The Erkonauts – I Did Something Bad

THE-ERKONAUTS__RingMaster Review

Having missed the release of I Did Something Bad first time around, we as so many others will be, are seriously grateful for its world-wide re-release through Kaotoxin Records. The debut outing for Geneva’s The Erkonauts, the album is a ferociously diverse and increasingly fascinating collage of genres and sound. As thick in unpredictability as it is rich in bold imagination, I Did Something Bad is one of those propositions that heavy duty recommendations swarm to. We can only join the crowd and with two additional new tracks to contemplate and devour for all, the album’s return is a not to be missed a second time treat.

Formed in 2014, The Erkonauts consists of ex-Sybreed members in bassist/vocalist Ales Campanelli and drummer Kevin Choiral, alongside guitarists Adrien Bornand and Sébastien Puiatti. Together they expel a sound which is as punk and heavy rock as it is metal, as much progressive enterprise as it is off kilter imagination. Fair to say the band made a hefty impact with the self-released outing of their debut album in 2014, the limited first and second press of I Did Something Bad greedily consumed with the band’s reputation growing in tandem through their live show and touring voracity. Produced by Drop (Samael, ex-Sybreed), the album is now poised to allow the rest of us slow coaches to dive into The Erkonauts bedlam, as mentioned with a pair of new songs recorded last year for extra rich taste.

The Great Ass Poopery opens up the tempest, a gloriously carnivorous bordering on carnal bassline infesting ears initially to be joined by the kinetic swings of Choiral. Alone it is gripping stuff but add the fiercely shimmering guitars aligned to rousing vocals and the air becomes aflame with rumbling attitude loaded rock ‘n’ roll. In some ways like Fear Factory meets Mudvayne with Suicidal Tendencies orchestrating, the punk metal assault is creative rampancy and virulent energy fired down the barrel of a dynamically hungry cannon.

art_RingMaster ReviewTony 5 swaggers in next, its body similarly spawned to that of its predecessor but swiftly sharing its own consuming tenacity. As biting rhythms and swinging grooves embrace the excellent mix of clean and aggressively rasping vocals, the song is a cantankerous affair but with a body of spiralling twists and sonic resourcefulness which makes other’s references to bands such as System Of A Down and Gojira understandable. As the first, the track is a ravenous swamping of ears with superb clarity within its smothering touch for the swarm of progressive tenacity within to equally entice and shine.

There is a greater initial hostility to the following All the Girls should Die, riffs and rhythms angrily badgering ears whilst readying them for the fluid slip into melodic pastures with emotive mellow vocals. Entwining melodic rock fire with alternative metal flirtation as other elements snarl and grumble, the song ebbs and flows in its sonic ire whilst providing a perpetually compelling persuasion. Again there is a rampant directness upon ears at times, the track managing to be simultaneously predatory and seductive before making way for the electro lit, punk fired triumph of Nola. The first invading bassline tells you all you need to know about what is to come; the track flinging hooks and rapier beats around like a dervish whilst expelling a groove infested sonic devilry around them. Vocals again are as varied and impressive as the maelstrom of delicious sound and the increasing imagination of the aural emprise.

A sultry climate comes with Dominium Mundi, its evocative air a suggestive calm for the imagination to expand upon before the heart of the storm breaks with again addictively stabbing rhythms and aggressively hued vocals. Though it brews an inferno of sound, the earlier haunting peace continues to switch and collude with the raging animosity, leaving ears ringing, emotions aflame, and the body exhausted by the persistent breakout of heavily flirtatious grooves. The latter is weaponry which increases its pull in Hamster’s Ghosthouse straight after. With irritable riffery and stalking beats, the track stalks and infests the senses. Its hardcore/nu-metal infused rock ‘n’ roll is pure temptation as it leads the listener into a following progressive garden of melodic and classic rock. As many songs, how they start is no hint to how they depart and certainly their ever intriguing journeys as superbly epitomised here.

The creeping devilment and sonic rapacity of Gog raises the greed in an already eager appetite with ease, its dark character and lively imagination awash with biting elements and imposingly suggestive textures and flavours whilst Your Wife hugs with an acoustic caress shaped by equally warm vocals. The croon does get feistier across its melody and harmony soaked captivation but never relinquishes its elegance and charm.

There is no escaping the great humour that runs through the band’s songwriting and attitude either ,with its boldest moment coming in the punk rage and fun of 9 is better than 8. It is an unbridled riot, simple as that and impossible not to get physically involved in before Machine brings its own commanding incitement to the party. The first of the new tracks exclusive to the release, it is a growling, thrashing slab of metal diversity. Hellacious in its body, infectious in its armoury of hooks, grooves, and anthemic rhythms, the track is as much punk metal as it is extreme metal toxicity and manna to the ears.

Concluded by the tempestuous Culbutos, it a merger of thunderous confrontation and seductive tempting, I Did Something Bad has all the quality and mastery to leave body and soul enraptured. As the intricately and dramatically woven final song, the album is a creative collage of sound turned into a riveting theatre of invention and fiercely arousing adventure that no one should miss out on.

Quite simply, with a new album proposed for later this year, time is ripe for all newcomers to grab your piece of The Erkonauts via I Did Something Bad.

I Did Something Bad is out via Kaotoxin Records from February 12th @ http://www.kaotoxin.com/shop/page/6/

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Pete RingMaster 12/02/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Flowers – Everybody’s Dying To Meet You

Flowers_RingMaster Review

Though debut album Do What You Want To, It’s What You Should Do pleased, for personal tastes, it lacked a certain spark to fulfil its obvious potential. It was an encounter though, which certainly ensured its creators Flowers lured strong and lingering attention. Now the UK trio return with successor Everybody’s Dying To Meet You, a rousing slice of noise infused indie pop that enchants as it enthrals; a release rattling the cage of expectations and all overworked pop offerings around it.

Flowers began in 2012 after vocalist Rachel Kenedy met guitarist Sam Ayres through an advert wanting band mates to help create pop songs which were like “early Madonna through a broken tape machine”. From there a romantic and creative union ensued between them, with drummer Jordan Hockley coming in to complete the band’s line-up. With their first batch of tracks refined by Bernard Butler, debut album Do What You Want To, It’s What You Should Do emerged in 2013 to potent responses and support. It drew keen interest which is surely now set to ignite louder acclaim with Everybody’s Dying To Meet You. Everything about the release, from songwriting and sound to inventive tone has blossomed from its predecessor, emerging an eighties seeded but uniquely current kiss of tenacious indie pop.

Recorded with producer Brian O’Shaughnessey (The Clientele, Primal Scream, My Bloody Valentine), the album opens with Pull My Arm. A slim jangle of guitar with glimpses of ska revelry makes the first contact, strolling beefy rhythms soon joining it before the lively ethereal tone of Kenedy lays evocatively over the dynamically catchy sounds now in full flow. Thoughts are sparked of bands like Mo-dettes and Girls At Their Best by the track, ripe spices adding to its boisterous charm and rousing adventure.

art_RingMaster ReviewThe great start is followed by the mellower caress of Bitter Pill, though its body is all drama and the vocals awash with warm crystalline harmonies that seem to incite an infectious swing to grab the energy of the song. From lapping ears like gentle but eager waves to a fiery expulsion of sizzling sonic rowdiness and back again in a repeating cycle, ears are richly satisfied before Ego Loss takes over with its similarly low key but vibrant dance. The dark hues of bass make a healthy temper to the celestial strains of Kenedy and the imaginative jangle of Ayres’ guitar, the jabbing beats of Hockley bridging the two with their metronomic yet inventive canter. Like The Darling Buds meets The Raincoats, the track is a persistent captivation.

A Weekend like air drifts across next up All at Once; the song as those before it thick seduction, though all have to bow to the outstanding prowess of Intrusive Thoughts. Again a gentler entrance is the lead to richer and heavier deeds. The song never loses its gentile character though, moving with a Young Marble Giants scented saunter through noisy melodic scenery accompanied by hypnotic rhythms. Kenedy once more is as alluring as the sun in the sultry temptation as the album offers its undoubted pinnacle, though the song is challenged for that stature throughout.

How Do You Do smiles at and grumbles in ears next, its scuzzy proposal an irresistibly magnetic affair matched by the fiercer rock ‘n’ roll of Tammy. Ayres’ guitar is a scorching blaze of resourceful endeavour whilst Hockley again lays anthemic bait down around the, at times, slightly overwhelmed voice of Kenedy. Even with that slight issue, the track is a punk lined pop treat to get a healthy appetite for; a hunger quickly satisfied by another Young Marble Giants like seducing under the name Russian Doll. Its true rock ‘n’ roll colours are soon pushed to the fore of its initial minimalistic presence, the initial thick enjoyment only becoming most lusty as the entwining of both textures from thereon in creates another mighty triumph for the album.

The final pair of songs ensures Everybody’s Dying To Meet You ends on the high it started with and for the main maintained up to their appearance. The balmy yet sonically volatile My Only Friend is first with endearing melodic caresses evolving into bordering on cacophonous jangles for a hearty lure whilst closer Bathroom Sink is a provocative romance with a tempestuous air and intrusive flames to its harmonic elegance. Both tracks spellbind with their individual characters; a success brought to broader fruition by the album as a whole.

The Flowers has come of age with Everybody’s Dying to Meet You, though major uniqueness is still a little down the line. All the same with this thoroughly enjoyable and increasingly magnetic album their current bloom, the threesome has shown themselves to be one of Britain’s brightest and most stimulating indie/pop bands.

Everybody’s Dying To Meet You is released February 12th via Fortuna POP! on CD, vinyl and download.

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Pete RingMaster 12/02/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Huron – The Dead Stay Dead

Photo by Leigh Drinkwater Photography

Photo by Leigh Drinkwater Photography

It will not be the first time that UK metallers Huron will have majorly stirred up acclaim and attention with a release but their stunning new album, The Dead Stay Dead is surely going to ensure that the band is regarded as one of the big boys from hereon in. As mentioned, previous encounters have all drawn strong support and praise from media and fans alike but their new and easily finest proposal to date is a band reshaping and igniting not only their own creative landscape but the metal scene around them.

Formed towards the end of 2007, Plymouth hailing Huron has worked through many line-ups changes which seem to have only help spark new potency and power in their fusion of progressive, thrash, and melodic metal and the increasingly impressive releases it fuelled. Debut album Cheyne Stoking lured strong praise and focus with its release in 2009, the band’s live reputation only being enhanced as they toured the UK in support. Its successor Mary Celeste whipped up an even feistier storm of acclaim across fans and media in 2011, its success matched a year later by the War Party EP. Performances at the likes of Download, Bulldog Bash, and Bloodstock followed whilst a British tour with Skindred was just one more live triumph to add to shows with bands such as One Machine, Onslaught, Evile, Alestorm, Ill Niño, and Viking Skull over the years. As the outstanding The Dead Stay Dead lights an expected touch paper to the strongest spotlights upon the band yet, this year looks set to emulate and surpass the successful twelve months the band had in 2015 and show Huron to be the new big roar in modern metal.

Mixed and mastered by Justin Hill (SikTh) and produced by guitarist Rimmy Sinclair, The Dead Stay Dead opens with The Ark Of Deucalion. A provocative sonic mist first wraps ears before intensive riffery from Sinclair and Chris Smith descends venomously on the senses driven by the barbarous beats of drummer David Parsons and the predatory throaty lures of Rohan James’ bass. It is a swiftly compelling and anthemic incitement built on the contagion of thrash but quickly showing the hefty weave of textures and styles now in the Huron sound as it evolves under the antagonistic roar of vocalist Sean Palmer, who has since left the band with James taking over the vocal spot. Darkly celestial harmonies only add to the drama within the blazing cauldron of craft and intensity, at times the track almost like a merger of Slayer, Devin Townsend, and now demised UK band Mishkin.

Huron Cover artwork_RingMaster ReviewThe striking start is soon eclipsed by the album’s title track, The Dead Stay Dead a predator quickly stalking ears and imagination with its scything rhythms and sizzling tendrils of sonic spice. Vocals assault and ripen the appetite as the song matches their bait with aggressive kind but it is when the track slips into something more melodically comfortable with clean vocals to match, that a great song opens its full temptation. It is irresistible, an ugly duckling evolving into blooming beauty and back with Jekyll And Hyde frequency for the thickest contagion.

Santa Muerte slips in next with a sinister climate and grievous intent in its rhythms and riffs. As in its predecessors, tortuously swinging grooves bind ears and an already greedy appetite whilst the raw vocal tones collude with the open animosity in the thrash bred and increasingly dynamic ferocity devouring the senses. Exhaustion and joy is the by-product of the blistering encounter, ears basking in the melodic enterprise searing their flesh and the rapacious imagination seducing their depths before both Pyschosis and Murder Hole unleash their venomous rancor and creative rabidity. The first of the two is a thunderous onslaught with a death thrash tendency to its equally tenacious weave of infection loaded flavours and ideation. Infused further by the burning prowess of guitars and solo it makes for one glorious collision between song and lust emulated again in its successor, a song which wraps itself in more recognisable thrash spices a la Metallica and proceeds to twist and re-weave those flavours into something far more primal and inventive with another dose of excellent clean vocal adding to the great diversity.

Managing to be brutish and seductive, the mouth-watering Despina feverishly rampages on ears like a cultured barbarian next whilst Bastard King emerges from atmospheric shadows to infest body and psyche with its sonic trespasses and rhythmic predation like a vampiric temptress taking the imagination on a ride through the darkest fearsome scenery. Both again are individual in their nature and bodies but united in igniting the passion with their invasive and imposingly addictive adventures through they are slightly outshone by the merciless virulence of The Spirit Of Hat & Vengeance. Like Black Dahlia Murder meets System Of A Down with Bloodsimple in close attention, to try and give a hint to its insatiable tempest, the track is manna to the metal feeding passions and for personal tastes the king amongst only great warriors on the album.

With the militant natured Bokanovsky’s Process and the flaming progressive subtlety of Solace, band and album continue to beat and thrill; the cunning twists and resourceful stalking of the senses by the first contrasted by the melodically poetic and cantankerously intrusive might of the second. Again each song has its own creative agenda and voice to keep the rich variety to the album flowing before Fresh & Thorns brings The Dead Stay Dead to a fearsomely rugged and invigoratingly rousing close. There is a hint of Mudvayne to the violent wantonness and canny maze of biting textures of the track, yet as everywhere any hints offered to songs in reference to others are slim hues in something uniquely Huron.

It has been a fair while between albums but the time has seen Huron escalate their craft, imagination, and fiercely flavoured confrontation of sound. The Dead Stay Dead is the proof from a band ready and undoubtedly equipped to take on the world.

The self-released The Dead Stay Dead is available from February 12th through all platforms and outlets.

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Pete RingMaster 11/02/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Dangerego – Special Dreamer

Dangerego_RingMaster Review

This month sees the release via Sliptrick Records of Special Dreamer, the latest album from Italian rock band Dangerego. This is a band that has seemingly become a potent presence on the underground scene of their homeland but escaped wider awareness…until now that is as it is easy to see their latest proposal igniting global bred attention. It is an enthralling and increasingly compelling collection of songs fuelled by their “alternative/ post grunge” sound. In fact the band’s music is a tapestry of diverse and flavoursome styles across many genres woven into a proposition which is simply rumbling, fiery rock ‘n’ roll.

Formed in 2005, the Florence bred quintet emerged from a union of musicians from the city already experienced from playing in the likes of Terrametèa, Bleff, Chèquers, and Florence New Grass. Drawing on inspirations from the likes of Black Sabbath, Faith No More, and Audioslave, the band soon made a potent impact on the local live scene, playing some of the most prestigious venues of Tuscany such as Viper Theatre, The Cage Club, and Borderline over time, as well as numerous festivals and sharing stages with bands such as Heike Has The Giggles, Calibro 35, and Maniscalco Maldestro. The band self-released their debut album Autopsy in 2011, it finding more success with a re-release two years later through Atomic Stuff. The autumn of 2014 saw Dangerego touring the US and playing Fall Jam Fest with bands such as Otherwise whilst last year they began working on Special Dreamer and linked up with Sliptrick Records for its uncaging.

The album quickly grabs ears and imagination with opener The Death of Thoughts, Pt. 1, an acoustic caress with electronic shadows that instantly reveals the alluring strength of band’s songwriting and the potency of Flavio Angelini’s vocal prowess. It is a mesmeric start which even at a handful of seconds over a minute in length has thoughts and attention firmly gripped and ready for the following tempting of Blackheart Hotel. Riffs straight away entangle ears with a bluesy spicing whilst rhythms forge a punchy welcome, both continuing to impose their weight as vocals and inflamed melodies get bound in fiery grooves and salacious hooks. There is a touch of Soundgarden to the encounter, a scent of Kyuss too, but predominantly here and across the album the one band which most comes to mind is Life of Agony, though undoubtedly Dangerego create something wholly individual to them.

art_RingMaster ReviewBarely a moment passes before the second song becomes the third, Everything Comes to Life a sister temptress to its predecessor but soon exploring its own emotive depths as the infectious rhythms of drummer Massimiliano Innocenti work on hips and the grooves and melodies of guitarists Enrico Francesca and Lorenzo Giusti enslave ears. Once more hooks are in appealing abundance but finely honed to sneakily line the tenacious body and anthemic pull of the song where the moody basslines of Claudio Zucchelli is as much thick bait as anything within the sultry blaze of rock ‘n’ roll.

Special Dream allows a moment to catch a breath, its initial melodic and vocal serenade soaked in reflective emotion and poetic melodies but soon it too is a robustly dynamic and a creatively incendiary offering firing up an even greater hunger for the release in an already easily persuaded appetite. Vocalist Angelini continues to impress and captivate as forcibly as the canvas of evocative and again enjoyably imposing sounds around him, even in the quieter reflective moments mid-way through the song.

I’ll Stand Here tantalises and entices with its melodic amble next, though of course it too has impassioned and sonic outbursts in its stoner/grunge hued and melodic rock coloured presence before Winter’s Come steps up to reveal its boisterous blues rock spiced rock ‘n’ roll. Expectations at this point are for songs to twist and turn through an array of flavours, and the broodingly catchy offering is no exception nor the riveting Red Dawn with its funk bred bassline and the predatory nature of riffs and prowling grooves. The noir lit track is glorious, a canvas for the imagination to run with and an enthused body to get eagerly involved with.

With another moment to relax as the emotive charm of Euphony with its classically aired keys and thick emotions takes over to further captivate, there is no escaping the diversity of sound and resourcefulness of inventive craft across the album, the last trio of songs alone rich proof, and it only continues as the dark hearted and grippingly volatile Black Soul steps forward next. From a haunted, melancholy drenched slow opening, the track erupts into a cauldron of intensive energy and ferocious drama. From the predatory bass to the scything rhythms and the searing grooves to the heart driven vocals, it is a devouring fire of magnetic songwriting and bracing persuasion that only leaves a want for more.

The Road to Stockholm also has a haunting climate to its almost vaudevillian theatre of evolving sound, its great success backed by the roar of A Trail of Tears with its flirtatious hooks and Poets Of The Fall like character. Both songs again inspire full involvement, one of the many potent aspects of the album shown again in the seemingly but indefinably familiar and bewitching Broken Bones with its electronic devilment around another imaginative sonic web sprung from the strings of both guitarists.

Completed by The Death of Thoughts, Pt. 2, the companion bookend to the opener, Special Dreamer is a masterful and thoroughly thrilling encounter which only grows in temptation and stature with every listen. Like us you may not have heard of Dangerego before but the time is ripe to change that and to prevent the secret from being allowed to go on. For stylish and imaginative melodic rock woven from its various guises, there will surely be few releases this year to outshine Special Dreamer.

Special Dreamer is out now via Sliptrick Records.

http://www.dangerego.com    https://www.facebook.com/dangerego

Pete RingMaster 11/02/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

For more exploration of the independent and promotional services check out http://www.zykotika.com/

Iron Jawed Guru – Mata Hari

iron jawed guru_RingMaster Review

With all the curvaceous moves and intrigue fuelled exploits its title suggests, Mata Hari is an encounter which simply and irresistibly entices ears as it infests the psyche. The new album from West Virginian instrumental groove rockers Iron Jawed Guru, it is creative espionage of the most rewarding order offering seven songs bursting with grooves that writhe like seductive snakes and a rhythmic intimidation as imposing as it is dynamically compelling. Without reserve, Mata Hari is a delicious incitement that the more you struggle to resist and move on, the deeper you get entangled up in it.

Iron Jawed Guru is the pairing of multi-instrumentalist Mike Lorenzen and drummer Roy Brewer; a Morgantown hailing project which emerged in 2013, though both members first met nine years earlier. Originally a trio with Eric Clutter, who later went on to join Karma To Burn, Lorenzen and Brewer continued as a duo from his departure evolving their fiery and rapacious psych/stoner rock sound. It is a proposition which singes the senses as it flirts with the body, its heavy yet salaciously inviting weave of grooves and riffs aligning with rousing rhythms to create the fiercely captivating and anthemic blaze that is Mata Hari.

cover_RingMaster ReviewFirst up on the album is Quake and straight away its impacting rhythms and dusty grooves echo the ferocity and agitation suggested by the name. As a sonic, almost smog like, embrace is cast, Brewer not for the last time swiftly has the senses on edge and energies ignited with his dynamic presence whilst Lorenzen only expands the flame of sultry grooves and intrusive hooks to increase the virulence of the song. An explosive yet controlled incitement, the song is more than matched by the heated aftermath of Aftershock. Toxic and flirtatious, the track is a maelstrom of contrasting and supporting textures again built on the commanding beats of Brewer and shaped by the tenaciously creative fire of Lorenzen. Bands such as Clutch and Kyuss have often been mentioned as a reference for Iron Jawed Guru, and it is easy to see why from this alone.

The deceptively wiry and full-bodied intoxication of the album’s title track is next, it expelling a sinister and tempestuous air around the undisguised salaciousness that ignites every swinging groove and deeply rooting hook. The song is a devious temptress, a predatory romance stealing breath and soul before Gemini and its mercurial saunter lays bold hands on the imagination. With sinews again flexed in every rhythmic swipe and jab as dark volatility lines the sultry climate of sonic suggestiveness, the track has thoughts leaning towards serial killer like imagery rather than astrological based tales such its rich spiral of dark and intensive adventure.

Navajo brings the hues of the dust hugged West next with its smouldering heatwave of melody inflamed enterprise amidst a web of senses scorching grooves whilst Tremors rumbles and grumbles as it descends ravenously on ears with a horde of robustly explosive rhythms matched with equally abrasive riffs. Both tracks in their individual ways are increasingly veined and bound in the ever forceful invention and irresponsible grooves of Lorenzen; they reckless because there is no doubt that hips will never be the same after indulging in the thick devilry of Mata Hari.

Unsurprisingly Vesuvius is a volcanic prowl of sound with lava-esque drama from the guitars and the expected and enterprising bone shuddering swings from Brewer. Its sizzles upon and burns the senses whilst igniting the passions from start to finish; its gripping and increasingly rabid rock ‘n’ roll the perfect exhausting finale to one increasingly thrilling release.

Mata Hari is pure manna for anyone with a groove fetish; for anyone who loves to be flirted with by swinging strains of guitar and rebellious rhythms whilst Iron Jawed Guru is a band surely on the way to recruiting a rampage of hungry appetites and spotlights.

Mata Hari is available now digitally and on CD via Grimoire Records @ https://grimoirerecords.bandcamp.com/album/mata-hari

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Pete RingMaster 09/02/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

For more exploration of the independent and promotional services check out http://www.zykotika.com/

Acid Brains – Thirty Three

ACID-BRAINS_COVER2_RingMaster Review

Rampant with a torrent of diverse flavours all uniting in one mighty slab of punk ‘n’ roll, Thirty Three is one of those proposals which out of the blue sets energies racing and thick pleasure flowing. The rousing success of the new encounter will probably be no surprise for fans of and those in the know about Italian band Acid Brains, a quartet previous full-lengths having earned the band a potent reputation in their homeland’s rock scene, but for the rest of us the album is an impressive introduction to a thrill we have all been missing out on.

Hailing from Lucca and formed in 1997, Acid Brains create a sound which merges alternative and punk rock with grunge and new wave, amongst many flavours, a mix brewed with devilish invention and thick imagination. 2004 saw debut album The End Of The Show released after a trio of demos before it; its well-received outing more than matched by its successor Far Away two years later and Do It Better in 2009. As the new proposition, fourth album Maybe was unveiled via Red Cat Records in 2012 to show more of the evolving enterprise and boldness in a sound now inflaming ears in Thirty Three.

Produced by Gherardo Monti and Acid Brains, Thirty Three comes in two parts; the first consisting of five tracks sung in English and the second with four songs sung in the band’s native tongue. Why the segregation of languages we cannot say but the parts are a CD equivalent to the side A and side B on a vinyl release or like on a double EP.

Band and album have attention and ears in the palms of their creative hands from the off, opener Make Up Your Mind laying down an initial lure of confrontational yet controlled bass and guitar before bursting into a fiery punk rock escapade with, whether intentional or not, a more than familiar relationship to The Damned’s Neat Neat Neat. The track proceeds to stop and flow with magnetic invention and aggressive ferocity throughout, creating a compelling proposal easy to get greedy over long the way, just like the following Halloween. The second track strolls in with its own slightly belligerent character, the bass of Antonio Amatulli devilishly prowling amongst the sonic tempting of guitarists Alfredo Bechelli and Stefano Giambastiani. The latter’s vocals equally engage with grouchy persuasion as the song explores a post punk/new wave fuelled slice of raw power pop, it already showing the strong variety within the album as it has the imagination bound and ears again aroused.

Sometimes steps up next, tantalising initially with a dirty flame of riffs before hitting a grunge/punk canter playing like a feisty mix of Nirvana, The St Pierre Snake Invasion, and Feud. Antagonistic but with an anthemic welcome rather than a nasty intent, the track stomps along recruiting body and appetite before On The Borderline takes over with its post punk laced, rhythmically gripping prowl. The resourceful beats of drummer Luca Bambini masterfully shape the track and entice instincts to which guitar and vocals offer their inventively bracing assets. With a spice of Gang Of Four meets Gruntruck to it, the track continues the impressive and increasingly gripping persuasion of the album, and the enjoyable wealth of diversity.

Adding a touch of glam rock swagger is Answers next, but equally a healthy scent of old school punk is the order of the day within the slimline and enjoyable canter before Tu throws some rhythmically tenacious garage rock into the album’s mix. A bracing stomp bouncing aggressively around with sonic colouring maybe best described as NOFX and The Pulsebeats in league with the punkier side of Les Négresses Vertes, it sets the second part of Thirty Three off in fine style to be quickly backed and surpassed by the outstanding nagging tempting of Mi Sorprendi. Riffs and rhythms provide a great worrisome yet addictive beckoning for the vocals of Giambastiani to stir things up in potent style within. Once more that post punk spicing add to the varied punk ‘n’ roll adventure of the track whilst hooks and the throaty tones from Amatulli’s strings only add to the inescapable captivation.

The final pair of songs ensures the album ends with as much variation and resourcefulness as it has perpetually offered already. All’infinito is first, a heavily enticing slice of drama with sinister electronics courting a grunge punk aggravation whilst closing song Solido has its own dark theatre through haunting keys within a rawer coaxing of guitar. Soon it raises its temperature and contagion with a glorious roar of a chorus that has listener participation involved with ease. Subsequently leading into another hungrily virulent blaze of rich grooves and deeply embedding hooks; that in turn the passage into an attitude loaded punk bellow of a blistering finale, it and its predecessor provides a thumping close to an increasingly persuasive and impressive album.

Acid Brains is rock ‘n’ roll to get excited and greedy over; something fresh to get lusty with through an album that flicks all the right switches.

Thirty Three is out now via Red Cat Records across most online stores.

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Pete RingMaster 08/02/2016

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

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Audio Poets – Make a Scene

artworks_RingMaster Review

Such the almost scattergun diversity escaping Make a Scene there are times you wonder how it works with such coherent unity but it does and what is on offer is one gloriously rousing and dynamically imagination incitement for ears and emotions. The new album from US rockers Audio Poets, it is a thumping merger of pop punk, alternative rock, and unbridled rock ‘n’ roll, to try and slim it down, which leaves an increasingly greedy appetite breathless for more.

Formed in Dallas as 2014 made its goodbyes, Audio Poets quickly hit the live scene the following year, playing their first show in Buffalo with Rookie of the Year. Debut EP Colours had its successful release the following month before the quartet spent the spring of 2015 recording Make A Scene. The latter months of the year saw the album uncaged and the band relocate to Los Angeles, as well as hungrily hitting the live scene across the US. The UK and Mainland Europe are now in their live sights for 2016, the band ready to pounce on the already eager reactions to the galvanic sounds and the quickly impressing adventure of Make a Scene.

Recorded with producer Geoff Rockwell (Forever The Sickest Kids, Memphis May Fire, Crown The Empire), the band’s album swiftly hits a rousing plateau with opener The Anthem. A scuzz lined guitar makes the first invitation with its sultry hues, the lead vocals of guitarist Chris Durio quickly adding their punch to the attitude loaded proposal. As the track develops there is no escaping the potent and enjoyable Rage Against The Machine essence to the track, it coming bound in just as appealing stoner-esque grooves from the fiery guitar enterprise of Bru Whitley and Durio who create a magnetic web around the increasingly defiance loaded narrative and vocal tones.

It is a riveting and contagious start to the release but soon overshadowed by the outstanding Wake Up. Straight away that variety in sound and imagination is arousing ears and thoughts, the second song bounding around with pop punk energy and revelry whilst casting an aggressive CIV like snarl and melodic tempting. There is a touch of UK band Hawk Eyes to the romping escapade too, enslaving hooks aligned to rowdy but controlled dynamics colluding excitedly with the darker inviting prowess of bassist Mike Knight and the sinew swung beats of drummer Landon Jett.

Next up Not My Time is a triumph to match the last, this time the band exploring a My Chemical Romance meets Fall Out Boy like theatre of invention and creative mischief. Feet and hips are soon seriously involved with the more restrained, compared to its predecessors, yet feistily swinging canter of the spellbinding song and its unpredictable invention. There is a serious urge to dive right back into the track after its conclusion, though that is soon diverted by the punchy roar of Burn and after that, the album’s Marilyn Mansion scented title track. For the first, Durio mixes his strong clean tones with more rap bred vocal jabbing, though this time The Kennedy Soundtrack is a closer hint to the adventure of sound and voice on offer. As the song evolves between standing toe to toe with grouchy agitation and seducing with poetic melodic infectiousness, a touch of Lost Prophets slips into the captivation, that one more arguably familiar colour which, as within every song, simply helps flavour something openly unique. Next up Make A Scene flirts with and barges across ears with a virulence of craft and sound which again has the body and emotions subservient; electronic and industrial ingredients as powerfully persuasive as the punk infused rock ‘n’ roll at its heart.

Fiery interlude Space is more the doorway into a new turn to the album than a break, its cosmic air a progressively textured tempting for the imagination before Revolution stands tall and defiant in attitude and sound. Featuring Jay Miller of Texan band Drudge, the song is a brooding maelstrom of imposing rock ‘n ‘roll spiced with melodic hardcore imagination and an array of intriguing sonic colours and styles. It easily holds attention and enjoyment tight and leaves satisfaction full though it is maybe not as inventively bold and tenacious as earlier songs, a success found by the equally weighty emotive and tempestuous embrace of Wounded Eyes. Mixing a rich blend of varied metal infused rock flavours, the track is again an encounter fulfilling all wants and hopes if without quite breaching the same plateau the album set in place early on.

Do You Feel It (Now) brings a feistier and in some ways creatively livelier proposal with its tapestry of styles soon after, vocals and sounds from every corner of the band helping draw physical participation before closer Make It Through, escorts ears into a broader electronic landscape that sees the album go out on a potent high.

For personal tastes the album produces its richest and most ingenious mastery across the first five or so tracks, exploring more emotively shadowed and intensive depths to matching success thereafter, and from start to finish Make a Scene is one irresistible and rousing temptation from a band surely heading towards major attention.

Make a Scene is out now through most online stores.

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Pete RingMaster 07/02/2016

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