Introducing Reverse Family

RF_RingMasterReview

Ever had that dream where an insect invades the ear and sets up home to mercilessly tease and torment thereon in? If so, a form of similar reality is about to be unleashed as the Reverse Family step forward to announce themselves with a sound which trespasses and festers in the psyche. The difference is that this is set to be the most welcome invasion of ears as it crawls with relish into the imagination.

Reverse Family is the solo project of Walmington-on-Sea resident Dermot Illogical, better known as Andreas Vanderbraindrain, the frontman of British band The Tuesday Club. Aided by a fluid band of collaborators from time to time, the new offering from Dermot is a lo-fi exploration into an experimental DIY web of sounds and flavours which is hard to pin down but certainly embraces everything from post punk and noise pop to indie and old school punk.

The RingMaster Review had the honour and pleasure to be the first to hear the tracks set to make up My Songs About Life Mid Crisis, the debut album from Reverse Family which is not due until next year through Perfect Pop Co-op but makes the ideal introduction to the new proposition so we thought we would share our findings within its dementedly addictive lures.

The first song we came up against was Alchopoppers on Fast Food, a brief and gentle yet deviously engaging song which instantly entices thoughts of seventies bands like Swell Maps and The Shapes but with the melodic natures of The Freshies. It is captivating stuff even with a drop into calmer waters which does not quite connect with personal tastes. We are not sure of the album’s track order but if this is to be the opener it provides a potent start though the brilliant Way It Goes is an even bigger pull. Carrying an early Adam and The Ants feel to its magnetic stroll, the song is pure addiction with a funk revelry bubbling under its pop punk surface, Dermot as vocally mischievous as the guitar led sounds around him.

art_RingMasterReviewThere is great variety to the songs too; Bit Slits for example flirting with the senses through keys which manage to sound like the brass flames of Essential Logic while guitar and vocals veer towards the Nikki Sudden school of discord blessed minimalistic seduction while Electronic 6 entangles portentous keys and winy guitars with fuzzy vocals for a Dalek I Love You/Artery scented melancholy. It is fair to say that Dermot wears influences openly yet each song develops its own distinct character under often familiar hues.

Hand of God has a darker and meatier nature to its predacious swing, contagious hooks and a great grumbling bassline aligning with melodic enterprise for a proposal which swiftly grips ears and appetite; a success just as easily won by the lively pop bounce of One Eyed, a seemingly early Television Personalities seeded encounter and the hypnotic I Can Sense Their Watching Eyes. This too has a flavour of Dirk Wears White Sox to it but with funky beats and another irresistible post punk guitar jangle in its off kilter dub teased shuffle, the track blossoming into another unique proposition within My Songs About Life Mid Crisis.

Other tracks in the mix are Business or Pleasure, a delicious song which sounds like Weezer soaping The Piranhas while recording it all in the bath, The Legend of Pierre with its haunting keys wrapped sultry croon, and Odd Mix Newgates, a seductive magnetic monotone tone spawned track surely inspired by Mark E. Smith.

The collection of tracks are completed by Higher Power with plaintive melodies and dour yet emotionally suggestive vocals and the outstanding May Number 10 Dream which again hints at bands like The Fall, Marc Riley and The Creepers, and The Mekons, as well as the criminally catchy Sods Law. Hips and feet beware as even in its low key nature it will have you swinging in an instant.

There are so many highlights offered by the Reverse Family songs; each track connecting with an ever eager hunger for punk fuelled, post punk spiced imagination. Plastic Punks epitomises this perfectly, its Fire Engines toned melodic jangle and Spizzenergi devilry sheer temptation again emerging as something specific to Reverse Family.

With a tongue in cheek lining to the lyrical reflection shaping songs which spreads into the music itself, Reverse Family is a beguiling adventure with a nod to the past and a grip on an imagination as fresh as it is, well quite simply a touch loco.

As mentioned My Songs About Life Mid Crisis is due for release next April but it is never too soon to get into something this craftily tasty.

http://reversefamily.co.uk

https://www.facebook.com/reversefamily/

Pete RingMaster 07/11/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Yugal – Chaos & Harmony

Yugal_RingMasterReview

We have had a little bit of a wait for their debut album, having been impressed and increasingly hooked on the Yugal sound through previous EP Enter the Madness, but anticipation has been forcibly rewarded by one richly enjoyable confrontation in the shape of Chaos & Harmony.

Carrying an organic continuation of their earlier sound but with the more unique surprises and elements its predecessors lacked, Chaos & Harmony is a fierce and imposing tapestry of contrasting and conflicting textures spun from the seeds of hardcore, death, and thrash metal. Its sound reflects the disparity yet balance suggested by the album’s title and the band’s Tibetan language derived name, both a representation of “the concept of universal duality” where two antagonistic constituents are indivisible.

Hailing from Vannes in Brittany, the 2010 formed Yugal lured awareness the following year with the demo From Pain to Pleasure before six track EP Illusion of Time two years later sparked concentrated attention upon the quartet which Enter The Madness reinforced and pushed on in 2014. The time between EP and album has seen the band hone their sound and songwriting to new heights and though at times it feels like Yugal are still on the way to rather than having found their final sound, Chaos & Harmony has replaced any ‘deficiencies’ before with a new individual and fresh forged imagination boldness.

The album opens with the gorgeous enticement of Khamsin, a Middle Eastern flavoured lure of guitar within seconds leading a seduction equally hinting at the entangling musical dissidence to come. The instrumental’s melodic romance and exotic charms are courted by shadows and the portentous thump of anthemic beats; a union which entices but with an element of intimidation before Once Upon a Lie rises up to consume ears with rapacious riffs and bludgeoning rhythms. Wiry grooves are soon entangling the song as the throbbing bait of the bass grips ears as potently as the throaty growl of vocalist Guillaume. A commanding fusion of death and thrash, the song is quickly a potent proposal but truly comes into its own as suggestive melodies and psychotic twists begin to emerge; each more glimpses than song changing elements but all adding drama and unpredictability to the song.

cover_RingMasterReviewHeavy Mental follows devouring the senses with vicious riffs and senses whipping beats as grooves taunt and the bass subsequently spins its own threat loaded magnetic dance. Drops into reserved but more predatory passages surprise and thrill as too the variety of voice and melodic enterprise; it all an absorbing web spun again by From This Day I Will Rise in its own individual design. Opening with a Breed 77 like coaxing, again as exotic as it is welcoming, the song looms up around that continuing lure with a wall of imposing rhythms and grouchy riffs. It is a threat which never fully lands but evolves into an invasive and invigorating trespass again still cored by the Eastern elegance and mystique the track started with.

From one superb offering to another as Dogma prowls and taunts the senses; its muscular rhythms and choleric intensity almost bestial but again an aggressor on a leash which allows clarity to the elements within and their infectious union. A further momentary pull on its reins allows a calmer attack opens the flood gates to thrash inspired riffs and an energy which alone invades and excites, though that in turn only leads to another twist in the song’s mercurial and relentlessly impressing landscape.

The imagination and cantankerous aggression already lighting the album continues as Illusion of Time stalks and flies at the listener with open fury, though a respite from the enterprising hostility is forthcoming through the brief instrumental Interlude. A close relation and in many ways continuation of the opener and an echo of the melodic beauty lying within the tempest of the previous track, it seduces ears and imagination before they are again under siege, this time from the barbarous attack of Silence is Golden. It too is an uncompromising tapestry woven with animosity and a virulent catchiness which is as venomous as it is addictive; each further bound in spicy melodic strands.

Another stirring moment within Chaos & Harmony, its quality and success is matched by the punk infused Lost Mind, the band’s hardcore influences at their most vocal but sublimely countered by the wires of Eastern promise which circle them and the variety of vocal imagination, something the band should definitely explore more ahead.

The album’s title track closes up Chaos & Harmony, a proposition which more than lives up to its name in tone and sound as it relentlessly courses through ears. Raw and rugged it ensures the album leaves with force and though it does not live up to what came before, the song  confirms Yugal as a band coming of age and ready to grant global attention.

Chaos & Harmony is out now on iTunes and through other stores.

https://www.facebook.com/Yugalofficial

Pete RingMaster 07/12/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Scorching Winter – Victim

scorching-winter_RingMasterReview

They may have started out with a hard rock sound and be tagged as such still but Australian band Scorching Winter confirm on new album Victim that their music works from a much broader palette of flavours. Strands from progressive and heavy rock to gothic and melodic metal are woven into a sound and release which may not always be the most unique but is persistently fresh and marks the Melbourne quintet out from the female-fronted rock crowd.

Formed in 2012, Scorching Winter released their first pair of singles, Leap and One You Left Behind the following year building on their awareness earning success with subsequent single The Change. 2015 saw the release of the band’s first EP Peripheral and the first signs of a broader body and imagination to the Scorching Winter sound, an evolution in full swing within Victim.

Victim is an eight track concept album about “a girl who is raped and beaten by a group of men but was saved by a demon who gives her powers to get revenge. However, nothing ever comes for free as she would later find out.” Divided into eight chapters, it opens up with The Six Headed Beast and an innocence graced keys cast melody. A portentous atmosphere brews around it, perpetually growing as the narrative unfolds and rhythms bring their predatory threat. In full flow as the chase is on, riffs and beats impose and trespass the senses, venomous melodic strands of guitar adding to the fear carrying drama led by those rapacious rhythms amidst which, a bass threateningly grumbles. The swiftly impressing tones of Konstantina Papadimitriou temper the darkness but act as a uncomfortable spotlight on the transgression within the song. Ending as gently as it starts but this time soaked in angelic melancholy and pain, the track is an excellent start to the album, a lingering moment which sets the atmosphere for the whole release.

art_RingMasterReviewOn Hands and Knees follows bringing demonic support as the guitar of Rafael Katigbak casts another suggestive web over ears backed by the dramatic touch and beauty of Natalie Bellio’s keys. The bass of Glenn Treasure adds its heavy emotion to the emerging song as the beats of Nick James land with firm restraint, Papadimitriou’s voice and words echoing the despondency and also the hint of a fight back beginning to be nurtured within the girl. With rising crescendos of rigour and inner anger, the track blossoms into a tapestry of melodic and emotive enterprise, its varied textures bringing new essences to spark the imagination before From the Ashes realises that hinted at defiant heart with tenacious grooves and senses resonating rhythms. The infectious melodic prowess of voice and guitar make an easy recruitment of ears as keys imaginatively sigh and the bass prowls. Light and dark, submissive and aggressive, the track is a snare of creative drama providing a new high point for the album.

Through the predacious cinematic fight back of The Hunt and the reflective repose of Hiding in the Shadows, album and story continues to entice ears and inspire the imagination; the array of inventive textures and flavours involved in the two songs alone as potent and impressing as the instrumentation involved in bringing powerful songwriting to life. The second of the two is especially impressive, almost majestic in its character and composition to eclipse those around it.

Wrath follows, demonic tones opening the piece within another dark climate before the track uncages a consuming surf of riffs and rhythms; venom seeping from every texture within the metal bred tempest as the melodic beauty of Papadimitriou incites the senses. As its protagonist is nagged by the devil, so the senses are by the surging body of the song with its constant tide skilfully ebbing and flowing with variable intensity. As its predecessor, the track is creative theatre as lyrically enthralling as it is musically striking.

The album is completed by firstly Devil in the Mirror, another suggestively cinematic piece with Bond/cold war espionage spiced melodies sold with acoustic beauty, and finally My Gift, My Curse, where acceptance of the girl’s two faced fate is potently cast by keys and guitar alone. With a Celtic touch to its already enthralling character, the song is a fine end to a thoroughly enjoyable encounter.

Though it is a striking proposition on the first couple of listens, Victim only grows and blossoms overtime. It is not the perfect release, what is, but any issues soon pale against its open qualities and an imagination within the band as ripe as the sounds it inspires. Victim is a formidably promising debut album from a band which can only ascend to bigger and bolder heights.

Victim is out now across most online stores and @ https://scorchingwinter.bandcamp.com/album/victim-2

https://www.facebook.com/ScorchingWinter/   http://www.scorchingwinter.com/

Check out our interview with guitarist @ https://ringmasterreviewintroduces.wordpress.com/2016/10/14/beauty-and-the-thorn-exploring-scorching-winter/

Pete RingMaster 07/12/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Camel Of Doom – Terrestrial

camel-of-doom-promo-shot_RingMasterReview

Already working on their next album for uncaging next year, British progressive doomsters Camel Of Doom have just re-released fourth album Terrestrial, which came out earlier this year as a limited release. A ravenously invasive and emotionally corrosive affair carrying an inescapable magnetism, Terrestrial is another step forward in the evolution of the band’s sound and bold creativity.

Officially formed back in 2001 by the then 13 year old Kris Clayton, Camel Of Doom released a series of rough EPs before debut album, The Desert At Night, was unveiled in 2003. Recruiting some schoolmates, Clayton took the band onto the live scene before recording a second album which was subsequently released in 2008. Before then the band had already shown signs of slowing, little activity appearing from them as the decade came to a close. It was a time though seeing Clayton honing his songwriting and craft as well as becoming a member of Esoteric.

2011 saw the release of an EP of freshly recorded versions of tracks originally upon The Night After Time. Mixed by Esoteric frontman Greg Chandler, it provided the spark for multi-instrumentalist Clayton to re-ignite the project and work on a third album. Psychodramas: Breaking the Knots of Twisted Synapse came out in 2012; co-engineered and mixed as each album since the previous EP by Chandler and an encounter bred from the psych/prog/doom exploration its creator had been aiming for since the project’s first breath. For its successor, Clayton doubled the Camel Of Doom line-up with bassist Simon Whittle and in time session drummer Thomas Vallely (Lychgate, Omega Centuri) was enlisted as the following album was being written. In 2015 drummer Ben Nield came in just as fourth album Terrestrial was completed and the band’s live presence was re-activated, though the three became and remained two as Whittle left the band soon after it hit stages again.

camel-of-doom-cover-artwork_RingMasterReviewAs mentioned Terrestrial now gets its broader release with the band working on its successor. The album works as individual trespasses of the senses or as one complete physical and mental consumption, the latter our preferred assault. Opener Cycles (The Anguish of Anger) sets the scene and tone of the release; its melodic and atmospheric presence melancholic and haunting while its rhythmic touch is intensive. Clayton’s vocals are as emotively harrowing and imposing as the emotionally bruising weight of the funereal toned and moving track, yet throughout the sinew wielded beats of Vallely and grievous breath of Whittle’s bass incite a magnetism alone which infests as Clayton weaves with guitar and keys.

The brief melancholy soaked instrumental of A Circle Has No End pulls the imagination into the waiting jaws of Pyroclastic Flow next, the track embracing the melodic coaxing of its predecessor in its electronically rimmed cauldron of emotional venting and sonic devouring. The outstanding track quickly swallows the senses; invading and ravaging them with its creative ire whilst brewing virulence as contagious as it is predacious and just irresistible whether storming ears or crowding them with bestial sludgy rancor.

Through the mercurially venomous Singularity ears and imagination are further seared and ignited. It is a similarly dangerously catchy slab of creative and emotion flooded enmity, Clayton revelling in his prowess at fusing heavy and darker textures, cancerous and hope gifted essences united in one compelling invasion. Vocally he matches the sounds around him, guttural poison aligning with cleaner throated roars before another major highlight within Terrestrial makes way for the distorted sonic limbo of Nine Eternities.

The near on twelve minutes of Euphoric Slumber provides a testing magnetic proposal straight after. With the steely throes of bass and keys throbbing and pulsating through its portentous prowl, the track explores the depths of it and the listener’s psyche before unexpectedly dropping into a sonic wasteland. That desolate calm springs a lone, sepulchral melody soon skirted by the rhythmic incitement of Vallely as a godforsaken atmosphere brews and intensifies. It is an absorbing, senses violating affair matched by the even more extensive examination and length of Sleeper Must Awaken. Raw and drawing on the broadest array of styles and flavours yet on the album, the track rapaciously grows with each passing minute casting a fiercely provocative and emotionally torturous yet often sonically beautiful landscape throughout.

Concluded by the suggestive beauty of the sonically cast desert Extending Life, Expanding Consciousness, the demanding and rewarding Terrestrial leaves senses and emotions ringing and pleasure rampant. There is much more to the album’s sound than even the psych, prog, doom tag suggests yet an appetite for either will find a treat in Camel Of Doom and certainly this exhaustingly fine proposition.

Terrestrial is out now through all stores and @ https://camelofdoom.bandcamp.com/album/terrestrial

https://www.facebook.com/camelofdoom  http://www.camelofdoom.com/

Pete RingMaster 06/12/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Crooked Eye Tommy – Butterflies & Snakes

CET_RingMasterReview

Sparking eager attention and acclaim with its release in the US last year, the debut album from Ventura, California hailing Crooked Eye Tommy has set about finding the same in the UK in 2016 and such its eclectic charm and seductive prowess, it is hard not to see Butterflies & Snakes finding matching success.

Created by blood brothers Tommy and Paddy Marsh, Crooked Eye Tommy shares a spicy melodic spell of a sound cast in the elements of heart driven blues and smoky southern rock. As their first album reveals though, it conjures songs embracing an array of flavours and moods too, all essentially seductive and emotively impassioned. Butterflies & Snakes itself is a smoke filled, liquor scented room of creatively wily romances, hip swinging enticements, and spirit rousing encounters which even one without the instinctive appetite for their kind of temptation cannot fail to get a kick out of.

With Hammond organist/saxophonist Bill Bilhou, bassist Samuel Correa, and drummer Josh Herbst alongside vocalist/guitarist Tommy and guitarist Paddy, Crooked Eye Tommy open up proceedings on the album with a track bearing the band’s name. Crooked Eye Tommy straight away entices with woozy grooves, guitars aligning their individual tonics as rhythms slowly but boldly stroll through the swiftly intoxicating proposal, one only blossoming further as Tommy’s tones join the affair.

Unsurprising yet fully magnetic, the song makes a potent start for an album which only continues to enjoyably smoulder and pleasure as the excellent Come On In next shares its sultry blues before I Stole the Blues provides a molten blues persuasion weaving openly familiar hues into something fresh and relentlessly captivating .The first of the pair offers a haze of guitar and keys around the clearer and similarly potent lure of a moodily inviting bassline and crisp beats while the second is nostalgia and imagination in one sweltering seducing, each sharing a fine wine of melodic rhapsody and sax heat.

art_RingMasterReviewTime Will Tell follows and soon has ears and appetite engaged in a Hammond spun romancing alone, a lure only built upon by the dazzling guitar craft on offer from the Marsh boys. It is a recipe repeated in its own design by the slow saunter of Tide Pool and though neither track quite catches personal tastes as fully as those before them both only spark full enjoyment before After the Burn forcibly hits the spot with its hip enticing stroll. It is one of those encounters which feet and bodies instinctively move to as ears feast on highly persuasive vocal and melodic endeavour.

The track forms part of the pinnacle of the album, Somebody’s Got to Pay offering the next moment as sizzling sax and serenading guitars join in on another commandingly addictive and energetically catchy affair for ears and passions. Increasingly magnetic, it sets up the more humid climate of Love Divine, a track involving a stronger melodic rock ingredient in its highly satisfying melodic ramble before the outstanding Mad and Disgusted strolls in with fifties scented blues ‘n’ roll to take best song honours. Drawing on early rock ‘n’ roll and country lined honky tonk blues, the irresistible song simply kisses the sweet spot as it pleasures the senses.

Concluded by the increasingly entrancing and melodically woozy Over and Over and finally Southern Heart, a song wearing its sound on its sleeve to reflect its title, Butterflies & Snakes thoroughly pleasures. True to tell, classic blues is not a flavour we find ourselves drawn to naturally but in embracing it Crooked Eye Tommy offers plenty to only get a keen taste for.

Butterflies & Snakes is available now through CDBaby and iTunes.

http://crookedeyetommy.com/   https://www.facebook.com/CrookedEyeTommy

Pete RingMaster 06/12/2016
Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Annisokay – Devil May Care

annisokay-devil-may-care_RingMasterReview

With attention increasingly being drawn their way, German metallers Annisokay have just released third album Devil May Care, a release which rumbles and roars in ears demanding attention. The successor to their acclaimed 2015 full-length Enigmatic Smile, a release following an equally well-received debut in the shape of The Lucid Dream[er] a year earlier, Devil May Care is a rousing and tempestuous beast as at home casting ferocious confrontation as it is sharing melodic and harmonic enterprise.

Creating a sound spun from the heart of metalcore and post hardcore with just as rich rock and electronic flavours involved, the Halle/Leipzig hailing quintet has grown from a national roar to an eagerly welcomed European proposal, the success of their albums and tours across the likes of Austria, Switzerland, France, Russia, and the UK proof. Now it is Devil May Care looking at expanding the band’s presence and sound, a result the release certainly achieves with the latter if still driven by their familiar yet persistently unpredictable sound.

The album opens up with Loud, a track which initially shimmers but soon breeds a scuzzy dose of guitar before catching light with primal rhythms, romancing keys, and riffs which infest the senses. There is no escaping a Rammstein edge to the crowd roars and intensive examination but as the growls of Dave Grunewald shares the platform with the clean tones of Christoph Wieczorek, the song soon takes on its own persona and continues to tempt and ignite the senses. The rhythmic animosity of bassist Norbert Rose and drummer Nico Vaeen is as direct and uncompromising as the throat scarring shouts of Grunewald but perfectly tempered by the harmonic caresses of Wieczorek and the melodic enterprise and sonic ferocity escaping his and Philipp Kretzschmar’s guitars.

The following What’s Wrong also makes a gentle entrance which needs little time to catch aflame as keys and grooves collude  within another rhythmic/riff led onslaught. It too is a passing moment as warmer lures wash ears with matching vocals, but it too becomes a relatively fleeting passage in the revolving landscape of the swiftly infectious encounter. The mix and contrasts of vocals is not surprising these days in caustic metal but works a treat and is emulated in the imaginative textures within the ferocious intensity devouring air and listener.

Featuring Northlane vocalist Marcus Bridge, next up Smile quickly commands ears and imagination. Its initial melodic coaxing is as suggestive as the rapier like thrusts of the grouchy rhythms and harmonic union aside the lusty scowls of Grunewald which follows; their tempting sprung within a carnivorous tide of riffs and djent spiced rabidity. Twisting and turning with increasing virulence, the track is superb, a rousing and dementedly addictive affair as prone to melodic seducing as rancorous trespasses.

Through the haunting drama of D.O.M.I.N.A.N.C.E, another thrilling dichotomy of melodic temperance and punishingly inhospitable attitude in sound and intent, band and album devour as they ignite an even greedier appetite for the release while the mellower but still volatile fire of Blind Lane leaves ears more than satisfied. The second of the two does fail to live up to the creative drama and unpredictability of its predecessors but provides plenty to be wholly engaged in before Thumbs Up, Thumbs Down uncages its own maelstrom of mercurial incitement as ravenous as it is melodically tempting. Aggressive and invasive it surely is yet it also shows Annisokay songs to be as catchy as they are challenging and with the guest appearance of Christoph von Freydorf from Emil Bulls, offers another eventful and magnetic proposal.

Both Hourglass and Photographs have body and imagination firmly held, the fierce yet enchanting first with its poetic melodies and angst fuelled vocals and the second through its volcanic nature. Each again only please though the latter is another lacking the more unique essences of others around it to shine as impressively for personal tastes while after them Gold is a maze of twisted grooves and hungry riffs driven by biting rhythms but equally a beacon of harmonic and melodic elegance around an electronic heartbeat.

Concluded by the mercurial theatre and roar of The Last Planet, the initially impressing Devil May Care only grows in stature with every passing listen. You could say there is a similarity between many tracks within the release, a surface familiarity but it is countered by the fresh revelations found within its inventively layered tracks once given closer attention. The enjoyment found with it also leaves any shortcomings, of which there are few, an ever diminishing essence.

Devil May Care will be released through SPV / Longbranch as a Limited Box-Set, CD Digipak, Vinyl Version (incl. CD), and Download.

http://www.annisokay.com/    https://www.facebook.com/annisokay/

Pete RingMaster 30/11/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Arcade Messiah – III

john-bassett-promo_RingMasterReview

This past week saw Arcade Messiah unveil its third album in as many years, each a November treat instantly challenging thoughts on best of year nominations.  III is a mighty continuation of that trend, a release where imagination might not be rampant in its title but in its kaleidoscope of suggestive sound and inventive flavours, it simply ignites ears and thoughts.

Arcade Messiah is the solo project of Sligo based songwriter/multi-instrumentalist/producer John Bassett, the founder and driving force of the outstanding UK band KingBathmat. It is a true solo effort with every detail the imagination, creation, and work of Bassett, all apart from the art of III which sprung from the craft of Michael Kerbow. Arcade Messiah has persistently taken ears through a myriad of sonic and powerfully evocative landscapes, pushing the union of creator and listener’s imaginations to new heights. III unsurprisingly is no different to its predecessor, exploring a new depth in textures and invention which just lights up mind and spirit.

To simplify things, Bassett weaves his music from the merger of everything from post and stoner rock to doom, sludge, and metal doom. It is still a narrow description of his sound which defies labels yet openly embraces inspirations whilst turning them into something inescapably unique to Arcade Messiah. Like a melodic siren with the growl and intensity of a bear, his instrumental endeavours to date have fascinated and consumed ears and mind alike; III as mentioned does not deviate from that success. It is though, the heaviest, most compelling and exhilarating offering from the man yet. Across six tracks, the album is creatively ravenous, melodically seductive, and often emotionally irritable and quite bewitching.

It opens up with Revolver, a prowling slice of heavy metal with an air of Sabbath to it which is soon entangling ears in a net of melodic and sonic intrigue. Rhythms barge through the maze of sound, imposing on the senses with poise and aggression as guitars weave their web. The first surprise is the sudden expulsion of vocals from Bassett, they more a texture than an attention stealer but carrying a clarity as ripe and potent as the cauldron of sounds around them. Simultaneously confrontational and welcoming, the track continues to disturb and beguile like a dramatic carousel.

It is a glorious start swiftly backed by the bestial presence of Citadel, a lumbering slab of crawling doom which looms up over the senses, submerging them in its sludgy tar before veins of melodic enterprise and emotive grace wrap around body and imagination. Dark and dangerous, alluring and captivating, the song gets under the skin and into the psyche; its aural scenery an irresistible adventure to navigate and explore.

arcade-messiah-iii-album-cover_RingMasterReviewAt over ten minutes, Deliverance is an epic proposal which devours time with its craft and magnetism. From a gentle opening as warm as it is melancholic with guitars and keys entwining with earthbound celestial beauty, the piece brews a darker side. Striding rhythms are the first deceptive shadow, again a sure invitation with a portentous edge though their threat merely simmers for its first third. Eventually though there is no holding back the energy and intensity of the skirting shadows, their fiery eruption the spark to a lava flow of melody and carnivorous energy. It is impossible not to get lost in the depths and suggestiveness of the track, the imagination casting its pictures and tales as the track continues to ebb and flow in touch and creative fire, perpetually burning its presence into appetite and spirit while captivating with its variety of attack.

It is impossible to pick a best track, all providing unique aspects and characters to immerse in, but the song certainly makes a highly persuasive argument as too its successor Life Clock. Washing over the senses with its space rock like atmosphere and fertile layers courted by the dark lures of bass and beats, the track is another femme fatale resembling encounter luring ears onto its ravenous rhythmic rocks and predacious intensity which lay in wait as the track builds its apocalyptic climax.

Once consumed, the song makes way for the Hades like realm of Black Tree; another predatory piece which stalks and infests with a seductive prowess as powerful as its acrimonious side, both having their moments to make their case across the outstanding trespass. Of course this and every track will inspire a scenario and emotion unique to the individual, one of the many glorious aspects of the Arcade Messiah tapestries.

III closes with the relative calm and peace of Sanctuary, though it too has tempestuousness to its heart and touch which only fires up the senses and imagination as Bassett casts another canvas of melodic suggestion, sonic rabidity, and all that lies between.

III is glorious, a riveting slice of aural alchemy which should not surprise considering the strength and prowess of its creator and predecessors but does at every twist and turn. Time to take another look at those End Of Year lists folks.

III is out now on Stereohead Records @ https://arcademessiah.bandcamp.com

http://www.arcademessiah.com   http://www.kingbathmat.com   http://www.johnbassettmusic.com   https://www.facebook.com/arcademessiah/

Pete RingMaster 30/11/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright