Fit For An Autopsy – Absolute Hope Absolute Hell

fitforanautopsy_RingMaster Review

The time between previous album, the 2013 released Hellbound, and its new successor Absolute Hope Absolute Hell, has seen death metallers Fit For An Autopsy become not only more brutal but strikingly bolder in the adventure behind the infusion of melodic imagination and diversity shaping their ferocity. The evidence is all strikingly there in the band’s third album which is also the first with new vocalist Joe Badolato after the departure of Nate Johnson last year. Quite simply Absolute Hope Absolute Hell is a gripping tempest of sound and intensity, of passion and anger, and a new heady bench mark for the New Jersey hailing sextet.

Self-produced by guitarist Will Putney, who has also previously produced the likes of Thy Art Is Murder, Acacia Strain, and Northlane, Absolute Hope Absolute Hell opens with its title track and a melodic tempting which reflects the first part of its title perfectly. Within a few more deep breaths riffs are crawling through the air and dark grooves binding ears as the quickly impressing delivery of Badolato steers the brewing volcanic tempest. Whereas in previously releases the open barbarism fuelling the new intent would be undiluted, here the opening enticing continues to flirt from within the storm, ebbing away occasionally to return with vocal elegance as the track relentlessly grows into and evolves its furious skin and body.

FitForAnAutopsy_AHAH_RingMaster Review      It is a mighty and thrilling start carried on by the following Wither, its first touch a crunching tide of raw riffs and imposing rhythms again straddled by the excellent tones of the new frontman. Johnson was a mighty force and texture within Fit For An Autopsy but Badolato brings something just as hearty but stirringly different which simply fits the band’s evolution in sound, Saltwound straight after conformation if it was needed. Backing vocals equally seem to have found a new zeal and hue to their roars too, on the third song creating searing harmonics within the sonic smog wrapping the rhythmic trespass of the track. Though not quite living up to the pair before, such their stunning success, the track quickly unveils more melodic enterprise and atmospheric imagination as forcibly alluring as any raw ferocity unleashed across song and album.

Both the Gojira meets Oceano like Murder In The First and Storm Drains exhaust the body and ignite the senses, the first a zealous predatory stalking which bewitches with repetitive hooks and spiralling grooves whilst becoming more barbarous with every passing minute and blast of viciousness. Its successor is a viscous sonic and vocal assault but again a turbulence unafraid to spin magnetic melodic and caustic tempting through the guitars of Putney, Tim Howley, and Pat Sheridan, drummer Josean Orta alongside splintering bone with his often restrained but fierce swings; that reserve emerging with the almost post-rock like ambience which also blows through the track.

Another high is breached with Ghosts In The River, Badolato offering a Jaz Coleman like tone to his cleaner grizzled delivery whilst around him vivaciously shimmering melodies seep from guitar strings and a warm inviting atmosphere leads the listener into the volatility and perpetually animus of the song’s heart. Bassist Shane Slade sculpts bait which borders on bestial but is tempered, almost smothered at times by the mesmeric melodic imagination working away on an already by this point greedy appetite. The track is as enthralling an inventive and fluidly diverse violation as you could hope for and quickly matched by the outstanding and creatively rabid Mask Maker which takes things to even more entangled richer depths. One moment it is scarring the senses with sonic acidity and the next creating a furious anthem which again has a slight Killing Joke scent to it, not to mention that of bands like Thy Art is Murder, though as shown yet again by Hollow Shell straight after, Fit For An Autopsy have created a presence truly distinct to them showing past great efforts were still a sound in the making. Hollow Shell is almost gentle in comparison to the previous track, well for a passing moment or two as sinews become stretched, emotions turn sour, and intensity is uncapped as the track boils over with rancor but without losing any of its creative enterprise and seamless fusion of melody rich ambience and toxic savagery.

Out To Sea is a song which took time to fully persuade, its opening emotive calm and sweeping atmosphere tempered for personal tastes by the vocal delivery choice of Badolato, his rasping tones a dampener on the climate but coming into their own as the short but potent track breeds a cantankerous torrent of hostility around the persistent beauty. It is a great appetiser for the virulent bad-blood of False Positive though, this a maelstrom of creative spite and bedlamic ingenuity as blusteringly unpredictable as it is punishingly hellacious. Every second brings a new chastisement for the senses and inventive tonic for ears and imagination, the album closing on the same lofty heights as it started, a pinnacle reinforced by album closer Swing The Axe and its more controlled and tempered storm flowing with and exposing the new direction and ingenuity in the Fit For An Autopsy songwriting and sound.

To simplify things, Absolute Hope Absolute Hell is technically compelling, brutally impacting rock ‘n’ roll to give your soul to, the roar of a band’s sound coming of age with plenty more still to be explored and experienced. We have another best of year metal contender!

Absolute Hope Absolute Hell is available from October 2nd via eOne / Good Fight Music.

Pete RingMaster 02/10/2015

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Get The Blessing – Astronautilus

GTB_RingMaster Review

Jazz is not a genre which gets squeezed into our schedule too often and when it does it is the more experimental and often schizophrenic takes on it which most spark the imagination. With more offerings like the new album from UK’s Get The Blessing, making room and finding time to explore many more potential treats might just be a new intent though. The fifth full-length from the Bristol instrumentalists is a fiercely captivating, imagination stirring adventure which according to the band sees them create a proposal which is “dark with a joyous soul.” It is a declaration quickly confirmed by the album, as also claims of others which describe Astronautilus as being bred with “more adventurous improvisation and electronics” than ever before without losing the unpredictability and musical mischievousness the band is renowned for. New to Get The Blessing through their latest encounter we again take their thoughts as being on the mark whilst just adding that Astronautilus is simply irresistible.

The successor to 2014 albums Lope and Antilope, and dedicated to Ornette Coleman, an American jazz saxophonist, violinist, trumpeter, and composer who died earlier this year and “was pivotal to the band’s formation in 2000”, Astronautilus opens with the dark shuffle of Phaenomena. Instantly the fuzzy groan of Jim Barr’s bass resonates on ear drums, their attention keen to get involved as to that of the imagination as the warmer tones of brass blowing seductively yet devilishly over the senses. The skittish beats of drummer and percussionist Clive Deamer take care of the body whilst the hips belong to the hook swung by the sax of Jake McMurchie and trumpet of Pete Judge. In no time the body is enslaved, shadows and light colluding within the improvised piece of contagion spilled to cast a dance perfect for darkly lit surroundings and hope fuelled good times.

ccover_RingMaster Review     The following Carapace is a sultry romance for ears and thoughts, its seductive smoulder of brass and horn alone bewitching as the song takes the listener on a flight through exotic realms built on reflective intimacy. Like all great instrumentals, thoughts inspired, escapades sparked in the imagination most likely vary from the inspirations and themes the band breed the piece from, but they are ignited and that is the potent success which Get The Blessing achieves time and time again.

Next up is Monkfish, a piece simultaneously inspired by Thelonius Monk, a pair of Deamer’s shoes, and the fish, though as it swings and shuffles with tenacious enterprise and flirtatious bait we cannot help but think of the Fast Show and the character Inspector Monkfish, especially with the core swagger which relishes its inescapable lure on feet and emotions. The track reminds of eighties band Mouth, especially rhythmically and in insatiable energy whilst Conch straight after reveals a unique presence grown from an echoing shimmer of melodic enticement which almost toys with the senses as undefined and shadowy resonance invasively flirts with dark elegance.

Things get a touch surreal with Cornish Native next, the outstanding incitement a rhythmic compulsion for the body and its creamy invention a spark for the mind. At times it has the salty taste of the sea, or the oyster it is titled after, and a sense of the random landscape and deceptively busy natural life of the remote area where the band recorded the album. In other moments within a sense of isolation, abstract sounds and twists break out to leave the listener roaming disconnected yet still alluring scenery; the latter a bit like visiting the Scilly Isles when it is closed i.e. Sundays.

The lapping of waves continues in next up Nautilus, its melancholic and hazy air a drifting melodic fog within warm spirals of brass driven air which gets more intensive and lively, in turn suggestively dark and almost intimidating, across the length of the mesmeric track. It is enthralling, a tantalising swim though emotionally refreshing sound which like the night makes way for the morning light brought by Green Herring, a joyful and carefree piece that carries a smile to induce a matching response in the listener. The bass especially has feet enslaved, trumpet and sax taking care of the rest with both colluding to riveting effect for a finale where the imagination envisages a battle between fish and man, the net, the escape…or not.

The album is closed by firstly Hayk, a track which for no obvious reason than that is simply is, provides a mesmeric exploration which is just sinister on the ears and thoughts, and finally the haunting Sepia, a piece which lives up to its name in tone and suggestiveness whilst sending the listener drifting off into a spatial yet emotionally smothering atmosphere. It is not one of the emerging favourites within Astronautilus but it is the most fascinating proposal inciting new imagined experiences with every listen.

We cannot say if Astronautilus is the best Get The Blessing release or if they have tapped into a new plateau with their sound, with as said earlier the album our first meeting with them, but if it is not the case, past albums must be set in stone classics as the band’s new offering is simply delicious.

Astronautilus is available digitally and on Cd and vinyl from October 2nd via Naim Jazz Records.

Pete RingMaster 02/10/2015

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Haut&Court – Troffea

H&C_RingMaster Review

As 2012 turned into its successor, a thrilling senses stripping violation was unleashed by French noise spewers Haut&Court. It was their debut EP La Vie, a fury of sonic magma which had us declaring it “one of the most promising and rewarding releases in a long time” whilst cowering in the corner. Now the Strasbourg band has released its highly anticipated successor in the brawling violation that is Troffea. All the potential and qualities that marked the first Haut&Court onslaught have been realised and pushed masterfully on in their new twelve track animus. It is nasty, vicious, and physically and emotionally painful but equally with whiplash causing grooves and at times a truly ravenous swing to its body, the release is an essential beating all raw thrash, violent crust and hardcore punk, as well as rabid noise and grindcore fans should be looking at devouring.

Formed mid-2012, the threesome of vocalist Arnaud Diemer, guitarist Bernard, and drummer Ravindranth Saint Jean quickly whipped up potent attention with La Vie, its unique tempest of sound a corrosive and merciless confrontation bred on striking invention. Now a quartet with bassist/vocalist Benjamin ‘Merko’ Simon and guitarist Bernard ‘Skud’ Zurletti alongside Diemer and Saint Jean, Haut&Court has dug with new zeal deeper and explored further into their imaginative hostility to conjure a creative rage rippling with contagious enterprise and virulent invention with the invigorating sonic abrasion they are already renowned for. Troffea startles and abuses, savages and seduces as the band weaves a host of styles into their unbridled aural rancor. It is a dance for the apocalypse, a perpetual festival caked in destruction and crippling ferocity swinging alluring creative hips that invite all to partake in its revelry.

cover_RingMaster Review     Troffea opens up its malicious charm with Sea of Shit, band and song initially immersing the listener in thin but intrusive sonic smog from within which hefty beats and swirling grooves spring their raw tempting. Quickly, as the bass of Simon spreads its hearty malevolence, the raw vocal squall of Diemer brings distinctive ire to the already infectiously imposing bellow of sound and spite. It is a minute and a half which ravages and incites the body, a thrilling infection of sound and emotion putting the imagination and appetite in the mood for contagious war.

The following Putin continues in similar vicious vein, its individual tsunami of intensity loaded with catchy bait. A hardcore wind roars through sound and vocals to buffet the listener but its impact is perfectly tempered by the fiery grooves and rhythmic enticing which equally takes no prisoners. Of course this is not going to be for everyone, the whimpering behind as these words are cast evidence, but if the flavours mentioned above hit the spot, lustful greed is the swift and sure reaction, and only gaining pace and ardour as Caligari emerges from an earthy bass lit shadow to spin a demonic and intoxicating web of sonic bedlam pierced by technical prowess, searing grooves, and brain damaging beats. The song is an infestation, every aspect despoiling the senses, seeping under the skin, and laying a scourge on the psyche for pure pleasure.

Meursault provides no let up straight after, even as guitars cast a venomous melodic trail within the excruciating storm, the track is bestial as its charges through and crawls over the listener with open antipathy for all. It also confirms the great unpredictability and often understated but constant imagination and creative ingenuity frequenting each track. With a Coilguns like cacophony ripe with twisted slithers of grooving and acidic sonic tang, 1518 straight it is determined revelry in the face of punishing adversity; its bedlamic drive almost dervish like in energy and intent whilst Ostinator is molten extreme metal bent and brutally coaxed into another unique and grievous Haut&Court punk assault; both tracks offering their own impossible to predict and easy to enjoy trespasses.

To be honest every track within Troffea carries those rewarding qualities, no moment ever less than open exploration or offering respite in breath-taking adventure, the outstanding Chosta alone, debilitating grindcore whipped proof scintillatingly backed by the seriously bruising and tenaciously busy Hienes. One of the longest tracks on the album at three and a half scorching minutes, it is a jungle of barbarous rhythms and predatory bass animosity with vocals to match, a torrential sandstorm of toxic guitar enterprise equally helping it ignite the passions with ease.

The salacious prowl of the doom soaked Swing comes next unleashing another raw avenue and depth to the Haut&Court songwriting to bring more unique diversity to the album, its ruinous presence as much cerebral as physical. Though the track admittedly does not quite spark the same richness of ardour as elsewhere, it gives potent food for thought as to where the band may go next, though time to think comes later as swiftly the exceptional Feed the Fat with its funky savagery ignites the lust before Goetz spills its harshest grudge led by undulating hostility on the listener, more than likely leaving them in the fetal position.

Completed by the gang brawl of JMLP, a warring anthem to shade most others, Troffea is simply superb. All the great things of La Vie have been intensified and twisted into new tempting, then aligned to a broader and richer but no less blisteringly vehement proposition. Haut&Court is a band to be feared or loved. We choose the latter; time for you to decide…if you dare.

Troffe is out from October 1st on download and vinyl @

Pete RingMaster 01/10/2015

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Hub City Stompers – Caedes Sudor Fermentum: The Best of Dirty Jersey Years

hubcitystompers_RingMaster Review

It never takes much of a reason to get our stomp on here, any excuse to fling limbs and energy around like a headless chicken devoured. One band which has perpetually been a spark is Hub City Stompers but in collecting a horde of their horniest ska bred tunes for their latest album, the band has set the fuse to global skanking like no other.

     Caedes Sudor Fermentum: The Best of Dirty Jersey Years is an irresistible bundle of songs personally chosen by band founder Rev Sinister and taken from previous releases Dirty Jersey, Blood Sweat & Beers, and Mass Appeal. It is also offers a long awaited outing on vinyl from the band, its songs re-mastered by David Perez of Memphis Street Studios for the format.

For those new to Hub City Stompers, the band was as mentioned, formed by Rev Sinister, the former vocalist for NJ Ska band Inspecter 7. When that band went into a kind of hibernation around 2001, Sinister searched out to like-minded musicians and by the following year, Hub City Stompers, with a line-up consisting of ex-members of bands such as Inspecter 7, Bigger Thomas, Professor Plum, Predator Dub Assassins, Bomb Town, and The Heavy Beat, was unleashing irrepressible creative romps. Infusing essences from styles such as reggae, punk, oi!, and hardcore amongst a few others into an array of ska flavours from the 60’s through to the 80’s, the band quickly bred a unique voice to their music which took little time in awakening greedy appetites, as shown by the success of 2004 debut album Blood Sweat and Beers and the Mass Appeal EP a year later. Both the Dirty Jersey and Ska Ska Black Sheep full-lengths of 2006 and 2009 followed suit before the band took a year out on hiatus as Rev Sinister members returned to help revive Inspecter 7. Last year though saw the frontman quit the band and return to Hub City Stompers, bringing it back to raucous new life as evidenced by their last album Life After Death which came out last December. It was of course a heftily welcomed return with their new compilation alone holding all the reasons as to why.

HCS Cover low_RingMaster ReviewThe twelve-track escapade opens with the epic sounds of Wtfiu, ears instantly under a cascade of roving rhythms and sultry brass whilst keys seduce and romance the imagination. Soon into a trampoline like gait, every beat and riff a bold bounce, the track is quickly the puppeteer to the body and soul of the listener, its contagion and energy aural addiction and merciless incitement. Uncaging a scuzzy intensity in its climax, the glorious opener sets release and ‘victim’ off in insatiable style before Bumbl-B is allowed to swarm over ears with its choppy stride and infesting key bred melodies. Vocals snarl and invite whilst the bassline coring it all, is heavy nectar, just two aspects colluding to stir up air around and the passions of all in close proximity in an encounter reminding of the UK’s own King Prawn at times.

Both the smooth skinned, Scarlet & The Harlots meets The Beat like Skinhead Boi and the ska ‘n’ roll canter Johnny Date Rape, captivate with their individual swaggers, both enticing as masterfully through the voice of Jenny Whiskey as they do with their ever tenacious weave of sounds whilst Chatterbox swings with reggae hips as the flirtatious clipping of the guitar aligns with hypnotic beats and another juicily moody bassline. Again the two tone elegance of The Beat comes to mind as the song seduces feet and sparks thick attention but once more Hub City Stompers employ all spices in their own renowned inventive and hungry adventure.

Trojan Night lifts bodies and dance-floors with its insatiable infection of sound and revelry next, early Specials a scent within its romping body, whilst a great Hub City Stompers infested version of The Cure’s Boys Don’t Cry hits the passions in the form of Skins Don’t Cry which hounds and brawls with ears; its punk toned sound and words twisted with Hub City Stompers warm irreverence.

A sixties smooch comes with the lively dance of Leave Me the F**k Alone after that thrilling pair, its own body a mischievous and flirty tempting sure to ignite everything from toes to voice in all to fall under its spell. Another exciting physical workout is guaranteed by band and song, a promise pretty much applying to all songs on teh album let us be honest, the following I’ve Got a Boot even in its belligerent and rawer ramble, a tonic to enliven the body, its relaxed and resourceful hooks and boozy brass lures especially intoxicating.

The magnetic punk irritability of F**k You, You’re Irish hits the spot with ease, its Dropkick Murphys like bar-room tromp a grin inciter matched in fun and unique persuasion by the jazz lined, blues charmed Little Julie Swatstika before the album is closed off by Mass Appeal and one last undiluted swing of sound and energy.

     Caedes Sudor Fermentum: The Best of the Dirty Jersey Years  is the cream of Hub City Stompers in the ears and thoughts of the band. Sometimes it is easy to forget the power of a band in consistency and evolving adventure over time and a good Best Of as here, can bring that home. This is simply a brilliant compilation which excites whilst igniting even greater and eager anticipation of the band’s exploits ahead.

Caedes Sudor Fermentum: The Best of Dirty Jersey Years is available from September 30th as a co-release between Rebel Sound on 150x White Riot Vinyl, Crowd Control Media on 150x Clear Vinyl, and Not Dead Records on 150x Green Goblin Vinyl, each colour exclusive to the individual label with 50x Classic Black Vinyl versions also available.

Pete RingMaster 30/09/2015

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Vanilla Muffins – The Drug Is Football Double 7”

REB1051 front cover_RingMaster Review

Apparently Switzerland’s Vanilla Muffins have been the undisputed Kings of Sugar Oi! for the past 25 years or so. I am not sure about you but I have no idea who else has a sound which fits that genre; well actually maybe we do as the trio from Basel create a stomping proposition which blends pop infused punk with infectious rock ‘n’ roll. It is quite simply punk ‘n’ roll but a strain which indeed has a distinctiveness singular to the band whilst providing one rousing and thoroughly enjoyable escapade.

Driven by a passion for football and their home city team, Vanilla Muffins began in the late eighties, growing in presence, songs, and stature with each passing year. Now they have five albums, eleven EPs, and numerous compilation appearances under their belt, the latest being a re-issue of their classic and highly sought after 2003 album The Drug Is Football via Rebel Sound Music. Last year saw the band return with Best Of (Triumph of Sugar Oi!) via Bandworm/Spirit of the Streets and after it the A Little Night Music / Eine Kleine Nachtmusik EP on Sunny Bastards. Both re-ignited old and indeed sparked new appetites for the band’s insatiable infectious sound, as too limited edition single Goal of the Month earlier this year. Now for a limited edition Double 7″ offering, the band itself has plucked eight of the best songs from The Drug Is Football and if like us you are new to their presence, it is a must listen.

The trio open things up with No Punk Rock In My Car, and a rally off boisterous vocals and punchy rhythms aligned to bracing riffs. Instantly it is a virulently catchy affair with sinews as gripping as the warm and inviting melodies are infectious, slavery for feet, neck muscles, and vocal chords the result. There is a feel of UK rockers Spunk Volcano and The Eruptions to the encounter, a similar old school punk meets modern devilry at riotous and irresistible play.

The following Brigade Loco is just as magnetic and inciting, the grooved coaxing from the guitar of Colin Brändle an inescapable lure within the jabbing beats of Eddie Jr and the great bass groans posing as a bassline from Ian Norris. Equally Brändle’s vocals are nothing less than rich persuasion and though there are no major surprises in the song, as throughout all tracks, everything colludes in a power pop meets punk rock tempest of boisterous and seriously invigorating goodness.

Dirt Box Disco meets Weezer is a handy description for All Roads Lead To Rome which follows, the song sitting somewhere between the two as Vanilla Muffins swing riffs and hooks like a puppeteer to again command eager hips and reckless feet. Without quite matching the first two in drawing lusty reactions, the song is an easy going protagonist to get swiftly involved with, its success nicely setting up the appetite for the brilliant 3 Comrades. Rhythmically compelling and vocally inescapable, the song is pure anthemic rebel rousing and maybe the best thing on the release, though that fluctuates between a trio of songs daily.

The title track rampages through ears next; its steely punk attitude and intensity simultaneously tempered and urged on by the ever alluring vocals and melody rich hooks which just as potently rouse the spirit and spark unavoidable participation. It is a blood pumping call backed resourcefully by The Gang From Kannenfeldpark and its nostalgic look at the young years and more carefree times and straight after by The One And Only with its Buzzcocks like nag of a hook and fuzzy Vibrators like contagion. Both songs whip up more pleasure and hunger for the thickly enjoyable punk frolics, and the wonderment as to why it has taken this long to come across the slavery of the Vanilla Muffins sound.

The Mob From Kannenfeldpark is built on similar seeds as to its predecessor with another recognisable hook the lead into a slice of rock ‘n’ roll which finds a inspiration in decades further back than that of its original birth to spice up its own tenaciously imagined rock ‘n’ roll.

As the saying goes, better late than never and it certainly applies to finally get wrapped up in the Vanilla Muffins experience, a treat no punk and rock ‘n’ roll fan should miss out on. Watching FC Basel play on TV will come with a new soundtrack and fun from now on too.

The Drug Is Football Double 7″ is available from 30th September via Rebel Sound Music on Black Vinyl (200), Red A&B Side, Blue C&D Side coloured vinyl (200), and on Half N Half Blue/Yellow vinyl (100 and only exclusive to Rebel Sound)

Pete RingMaster 30/09/2015

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Paul Menel and The Essentials

Paul Menel pic 1_RingMaster Review

Having teased us all in regard to their new album with recently released single They Call Her Leaf, Paul Menel and The Essentials have offered a bigger insight into in their forthcoming full-length with a five track sampler. Primarily a promotional tool to awaken media attention, all we can say is if the five tracks within its walls are an indication of the album to come, the band has a sure-fire success on their hands with Spare Parts for Broken Hearts.

Led by singer/songwriter/guitarist Paul Menel, an artist who fronted prog rock band IQ from 1985 to 1990 and whose previous solo albums in Carpenter From Nazareth Seeks Joiners and Into Insignificance I Will Pale have met with increasing success and acclaim, the band is proving itself to be one of the bright winds on the British rock scene. The line-up is completed on the Gav Monaghan produced Spare Parts for Broken Hearts by bassist Steve Swift and drummer Tim Churchman but also sees numerous guest appearances including Vix Vox of Fuzzbox who features on the opening song from the sampler, that latest single They Call Her Leaf.

From its initial tingle of melodic guitar the song is perpetual captivation, escalating its potency as the strong vocals of Menel join rich melodies and resonating beats. Shadows come from a tasty, if understated, bassline whilst atmosphere and suggestive expression oozes from every aspect of the aural fascination. There is no escaping a Peter Gabriel essence to the flowing folkish charm and dramatic colourful of the song it has to be said, but it is a hue only adding to the refreshing imagination and originality flowing freely around and in the vocal roar of Menel. With the siren tones of Vox equally entrancing within the richly flavoured fusion of progressive and classic rock, The track is a master of ears, and just as powerful and irresistible after a torrent of plays as it was first time around.

The second song on the sampler is Walk In My Shoes, a glow of voice and emotive melodies spread further by harmonies and keys. The song quickly reveals a different shade to the sound and songwriting of Menel and band, its classic elegance and emotive intensity a warm slice of thick balladry. It is a potent and powerful proposition but not one which sparks with personal tastes and that is the only issue it has, just trying to please someone missing an appetite for its kind of temptation.

There is going to be plenty of rock ‘n’ roll diversity across Spare Parts for Broken Hearts going by this early taster too, the third song Strife strong evidence with its glorious post-punk/Bond like hook and steamy blues toned flame of guitar. Equally there is a theatre in the jungle of rhythms and expressive vocals which leave their addictive bait across the fifties/sixties laced rocker, all uniting in a glorious incitement as individual as the rest of the songs and equally riveting.

The title track from Spare Parts for Broken Hearts is another striking tempting on the sampler. Opening on a worldly chorus and also developing a bassline and stirring core as much punk as it is melodic rock, the track soon breaks into a feisty canter enveloped in a tapestry of melodies and varied styles; all the time increasing its virulent persuasion. Strings, brass, and keys serenade as robust rhythms lead the unpredictable and addictive waltz into igniting ears and imagination.

The final early look at the album on this release is Let’s Do It, another Gabriel-esque seduction loaded with a cosmopolitan air and world bred rhythms bred with shamanic hypnotism. There are glimpses of almost every flavour and corner of the globe somewhere within the scintillating party of the song, its title a suggestion you can only embrace and apply to checking out the full Spare Parts for Broken Hearts album when it is soon unveiled.

We will be there and hopefully you too as this sampler more than hints that there is something very special awaiting us.

The single They Call Her Leaf is out now via most online stores.

Pete RingMaster 30/09/2015

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Los Brigands – Nothing’s Clean

LB_RingMaster Review

We had limited knowledge of Los Brigands up to this point in time but that is about to change and for a great many others no doubt, thanks to the might of their debut album Nothing’s Clean. Co-released with Crowd Control Media, the sixteen track stomp is an incendiary brawl of punk rock in its varied forms and devilry. It is quite simply rousing undiluted rock ‘n’ roll which just hits the sweet spot and can only push the band to greedier, broader spotlights hereon in.

Hailing from Los Angeles, the trio of vocalist/bassist Aroldo, guitarist/vocalist Hector, and drummer Keith have become one of the staples of the LA punk scene since forming in 2009. Inspirations come from the depths of hardcore but as their first full-length shows, the band is unafraid to add and twists things to embrace a host of distinctive styles and flavours within their songs. Back home they are a loyally supported outfit renowned for their high energy shows and catchy incitements of sound. Now with the unleashing of the sabre like charge of Nothing’s Clean, sixteen songs in thirty four minutes, Los Brigands look set to become a name on a much broader expanse of enthused lips.

     The Haters’ Circle starts things off, the track a thickly enticing instrumental slice of psychobilly/punk which alone has body and emotions ignited and ready to feast, which they greedily do on its successor. Like Dead Kennedys meets Tiger Army, the opener brings its two minutes plus to the boil perfectly, making way for the similarly bred but hardcore driven 8 50. Hooks and rhythms are a hungry enticement whilst the vocals roar and brawl to match the addictive impact of the sound around them. For less than a minute and a half, the track incites ears and appetite, and for that same length whilst embracing familiar inspirations and essences, the punk rock passions are aflame, burning greedily for what is to follow.

losbrigandsnothingcleanalbumart_RingMaster Review   10 Times Worse is the first to step up with pulsating beats and a throbbing bassline aligned to ska bred enterprise. The song continues to swing along with infection lining its thick lures and chorus, its body an irresistible mix of UK band The Vox Dolomites and [Spunge] and leaving lips licked and a ripe want for more. The following Robbie does not provide more of the same flavour but is instead a highly agreeable Los Brigands take on Johnny B Goode which leaves rich satisfaction in its wake before the Spanish sung Algun Dia provides a Clash like stirring of ears and energy; its hard bounce another lifting the listener to feet amidst anthemic calls.

Things only get tastier as the belligerent ska brawl of Cold Cold City escapes the album next, it’s bruising attitude and prowess another spark to ignite the passions for the release with a success emulated and indeed eclipsed by the outstanding Dead American Dream. With a feisty tinge of street punk to its tempestuous swagger and defiance fuelled attitude, the song is as spiky as it is infectiously virulent whilst On The Wall straight after, dips into some raw pop punk revelry with a Rancid meets The Bouncing Souls proposition to outshine much around it as impressive though they all are.

The opening volley of beats from Keith straight away puts Downtown Nights on a pedestal to expect big things from, the swiftly rapacious riffs which swoop in not letting anyone down, or the snarling vocals and energy flooding the great confrontation. It is a raging force continuing in the excellent blaze of Fight Fire With Fire and true to form anthems come one after another within Nothing’s Clean but few incite participation as effortlessly as this excellent aggression.

As you will have guessed, variety across the album is rife and provides another colourful shade of adventure through the caustic ska romp of Broke, guitars and sax especially fruity against the growl of the vocals and the brooding bass tone cast by Aroldo. That fluid diversity creates another appealing contrast as the grouchy bellow of First 48 springs its contagious old school punk irreverence on the passions before it has to make way for Bumming Cigs and its bluesy rock ‘n’ roll canter which has all bouncing in their chairs, on their feet, and in the streets on personal experience.

Denver Ave has a feel of Russian punk rockers Biting Elbows to its more relaxed but spicy and increasingly agitated presence next, its magnetic tenacity and creative bait getting body and soul excited ready for Bad Vibes to exploit with its furious tempest of boisterous riffs alongside antagonistic rhythms, they bounding around another steely bass sound to get lusty over. It is the home straight on the album and both tracks are nothing less than impressive and addictive as they steer ears towards the finale that is Last One, a last bracing arousal of ears and enjoyment honed into a tangy and furious anthem.

Major surprises on Nothing’s Clean are not dramatic or regular but with a freshness and passion few bands can contemplate let alone match, Los Brigands has provided one of our favourite slabs of rock ‘n’ roll this year. After this the band deserves to be a big blip on all punk rock radars of fans and media alike.

Nothing’s Clean is available now through Crowd Control Media.

Pete RingMaster 29/09/2105

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