with every passing tangy caress and melancholic sigh, Another switching of calm and ruffled intensity eventually leads to a bedlamic finale set ablaze by the slightly psychotic flames of sax from album guest Vincent Dupuy. It is inescapable bait, enslaving attention and emotions before making way for the mystical, tempestuous flight of Kapal Kriya, the track another brooding mix of varied heavy rock sounds in one diversely layered, intimately spatial adventure.

The raging diversity and expectations ruining enterprise continues to thrill through firstly the ferocious rock ‘n’ roll stomp of Square The Circle, its charge on ears as probably assumed by now, never dawdling in one style, torrent of sound, or urgency of delivery for long. Its outstanding incitement is followed by the emotional and increasingly physical turbulence of the excellent Omens Pt. 3 which then moves aside for the equally enthralling A Shepherd’s Grief, which features guitar solos from Monster Magnet guitarist Ed Mundell. It is a squalling seduction, employing vast arrays of challenging spices and emotions in its expansive soundscape, and yes it is creatively sorcerous.

The album closes with the mournful beauty and blistering fire of Conium, a devouring sonic embrace bringing a thrilling release to a dramatic conclusion. The Abrahma /Thomas Bellier produced Reflections in the Bowels of a Bird is a virulent listen which can be as uncomfortable as it is pure seduction, but with constant attention grows from an impressive encounter into something very special.

Reflections In The Bowels Of A Bird is available on CD and digitally via Small Stone Records @ https://smallstone.bandcamp.com/album/reflections-in-the-bowels-of-a-bird

http://abrahmamusic.net/      https://www.facebook.com/ABRAHMAMUSIC

RingMaster 14/05/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard on Reputation Radio @ http://www.reputationradio.net

Graveyard Johnnys – Dead Transmission

Ester Segarra

There has always been a fire in the belly of the Graveyard Johnnys’ sound, as well as a constant entwining of varied strands of rock ‘n’ roll, but the band has tapped into their richest vein of belligerent contagion yet for new album Dead Transmission. The release is a glorious incitement of punk and rockabilly, though as ever the Welsh band infuses plenty of additional rock bred spices in provocations impossible to pin down but very easy to greedily devour. If you had to make a comparison it would have to be The Living End, though Graveyard Johnnys, as evidenced by their new offering, create something a little dirtier and more unpredictable.

Formed in 2008, the Chepstow hailing Graveyard Johnnys has earned a massive reputation for their fiery and frantic live performances, an aspect also echoed as close as it is possible to ever achieve in the studio within Dead Transmission. It is fair to say though that starting with their debut EP Streetblocks and City Lights, the band’s releases have persistently been a voracious slab of energy, as epitomised by first album Songs From Better Days in 2011. These only emulated as mentioned a live presence which has stirred up audiences Europe wide over the years, persistently luring new and loyal appetites to their sound. Graveyard Johnnys has shared stages with the likes of Turbonegro and Hayseed Dixie, toured with bands such as Mad Sin, The Peacocks, and Nekromantix, and left crowds exhausted with their own headlining shows, all earning greater acclaim and increasing a potent reputation. Now the threesome of vocalist/upright bassist Joe Grogan, drummer Thomas E Lord, and guitarist Callum Houston, arguably the first really stable line-up within the band and its most potent, are poised to open a new storm of attention with Dead Transmission, a release which will not take no for an answer.

Album opener is The Poison, a song entering on the regimented stomp of marching feet, equally eager beats, and subsequently a rich lure of flavoursome enticement which is as much melodic rock as it is classic rock ‘n’ roll seeded. Settling into a landscape of catchy energy and invention, a blues air lays over melodies and dust coated vocals whilst hard rock revelry creeps into the hook lined swing of the encounter. Straight away the band has expectations perfectly defeated, the song bounding through ears like a mix of Turbonegro, The Hives, and The Black Keys yet not. It is a tasty appetiser for things to come, but quickly outshone by the following For Tonight, and indeed the rest of the increasingly virulent album.

Dead Transmission Cover   The second track spills a delicious hook straight away, one swiftly joined by the excellent voice of Grogan and a potent rapping of drum skin by Lord. The singer’s bass is also quickly stirring up ears and appetite, its pungent bait a dark temptation within the swinging enterprise of Houston’s fingers and strings. A great mix of restrained and keenly strolling energy, it has an essence of The Peacocks to it though again it is easy to suggest other styles and artists as references to something quite distinct to Graveyard Johnnys.

The album’s title track is next, static caressing ears before majestic and instantly rousing rhythms and riffs ignite body and imagination. Scythes of guitar and an open spillage of attitude soon join the punk bred incitement too, its snare drum rim clicking and thumping beats irresistible and matched in slavery by the constant adventure of inescapable hooks and brawling energy. Again the band keeps things too lively for expectations, its passage another mix of feverish fury and predatory reserve, and simply sensational.

One major highlight passes the passions over to another in the feisty shape of Because Of You, an old school rockabilly stomp with modern tenacity and attitude. It is the kind of song that if Gene Vincent was stomping around in his young leathers now he would be unleashing. It is one minute and a half of pure and spicy rock ‘n’ roll; a description applying to the punk seeded One Day Or Forever and its individual march upon ears and emotions just as easily. Its rhythmic stroll has feet shifting and head bobbing whilst its alluring Bad Religion meets Flogging Molly like melodies and tempting has ears gripped.

     A similar punk fired persuasion colours the next up Ready To Roll, riffs and rhythms instantaneous seduction reinforced by a tenacious enterprise of guitar which at times flirts with a seventies spicing a la Mud/Showaddywaddy, though blink and you miss it as like so many, the song is a busy cauldron of flavours and temptation which has attention solely in its grasp, much like the following pair of I Won’t Wait and Compromise. The first of the two merges raw punk and vintage rock ‘n’ roll resourcefulness for its decades fusing, passions firing riot. It snarls relentlessly, and expels a dirt encrusted breath of predation, but with the throbbing string slaps of Grogan, the hypnotic bait of Lord, and the ear entangling prowess of Houston, the song was never going to be anything other than an epidemic of infectiousness. Its successor swaggers in with its own appetite binding lures as well as the potently confrontational lyrical craft which flows across the whole release as impressively as the sounds. The Living End is an unavoidable comparison to the outstanding song but again the British three create something as unique from as it is similar to any references.

Fair to say by the end of the song the body is weak from the energy given to the insatiable romps within Dead Transmission, and seemingly sensing this Graveyard Johnnys offer Mothers next, a calm acoustic rock ballad with a country rock breath. It is an engaging and increasingly magnetic croon but admittedly before its increasingly lively end, feet and appetite greedily wanted to let loose again which they do with the closing Little Witch. A smog of sonic aggravation and rhythmic intimidation, the punk/ hard rock explosion is the perfect book end to the start of the album, a fiery and tempestuous maelstrom of fiercely flavoured rock ‘n’ roll with a flirtation of melodies and keys to keep things even more fascinating.

It is a blistering end to a thrilling proposition, Graveyard Johnnys at a new peak with songs which tap into every instinctive want of any rock ‘n’ roll fan, a broad genre which just does not get much better than this.

Dead Transmission is available now via Bomber Music @ http://store.bombermusic.com/products/545212-graveyard-johnnys-dead-transmission-cd-or-download or https://graveyard-johnnys.bandcamp.com/releases

http://www.graveyardjohnnys.com/   https://www.facebook.com/graveyardjohnnysUK

RingMaster 13/05/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard on Reputation Radio @ http://www.reputationradio.net

 

Charge – Sweet Lies

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With a band name like Charge, you need a sound with a suitable intensity of energy and boldness to it, and that is exactly what the French metallers provide with debut album Sweet Lies. It is a storming onslaught of voracious and volatile rock ‘n’ roll, a multi-flavoured adventure which might have a few minor issues but provides a seriously exciting and potential soaked incitement. The band has been around since 2004 and have tucked a couple of EPs under their belts but Sweet Lies is their first thick nudge on appetites beyond the Paris and French rock scene, and makes a rousing invitation many will be compelled to eagerly embrace.

Forming around eight years ago, Charge quickly brought out the demo Ain’t My World, recorded with producer Francis Caste (Zuul FX, The ARRS) who returned to work with the band on their first official EP 8 Miles Away in 2009. It is fair to say both as well as a live presence dishing out adrenaline driven and raucously varied metal, brought potent attention and a swiftly growing fan base locally. The band’s line-up has been through a few changes since day one but now with the release of the album, vocalist/rhythm bassist Ravin, guitarist Sacha, drummer Loïc, and lead bassist Lionnel are now looking at broader spotlights to breach. Consisting of the songs from their EP and new tracks produced by Spirou (Bérurier Black), all mixed and mastered by Caste, Sweet Lies opens with a contagious riot and just does not look back.

From the first surge of the initial groove, the album and its opener Alone has ears and imagination hooked. The potent first breath is swiftly a surging torrent of bass riffs, thumping beats, and squalling sonic enticement, a magnetic start soon providing an inescapable onslaught of anthemic bait. Thrash and groove metal collude with heavy rock and punk essences in the now riotous affair, whilst vocally Ravin, though at times a little wayward, just fires up the gripping turbulence further. The union of basses brings a great growl to it all and provides rich depth to song and subsequently album though Charge does not exploit the opportunities they offer enough in some ways. With both openly skilfully played, the band never quite finds the experimental potential explored by for example Morkobot, but it is a dual attack sculpting thick irresistible bait and resourceful adventure as evidenced straight away by Fantasy.

The second song has a much more restrained start but one soaked in menace and predatory intent. The twin prowl of certainly not identical bass provides a bestial and sinisterly charming proposal pierced by the forceful jabs of Loïc and entwined in the just as rabidly delivered and resourcefully crafted sonic laces of guitar. Eventually the controlled stroll succumbs to a brewing intensity, erupting in a ferocious rampage but one easily slipping through the gears in all directions. There is an element of post punk to the colder acidic hooks and of nu-metal in the psyche enslaving devilry, everything coming together for one thrilling stomp.

Both 84 and That’s It keep album and emotions ablaze, the first merging raw elements of pop punk with melodic rock and more whilst turning each flavour into a cauldron of hostile and infectious endeavour. Its successor is even more contagious, bass and guitar grooves aligning with gripping hooks for a flowing tempting within the lure of the other growling almost carnivorous bass and the senses punishing beats. It also spins a weave of melodic and milder tempered exploits which adds to the irresistible romp before making way for the pungent drama and addictiveness of Just Want More. Also as punk as it is metal, Russian band Biting Elbows coming to mind at certain points, the track is a barbarous and wholly catchy incitement on ears and passions, and as the album just increases in potency and persuasion with every listen.

The sheer force and busy assaults of songs does at times hide the individual skill and invention of the band members, but each only impresses and shows a hungry imagination throughout even if, as suggested earlier, they have the potential to explore greater triumphs not quite realised here. With songs like the following One though, there are no complaints just more anticipation of their future. The track is a juggernaut of heavy duty riffs and towering beats insatiably rolling with the handbrake off over the senses. To that vocals scowl and roar with impressive potency whilst tangy grooves and even spicier hooks leap out from every corner and twist of the exceptional infestation of ears and emotions.

The epidemic lure and rampancy of the album continues with its title track, punk metal unleashed with addiction spawning relish and aggression but aligned to searing flames of sonic enterprise and the ever seducing blend of ravenous bass invention. Such the potency of its onslaught, even sitting down and listening to the album’s best song leaves exhaustion in its wake.

Sweet Lies is brought to a fine close by Ain’t My World, the most hostile and raw encounter on the release, though the band is as unpredictable as ever slipping slithers of melodic calm and warm melodic enticing into the hellacious storm with skilled efficiency and effect. It is a striking end to an outstanding release. There is often something familiar to songs with the encounter but as everything it only helps make tracks an adventure in recognising their source and in baiting a thick physical offering from the listener to its temptations.

Charge, if not through Sweet Lies, at some point will not be just a treat for the French to bask in and be battered by, though the invitation from this album really should be checked out now by all.

Sweet Lies is available now @ https://itunes.apple.com/gb/album/sweet-lies/id912217677

http://www.chargerocks.com/   https://www.facebook.com/ChargeRocksBand

RingMaster 13/05/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard on Reputation Radio @ http://www.reputationradio.net

 

LaBrassBanda – Europa

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To support and celebrate the band’s recent UK tour, German nine-piece LaBrassBanda have re-released their acclaimed 14-track album Europa, and if like us you missed it first time around, now is the time to join their compelling festival of sound. Uniting the richest contagious elements of everything from techno to funk, reggae to ska, and punk to alternative rock pop, the Bavarian outfit take ears and imagination on a euro stomp of irresistible creative revelry.

LaBrassBanda was formed in 2007, one of its founders, vocalist/trumpeter Stefan Dettl inspired by the Youngblood Brass Band. With a few line-up changes and an expansion of personnel, the band has persistently ventured across Europe with their sound, becoming renowned for their high energy live performances. As mentioned the band’s sound is bred on styles and flavours as diverse as the different musical backgrounds and tastes of its members. Originally released in 2013, Europa gets a fresh UK concentrated unleashing to accompany their just completed and highly successful tour and before the full complement of trumpeters Jörg Hartl and Korbinian Weber, trombonist Manuel Winbeck, bassist Mario Schönhofer, drummer Manuel Da Coll, percussionist Tobias Weber, tuba player Stefan Huber, and guitarist Fabian Jungreithmayr alongside Dettl hit the festivals of Europe.

The album fires up ears and thoughts straight away with opener Tecno, its sound as you would expect from its title a vibrant enticement for feet and dance-floors aligned to a great throaty shadowing of bass and tuba. The expressive vocals of Dettl are equally low in tone but as magnetic as the flames of brass which flirt with the senses across the relatively restrained but tenacious encounter. Thoughts of eighties bands like Pigbag and Mouth spring up as the song dances with ears before passing the baton of infectiousness over to the following Jacqueline. Immediately more feisty and energetic than its predecessor, the song swings and grooves with a funk bred air and gypsy folk devilry, again body swerves and lively feet the target.

0888837022521     The album hits its pinnacle early with the exceptional Holland, the track a slightly deranged waltz of hip hop tinged vocals and an accompanying mashing of syllables courted by a soundtrack of busy and psyche seducing brass. It is just the start of the fun and lustful persuasion though, a fluid step into a reggae spiced, punk hued romp reminding of bands like Asian Dub Foundation causing pure addiction. A track to bring graveyards alive and lungs exhaustion, the track is pure manna for body and soul. What it is about who knows, being Bavarian illiterate we fail you on that aspect as there is not an English word spoken across the whole album but we are led to believe plenty of songs are about beer, girls and partying.

Schweden next nudges and entices the listener with an electro beat based offering equipped with a potent seduction of bass which blossoms into a sultry croon of brass and melodic persuasion. It also has a whiff of nostalgia, parts of it reminding of Dalek I Love You whilst it’s more feisty and lively exotic catchiness has a sense of Mano Negra to its enterprise. The freely flowing encounter never erupts into a blaze but relentlessly seduces before allowing the agitated adventure of Z’spat Dro to tease and bounce with ears and appetite. A punk tenacity and energy surges through the infectious anthemic romp, think Biting Elbows meets Les Négresses Vertes and you have another treat of a track.

The punchy Nackert with is rock pop croon keeps the energies and thorough enjoyment in top gear whilst Sarajevo takes a gentler but no less enthralling flight across a boldly simmering but reserved scenery of melodic craft. The elegant instrumental has the imagination casting its own travelogue of adventure, brass and guitar providing the colour and rhythms the drama for thought sculpted exploits.

Entering into the second half of the album, Europa evolves into a more evocative and suggestive persuasion than the more forceful devilry of its opening half, though first of all the cosmopolitan soundscape of Frankreich reveals itself as another instrumental with bold rousing hints for ears and thoughts to play with. The colder climate of the melancholically charmed Russland comes next, its slow haunting an immersive caress whilst Western straight after saunters along with a jazz funk smile and brassy mysticism as vocals unite in harmonic, almost shamanic prowess.

Though admittedly there was pining for the outright devilment of a Jacqueline of Holland at this point, the album still has the listener firmly departed from the real world attention wise with each proposal, a success continued with the warm and dark theatre of Griechenland and following that, the folk lined shuffle of Vogerl where that gypsy folk/punk tempting returns to take feet and emotions on another flirtatious dance.

Europa ends with firstly the highly persuasive Opa and lastly the melancholic, funereal like sigh of Hymne, arguably the one time not understanding the spoken narrative is missed, though the wake like reverence of the music explains plenty.

It is fair to say that Europa is easily one of our favourite encounters this year and at times offers songs sparking a lust which borders on illegal. To bring your summer and year to life, if you have not already, time to join the LaBrassBanda festivities we suggest.

Europa is available now via Sony Music/RCA @ https://itunes.apple.com/us/album/europa/id651995604

http://www.labrassbanda.com   https://www.facebook.com/LaBrassBanda

RingMaster 12/05/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard on Reputation Radio @ http://www.reputationradio.net

Min Diesel – Mince

Photo by Lori Wilson.

Photo by Lori Wilson.

Mince, the debut album from Scottish band Min Diesel, is a clash on the senses and for some maybe a car crash as certainly their sound is not going to be an easy fit for many. It is a challenging proposition, and at times has even keen ears unsure but its real potency is in luring back regular attention which shows album and band are doing plenty right.

Aberdeen bred Min Diesel take inspirations from late-80s/early-90s punk, lo-fi and math-rock bands into their abrasing cacophony of sonic enterprise. They are a trio also becoming used to strong support and praise, through a live presence which has seen the band play with the likes of Errors, Acoustic Ladyland, Joan of Arc, Johnny Foreigner, Playlounge, Tuff Love, Hot Club de Paris, Sky Larkin, and Paws since forming in 2009 and a clutch of EPs. Two splits with Sidca and Pinact respectively in 2013 lured potent acclaim whilst last year’s Puzzle & Activity EP gave an enticing teaser to Min Diesel’s debut album now uncaged and prowling the psyche.

The threesome of Zippy, Stu, and David state inspirations come from the likes of Fugazi, Pavement, and Shellac whilst others have compared the band to artists such as Dinosaur Jr. and Stapleton. They are all understandable references though you can add many others, for us at times thoughts of Pere Ubu emerging in certain places across Mince. Equally though there is a freshness to the band’s sound which puts them at least one step aside of the crowd. Opener War Band swiftly entangles the senses in a healthy scrub of guitar and thumping beats, their union with the throaty lure of bass a magnetic invitation for ears and attention. The vocals come from within the thick mesh of sound, laying deeper in their textures than expected but working enjoyably as contagion brews within the enjoyable encounter. A searing spearing of guitar erupts in its closing moments, its acidic aggression imposing and magnetic as the track leaves with impact.

a2445096622_10   The following Pagan Pageant opens with a folkish air and quaint melody wrapped in caustic ambience, the blend further coloured by raw and often wandering vocals. Slightly deranged and openly wrong-footing, the song swings from good to not sure regularly but already there is that captivation at play meaning you want to indulge in its confusion and incitement again and again in response to its increasing persuasion. Next up Trail of T-Shirts is a more immediate tempting but also reveals stronger enticing over listens. Sharp hooks and spoiled melodies provide an appealing enticement whilst the energetic rhythms quickly bait ears and appetite, but it is the delicious discord coating the clang which steals the passions, another mighty aspect across the release backed as here by potent guitar craft and rhythmic juggling.

Kirk Session reveals a mellow though no less concussive quality to songwriting and sound next, the band casting a jarring croon of sound and vocal prowess which again will work for some and not others whilst Down on the Green straight after, goes for a more predatory intent for its pop rock cacophony. The bass discovers a bestial growl over which voice and guitar dance with brash yet warm resourcefulness. As it continues the track seems to turn a little mellower though ears are still resonating to the sonic jangle and rhythmic confrontation by its close.

The album hits its high spot with the next trio of tracks, starting with the virulent swagger of dB where again the bass is wonderfully bestial against the melodic ferocity around it. The song emerges like a tart mix of Swell Maps and Asylums though there is also a strong whiff of Josef K and very early Orange Juice to the encounter, all spicing adding to the invention of the best track upon Mince, though it is quickly challenged by Last Bus (Emm Es Bee ). The new encounter sways whilst caressing ears with citric melodies and a tangy sonic tempting, musically playing like a raw lemon on the tongue, making the senses pucker at its touch but sparking a hunger for more. Again though, it is the inventive discord trespasses which steal the show, adding greater intensity and weight to the thrilling croon.

Another song which half thrills but leaves questions in its wake, Musskulls is a psyche pop/noise rock tangle of sound and ideation. It twists and turns through coherent and deranged scenery with seamless and ultimately enticing adventure though vocally something goes a little astray. That said without finding the same spark as the last two songs, it still engages ears and thoughts forcibly and as the album grows with every listen.

Mince is brought to a close by firstly the volatile energy and aggression of Bastards, an encounter with a catchy melodic spine of infectiousness, and finally North-East Soul, a dark and raw serenade which sparkles with the Scottish lilt of the vocals, the first time the accent really comes into play within the album. Stray twangs and off kilter noise add to the drama and lure of the enthralling end to the encounter, the band almost exploring improvisation with sonic relish across the turbulent landscape.

We are on safe ground suggesting that Mince will not be a tasty offering for all but it is a release which needs time and focus to explore and come to terms with; for us as an example, it making an ok first impression but with regular engagement turning into a vat of increasing persuasion and thorough enjoyment.

Mince is available now via Struggletown in association with AlbTwo Records and Cool Yr Jets digitally and on Ltd Edition 12” cream or red/white vinyl @ http://mindiesel.bandcamp.com/

https://www.facebook.com/pages/Min-Diesel/122142337808269

RingMaster 12/05/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard on Reputation Radio @ http://www.reputationradio.net

David Sinclair Four – 4

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The fourth album from David Sinclair and the first with his band as a quartet, 4 is one of those encounters which makes a decent first proposal and then with increasing tenacity continues to endear itself to ears and thoughts over time. The David Sinclair Four release contains ten varied and highly flavoursome slices of rock ‘n’ roll which spring from a blues rock seeding but never restrict their enterprise to any single musical colour. Equally there is a feel good factor which fuels songs looking at and springing from the diverse culture of the artist’s home, London; the result of all essences together being one enjoyable proposition.

The current band line-up came together in 2013, bassist Jos Mendoza and guitarist Geoff Peel linking up with vocalist/guitarist Sinclair and his drummer son Jack, their addition turning the David Sinclair Trio into the David Sinclair Four. Before this the band had already released a trio of acclaimed albums in the shape of Hey (2006), Threewheeling (2008), and Take Me There (2013). Live too the band has been a greedily devoured proposal and list playing with the likes of Wilko Johnson, the Oli Brown Band, Marcus Bonfanti, Johnny Dowd, Graham Bonnet, and Willie Nile amongst many on their CV. Now the four-piece are setting about bringing the summer a healthy stroll of rock to swagger along through their new album, a release easy to see following its predecessors in drawing the plaudits.

The album opens with Sick Of Being Good and an initial potent caress of guitar to awaken ears. Imagination is swiftly stirred too by a subsequent sturdier stroll of energy and sound led by an infectiously enticing hook. The song continues to lure in appetite and attention with its blues hued catchiness and David’s vocals, backed well by the band. There are few surprises in the song but plenty to get hungry teeth into with an expressive guitar invention, warm harmonies, and colourful enterprise shaping every twist of the song.

The strong start is matched by the following treat of The Click-Clack Man. The tale about a character on the search to meet I am led to believe Tom Waits; the song has a seductive swing and resourceful adventure to its quickly enslaving presence. Hooks and grooves create an inescapable web to which a deliciously roving darkly toned bassline and crisply swung beats add further drama and temptation. The song is irresistible to feet and emotions, the biggest highlight on the album though often rivalled.

The sultry blues climate of next up Life Gone Cold brings further variety to the album, its slow saunter equipped with fiery flames of guitar and emotive intensity. It does not have the spark of the first two songs though but with again mouth-watering guitar craft and potent rhythmic bait alongside straight-forward and easily accessible lyrics, ears held easily before being excited again by Crude Emotion. Rhythmically muscular and casting a heavy stride from its first breath, the song is another unveiling of contagion posing as grooves and hooks. The swing of its body is an incitement to physical participation and the funk infused chorus bait to a vocal union, as band and track create another major moment within 4.

The excellent Down By The Canal comes next, and swiftly transfixes as the excellent guest vocals of Maxi Priest flirt with ears alongside the tones of David. The song’s reggae hued scenery is just as magnetic, drawing a swift smile with its engaging revelry before making way for the blues smoulder of World Turns Around. The harmonica of Paul Jones, another guest on the album, is a spicy flirtation matched by the fiery craft and sounds uncaged by Peel as the song swerves with the persuasion of a temptress within ears. Both tracks entice and reward enjoyably whilst providing further fresh textures and creative ventures within the album.

The remainder of the album for personal tastes does not quite match up to what comes before, though songs like The Illness & The Cure and Give Me A Rose which follow, only provide easy to consume and enjoy offerings with their individual blues rock spiced ventures. They just do not have the extra ingredient to ignite these particular ears, feeling a little flat against the quality sounds earlier in the release. It will obviously not be the same for everyone though and there is nothing less than enjoyment gained from the tracks or the closing pair of Coming Out Of The Rain and Coming Off The Rails, they also strong and enjoyable encounters but again just do not have that extra ingredient found in other songs upon the album. The penultimate song sees David dueting with Lorna Reid, who also co-wrote the song, their union another flavoursome delight, whilst the closing song again embraces the vibrant flair of Paul Jones.

The bottom-line though is that 4 is one highly satisfying and at times addictive encounter, David Sinclair and co’s finest moment yet and a definite recommendation for blues rock ‘n’ roll fans with an appetite for others like Paul Weller, The Rolling Stones, The Kinks and especially on the guitar and blues side, Seasick Steve.

4 is available now via IRL @ http://irl.bigcartel.com/product/david-sinclair-four-4 and on most online stores.

https://www.facebook.com/DavidSinclairFour   http://www.davidsinclairfour.com/

RingMaster 12/05/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard on Reputation Radio @ http://www.reputationradio.net