Peekaboo Primate – Misanthropical

PP_RingMasterReview

Bedlam suggests an element of chaos to its madness, an uncontrolled essence which certainly does not fit the character of Misanthropical, the new album from Finnish alternative metallers Peekaboo Primate. Yet in every other way the word best describes the creative diversity and inventive loco of the band’s irresistible incitement. The release holds ten tracks which twist and turn like a kinetically sonic kaleidoscope weaving an eclectic array of flavours into their own distinct imagination fuelled escapades.

Peekaboo Primate is like the joker in the pack of modern metal; not the fool playing with a lunatic demeanour just for attention, though mischief is never far from their imagination and songs, but the bold protagonist using unpredictable exploits to ignite the senses and inspire thoughts towards, in the case of Misanthropical, a world where “as ugly, brutal and harsh but sometimes also beautiful as it is – everybody wants to be part of the greatest party of our time before our species go extinct solely by our own hand.

Hailing from Tampere, and originally under the name of Airhead, Peekaboo Primate was formed in 2004 by vocalist Lauri Lepokorpi and drummer Riku Airisto. The original line-up also included Hannu Kumpula and Tuomas Kumpula up to the release of the band debut album Peek-a-boo Primates in 2011. Following its release, the band changed its name to Peekaboo Primate with its personnel subsequently completed by the addition of guitarist Matti Auerkallio and bassist Juhani Rytkönen.

The time between albums has seen the band’s sound evolve and become even more defined in its real uniqueness, though if looking for a hint to what band and Misanthropical offer, imagine a mix of Dog Fashion Disco, American Head Charge, and Five Star Prison Cell with a touch of 6:33 to it. From its first heartbeat the album has ears and attention gripped; Spray Tan opening things up with an assault of tenaciously unpredictable rhythms and hungry riffs as wiry grooves wind around their thick bait. The vocals of Lepokorpi are just as dynamic and impressive, carrying an air of Chad Gray to their rousing presence at times as keys and guitars create a masterfully tempestuous and exotically dramatic theatre of sound

PP_Cover_RingMasterReviewIt is a thumping start matched in quality and irresistibility by the psychotically cultured Ha Ha. Sonic and rhythmic stabs court vocal shenanigans from the start with heftier beats soon adding their instable intent to the quickly compelling mix. Slithers of jazz and groove metal flirt with avant-garde psychosis as the track grows and writhes as well as anthemically incites in equal measure before allowing Nothing the opportunity to prey on an already submissive appetite and imagination for the release. The song saunters along with flirtatious and intimidating hues to the fore, Lepokorpi like the ringleader in its midst as his narrative challenges and highlights the issues theming the magnetic proposal.

From its initial intriguing low key start, The Unleashed soon unveils a pulsating and sinister body of synth bred sound as exotic and sultry hues in female voice and melodic suggestiveness add an alluring invitation. The challenging words of Lepokorpi probe and echo in the background before with unpredictability as enjoyable and prominent as ever, the track slips into a reggae cultured shade of character, though it is just one moment in the revolving journey of the encounter.

An addictive dose of pop ‘n’ roll grips next in the outstanding shape of Heroine, its catchy colour led by the great guest vocals of Noora Louhimo from Battle Beast. The rest of the song is a predacious prowl with the again effect coated tones of Lepokorpi stirring up riffs and rhythms between the flames of pop temptation. Within moments, it is sure to have bodies bouncing and voices fully involved, as ours, before Mama Earth rumbles as sonic spices zoom in and out across its growling tone and nature; that American Head Charge reference coming to the fore here, across a wonderfully grouchy yet fiercely inviting proposition.

As its predecessor, Star has a more ‘straight forward’ adventure to its body, though as the last treat too, there are plenty of unexpected and seamlessly woven together twists to catch out expectations and enthral the imagination, especially when uncaging some creative aberration midway. It’s more composed sanity and boldness is contrasted by the delicious raw frenzy of Peekaboo Primate, the track a demented slice of noise rock infested avant-garde/nu metal mania and quite irresistible as it stalks and bruises the senses.

Some of its punkiness survives in the cantankerous luring of ears by Follow My Lead, though the song is unafraid to bring some pop seeded melody and contagion into its imposing metal shuffle between even more irritable and aggressive trespasses.

Ending with the melodic caress of 291112, an emotively suggestive instrumental which fits easier into the scheme of the album with each full listen, Misanthropical is ripe pickings for the imagination and enjoyment. It offers a canvas and adventure which persistently provides fresh twists and surprises even after numerous listens. We will admit, we had not heard of Peekaboo Primate previously, a band which right now it is hard with their music to get out of our heads.

Misanthropical is released on CD and digitally May 12th via Inverse Records.

http://www.peekabooprimate.com/   https://www.facebook.com/peekabooprimate  https://twitter.com/peekabooprimate

Pete RingMaster 12/05/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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The Pulsebeats – Fiction Non-Fiction

The Pulsebeats_RingMasterReview

Every two years or so we seem to get a new stomping encounter with The Pulsebeats; a regular occurrence, certainly over the past four years, providing so far highly memorable and rousing adventures. Nothing has changed with new album Fiction Non-Fiction either, a riotous ten track affair which has the body and spirit leaping with the band’s distinct fusion of garage and punk rock with power pop contagion.

Formed in 2010 by a quartet of musicians from Manchester and Santander in Spain, The Pulsebeats soon had an increasing flock of fans bouncing live and with their self-titled debut album of 2011. A raw but captivating romp, it awoke a new wave of attention and media interest which was further stirred up by the band’s three track 7” single Don’t Turn Your Fucking Back On Me two years later. That release immediately revealed a new imagination and diversity in the band’s songwriting and sound which has now been taken to yet another plateau with Fiction Non-Fiction. Released a couple of weeks ago by FOLC Records and Action Weekend Records, the recording of The Pulsebeats’ new roar of energetic fun saw the band return to Santander’s Drive Division Studio with Alex Pis handling production. What emerged was a collection of songs eager to reveal the band at its most musically adventurous and indeed creatively tenacious yet.

What Can I Do? is the first slice of engaging incitement on the album; a welcome instantly wrapping ears in jangly guitar and crisp beats. The distinctive British tones of Nathan are soon adding to the already potent lure of the song, his and fellow guitarist, Luis’ riffs and hooks surrounding his tones with matching zeal and expression The track is a tidy slice of power pop mixed with sixties spiced R&B, a warm an catchy start soon eclipsed by Dead School Marching Band. New wave like guitar insurgency rubs the senses first; their almost duelling bait soon accompanied by the swinging rhythms of drummer Ral and the almost haughty bassline of Alex. In no time, the outstanding song has feet and hips bound in its virulence whilst a Who/early Jam hue blossoms to ignite the imagination. It is also an inventively busy proposal, vocal growls and writhing harmonies colluding with spiky hooks and tangy grooves to add to its ear gripping devilry.

Cover_RingMasterReviewThe punk ‘n’ roll of Eyes On You leaps straight from the closing breath of its predecessor, the track a glorious old school incitement with a touch of early Buzzcocks meets The Freshies to it; indeed Nathan adding a Howard Devoto like toning to his raw vocal persuasion. Like the previous track, it quickly and easily has body and passions involved while showing more of the variety in sound shaping Fiction Non-Fiction.

The following All I Give also has some of that nostalgic spicing to certainly its acidic hooks and uncluttered body, bringing a lighter infection of pop ‘n’ roll for its magnetic chorus, while Carrie-Anne is a less forceful proposal creating a flirtatious smoulder with sultry surf like melodies within a power pop/new wave hug with just a touch of The Only Ones to it. Both songs easily command undiluted interest and an increasingly greedier appetite for the album, if without quite matching up to the major heights of those before them and the thumping garage rock ‘n’ roll of Baby Girl. The anthemic punches of beats alone have limbs involved, vocals and riffs taking care of the rest of quickly seduced attention.

The mischievous nature of the band in word and sound is never far from the surface of the album and especially dynamic and irresistible in The Man Without A Head. The stomping slice of rock ‘n’ roll is an epidemic of sonic contagion with a host of additional strands drawn from blues, vintage R&B, and pop punk. Many tracks have a claim for best track honours within Fiction Non-Fiction, this one of the most vocal though so too is its successor, the resourcefully infectious and melodically lusty September Calendar Girl.

To be honest most tracks create an unforgettable peak within the lofty stature of the album, the glorious Everybody Wants Some intoxicating punk rock revelry almost aflame with raw energy and attitude to match earlier heights. It offers an uncomplicated two and a half minutes of breath-taking and seriously addictive rock ‘n roll which just ignites body and soul.

Completed by the even briefer punk riot of The Ballad Of Medicine Stu, again a track impossible not to get fully involved in, Fiction Non-Fiction is the kind of release you turn to for pure fun, knowing it will not disappoint in sound, adventure, or attitude. As for The Pulsebeats, they just get better and better, which means so do their records which Fiction Non-Fiction can testify.

Fiction Non-Fiction is available now on CD and download through Folc Records/Action Weekend Records and @ https://thepulsebeats.bandcamp.com/album/fiction-non-fiction

https://www.facebook.com/The-Pulsebeats-378049614144

Pete Ringmaster 11/05/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

For more exploration of the independent and promotional services check out http://www.zykotika.co

Bootlegs – Ekki fyrir viðkvæma

Bootlegs_RingMasterReview

With the band recently inking a worldwide management deal with GlobMetal Promotions, we thought a look at Bootlegs’ recent album, Ekki fyrir viðkvæma, was in order.  Formed in 1986 and soon becoming one of the bigger names in Icelandic metal history over the next five years or so, Bootlegs released two highly praised albums in that period before disbanding in 1991. Since then the band has come and gone through a couple of brief comebacks before returning more permanently in 2012. Released last year, Ekki fyrir viðkvæma is the Reykjavik quartet’s latest incitement of raw and ferocious thrash metal, a release metal fans will not want to be missing out on.

WC Monster and their self-titled second album, released 1989 and 1990 respectively, certainly pushed Bootlegs from national success towards recognition upon the broader metal map as too appearances on compilation albums over the next couple of years and a live presence which saw the band break into the likes of Denmark. After coming to an end, the band did come back together for a big reunion concert which was recorded and subsequently released as a live album a few years later in 2006. Before its release though, Bootlegs were already active again, returning in 2004 for a two to three year presence.  Then in 2010, they arose again with original members back; the fresh return followed by releases of the band’s first two albums in 2014 via Minotauro Records. Last year saw Bootlegs enter the studio for their first recordings in over two decades, and emerging with the rather impressive and rousing Ekki fyrir viðkvæma.

With the vocal roars of guitarists Jón ‘Junior’ Símonarsson and Jón Örn ‘Nonni ‘ Sigurðsson to the fore and its energy and intensity driven by the rhythmic predation of bassist Ingimundur ‘Elli’ Ellert Þorkellsson and drummer Kristján ‘Stjuni’ Ásvaldsson, album and sound is old school, thrash in its irritable prime. It is unafraid to offer some punk attitude too, at times songs breaching a Suicidal Tendencies like punkiness, but for the main and in its individual style, Ekki Fyrir Viðkvæma is the perfect fit for tastes bred on the likes of Voivod, Exodus, Metallica, Slayer, and Subhumans.

Front_RingMasterReviewFrom the hungrily abrasive and riotous punk ‘n’ roll of Gervigleði er ógleði, the album has ears and appetite in league with its ferocious intent. It is a great opener quickly matched in success and persuasion by the thrash prowl of Fullur á Facebook. Grooves and hooks collude with rapier like swings from Stjuni in the second song, luring in the listener before uncaging a ravenous assault and devilment reminding of the crossover thrash sounds of the previously mentioned California hailing band.

As the likes of the senses nagging KúkurPissOgÆl and the glorious exploits of Bootlegs fyrir börnin come and go, it is fair to say that major surprises are few yet fierce temptation and unbridled enjoyment unmistakable and inescapable. Within the second of the two, there is also something very familiar about certain melodies and flavoursome hooks yet all escape comparison to anyone in particular as the track steals ears and passions with ease. There is an occasional sense of early Stam1na, passing essences fleetingly bringing the Finnish band to mind as the track provides the first major pinnacle within the album.

Tribute to Thrash is one of the few English sung tracks and more than lives up to its title, swinging along with a snarl and swagger while being as multi-flavoured as its predecessor. With some great guitar interplay involved it is followed by Eitur naðra which explores a darker and heavier canvas of textures and character as sonic flames vein its intimidating posture and tone. The track is just one more highly memorable proposal, whether stalking the listener or in a rampage of niggling riffs and the snakiest of toxic grooves, and swiftly irresistible as too the in the face predation and roar of the excellent Gjallarhorn.

By this point it is fair to say that Ekki fyrir viðkvæma had us hooked, sharing physical and vocal, where we could language wise, involvement with instinctive eagerness. The pair of Fórnarlamb tískunnar and Kjörkassasvín only add to the album’s temptation and uncompromising thrills; both tracks providing an immediate and merciless trespass as anthemic as they are grouchy. They are highly addictive proposals carrying an array of imagination pleasing twists and turns backed by the band’s individual craft; the latter especially intriguing and devilish in shape and resources.

Making less of a dramatic and lingering impression is Poser though fair to say that its antagonistic attack leaves only satisfaction in its wake before Haleluja adds its own creative incitement and SOD III uncages the album’s shortest and most hostile offering yet. Again both leave pleasure full without matching earlier triumphs with the closing Ó Reykjavík providing a final spirit arousing galvanic punk ‘n’ roll stomp to greedily devour.

It is a great end to an excellent release. Ekki fyrir viðkvæma might not be the best thrash album you will have heard this past year or so, though it is in with a real shout, but it is undoubtedly on the frontline of the most enjoyable and ridiculously easy to return to propositions you will come across.

Ekki fyrir viðkvæma is available @ https://bootlegsthrash.bandcamp.com/releases

http://www.facebook.com/bootlegsiceland

Pete RingMaster 11/05/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

For more exploration of the independent and promotional services check out http://www.zykotika.co

Raizing Hell – Monsters Prefer Blondes

RH_RingMasterReview

If you have found the ground rumbling under foot in recent weeks, it is not the earth in rebellion but the dead rising to join the living in descending on the long and eagerly awaited second album from Romanian horror punk n’ rollers Raizing Hell. Providing devilish slices of graveyard boogie fuelled by punk rock attitude, Monsters Prefer Blondes is a carnivorous incitement from the crypt and quite irresistible.

Raizing Hell emerged in 2010, formed by vocalist/guitarist Liv Decay (ex-Howling Saints), guitarist Mr. Zombie, and drummer Oly Sinn. The line-up was soon completed by bassist Demented Vlash with the band laying down their live presence from 2011 and going on to share stages with the likes of Blitzkid, The Silver Shine, Tazmanian Devils, Fancy Dolls, The Argies, A Wilhelm Scream, Koffin Kats, Daily Noise Club, Orlok and the Rockin Ghouls, The Irradiates and many others over the years. Drawing on inspirations from bands such as Motorhead, The Plasmatics, Wendy O. Williams, Misfits, Nekromantix, Blitzkid, Demented Are Go, Horrorpops, and The Meteors, the Bucharest quartet soon evolved their own distinctive shade of horror punk which fuelled debut EP Psychoholics Unanimous in the December of that year and in turn provided a tasty part of the excellent Chainsaw Ballads split EP with UK bands Thirteen Shots and Trioxin Cherry via Psycho A Go-Go Records in 2013. First album Of Ghouls And Men was an even bigger attention grabber when released later that year; thirteen tracks which pushed the band into the full spotlight of the European horror punk and rock ‘n’ roll scene.

2014 saw Raizing Hell sign with the excellent Germany based label, Undead Artists Records, which quickly brought Of Ghouls And Men to a broader expanse of ears while last year the departure of Sinn, after the recording of their new album, brought the stick swinging corpse of Marky B. Morbid into the Raizing Hell mausoleum. Unleashing Monsters Prefer Blondes a couple of weeks back, Raizing Hell has not only provided a bigger and bolder slab of their horror gripped sound but also brought a real feel of their live energy and aggression to the recording and presence of the album. At times it borders on predatory and throughout is a constant blaze of contagious intensity coated with the organic rawness so many bands only manage to create on stage.

Raizing Hell Cover_RingMasterReviewIt all starts with I Like It Wrong and the resonating hefty beats of Sinn. Swiftly they are joined by tangy grooves with a hint of blues toxicity to their invitation. The distinctive tones of Decay are soon adding their dark flirtation and defiance to the mix too, her snarl climbing all over the virulent contagion of the hooks and grooves which are still working their temptation. It is a potent slab of rock ‘n’ roll with maybe few surprises yet making up for it with heart and attitude before Sold My Soul For Rock ‘N’ Roll saunters in with its punk ’n’ roll incitement. There is a touch of In Evil Hour to the song, an irritable hue which adds to the great blend of melodic enterprise and the grouchy snarling of voice and sound.

Two songs in and already it is easy to hear the fresh blossoming of the qualities and craft the band had already shown and the maturity and realisation of potential found in previous releases. I Am The Damned is quick confirmation as it eclipses its predecessors with its psychobilly swagger and flirtatious hooks. Vlash’s bass reveals its most cantankerous growl yet as it stalks the swinging lures of guitar and beats, a bestial essence echoing the edge in Decay’s otherwise clean and infectious tones.

Time Of A Killer Flies brings some delta blues scented enterprise to its robust and fiery body next whilst This Is It flirts with garage rock ‘n’ roll as it prowls of the senses to echo the creature crawling within its sci-fi themed narrative. As usual, Raizing Hell draw most on horror movies and dark tales for the lyrical seeds of the album, very often crafting their sound to echo and reflect the actions of the protagonists within their stories and here turning that first wave of stalking into a rabid devouring of ears and appetite by its finale.

Through the sultry Django-esque climate and landscape of The Sun Is Down, the band has the imagination as forcibly involved as the body whilst Dead Girls Don’t Cry kicks up a feisty stomp with its punk rock. The dark harmonies and lone whistling within the first of the two simply adds to a compelling theatre of guitar and rhythms while a tinge of folkish temptation lines the spicy veining of the second to similarly magnetic effect. Both are further examples of the new adventure and imagination in the band’s songwriting and sound, laying down new pinnacles within the album for a success soon matched by the smoky dark seduction of Trouble where Decay is the kind of temptress you know you should escape but cannot resist.

I’m Not A Monster is a grizzly stomp of an encounter; one again maybe feeding expectations a touch but with a chorus impossible not to join in on as the body bounces throughout, it matters little as it leads ears to the equally captivating antagonism of I’m Not Evil (I’m Just Bad). The next song is appetite pleasing punkabilly with a whiff of Trioxin Cherry meets Midnight Mob to its thick pleasure giving; another energy rousing persuasion more than matched by both the excellent old school punk infested Braindead, a track spinning a web of punk and horror rock strands  from recent decades, and Killing Time. The last of the pair is the kind of romp which has the feet engaged almost before ears; commanding body and attention with scything rhythms and punchy riffs as the band vocally rouses the spirit.

Monsters Prefer Blondes is completed by its title track, a predacious tango again aligning an array of punk rock with further instinctive rock ‘n’ roll diversity. We always like an album to end on a bang, and this anthemic infestation of ears and the passions certainly provides. As for Monsters Prefer Blondes the album, it provides a rich and thoroughly enjoyable blood soaked rebel rousing with adventure and creative fun. It is high time that Raizing Hell is recognised by the broadest rock ‘n’ roll spotlights; this album just might be the key lure. If not it is only a matter of time.

Monsters Prefer Blondes is out now via Undead Artists @ https://undeadartists.bandcamp.com/album/monsters-prefer-blondes

http://www.raizinghell.com   https://www.facebook.com/Raizing.Hell

Pete RingMaster 10/05/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

For more exploration of the independent and promotional services check out http://www.zykotika.com

Skin Drone – Evocation

Skin Drone - Evocation _RingMasterReview

Evocation is the eagerly awaited debut album from US duo Skin Drone, a web based project consisting of vocalist/multi-instrumentalist Erik Martin (Critical Dismemberment) and multi-instrumentalist/producer Otto Kinzel (Chemical Distance/Bluntface Records). Both have released and been part of many striking and praise luring proposals but it is as Skin Drone that the pair arguably creates their most un-conventionally inventive and imposingly experimental adventures as evidenced by Evocation.

The album is a collection of emotionally and lyrically dark tales fuelled by insanity and torment encased in a hard to pin down tapestry reaping the raw and caustic might as well as beauty of certainly extreme, industrial, and avant-garde metal. Each track is a tempestuous journey through ravenous shadows, hellacious landscapes, and emotive turmoil but songs which equally at times share melancholic beauty and intimate psychosis. All grab keen attention on the first listen, each enslaving ears and thoughts, but it is through the journey of numerous plays that their layers, depths, and full compelling characters compellingly truly come alive.

With one half of the band in Hot Springs, Arkansas and the other in Boston, Massachusetts, it is hard not to  be quickly impressed by the skilful and coherent weave of almost kaleidoscopic textures and ideas, an organic unity which has blossomed through assumingly a torrent of ideas and files being passed back and forth between the duo. Admittedly though, as opener Scarlet Road consumes the senses, Evocation has thoughts swiftly engaged in other creative dramas and intrigue too. The first track envelops ears with a rousing roar of vocal squalls amidst technical and death metal animosity. It has a swagger and toxic virulence which needs little time to infest appetite and imagination, with the latter also persistently gripped by the glimmer of unpredictable incitement which rises from the track’s mellow and provocative slips into emotional dissonance. The track is pure fascination, a challenge and poetic tempting leaving a lingering imprint on the psyche whether washing solemnly over the senses or nagging them with torrential antagonistic discord.

Erik & Otto album_RingMasterReviewIts emotional turbulence is matched by that of the following God Complex, another ravenous proposal of extreme and venomously grooved metal entangled with sinister disharmony and emotional dissension. The raw vocals squalls create a great rapacious texture in the tempest and the haunting ambience sharing the song’s air, adding great discord and heart bred turmoil again in an offering inflamed with raging ire or sharing sombre caresses. The track continues to envelop and involve across its ever evolving body, sharing its discordancy with its outstanding successor, Death Sentence. It is a carnivorous piece of music and invention, but equally a thrilling adventurous dive through a wealth of avant-garde/progressive experimentation amidst a toxically grooved and rabidly irritable incitement; it all colluding for one breath-taking and emotionally pestilential offering.

Shepherd of the Damned is an inharmonious crawl over the senses next, organ and vocal menace a caliginous calling aided by pained clean vocals before a ravaging expulsion of intensity and sounds spills their animosity. The track continues to weave in and out of vicious and elegant melancholy without escaping the emotional hell at its heart before making way for the nature-esque soundscape and again haunting charm of Ghost Reflection. As always though, even in its warmest melodic seducing, shadows lurk, biding their time as strings and keys skilfully serenade and seed the imagination. They are never allowed a real grip here though, instead a tribalistic rhythmic shuffle emerging to surprise and draw the listener closer as similarly bred vocals dance on their beats.

That darkness does get its moment though in the infectious rock ‘n’ roll of City Lights; a track which seems to stalk the senses even as it launches tenacious roars and bruising tides of rhythmic temptation. Even in that predacious intent, guitars create veins of sonic enticement subsequently leading to seductive noir lit physical and emotional scenery. The track is another pinnacle of Evocation, a fiercely memorable and greed sparking moment backed up just as dynamically and imaginatively by Witching Hour. Evil lines every beat and savage riff, Martin’s scarring vocal trespasses too but again the band creates infectious grooves and a raw catchiness which simply pulls you into the fire of the track. An addictive throaty bassline only adds to the irresistible bait of the track’s quarrel and creative rancor too, a lure equalled by the song’s industrial fizz and melodic oasis further in.

Classical keys coax ears and thoughts into the dark conflict within Darkness Within next; the track a heavy resonating smoulder of emotional and sonic disunity growing from a calm reflective charm into intrusive discordance. As with all tracks within Evocation, every moment is in flux and evolving into a new shade of turbulence and anguish brewed intimacy with matching character of sound to enthral and thrill.

Closing up with Salvation, a similar but individual tapestry woven from varying shades of darkness aligned to emotional greys, Skin Drone leave ears and emotions numb and enjoyment rampant. As suggested, Evocation should be embraced over numerous listens, every one bringing something new to explore while casting fresh twists on ideas already nurtured by previous ventures into its impressive depths. This often viscerally impacting album will not be for everyone but for those with bold imagination and a taste for a band pushing its and metal’s boundaries, Evocation and Skin Drone are worth a heavy slice of attention.

Evocation is released June 14th via Bluntface Records with pre-ordering available @ http://skindrone.bandcamp.com/album/evocation

https://www.facebook.com/skindrone/   https://twitter.com/skindrone   http://www.bluntfacerecords.com/

Pete RingMaster 10/05/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

For more exploration of the independent and promotional services check out http://www.zykotika.c

The Hillbilly Moon Explosion – With Monsters And Gods

THME_RingMasterReview

With a band like The Hillbilly Moon Explosion and a heavy clutch of ear thrilling and imagination gripping releases, it is hard to pick what might be the best. It is easy though to suggest that their new encounter, With Monsters And Gods is going to be right there as an option for most. The fourteen track stroll through their most eclectic and fascinating slices of rock ‘n’ roll yet is pure captivation. It stomps, it seduces, and rouses the spirit as it takes the listener on a magnetic escapade of creative fun, mischief, and imagination.

Returning to the local Swiss studio where they made their early rockabilly albums, The Hillbilly Moon Explosion have found a fresh edge and snap to their sound in whatever aspect it tempts from upon With Monsters and Gods. Vocalist/upright bassist and album producer Oliver Baroni recently said that the band wanted the album “to reflect the somewhat harder edge you get from the months on the road,” to create “a louder, more rock ’n’ roll album.” Fair to say they found success and more in an album which just seems to become more riveting and dynamic with every listen.

It opens up with the mesmeric In Space, a celestial romance of the senses with a disco beat and charm reminding a little of Blondie’s Autoamerican period. As exotic hues tease, the song evolves and blossoms into a sultry seduction with a persistence of nagging rhythms and surf rock scented melodic trails of guitar around Emanuela Hutter’s siren-esque tones. It is a hypnotic affair setting up ears and appetite for the adventure to come with Temptation next in line to live up to its title. Guest sax flames courtesy of Pete Thomas are soon licking at the imagination after an initial tenacious caress of guitar, their entrance lighting a lively stroll with celestial harmonies around the mariachi theatre provided by the horns of Calexico. As it swings and bounces, a ska bred flirtation adds to the persuasion too, just another twist and turn in the creative blaze of the anthemically outstanding and inventively cinematic track.

Depression throws the listener into a beefier rockabilly bred canter next; its riffs carrying a grouchy edge as Baroni’s bass and vocals swing with infectious enterprise. The scything beats of Sylvain Petite are just as catchy too, finding themselves bound in the spicily addictive grooves of guitarist Duncan James as the song provides a straight forward yet individual prime Hillbilly Moon Explosion stomp before letting Down On Your Knees gets in on the act of stirring up ears and appetite. A seriously catchy blaze of rock ‘n’ roll as potent in its mellow saunter as it is in its fiery roar, the song weaves a thrilling proposal with additional strands of seventies glam pop in its virulent rockabilly.

art_RingMasterReviewThe noir lit Midnight Blues brings some great sixties garage rock keys from Baroni into play next, that a decade equally referenced by Hutter’s glorious vocals and the harmonies swimming through the seductive air of the track. A blues hue coats the guitar solo at the heart of the seductive smoulder too, a tempting which never relaxes until it steps aside for the rockabilly saunter of Desperation where Hutter is again as magnetic as the contagious hooks and swinging rhythms.

If With Monsters And Gods stopped there, acclaim would be easily offered but things just continue to entice and spellbind as its title track creates a smooch with the senses and imagination. Country seeded essences mix with surf and again sixties nurtured serenading as orchestral and emotive drama ebbs and flows across the track’s bewitching landscape. There is a blues spicing hanging around too though it is a far thicker and a more vocal ingredient in the feisty stroll of Love You Better which follows. The track listing within the album is superbly thought out; small essences in one song being developed in the next while it in turn brews other hues to be explored in the next. As the blues textures are a fiery roar around the tones and piano of Baroni here, the slight discordance to its revelry is subsequently bred further within next up Black Ghost.

The song is the first of two almost expected and hoped encounters featuring Marky “Sparky” Phillips from Demented Are Go. Hutter’s tones glow and resonate within the sonic shimmer of the song while in the background Phillips prowls and vocally prods before bringing his great gravelly presence fully into the awaited duet between the two. Once they are aligned, honky tonk keys and a cowpunk swagger join the unpredictable and thrilling party; numerous other spices and textures also before many are brought to greater irresistible life in the quite brilliant Heartbreak Boogie. Th’ Legendary Shack Shakers like in its blend of dark rock ‘n’ roll, jazz flirtation, and almost steampunk rebel rousing; the song is an electrified fence of creative devilry with further provocative sax tempting beside the mighty vocal union of Hutter and Baroni.

That Blondie essence returns in its successor, though unsurprising as it is a swiftly pleasing cover of the US band’s Call Me with a rockabilly slant The Hillbilly Moon Explosion style. It soon has the body bouncing as too the garage punk contagion of You Miss Something where again a host of flavours collude for a virulent hop fuelled with blues liquor and fifties punk ‘n’ roll merriment.

The second song with Phillips on board comes next; Jackson a great cover of the Johnny Cash and June Carter track. Converting some of the country character of the original to a ska/reggae carnival of sound with the smiling swing of keys and seductive flames of sax further temptation, the song just hits the spot as too the union of Phillips and Hutter.

Completed by the boisterous r&b toned Rose Outside, think Imelda May meets Ronnie Dawson as a hint of its galvanic sound, With Monsters And Gods is simply a riot of fun and bold incitement for the ears. As mentioned earlier, it is hard to pick the band’s best release to date, so many choice moments for fans to devour, but as we press play again, With Monsters And Gods has to be a strong contender, maybe the strongest.

With Monsters And Gods is released May 13th through Fredonia Entertainment in the UK via Amazon on CD and Vinyl and digitally through iTunes.

http://www.hillbillymoon.com/   https://www.facebook.com/hillbillymoonexplosion   https://twitter.com/TheRealHME

Pete RingMaster 09/05/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

For more exploration of the independent and promotional services check out http://www.zykotika.com

Dead Register – Fiber

pic Joe Sands

pic Joe Sands

The inability to pin down the Dead Register sound is almost as enjoyable as the music itself and the expansive web of flavours making it up. The Atlanta trio weave a tapestry which seems simultaneously made up of essences from gothic and death rock, post punk and dark pop, doom and post rock and more. As shown by debut album Fiber, the richness of those textures is a genre crossing emprise of craft and imagination. Yet there is something easily accessible to its busy body of imagination igniting invention and atmospheric drama too, an almost familiar presence which still defies recognition. The result of it all is a release which has a uniqueness few can emulate and a fascination which simply seduces ears and emotions.

Formed in 2013, Dead Register began as the creative union of vocalist/bassist M. Chvasta (ex-Palaces; ex-Light Pupil Dilate) and his wife Avril Che (bass synth, textures, keys, backing vocals). The programmed rhythmic side of the project was replaced the following year by Chad Williams (ex-Magnapop) with a wave of writing and subsequently the live honing of songs live following. Bringing six of their favourite tracks together, Dead Register now release Fiber; an introduction which bewitches and challenges in equally compelling manner.

From its first moments, Fiber is a leviathan of monolithic, doom infused temptation sparking and feeding off the imagination. It manages to be imposing, bordering portentous, but with an infectious virulence and emotively melodic character of sound which does not so much temper its dark side but blossoms in its embrace. It all starts with Alone and a lone and slim melancholic melody. It is the spark for a doom loaded awakening of raw riffs and a deliciously gravelly bass groan. A suggestive ambience lays in its shadows too before the instantly impressing tones of Chvasta’s croon and the rhythmic shuffle of Williams help unveil new depths in the outstanding encounter’s increasing emotion and drama.  Che’s harmonies float like gossamer in that air whilst the track takes on a Southern Death Cult meets Modern English meets Swans presence across almost ten minutes of sonic and vocal bliss.

Dead Register Fiber Cover Art_RingMasterReviewIt’s impressive and gripping presence is matched in might by the album’s title track next. From its initial grouchy growl in metallic riffs and bass lures, the song has ears and thoughts thickly involved with an intimidating creative theatre and emotive exploration. It gently nags and openly immerses the senses in a slightly corrosive but engaging proposal, everything about it a skilful and imaginative merger of contrasts. Rhythms are irritable yet rousing, melodies poetic against almost ravenous sonic atmospherics, and Chvasta’s beguiling voice the descriptive haven within a tempestuous climate and raw wind.

A mouth-watering post punk incitement opens up the rhythmically irresistible Drawing Down next; it continuing to make ripe appearances within the evocative landscape and post rock/ gloom-gaze heart of the third track. At times there are spices sparking thoughts of bands like Echo and The Bunnymen and The Birthday Party, other times a surge of invention hinting at a Godflesh or Palms, but all strands within the band’s captivating ingenuity linked by the ever impressing vocals and the tenaciously seducing rhythms.

Grave offers the darkest, dankest climate of the album so far, its atmosphere almost clinging to the senses as guitars and bass cast emotively picturesque lures serenaded by the rich expressive tones of Chvasta. As all tracks, it has thoughts off on their own creative tangent whilst embracing the narrative offered by voice and melodic intimation; a craft and success unsurprisingly found in the following Entwined too. Even with the riveting throaty grizzle of the bass, a flavour hard to get enough of within Fiber, the song has a warmer tone to its predecessors. It has an almost mystical air, especially through its sonic and melodic design, though again raw and erosive shadows lurk and crowd their magnetic insinuations for great volatility in another lingeringly memorable moment on the album.

Closing up with the heavy seductive oppression of Incendiary, a track rivalling Grave for strength of suffocating emotive intensity, Dead Register transfix and thrill with every twist and turn of Fiber. Though maybe not quite matching those before it for personal tastes, the final track epitomises the qualities and craft of the band whilst exciting the senses and imagination. Again contrasting textures and elements collude through a kaleidoscope of styles and sounds to create something unlike any other proposal heard in a long time and likely to be found again this year outside of the trio. Fiber is dark magic, emotional trespassing, and quite wonderful.

Fiber is released May 6th via AVR Records digitally and on CD and cassette @ https://deadregister.bandcamp.com/

https://www.facebook.com/deadregister

Pete RingMaster 06/05/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

For more exploration of the independent and promotional services check out http://www.zykotika.com