Jingo – Make Some Money, Buy Some Love

jingo_RingMasterReview

March 11th sees the eagerly anticipated second album from British rock band Jingo and it is very easy to say that it does not let expectations, bred from the band’s previous impressive releases, down. The ten tracks making up Make Some Money, Buy Some Love are the band’s most eclectic bunch yet, at times in an understated way with closer attention revealing the new myriad of flavours and broad imagination bringing them to life. Just as importantly, it is another mesmerising collection of songs feeding in us and their growing wealth of fans an already eager appetite for the band’s invention and carrying the potential to excite another hungry wave of newcomers to the world of Jingo.

Formed by husband and wife, guitarist/vocalist Jack and vocalist/keyboardist/guitarist Katie Buckett, Jingo seem to have made a strong impact with every move since Jingo played its debut live show was supporting Blur’s Graham Coxon. Through a clutch of captivating singles, creatively provocative EPs, and striking debut album The Art Of Loving of 2014, as well as a live presence seeing the London based band take their imagination and craft across the UK and over to the US, France, Germany, and Belgium, Jingo has enticed rich interest and fan support which has through a highly successful pre-order campaign enabled the band to release Make Some Money, Buy Some Love on CD and vinyl as well as digitally.

With its line-up completed by the invention of Nima Safai, Michael Hussain, and Kelly Lenahan, Jingo has from day one never been easy to pigeonhole. They are generally tagged as alternative rock and have found themselves compared to the varied likes of Portishead, The Magic Numbers, Not Blood Paint, Fleetwood Mac, Interpol, and Jess & the Ancient Ones along the way. As Make Some Money, Buy Some Love again proves Jingo spins broad tapestries which explore diversity with zeal to match their eagerly creative imagination.

art_RingMasterReviewRecorded in New York with producer Kahan James, and mastered by Kevin Blackler (Raconteurs, RHCP etc.), Make Some Money, Buy Some Love opens up with Lifer, the alluring tones of Katie cradled by melodic coaxing as the bass strolls with a controlled but carefree grace. Crisp beats add to the enticement instantly flirting with ears, the song’s underlying funkiness infesting its gait and the listener as pop catchiness and lyrical romancing tempt. Drama is never far from a Jingo twist and turn, its boldest attraction lining Katie’s vocal prowess especially here in a gem of an introduction.

All of the track’s qualities and more emerge in the following Sirens and Vices, Its rhythmic bait quickly infecting feet as melody woven grooves seize hips. Both elements add to the flirtatious nature of the song, impassioned vocals and raw, fiery textures growing in the blend of smouldering and raucous seduction. Grabbing ears and imagination from the first second, it only tightens its grip second by second squeezing lustful responses out before making way for the pop revelry of Money. It is instinctive catchiness with a steely backbone and bold attitude though, dancing persistently and mischievously as the song teases with playful coquetry.

From a busy bedlam Gaia emerges with its own melodic grace and emotive eloquence next, Katie joined by the equally potent tones of Jack as keys and guitars paint their own poetic picture over a more forceful rhythmic spine. It is pure magnetism with a just unveiled eye catching video to match.

Never Love Again also has little trouble winning attention and pleasure as its evocative melodies and warmly invasive essences hug captivating vocals. The song never quite reaches the heights of its predecessors but never lacks a second of enjoyable adventure before the outstanding Death Counts takes over. The track is nothing less than melancholic beauty becoming more exotic, almost sinister, and relentlessly beguiling with each passing seduction of passion fuelled notes and vocal fascination.

The body is back jumping around with Let’s Be Friends next; its noir lit drama and tenacious rhythmic dexterity enough alone to enslave the imagination. Katie is like a devious puppeteer in the midst of the brew of fire bred grooves, agitated beats, and frequently concussive energy; her lures as inescapable as the gloriously tempestuous textures making up another mighty highlight within Make Some Money, Buy Some Love.

Last year’s sensational single Sweet Anne follows, Katie and Jack united in crooning temptation as initially the song gently grows in ears. Soon it is in full swing with boisterous rhythms skirting the tangy funk infused hooks and lecherous grooves uniting and barging against each other. It too has an irresistible tempest like texture to its body but equally melodic calm makes a compelling persuasion in between the song’s moments of vociferous and explosive carnival like devilry.

The album is completed by firstly the melodic romance and harmonic charm of Supersymmetry, one simply bewitching encounter with fire in its heart and finally by the pop rock seducing of The Shell. Both tracks solicit emotions and body to get involved in quick time and each leave only a want for more, the perpetual hunger which seems to come with every Jingo encounter.

For Make Some Money, Buy Some Love, Jingo has honed their sound into something as diverse and bold as ever but exploring both with a more seamlessly and easily flowing touch; the result being another Jingo moment which makes the world a better place.

Make Some Money, Buy Some Love is released March 11th

http://jingomusic.com/   https://www.facebook.com/jingomusic/   https://twitter.com/JingoMusic

Pete RingMaster 22/02/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Pryapisme – Diabolicus Felinae Pandemonium

band-_RingMasterReview

The press release for Diabolicus Felinae Pandemonium, the third album from the creative diablerie that is avant-garde/experimental metallers Pryapisme, declares it is “definitely the album of immaturity”. In truth it is the most accomplished, dare one say inventively mature offering from the Clermont-Ferrand hailing outfit yet. That growth has not defused the rousing bedlamic imagination of the band, in fact it seems to have escalated its mischief but where previous releases might be called schizophrenic such the mayhem of their head spinning diversity, Diabolicus Felinae Pandemonium feels in control of its creative chicanery; the result importantly again, a hell of a lot of fun and another irresistible infestation of psyche and spirit by the French outfit.

Their latest release is the first recorded with the band’s actual live formation rather than the core trio, the full quintet of Benjamin Bardiaux (keyboards), Nils Cheville (guitar), Antony Miranda (bass, guitar, moog, vocals), Nicolas Sénac (guitar), and Aymeric Thomas (drums, clarinet, keyboards) revealing their off-kilter craft and imagination. The album itself reveals the “advent of the Era of the Cat, the one which will replace mankind. After the arrival of the lol-cats all over internet, which constitutes the last conspiracy, well after the one of Ancient Egypt where the cats were already ruling the highest spheres of power, the diabolical felines are now preparing the birth of Satan’s cat, the Chosen One which will tame humanity and in the end, conquer the whole galaxy with the help of its pentagram of cat food.” Further music to our ears as we always claimed they were the devil’s spawn.

It opens up with Un max de croco, coaxing Middle Eastern vines escaping the guitar as rhythms shuffle around, ready to dance in the subsequent blossoming of melodic frivolity. There is a restraint to it all though, a reserve which accentuates the glint in the eye of hooks and keyboard spun melodies. In saying that, the infectiousness of the track is rampant and only strengthened by the jazzy twist and throaty throb of the contrabass provided by guest Matthieu Halberstadt (Ogino, Please lose battle). Never predictable but as expected and welcomed, the band and song turn on a spin of notes through varied styles and flavours, each move enslaving body and imagination in active participation.

artwork_RingMasterReviewLa Boetie stochastic process follows, flowing with summery warmth and flirtatious catchiness through darker shadows and dirtier street corners, every crevice a well of human drama and devilish enterprise. As with every song, thoughts have a field day interpreting and playing with the suggestiveness offered and the melodic painting shared, hips swinging with zeal to funk infused turns as the sax of Adrien Daguzon (Zibeline) flames in the midst of it all. There is a touch of 6:33 to the track, a whiff of Trepalium in its rowdier twists but as ever expectantly unique to Pryapisme.

The tenacious stroll of 100 % babines, pur molossoïde! roams ears and imagination next, its wave of hookery and sonic theatre if not cinematic resembling themes of those old sixties detective/sci-fi shows around floral melodies and darker, almost sinister beauty. Its individual escapade and canvas of sound just confirms another release driven by unbridled diversity, A la Zheuleuleu backing its affirmation with its celestial, moon lit saunter into a hectic and aggressively boisterous romp while Tau Ceti Central immerses the listener in another jazz scented, smoky adventure.

The album is like a travelogue, glimpses at landscapes and intimate insights discovered and invaded by its theme’s protagonists though Tête de museau dans le boudoir (Intermezzo) is more of a captivating and increasingly weird caress allowing for mental refreshment though to be fair it engages with the imagination as much as any other proposal within the album such its loco array of styles.

Myxomatosis against architektür vol IV is equally a rich tapestry of styles, its psychotic nature a trespass of extreme and melodic metal bound in the virulent revelry of varied flavours and pure manna for body and soul before Carambolage fillette contre individu dragon non-décortiqué casts its Nintendo spun contagion, a lure becoming more tempestuous with time as guitars and rhythms add their cartoonish devilment.

The album is completed by firstly C++ and its mesh of cosmopolitan spicing and endeavour, not forgetting mewing cats, and lastly Totipotence d’un erg, an epic thirteen minutes of dawning power, imposing contagion, and majestic wickedness. Flying by such the consuming potency of its evolving drama and kaleidoscopic soundscape, the track alongside its predecessor provides a compelling end to another thrilling outing with the instinctive insanity of Pryapisme.

Diabolicus Felinae Pandemonium is arguably the band’s most fluid and persistently contagious release yet, certainly it is their most skilfully woven and a treat for the bold and the insane.

Diabolicus Felinae Pandemonium is out now through Apathia Records @ https://apathiarecords.bandcamp.com/album/diabolicus-felinae-pandemonium

https://www.facebook.com/pryapisme    https://twitter.com/Pryapisme

Pete RingMaster 08/02/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Czar – Life Is No Way To Treat An Animal

cover-front_RingMasterReview

Finding something which stands out from the crowd let alone presents something truly unique gets harder and harder but Czar and their new album Life Is No Way To Treat An Animal easily tick both boxes. Creating a compelling experimental, bordering on psychotic, brew of sound bred in the raw essences of anything from progressive metal, hardcore, and grind to mathcore, post punk and more, all woven with avant-garde tendencies, the Tacoma, Washington based Czar infest ears and infect the psyche with relish. Certainly it is a challenge not all will take to, yet every intrusive assault, off-kilter trespass found within their album has an instinctive infectiousness which rewards as it devours. Like a mix of Dillinger Escape Plan, Mr. Bungle, and Psyopus, yet as suggested creating its own individual character, sound and indeed Life Is No Way To Treat An Animal is one of those times when you really feel something special is in the making.

The album makes a subdued entrance with the beginning of Owls, etc; electronic throbs and melodic coaxing a minimalistic but potent lure. Soon the enjoyably strained and captivating tones of vocalist Dr. Landon Jared Wonser join in with lively beats and a brooding bassline alongside. The track is still restrained but smouldering greater volatility in its belly. With the funk of Red Hot Chili Peppers and the progressive lilt of The Fall of Troy laced into its Every Time I Die like swing, the song never does explode and only benefits from that teasing of expectations for a thrilling start to the release.

Too Many Yetis quickly follows; its agitated heart and enterprise a caustic invasion as the guitar of Nicholas J. McManus drizzles sonic psychosis upon the rhythmic battering of drummer David Joseph Dorran Jr. and Peter Joseph Ruff’s throbbing bass meandering. Its brief but potent escapade further whets an already awoken appetite before Arachnochondriac casts its unhinged waltz on the senses, guitars a web of irrational melody and bass a roaming grumble as the keys of Christopher Duenas intensely sizzle. It is a frenzied ear twisting affair as magnetic as those before it with its unstable yet skilfully nurtured trespass.

Antelope Mask steps to the fore next, it’s extremely short hunt the perfect appetiser for Beware the Flies, Orestes and its unleashing of a post punk woven landscape littered with cold stabbing riffs, steely grooves, and vocal predation. The eye of its tempest sees keys sharing a classical beauty as harmonies float behind the corrosive squalls of Wonser, the combination as riveting as it is enjoyably testing as it leads ears into the Latin kissed melodic festivity of Vultures Never Eat In Peace. This is a hot bed of unpredictability and cracked emotional turbulence hugged by the toxic sonic craft of guitar and the perpetual imposing enticement of rhythms; drama soaking every twist, sinister deceit each throat spewed syllable.

With a psychedelic lining, The Worm Enters the Moon prowls the listener next, its theatre of sound and imagination sharing attributes found in UK band Japanese Fighting Fish and indeed Dillinger Escape Plan. The open variety of the flavours making up the band’s sound and individual songs is already clear and only reinforced by Canine, No Eyes Just Teeth, spoken word nestling in raw lo-fi sound and straight after the ferocious punk and metal bedlam of Shark Cancer, a track suffocating and igniting the senses simultaneously. Its mordant assault is then matched by that of The Golden Calf, its breath scathing and touch scalding yet equally captivating as it fluidly shifts from venomous pattern to corrosive irritability; and even when the movement is more of a clunky sidestep it works perfectly.

Through the creative surf hued snare of Mister Reindeer and the melodic calm of Domesticated Wolves, ears and imagination are effortlessly reeled in with the rest of the body disturbed into compliance by the predatory jazz infested mania of the exceptional first and the poetic serenade of the second. That track is an oasis in the certifiable invention and nature of the album, a gripping dementia fuelling the crumbling climate and emotional erosion of You Were a Comatose Lion and in turn the jazzily bipolar Wine Hog, both revealing an array of crazed facets to their attention demanding personalities.

So often a nineteen track release is sharing a filler or four along the way but there is no such moment within Life Is No Way To Treat An Animal, the celestially bent x̌ʷiqʷadiʔ provoking grateful reactions while Blind Mice provides a bewitching espionage of twisted enterprise and haunted frenzy with interruptions of dark repose with their successors in Prawn and after that RxABBITS invasively exploring and stretching the psyche respectively. The later of the songs is especially striking with its incendiary fusion of raw and composed sonic belligerence.

Concluded by the minimalistic lure of Taking Roadkill to the Vet, a track warming up to the task of seducing the listener with sonic malignancy through every second of its low key but haunting  electronically spun three minutes,  Life Is No Way To Treat An Animal is a rare gem as creatively murderous as it is formidably tempting. Czar themselves are a fresh breath which you will not have to go searching for; their music and talent will do the hunting.

Life Is No Way To Treat An Animal is out now @ https://czar.bandcamp.com/album/life-is-no-way-to-treat-an-animal

http://czarband.com/   https://www.facebook.com/czartheband

Pete RingMaster 08/02/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Mean Messiah – Hell

mm_RingMasterReview

As January shared its last days, Hell was unleashed in the form of the debut Mean Messiah album. It was the re-release of an invasion of the senses which left only one question in its furious wake. Just how did we like so many others, miss it first time around.

The release is an ear withering, pleasure igniting storm of industrial death/thrash metal with much more to its irritable heart and searing blaze of sound. To simplify things it is a tempest resembling a raging tapestry of Revocation, Strapping Young Lad, and Fear Factory woven with strands of the likes of Cryptopsy, Blood Simple, and Static X yet stands as something distinctly individual to the imagination and roar of Mean Messiah.

The Czech Republic hailing band started out as the one man project of multi-instrumentalist and producer Dan Friml, formerly of Sebastian, Apostasy and many other projects. The winter of 2005 saw him begin work on his first album, its release intended for the following year but delayed and delayed by numerous problems and complications before being completed in 2013. Since then its line-up has expanded, bassist Veronika Smetanová and drummer Honza Šebek joining Friml as he took Mean Messiah live, proceeding to play the biggest festivals in the Czech Republic such as Masters Of Rock, Czech Death Fest, Agressive Fest, Basinfirefest, and Gothoom.

With the band working on a second album for release later this year to follow 2016 EP Let Us Pray, Mean Messiah and Via Nocturna has uncaged Hell again for a formidable and compelling reminder and wake up call for fans and newcomers alike. With its concept themed by people´s varied complicated journeys and destinies inevitably leading to hell, the album makes a calm, welcoming entrance though dark clouds and portentous sounds are soon looming over and invading the imagination as opener Temple of Hell grows in ears. Melodies are enticing yet sinister, rhythms predatory but restrained until throwing off their deceit and storming the barricades. From there grooves and hooks seduce as riffs and beats persist in their invasive intent as Friml’s potent tones snarl. That earlier descriptive comparison is in full swing as the track shares its dangerous and captivating virulence.

cover_RingMasterReviewThe track is superb, using familiar textures in a new and fresh design before being matched in might and success by King Pathetic. The strong unpredictability underlining its predecessor is potent again, and across the whole album to be fair, prowling the vicious rhythmic tenacity and intoxicatingly venomous melodic and sonic web covering the song. Bracing and intrusive, things are punishingly catchy as thrash and death metal enterprise roar with angry rapacity as industrial essences beckon further involvement in the progressively toned fury.

As the second built on and eclipsed the first, Spiritual Resolution breaches a new plateau of persuasion next, scavenging and thrilling the senses with its nagging choleric character while The Death Song with matching toxic dispute stalks and savages the listener with raw infectious enterprise. The first of the two weaves progressively honed melodic suggestiveness while the second lets its bestial ferocity drive the thrilling show.

Hell is the perfect name for sound and theme within the album, the first echoing and fuelling the latter as found in The Last Ride which follows. In many ways the outstanding song is the least corrosive on the album, its swinging rhythms and magnetic grooves rousing infection but there is no escaping its instinctive animosity and barb littered acrimony. With orchestral beauty and atmospheric harmonies colluding with warm melodies, it is sheer magnetism, only intriguing and griping tighter as its growing imagination borders schizophrenic.

The Game gnaws on the senses next, its riffs and beats an enjoyably persistent abrasion colluding with lust igniting electronics. Its irresistible stomp provides another appetite inflaming highlight within Hell, one more to the growing list joined by the dark instrumental climate and dance of Saltatio Mortis and the fiercely catchy caustic devouring of ears and soul cast by The End. Folk bred hues unite with extreme and groove spawn endeavour in the first with its successor a brawl of truculent rock ‘n’ roll, both as imaginative and expectations defeating as they are, certainly in the case of the second, emotionally primal.

Completed by bonus track Remedy, another ridiculously tempting slab of thrash nurtured, creatively evocative music which needs no vocal side to excite and inspire the imagination, Hell grabs the listener by the throat and takes them on one brutally thrilling ride from start to finish. It also lays down a mighty benchmark its successor will be judged by but it is hard to imagine Mean Messiah failing to live up to the challenge with their now keenly anticipated second full-length.

Hell is out now through Via Nocturna across most online stores digitally and on CD.

http://www.meanmessiah.com   http://www.facebook.com/meanmessiah   http://twitter.com/MeanMessiah

Pete RingMaster 07/02/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Pink Pussycats From Hell – Hell-P

pink_pussycats_photo_RingMasterReview

Supposedly “A bizarre and unlikely alliance between one mad hunter and a dangerous rabbit gave birth to Pink Pussycats From Hell, a power rock duo formed decades ago just outside Hellsinki, not the capital of Finland, but a remote village buried deep in the forests of Portugal.” Whatever the origins, Pink Pussycats From Hell is a highly enjoyable invasion of the senses casting raw and scuzzy rock ‘n’ roll trespasses which only leave a want for more.

Debut album Hell-P growls and roars with abrasive lo-fi and viscerally raw sound, spreading blues and garage rock toxicity into the primal heart of their music and listener. It is fair to say that it is a challenge which is not going to be for everyone but whether the duo of guitarist/vocalist Mighty Hunter and drummer/vocalist Danger Rabbit simply wore us down or there was an instinctive appetite for their ballsy invasion of sound, by its close on just the first listen The RR was swinging and throwing itself around like a beast in heat.

Creating a caustic sound bound in essences recalling the likes of The Stooges, The Cramps, In The Whale, and Jackson Firebird, Pink Pussycats From Hell introduce themselves with Hello on the album, a fuzzy spillage of blues rock ‘n’ roll prowling the senses as vocals provoke attention. Initially subdued, rhythms soon become a punchy provocateur alongside the molten melodies and scavenging riffs of guitar.

Beats make a far livelier incitement in the following Hellmet, its blues rock straight forward but with the unpredictability which is swiftly revealed as a potent ingredient across the album and the Pink Pussycats From Hell sound. The song itself is a highly satisfying proposal if lacking the persuasion of the first or indeed of Hellga which follows which brings a smile to the face to match its own mischievous grin. The track is charred punk ‘n’ roll blessed with increasing irritability and bracing infectiousness which inflames ears and appetite ready for the even more heated and addictively enjoyable blaze of Hellvolution.

pink_pussycats_cover_RingMasterReviewThrough the baked or should that be half-baked stroll and declaration of Hellbow, the crunchy stomp of Hellephant, and the electrified blues blaze of Hellectric, the album continues to tempt and share more manic traits to its increasingly captivating character. The last of the three is equipped with the most irresistible hooks and pleasing rock ‘n’ roll cantankerousness subsequently matched in its individual way by those within Hellvetica, both tracks lava-esque rock to sear the senses.

Hellicopter pleases with its blues spiced garage punk assault next though it offers teases of mouth-watering enterprise and striking elements rather than actually releasing them to frustrate a touch. Its successor Hell Dorado is built on the same crazed imagination but is far more open as the track builds its schizophrenic rock ‘n’ roll but it too lacks the potency of earlier tracks though the sweltering Latin/mariachi hued melodies later on just hit the spot.

The next pair of tracks leaves ears and passions truly alive. Hell is Regina is first and unleashes a slice of dirty punk rock which just stays with the listener for hours after. A rousing celebration of personal differences with a snarl in its gut, the track is pure rock ‘n’ roll virulence you will find dancing around your head for ages after, especially its participation seizing chorus. Hellzheimer is the same in its own way, grooves and rhythms a familiar but rapacious invitation ridden by the pair’s catchy vocal trap.

The duo brings the album to a spirit inciting close with a raucous cover of the Berry Gordy and Janie Bradford written classic, Money (That’s What I Want). It is a galvanic senses roasting version ensuring Hell-P ends on another high, the listener too with an eager taste for the Pink Pussycats From Hell devilry in place.

Hell-P is out now via Raging Planet @ https://ragingplanet.bandcamp.com

http://www.ppfh.rocks   https://www.facebook.com/ppfhell

Pete RingMaster 07/02/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Lauren Hoffman and The Secret Storm – Family Ghost

lauren-hoffman_RingMasterReview

Often there is nothing more seductive in music than emotional and creative melancholy, a thought wonderfully backed up by Family Ghost, the debut album from Lauren Hoffman & the Secret Storm. Coming from the latest project of songwriter/vocalist/musician Hoffman, no stranger to acclaim through her solo releases, Family Ghost is an imagination stoking dark theatre of word, emotion, and beauty, or as potently suggested by its press release, “A whirl of cabaret, broken ballads, and indie rock, it is a collection of heart-bending narratives that double as emotional exorcism.”

Hoffman’s songwriting was already alive but was further nurtured by Jeff Buckley after she met him backstage while waiting for her father. He became her mentor up until his death in 1997, just one month before she released her debut solo album. Released by Virgin Records, Megiddo was critically acclaimed and subsequently followed by just as evocative and striking encounters. Hoffman assembled the Secret Storm a few years ago with its intimately and personally open Family Ghost built on songs written over a decade ago as well as newer explorations by their creator.

The release opens with Don’t Look Back, a tantalising serenade with wistful melodies and a brush of rhythmic coaxing around the enticing tones of Hoffman. The shadowy groans of cello from Cathy Monnes (of the indie-pop Sally Rose Band) are as potent and persuasive as the imagination of keyboardist Ethan Lipscomb, both bewitching textures in a swiftly riveting encounter. Its thicker crescendos of sound and evocation just reinforce the persuasive majesty of the song while all the time Hoffman’s vocals sublimely capture ears and thoughts.

family-ghost-artwork_RingMasterReviewFrom its gothic, funereal spiced enterprise, the band unveil a lighter gait and atmosphere with second offering Feel It All, though again the darker hues of cello and brooding tones of Jeff Diehm’s bass provide rich drama against the livelier air cast by guitarist Tony Lechmanski (Bella Morte) and Kevin Ardrey’s boisterous beats. Though less pronounced the vaudevillian touch of its predecessor colours the track to captivate before Let The Waves Crash On Me hugs the senses with its country rock/folk lit embrace. Its reflective heart and rich weave is a kiss on the ear, Hoffman a beacon at its core.

Sick With Love radiates in melancholic intimacy and vocal openness next while In The Sun bewitches as it grows in gentle but open intensity and imagination with each passing second. Both tracks easily excite but find themselves outshone by the following I Just Broke Up With A Guy Who Looks Kinda Like You. Carrying a Young Marble Like Giants like minimalistic air and seduction as bass and guitar entangle their descriptive prowess, the irresistible song blossoms into a tenaciously catchy slice of pop ‘n’ roll with spicy melodies and swinging rhythms. Even its magnificence though has to play second fiddle to the album’s title track which seduces straight after. There is drama in every riff, theatre in each ear flirting hook, while rhythms and vocals bring their own creative imagination to the compelling tapestry. Like a siren, the song lures the listener into its busy evocation of spirit and emotion.

Through the noir lit stroll of Fast Lane there is no let-up in the album’s grip on body and appetite. The song is as funky as it is jazzy, as folky as it is poppy; its dark rock ‘n’ roll nurtured croon simply haunting infectiousness. It is majestic in an understated but bold way, a success matched by the similarly catchy saunter of Broken. A thin but rich melody initially courts the magnetic presence and tones of Hoffman as the track offers another slim yet thickly provocative adventure and insight to get seriously caught up in.

The exotic bordering sinister hug of The Dragon comes next, the track a shadowy seductress in air, intent, and voice increasingly infesting and seducing body and psyche from its first provocative breath. There is also volatility in its nature which only adds to its might on the way to taking best track honours.

Family Ghost is concluded by the calm yet emotionally inflamed Til It Lasts, a fine end to a release which is Lauren Hoffman at her most creatively adventurous and open, backed by a band with as much suggestiveness in their sounds as in the singer’s heart bred words. It is darkly magical and sure to be on the favourites lists of a great many.

Family Ghost is out now on iTunes and other stores.

http://www.thesecretstorm.com/   https://www.facebook.com/laurenhoffmanmusic/   https://twitter.com/ShhSecretStorm

Pete RingMaster 07/02/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Union Jack – Supersonic

uxj_RingMasterReview

It has been twenty years since Paris hailing Union Jack first stomped around with their anger fuelled, ska infested punk ‘n’ roll, a celebration marked by the release of a brand new slab of infectious aggression. Supersonic is the trio’s seventh full-length, a stonking riot driven by the band’s familiar yet individual sound which simply hits the spot dead centre.

Across six albums and a host of EPs, Union Jack have honed their sound into one intrusively virulent proposal, a strain of punk rock with catchiness as potent as its irritability at the world. Live it has ignited hordes of fans, earning the band a big reputation across their homeland, into Europe, and Canada while sharing stages with the likes of The Damned, DOA, UK Subs, Leftöver Crack, Swingin Utters, Subhumans, The Aggrolites, The Movement, Inner Terrestrials and many more. Even so, they still may be an unknown quality to a great many, something that Supersonic should amend.

Recorded at Sofa Studio with RomTomCat, mixed and mastered by Mike Major ( At the Drive-in, Sparta, Coheed And Cambria, Gone is Gone), and with additional contributions on certain songs by Thomas Birnbacher (upright bass/organ), Phillipe Cattafesta (piano/organ), and Joe Robinne (organ), Supersonic grabs ears from its first breath. Cynical Sound Club starts things stomping, a brief introduction urgently loaded with wicked hooks and punchy rhythms as the band gathers all its wiles ready for next up Oh Boogie. The second track bounces around with attitude and aggressive energy tempered by the warm touch of an organ. The mischievous bassline is irresistible, riffs spice for the ears while the twin vocal attack of guitarist Tom Marchal and bassist/pianist Rude Ben are intrusive ringleaders in the magnificent raw and wild melody hooked romp.

Wordaholic has an even rawer air to its character and presence, Antoine Sirven Gabiache’s swinging beats leading the way as vocals and grooves leave lingering imprints on the senses and psyche. Like a mix of  Swingin’ Utters and Faintest Idea, the song brawls and flirts with the listener, showing recognisable essences while uncaging its own antagonistic delights before Blackout unveils choppy riffs and slapping beats as again the excellent unity between the band’s contrasting vocals bring their own magnetic clamour to the catchy ire pumped mix. Both tracks use the body like a puppeteer, resistance to their swinging rhythms and wicked hooks pointless though each is over shadowed a touch by the punk rock roar of Boomerang. Stalking ears with a predacious bassline, enslaving them with the tangiest hooks as vocals entangle participation in their physical and emotional affray, the track is glorious; a Billy Talent like spicing added pleasure.

art_RingMasterReviewNext up Purple Pride offers a melodic core not too far removed from its predecessor’s and indeed the track lacks the same incendiary spark but still has pleasure and appetite greedy with its raw punk ‘n’ roll belligerence while the bubbly but sonically raw assault of Human Zoo straight, also just missing out on the heights of earlier songs, is still nothing less than fiercely enjoyable with its unpredictable nuances and twists.

Bitter Taste shows a calmer nature as keys and melodies swing with a summery energy though still Union Jack drive it with an instinctive aggression which commands attention. Another song which easily has feet and hips in tandem and the spirit railing against the world; it is one fun and impressive warm up for the album’s best track. Don’t Look Back swiftly steals favourite spot, laying the seeds with its psychobilly nurtured bass slaps and sealing the deal with its Tiger Army like groove. From there the band’s punk heart drives the thrills; ska licks and senses rapping beats as well as elements reminding of bands like The Vox Dolomites and The Peacocks treats in the track’s heady swing.

Through the raucously catchy skirmish of Summer Waves, a song with a Buzzcocks like hook to lick lips over, and the ska infested rock ‘n’ roll of The Globe, the captivating aural roughhousing only sparks new waves of pleasure. The underlying variety in the album’s sound is also further highlighted though You and I returns to the more expected Union Jack musical ruckus with no complaints offered. It still springs a smart web of melodies and hooks though to stand apart with a Biting Elbows like rock/punk invention adding extra spice to its scrap.

It is an essence which also infests the excellent Bones, a coincidental similarity to the just mentioned Russian band no bad thing as the song twists and turns with quarrelsome anthemic chest beating before slipping away for Hate To Say Goodbye to close things off, the slither of music a reprise to that first welcome by Supersonic.

The album is a real joy deserving the attention of all those with an appetite for ska punk and punk rock in any guise.

Supersonic is released February 1st on Beer Records in collaboration with Guerilla Asso, Old Town Bicyclette, and Riot Ska Records for the UK, and through https://unionjack.bandcamp.com/

https://www.facebook.com/badska/

Pete RingMaster 01/02/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright