Grumpynators – Wonderland

Grumpynators_Reputation Radio/RingMaster Review

Two years can seem like a very long time when you are excitedly anticipating something. Certainly the wait for the debut album from Grumpynators has felt like a life time after being hooked by their previous releases. Once arrived and there waiting to explode from the speakers, thoughts turn to pondering if it will now live up to probably over demanding expectations and hopes. The Danish quartet’s self-titled motorbilly has been one of the few fresh sounds to really ignite ears and emotions over recent years and yes the band has forged another landmark in their ascent with Wonderland. The band’s mix of hard rock, psychobilly, punk, metal, and old school rock ‘n’ roll is maybe not over fuelled with major originality yet the way the band hone and twist the blend, it emerges as something distinct and specific to Grumpynators whilst providing a healthy and rousing option for fans of anyone from Motorhead to Metallica, The Damned to Volbeat, Mad Sin to Tiger Army. So it is again with Wonderland, a slab of ferocious rock ‘n’ roll pushing the band’s voracious sound and our passions to new heights.

The Copenhagen band was formed in 2011 by former band members and crew from Taggy Tones and Volbeat. Their first rampage on stage came that year at the Danish underground festival Barnyard Rumble in Denmark, the opening riot in an ever increasing and feverish attention following the band thereon in. Across the years the band has on shows and tours shared stages with the likes of Magtens Korridorer and Volbeat amongst a great many. A self-titled demo EP in 2011 just as potently awoke ears and appetites, though arguably it was the 666 RPM EP two years later which was the major spark to trigger a much further spread awareness. Wonderland is a bigger, bolder beast standing before us all now with the potential to break the band into the keenest spotlight possible.

The album opens up with its title track, and instantly has ears and imagination intrigued and enthralled by a thirty second kaleidoscope of haunting sounds and evocative textures. From its sinister coaxing, a flash of guitar opens the door for a predatory lure from the double bass of Jakob Øelund to immediately seduce an appetite always open to that kind of bait. Scything beats from Per Fisker equally adds to the brewing drama of the song whilst the guitars of Christian Nørgaard and Emil Øelund stir up air and senses with their belligerent persuasions. It is a fiery mix only increasing in energy and intensity as the song expands to its full height, the at times Lemmy like tones of Emil a magnetic roar in the midst of the infectious tempest. The encounter is equipped with the distinctive Grumpynators sound but already show a new adventure and creative theatre in the band’s invention and tenacity, hooks and swinging rhythms as mischievous as they are predatory whilst a guitar solo simply sizzles on the senses.

Wonderland cover _Reputation Radio/RingMaster Review   The stunning start is matched by both Walking in the Night and Burning in the Snow, the first dangling before the listener a spicy groove from its first breath, subsequently wheeling it in and using it to core the spinning of a feisty web of psychobilly contagion and hard rock devilry. The stomp just increases its attraction as vocals and another incendiary bass tempting fills its rampant prowl. Like a flirtation happy to brawl at any given moment, the track has ears and body leaping to its puppetry before making way for the similarly irresistible lures of its successor. The third track is a more even tempered stroll with restraint to its energy but even more virulence to its rockabilly meets punk ‘n’ roll devilment. Things do get over excited in its chorus but the band always pulls it back for a pungent croon of a seduction around the verses, led by Emil who is as ever impressively backed by calls across the band.

Walked Away winks with a dulled country twang initially before launching its own individual and tenaciously striding heavy rock persuasion. Of course as with all songs, it is a maelstrom of flavours colouring its anthemic canvas and tearing through ears, a thick flavoursome mix of rock infusing varied textures and spices soon emulated in The Calling. The track is a predator, prowling ears with an intimidating bassline and imposing grooves carolled by the excellently switching twin attack of the vocals. Track and band show you do not have to go hell for leather to create an inescapable anthem with the song, its character and potency a lingering thrilling threat. The short number of tracks in previous EPs generally meant each song bordered on a major highlight, the cream of that crop of songs so to speak, and it is easy to say that Wonderland follows suit, this point in the album already offering five dead on Grumpynator classics.

The Stalker steps forward next, this a lighter hued cantor despite its title but lock ‘n’ loaded with more addiction forging grooves and nagging hooks cast with a swagger and smiling contagion. As all offerings, it defies the listener not to join in with its epidemic of persuasion, poking the thought does rock ‘n’ roll get any better? Maybe not but it can be equalled as shown by Speeding #2, a reworking/recording of a track from their demo EP. It is does not venture too far from its first outing but provides a fresh and magnetic nature to an already established fan favourite.

The carnivorous This Is My Life growls next, its grouchy presence delving into more metallic scenery whilst laying down one pure rock ‘n’ roll groove through the forever masterful string plucks of Jakob. The guitars of Emil and Christian spread sultry strands of sonic endeavour around the instinctive catchiness of the proposal too, and driven by the forceful commanding swings of Per, yet another highlight is forged and soon matched by the voracious Pray For Your Life. It is a bruising antagonistic affair that, with its sterner caustic attitude, only captivates as its spreads its heavy and hard rock invention.

Both songs though are outshone by the steamy Mama No, probably the most diverse track on the album in that every strain of sound found on Wonderland is embroiled in the hectic and irresistible punk metal ‘n’ roll rampaging. Every riff and groove comes with a thick splattering of those flavours to their colour, an impressive feat and success driven by rabid rhythms and the rousing tones of Emil. The track is the perfect end to the album but the band knows better and closes things off with A Life Without You, an acoustic seducing of guitar and vocals embraced in the melancholic beauty of cello provided by Richard Krug. The song is a dark romance in ears, one sparking a tingle in the senses and a sigh of satisfaction by its, and Wonderland’s end.

It is fair to say that Grumpynators had a head start on raising the passions thanks to their excellent previous EPs but that also led to greater, greedier demands on Wonderland, something tossed aside with ease. As declared a little earlier, rock ‘n’ roll does not get much better than this.

Wonderland is out now via Target through most online stores

http://www.grumpynators.dk/ https://www.facebook.com/grumpynators

RingMaster 21/05/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard on Reputation Radio @ http://www.reputationradio.net

 

The DiggerZ – A Psycho’s Tales

The DiggerZ_Reputation Radio/RingMaster Review

There are numerous things to love about the debut album from German psychobillies The DiggerZ; from songwriting to sound, invention to unique devilry it is a rampant ride of contagious rock ‘n’ roll. Maybe the most notable thing about its success though is the fact it leaves the listener continuing to strut around after its departure as if they were indeed the cause of its glories. A Psycho’s Tales is a gripping and refreshing slab of diversely flavoured stomping, and one of the most compelling psychobilly incitements of recent times.

The DiggerZ emerged from Essen in 2010, the union of three musicians already well known to each other from mutually attended local shows. The line-up is Köppy (who is also the drummer for Pitmen), Andre Zaremba (guitarist of Messerstecher Herzensbrecher), and vocalist /double bassist Mo, a trio who like all good stompers decided to form a band after the consumption of a beer or ten. Shows around Essen established their adventurous sound whilst in turn breeding a potent fan base and a growing reputation only enhanced by festival appearances at the likes of Psychobilly Earthquake in Bremen, Satanic Stomp at Speyer, and Potsdam’s Psychomania Rumble, as well as an increasing number of gigs across Germany. Musically, as shown by their first album, their temptation is a mix of psychobilly snarling, eighties rockabilly infectiousness, and additional spices of surf, punk , and old school rock ‘n’ roll. It is a fascinating and excitable blend which at times plays like a fusion of The Frantic Flintstones, Pitmen, and Stray Cats but everything honed into something distinct to The DiggerZ.

The Crazy Love Records released encounter opens with the haunted Intro, a web of sinister sounds and passing tormented/innocent noises playing like a deranged opening to a horror TV show. It is slightly too long and it must be admitted after a couple of listens of the album, the tendency is to leap ahead to the first riotous offering in the compelling shape of Forgotten Son. The guitar of Andre instantly warms ears and imagination with its enticing, bait quickly joined by an intermittent juicy hook and the thumping beats of Köppy aligned to a rumbling bassline and gruff vocal pokes provided by Mo. A raging appetite is swiftly incited by the sounds and presentation, every element given its own spotlight but united in a storming stroll of a song. Spicy melodies and grooves continue to feverishly colour the infectious romp whilst the impressive tones of Mo, again clearly spotlighted within the tapestry of the track, direct the attack.

diggerz_psychos_tale_Reputation Radio/RingMaster Review   The following Breakout merges into its sultry tempting a guitar jangle which is almost ska like, whilst a shimmering melodic enterprise has as much of a surf swelter to its air as a rockabilly croon to its enticing. As with its predecessor there is no escape from its lure for feet and indeed voice, full involvement easily achieved though not quite as quickly as with Fresh Flesh From The Graveyard. A tangy hook opens up the decayed attraction, vocal cries and roving beats not taking long to leap into the affair either as a more psychobilly defined heart reveals itself within the song. To it though, spices across decades of rock ‘n’ roll again bring their hues to the death dance as the track incites its victims into bounding across the floor with limbs a blur as throats join the anthemic call.

Already a potent variety is blossoming across A Psycho’s Tales and continues in the rigorous seducing of Dreamgirl, a seductive energetic prowl of the senses and psyche. Its dark lure comes as a collection of punchy rhythms, addictive basslines, and acidic strands of sonic toxicity, all wrapped in a siren-esque melodic serenade. Its craft is so masterful that it simultaneously has the body not knowing whether to sway with its romance or rampage with its predation, in the end both is the best answer as the song ignites the passions ready for the addictive shuffle of Hangover and the heated swing of BBQ On Lost Island, again mouth-watering songs weaving a host of delicious, at times bluesy, hooks and melodies into a tenacious union of spiky beats and feverish rapacious grooves. As all tracks upon the album, both have their own confident and infectious swagger which almost alone has ears and emotions locked in and grinning broadly.

Jealousy is a frenetic motion of dark string plucking aligned to agitated rim and skin jabbing, again the rhythms a insatiable provocation to body and soul whilst the mix of tart and melodic escapades cast by the guitar alongside the magnetic vocals of Mo, flirt with ears and imagination. It is a furiously virulent uproar of sound and persuasion matched in energy and catchiness if not identity by I Want Her. Whereas the previous song seems to have the intent of wanting to brawl in its belly, its successor explores a mellower but humid landscape of melodic surf and rockabilly caressing. It is very different in sound to Jealousy but a mirror of addictiveness as the album brings itself to a raw and rousing close through a live cut of Set Me Free. Dirty and uncompromising, the song tells you all you need to know as to why The DiggerZ should be checked out in the flesh.

A Psycho’s Tales is a treat, a must for psycho/rockabilly fans providing something recognisable but very different from the crowd. The DiggerZ is the name and the sinister devouring of your passions the game.

A Psycho’s Tales is out now via Crazy Love Records @ http://www.crazyloverecords.de/diggerz-a-psycho-s-tale-cd.html

https://www.facebook.com/diggerzpsycho

RingMaster 21/05/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard on Reputation Radio @ http://www.reputationradio.net

 

Diamond Youth – Nothing Matters

dy Reputation Radio/RingMaster Review

It may be only thirty minutes in length but Nothing Matters, the debut album from US alternative rock band Diamond Youth, is jam packed with boisterously contagious songs to party hard and long to. It is a riot of fun seemingly bred on flavours inspired by the likes of Queens Of the Stone Age, Weezer, and Foo Fighters but with plenty of its own distinct characteristics and flavours to create something individual to Diamond Youth. For personal tastes the release is stronger and most tenacious in its first half but every offering within Nothing Matters is a compelling slice of pop rock equipped with feisty persuasion and a good strain of tenacious mischief.

Diamond Youth hails from Baltimore, emerging around 2010 with a line-up featuring members of Trapped Under Ice, Terror, and Down to Nothing; all sharing a common background of art, design, skateboarding, and of course music. Influences range from band such as Pixies, The Nerves, and unsurprisingly Queens Of The Stone Age, and it is fair to say that the quartet has increasingly lured attention through a host of EPs starting with DMND and Don’t Lose Your Cool in 2011. It is Orange in 2013 and Shake a year later, both as the new album released via Topshelf Records, which provided the spark to greater focus and acclaim enveloping the band, in turn sparking strong anticipation for the band’s debut full-length. It will leave no one disappointed and is destined to not only recruit another wave of eager spotlights and fans whilst simply creating a fun time for all.

Recorded with engineer Dave Warsop, the album starts with its title track, swiftly entrapping ears and appetite with stirring rhythms and spicy hooks encased in vocal and melodic revelry. Quickly, especially as the vocals impressively cast their tempting on proceedings, that QOTSA air is an open breeze bringing even greater catchy bait to the vibrant persuasion. It is the tangy hook though which brings the biggest smile in the emotions, that and the adventurous ideation lining the song from first note to last.

Nothing-Matters-Cover Reputation Radio/RingMaster Review     The excellent opening to Nothing Matters is quickly matched by Thought I Had It Right, another song with thick hooks and entrancing harmonic tempting. Slightly more restrained in energy compared to its predecessor, the song saunters and sways with a rich Muse like sultriness to sound and voice. Every syllable comes coated with a spice of angst whilst melodies like a fine wine just become more seductive and effective on the senses with very passing moment. There is also a volatile edge to the contagion posing as a track, its sonic presence flirting with causticity as it forcibly infests and ignites ears through to the imagination.

Spinning steps up next with an even more reserved nature though melodic and vocal passion in turn create a blistering roar courted by a snarl of a bassline. Fair to say that it might be the least feisty song on the release so far but it is the most tempestuous and fascinating, and subsequently quite irresistible as also the following Far Away from Earth. Rhythms straight away lay down an anthemic potency before quickly finding themselves skirted by a deliciously grizzled bassline and a brewing sonic mist of guitar. The mellow croon of vocals does bring a magnetic tempering but ultimately only seems to inflame the growl and rebellious attitude of the song as it erupts in a cauldron of pop infectiousness and rock ‘n’ roll predation. Crunchy and warmly smouldering simultaneously, it teases the psyche like Josh Homme toying with Muse as it creates yet another instant pinnacle upon the album.

A more summery swagger comes with Succulent next, a surf rock/ garage pop colouring the sweltering climate of the bewitching instrumental. Its heated charm and warm elegance are emulated in next up In the Clouds, a bubbling shimmer of sound and harmonies which takes the listener by the emotions and leads them on a dance of addictive devilry. Six tracks in and five of them are easily single potential, an instrumental having little chance of being chosen let’s be honest.

From Riptide onwards, band and album seems to explore a different avenue with a lessening of the agitated sonic invention and an increasing of more immersive melodies and warm radiance. Tracks as this compelling ballad still have a fire in their belly but such the alchemy of virulence in earlier songs they just miss, and it is just, casting the same persuasive spark. Nevertheless the song has ears engrossed and satisfaction full whilst the static kiss and melodic coaxing of No Control and the post punk like rhythmic lure of The Nothing, ensure only the keenest attention is given. The second of the two especially has thoughts and enjoyment lit before Deep Love explores some dark pop beauty. It has a feel of UK artist Rooster Cole to it, with its sombre ambience encased in an excitable adventure of sound. The track is superb, a match for anything before and without doubt also a song on its own sure to trigger greedy reactions.

The album closes with The Difference, itself a humidly aired release of emotional and musical drama, and a fine end to an increasingly impressing encounter. Diamond Youth has taken the qualities nurtured in previous releases to new thrilling and at times spellbinding heights. Whether you want an out and out romp to party with or something with a melodic embrace to sink into, Nothing Matters delivers one very enjoyable time.

Nothing Matters is available now via Topshelf Records @ http://www.topshelfrecords.com/products/545159-diamond-youth-nothing-matters or https://topshelfrecords.bandcamp.com/album/nothing-matters

https://www.facebook.com/dmndyouth   http://www.dmndyouth.com/

RingMaster 20/05/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard on Reputation Radio @ http://www.reputationradio.net

 

All Tomorrows – Sol Agnates

All Tomorrows_Reputation Radio/RingMaster Review

With the release of their second album Sol Agnates, Chilean metallers All Tomorrows are hoping it will be the doorway into establishing them within a European if not global metal spotlight. Listening to the encounter it is easy to suspect it is a desire destined to find success at some point as their impressive release and sounds assaults more ears and appetites. It is not a startling proposition, the band’s sound as familiar as it is promisingly fresh, but the album is a certainly stirring and increasingly magnetic incitement hitting the sweet spot of ears and emotions with persistent regularity.

All Tomorrows began in 2010, emerging from Santiago with the inspirations of bands like Gojira and Meshuggah in their creative blood and vision. 2011 saw the release of debut album Opilion, an acclaimed release at home and further afield. It helped push the band to broader attention, a recognition reinforced and increased by a live presence which has seen All Tomorrows share stages with bands such as Children of Bodom, Voivod, Megadeth, and At The Gates over the subsequent years. Their sound is tagged as progressive metal, if an extreme strain of the style, but as Sol Agnates reveals there is equally a death metal voracity and nature to their music which adds to the drama and intensity of songs. It also suggest that this is a band which gives equal concentration to every aspect of sound and to creating a release, the album an imposing proposal of clarity which allows every note, syllable, and rhythm to individually resonate and linger whilst uniting for a riveting predatory provocation.

All Tomorrows - Sol Agnates_Reputation Radio/RingMaster Review     It all begins with the album’s title track, a song which takes a mere second to unveil a web of sonic intrigue and temptation through the guitars of Pepe Lastarria and Ramón Pasternak backed by rigorously intimidating rhythms. Choppy riffs and beats stalk and badger the senses whilst the fiercely, raw vocal delivery of Lastarria is as abrasive as it is magnetic. You can openly hear the Meshuggah influence but equally as the outstanding opener vents its hostile creativity, there is a sense of Mudvayne and In Flames to the striking confrontation. The sonic enterprise of the guitars persistently flare up with sizzling endeavour across the song whilst the bestial tones of Oscar Arenas’ bass are as compelling as the wild but skilled swings of drummer Pablo Martinez are punishing.

The album could not have got off to a better start and keeps the raw power and impressiveness going through both Undying Seasons and Eidien. The second track equally rampages into view on a torrent of inhospitable rhythms and ravenous riffs, all seriously inviting whilst bound in acidic grooving and pierced with spiky hooks. Again unexpected whispers emerge as the track expands its turbulence, Slipknot and Tool reminded of as much as those earlier mentioned Gojira and Meshuggah spices. The trespass of the senses continues to twist and rage, erupt and seduce across its length before making way for its similarly hectic and tenaciously flavoursome successor. Slightly less hostile at its start, grievous riffs and rhythmic barbs holding some restraint as vocals rasp with predatory intent over ears, the track sculpts its own individual maelstrom of persuasion equipped with rich grooves blossoming in another bed of contagious imagination.

A devouring stalking of ears by Fiver’s Visions keeps enjoyment high and thoughts impressed even if the track lacks a certain spark of its predecessors, whilst next up Downpour spills an animus of stabbing beats and fiercely scything riffs across a barbarous landscape. Loaded with antagonistic vocals and a sinister sonic narrative, the track is arguably the first to really begin exploring the rich progressive depths of the band’s imagination. Previous songs hinted at rather than fully employed that provocative side of the band’s songwriting, and even this track does not dig too deep whilst thrilling ears, but Burnt by Call of the Bleak after definitely makes a bolder leap as it lights up the senses. Also fuelled by a relatively uncompromising aggression, the track’s guitars entwine imaginative textures with evocative invention whilst even the rhythms rein in their rabidity as song and band create a certainly intensively tempestuous but equally absorbing kaleidoscopic adventure.

Immanence draws on the more truculent side of the band’s sound for its physically predacious proposal but the guitars ensure they flirt with a melodic tempting between moments of sheer carnivorous majesty. It is a blistering challenge and treat, a bruising entrapment of the passions leaving the listener embracing the melodic opening of Ophidian Vibrations like a comfort blanket. The song allows that security to be assumed before uncaging its own nefarious enterprise and creative nature, riffs and rhythms fuelled by destructive hunger but perfectly tempered by the band’s venture into melodic flames of sound and progressive imagination.

Sol Agnates is concluded by the epic turmoil of Union, vocals and musical expression angst soaked as rapacious rhythms roam alongside a sinful bass tone. It is a bewitching roar of volcanic emotions and turbulent sounds aligning for a powerful and lingering conclusion to the riveting release.

It is impossible to imagine that All Tomorrows will be a South American ‘secret’ for much longer once Sol Agnates gets to work on new ears and attention. As ever of course, a hefty slice of fortune will be needed but if not with this album there can be no stopping the band breaking into the strongest recognition if they carry on creating treats like this as their music evolves.

Sol Agnates is available from May 19th via most online stores.

http://www.alltomorrowsband.com/   https://www.facebook.com/alltomorrows

RingMaster 19/05/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard on Reputation Radio @ http://www.reputationradio.net

Fight Like Apes – Self Titled

Fight Like Apes Cover _Reputation Radio/RingMaster Review

It has been as good as five years since the release of their second album, though there was a rather satisfying EP in between, so it is fair to say that anticipation for Fight Like Apes’ new encounter across the board has been bursting with hungry excitement. It is a wait now relentlessly rewarded by each of the twelve songs making up the self-titled proposition, offerings taking ears and imagination on a unique and rebellious exploit of indie pop devilry. It really only takes one listen to establish the album as a favourite and barely a couple more to suggest it is going to cast as one of the major triumphs of 2015.

Hailing from Dublin and formed in 2006, Fight Like Apes and their synth pop/alternative rock sound has been luring in keen and potent attention ever since the release of the EPs How Am I Supposed to Kill You When You Have All the Guns? and David Carradine Is a Bounty Hunter Whose Robotic Arm Hates Your Crotch in 2007. The following year saw them nominated for two awards at the 2008 Meteor Irish Music Awards, and it has only been a continuing torrent of support and acclaim since, though equally there have been moments to challenge as with any band. Debut album Fight Like Apes and the Mystery of the Golden Medallion that same year poked a keener, broader spotlight, attention emulated and pushed to new heights by second full-length The Body of Christ and the Legs of Tina Turner in 2010. Their sound and songwriting had already found uniqueness in presence and character which has consistently evolved from release to release, song to song at times, and it is again prevalent upon the new offering. The time between albums two and three saw the band dropped by their record label but they decided to go down the crowd funding route with quick success. This meant that it has been a length wait for their new epic of fun but as hinted at by the Whigfield Sextape EP last year; the band’s return has only brought new seductive and vivaciously eccentric pleasures.

Unleashed through Alcopop! Records, the album quickly has ears and imagination immersed in its pop alchemy through I Am Not a Merry Man. A quaint electronic coaxing jabbed by firm beats initially the song is soon sauntering along with a melodic swagger and lusty bassline, and lit up further by the ever bewitching vocals of Mary-Kate “MayKay” Geraghty. Moments of feistier endeavour also clad the constantly alluring stroll, the song an inescapable flirtation for ears and thoughts with the flowing keys and backing vocals of Jamie “Pockets” Fox just as magnetic as the pulsating rhythms and prime melodic roar of MayKay.

The following Crouching Bees from a single crisp rhythmic rap is soon engulfing ears in an elegant weave of melodies carrying a slight Altered Images air and once more badgered by thickly tempting rhythms. Vocally MayKay again is as potent in casting a mellow seduction or an impassioned raucousness, her heightened delivery a fiery incitement to the calmer waters of the keys, though they too at times provide an off kilter element of their own. The infection of sound and imagination of the album is already enslaving the psyche two songs in and only increases its bait through Pop Itch and The Schillaci Sequence. The first of the pair is a more ‘regular’ canter of indie pop design, though as it is Fight Like Apes there is plenty of sparkling vocal adventure and sonic twists whilst the second sways over the senses with melodic eloquence. It too initially seems a more reserved example of the band’s invention and creative exploration but with an agitated rhythmic shuffle and Devo-esque electro psychosis it soon puts expectations straight.

Fight Like Apes _Reputation Radio/RingMaster Review Both songs keep enjoyment keen and appetite greedy, though everything is soon eclipsed by the brilliant Didya. Easily our favourite proposition on the album, maybe from the band full stop, the song ambles in on a melodic hook which is Weezer like. That alone has lips licked but it is once Pockets takes the vocal lead with a punkish anxiety to his tone that things erupt into genius. The throaty bass and wilder tempered beats are belligerent whilst the voice of MayKay similarly has a challenging edge to it, the blend a spellbinding incitement though it is the vocal bedlam which follows that has these ears and passions are enslaved. It is like a warped mix of The Dancing Did and The Ting Tings, pure creative mania and manna, setting up the listener for a blaze of a finale.

Numbnuts calms things down a touch next, its persuasive croon persistently littered with stirring vocal snaps and musical twists on the way to creating an increasingly fiery climax whilst its successor Pretty Keen on Centrefolds has ears captivated with an eighties synth pop bubbling that nudges thoughts of Blancmange and Soft Cell. Of course things are never that simple, punchy and at times bedlamic beats adding a drama to match that of the vocals whilst keys whip up a contagious tempting for the dance-floor.

Like a mix of Morningwood and Yeah Yeah Yeahs but all Fight Like Apes, The Hunk and The Funplace sculpts another major pinnacle for the album. Rhythmically anthemic and imposing, melodically spicy and slightly nostalgic, the song easily has ears engrossed but it is the roaring chorus which takes a great song to the plateau of brilliance. It is pop at its most dynamic, provocative, and irresistible.

There is no let-up of the thrills and creative spills as firstly I Don’t Want to Have to Mate with You swirls around ears and leads expectations on a merry dance. It is a lively breeze of fascinating textures and rousing calm providing a spellbinding theatre of sound and voice, emulated in its own way by Baywatch Nights with its even slower smoulder, though again there is a snarl to vocal moments, spicy intrigue to keys, and dark shadows to surrounding scenery. Both tracks make riveting listening, a norm across the album to be fair and continued in the excellent Maevis Beacon: Annihilation, a song with more than a whisper of Young Marble Giants to it especially in its opening minute or so. All tracks make a quick and thick first impression but some reveal even more to their depths and beauty over time with this a prime example.

The mesmeric seducing of Carousel brings the release to an emotive and reflective close, and a dramatic one as epic rhythms and brooding melodies rise as the song progresses. Folkish theatre and heavy tribal rhythms break free too in the scintillating end to a sensational encounter. It may have been a while in the making and coming but Fight Like Apes has spent that time crafting their most vigorously inventive and exciting sound yet. This is a must have for all experimental and rousing pop enthusiasts, actually just every pop fan out there.

Fight Like Apes is available via Alcopop! Records from 18th May @ https://itunes.apple.com/us/album/fight-like-apes/id981566460

https://www.facebook.com/fightlikeapes

RingMaster 08/05/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard on Reputation Radio @ http://www.reputationradio.net

The Sun Explodes – The Calm, The Storm

The Sun Explodes_ Reputation Radio/RingMaster Review

2011 debut album Emergence was where UK progressive rock band The Sun Explodes first caught ears and attention, and not just lured their focus but had then gripped. It was a potential soaked and creatively masterful introduction with a few lesser issues which only added to the promise and anticipation of greater things to come. Its successor We Build Mountains two years later realised those hopes and expectations whilst setting down new adventures to greedily devour. The exceptional release one of the most exciting offerings of that year, so much so that you had to wonder if this was to be as good as it gets for the band and whether what came next could live up to such heights. Well, The Calm, The Storm certainly rivals its predecessor, eclipses it at times, whilst suggesting there is still more striking exploits to come from the band.

Carlisle based The Sun Explodes has explored a ‘mellower’ landscape with The Calm, The Storm, further blossoming the melodically colourful side of their sound. This also applies to the vocals though that is not to say that the bulging rhythms and aggressive almost predatory creative drama fuelling previous releases are not as pungent as ever, just that the focus is centred on another side of their invention. Technically and texturally, the release is as dynamic and unpredictable as ever, their fascinating and relentlessly busy sound and enterprise again best and only fully explored over numerous listens.

TCTS Artwork_Reputation Radio/RingMaster Review   It all starts with The Calm, and a gentle melodic caress of guitar. The reflective shimmer of their coaxing is quickly reinforced by the similarly relaxed tones of vocalist Dave Maclachlan, ears and thoughts immersed in an evocative lure and atmosphere. This continues to seduce, drawing the imagination deeper into its embrace before erupting into a more intensive wind of rhythmic predation and harmonic elegance. There is a new raw edge to the track, a rugged tempestuous air taking over though the poetic melodic craft of earlier continues to entwine and incite from within. It is a transfixing start to the EP which leads straight into the just as powerful and dramatic majesty of The Unnatural. The second song instantly reveals a more virulent contagion and energy to its body, riffs and hooks from the guitars of Alex Adamson and Alex Harris immediately enticing and thrilling ears. A slip into calmer, magnetic waters comes with the entrance of Maclachlan’s voice and song narrative, though the bass of Mike Walker and the punchy beats of drummer Jamie Harris line and skirt it all with darker shadows, a kind of menace which become more pronounced as the song flows into heavier, ravenous scenery. It is a continually changing passage of course, peace and volatile energies switching and aligning across the enthralling encounter as the guitars, also with continual unpredictability, prowl and ignite the air.

As openly as the band’s songwriting and sound has evolved and become even more involved, so the individual skills and maturity of each band member seems to have grown too. The second track is a web of striking exploits in all areas and straight away emulated in The Grand Design. It also opens up its incitement with a swagger and dynamic energy before settling into a more evenly offered temptation, though it is fair to say that within seconds the track reveals a fierce tapestry of flavours and endeavour which is as jazzy as it is predatory and as melodically enthralling as it is rhythmically intimidating. Like on hot coals, rhythms are a boisterous and agitated shuffle across the song whilst harmonies bring a warm seducing caress, whilst between them guitars and keys cast a vivid and tenacious sonic picture narrated by the excellent tones of Maclachlan. To be honest it is hard to portray everything going on within songs, the fullness of the dynamics and torrent of styles and enterprise lighting ears, so be prepared to hear and discover much more when listening to the release yourselves.

I Walk Alone takes the listener on a less agitated flight initially but creative turbulence is lying in wait and soon sparking appetite and greater enjoyment as the song twists and turns through its own individual maelstrom, though it is more a kaleidoscope of imagination and inventive resourcefulness then anything chaotic. This and the closing Storm Of Light are arguably the least capricious tracks on the release, but each is still a varying tapestry of mercurial enterprise. The final song is a captivating union of piano and vocals, a duet of beauty matched by the soaring harmonies around them. There is grace and emotional energy to the proposition which only strengthens as the track subsequently expels a blaze of guitar boiled intensity and intensive rhythms.

A stirring end to another masterful creative emprise from The Sun Explodes, we can only repeat the last words in our review of previous album We Build Mountains two years ago. The Sun Explodes stand as one of the most important bands in UK rock, just that after The Calm, The Storm they are even more essential for all progressive rock fans to investigate.

The Calm, The Storm EP is available from May 18th @ http://thesunexplodes.bandcamp.com/

https://www.facebook.com/thesunexplodes

RingMaster 18/05/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard on Reputation Radio @ http://www.reputationradio.net

 

We-Are-Z – Walkaway

pic by@AndyWillsher

pic by@AndyWillsher

The song might be about “taking a journey into the recesses of consciousness, exploring perceptions and angles that don’t add up”, but musically Walkaway is just one inescapable funk ‘n’ roll devilment of indie pop come new wave virulence. The song is the new single from We-Are-Z, a UK band which on the evidence of their new release, springs a sound on the senses as agitated and warped as it is infectiously magnetic. It incites body and imagination with tribal like rhythms amidst paranoia kissed sound, each racked with St. Vitus dance like activity within theatrical melodies and mellow washed vocals. The track is pure temptation, like Shriekback meets Late Cambrian in a Two Door Cinema Club embrace, yet different again.

The London based Anglo/French quintet formed in 2012, with its line-up already seasoned musicians bringing experiences of playing with the likes of Beyonce, The Waterboys, and James Morrison into the mix. Debut track Airbrush swiftly drew strong attention and support from media and fans alike, whilst the band since then has lured in diverse comparisons from Vampire Weekend to Devo and Franz Ferdinand to XTC. Inspirations are equally varied within We-Are-Z, the likes of David Bowie, Serge Gainsborough, Talking Heads, Blur, The Clash, and Static cited but as their new single shows, the band ultimately emerges with something yes a little familiar but perfectly peculiar to them.

Walkaway from its first touch is a rampant shuffle of jabbing beats and a dark flirty bass lure from Guillaume Charreau and Marc Arciero respectively. The guitar of Drew Wynen adds a lively temptation to the attention grabbing start also, little but gripping hooks and slithers of melodic spices a flirtatious tempting adding to the instant magnetism. Seductive and quirky keys are colouring the song further next, Clement Leguidcoq bringing a smouldering coaxing seeping around and within all the other tenacious textures at play whilst vocalist Gabriel Cazes has a drama and flirty quality to his insatiably vibrant tones and harmonies. There is no escaping the enslaving effect of the song, the puppeteer like lure of rhythms on limbs and the addictive contagion of everything else on voice and emotions, a proper feel good treat.

According to reliable sources, with an energetic and irrepressible live presence to match the adventure of their new single alone, it is easy to suggest we will all be hearing and devouring a lot more of We-Are-Z from hereon in.

Walkaway is available via Sputnik Records from May 18th

http://we-are-z.com/   https://www.facebook.com/WeAreZmusic

RingMaster 17/05/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard on Reputation Radio @ http://www.reputationradio.net