Choking On Illusions – Rest/less

Choking on Illusions Pic2

Hailing out of South-West Germany, Choking On Illusions is a band which looks like they are about to be on the receiving end of an enthusiastic roar of attention. The reason being their new album Rest/less; a beast of a melodic hardcore incitement which is as fiercely confrontational and emotionally voracious as it is inventively compelling. On first listen, it is not one which instantly leaps from the crowd though it certainly is a more riveting and fascinating encounter than most, but over time it reveals an imagination and craft which leaves ears and attention gripped. You would still not say that the second full-length from the Saarbrücken quintet is going to turn the hardcore scene on its head, but it definitely gives it an exciting proposal to chew over.

Formed in 2008, Choking On Illusions has frequently awoken keen and increasing interest in their presence; a self-titled EP in the following year starting the growth which was backed and nurtured further by a two track demo in 2010 and the band’s keenly supported live presence. It has been from the current line-up’s coming together a year later though that the band and their sound really hit its stride, as established by their well-received debut album Guide me home in the summer of 2012. Alongside all these moments the band has similarly drawn great praise and following through shows with the likes of Stick to your Guns, Comeback Kid, Terror, Evergreen Terrace, Hundredth, Counterparts, and La Dispute amongst a great many, as well as tours with The Green River Burial, Wasted Bullet, Chronograph, and Seasons in Wreckage. It all only reinforced and enriched their emergence in the hardcore scene. Now the band is lining up to burst into the broadest spotlights with their Bastardized Recordings released Rest/less, and given the time and focus it needs and deserves, it would be hard to expect anything but further potent success.

The opening Intro is a decent enough emotional scene setter, guitars melodically eloquent within a heavily brooding atmosphere whilst leading ears and imagination into the jaws of the following album title track. The second track bursts into life with ravenous rhythms and fiery riffs, each intensifying as the vocals of Mario Strasser begin their agreeable roar and the guitars of Jannik Aulenbacher and Maciej Spiczak align in a tempting mix of caustic riffery and sonic enterprise. It is when singer and melodies really erupt in an infectious and lively embrace that the song truly comes alive, their brief expulsion of revelry infecting the subsequent antagonistic side of the song which too develops an intriguing mix of catchiness and emotional provocation. It is a great start to the release, and like the album, it takes time to explore all its twists and depths, though its appeal and appetite sparking potency is swift.

Choking on Illusions Cover   The following Sleepwalker explodes in a creative and impassioned tirade you expect to hear in a hardcore based offering, continuing to feed with satisfaction those thoughts but twisting them into fresh endeavour through the persistently thoughtful and skilled ideation of the guitars. As in its predecessor though, there is a particular moment where the good song ignites into something greater, and here it is the lull in the sonic tempest where the bass of Christian Pontes takes over with a richly carnivorous bass tone matched in intimidation by the muscular swings of drummer Dustin Ueckert. It is a mere moment in the passage of the track but again seems to instil a new attitude and impact into the following adventure and passion of the proposition.

Both Left Unsaid and 13 rage and bellow with explosive and intriguing creativity, the first punctuated by the thickest rhythmic jabs yet on the album but tempered by a tantalising flame of impressive vocal harmonies and guitar crafted melodic acidity. The song continues to be unpredictable and enthralling, a slip into an acoustic landscape bewitching in company with calm and captivating clean vocals. Its heart felt and raw emotion though is soon back filling the senses, and again it is fair to say this also seems to return with a new air and vitality in its angst and sound. It is of course all sparked by the band’s dramatic adventure in songwriting and sound, with these moments seeded in a strong array of flavours outside of hardcore. They are essences not always apparent at the start of songs but emerging impressively throughout and something the band will hopefully utilise even more ahead as this is when Choking On Illusions impressively breaks free of any formulaic hardcore restraints and expectations. The song’s successor is the same, spinning a recognisable initial weave of sound and aggression built on open invention before sculpting a predatory net of rhythms and sonic imagination. It is the most straight forward song on the album in many ways but when relaxing into a smouldering embrace of warm melodies and intimate vocals to again cast a new light on its body and heart.

The disorientating dazzle of guitar and rhythms at its start sets Borderlines off in fine style and initially it is a shame it is not a constant incitement throughout the excellent track, the band preferring to unleash it in bursts amongst the muscular antagonism of the song. The truth is the band get it right, its intermittent diversity makes for thrilling eruptions of bedlam in the ferocious roar of the song and the subsequent melodic poetry charming from its heart. The song is superb, whilst the album simply gets stronger and more exciting with every offering.

The peaceful radiance of Interlude allows a breath next, its brief instrumental a classic hug of keys but as the intro, embraced by a more and increasingly turbulent ambience. Its beauty makes way for the fiery energy and intensity of Broken Song, a blaze of an encounter with deep anxiousness to its air and hostile emotion fuelling its fury. It is another which simply grows in weight and persuasion as it reveals more invention and unpredictable ideation once established in the ears; post and melodic hardcore colouring its ire as forcibly as a punk viciousness.

A new peak is set with the hellacious charge and presence of Death Waltz next, the track a thunderous predator of the senses unafraid to draw on noise rock and metallic essences to ignite its creative battlefield. Complete with soaring harmonies and sonic intricacies, the song is a raucous anthem and impassioned croon simultaneously, and quite sensational in its distorted and scuzz lit brilliance giving next up L.O.V.E. a hard task to emulate. It gives a mighty effort though with a bass sound from Pontes which is raw and carnal in touch, whilst a blistering furnace of sonic rapacity and vocal incitement treats the senses. It also has that fresh onslaught of punk hostility to it which seeps into the album’s latter tracks to enjoyable success.

Closing track Baptism – Funeral enters on a rhythmic enticement from Ueckert which alone secures hungry attention, and continues to drive and ignite the solemn and melancholic heart of the increasingly ferocious encounter. It is a mighty end to an outstanding release, one sure to put Choking On Illusions on the widest hardcore map and suggesting potential of greater things yet to come, though more of the same to be fair would not be too disappointing either.

Rest/less is available from March 27th via Bastardized Recordings @ http://shop.bastardizedrecordings.de/product_info.php?products_id=2411

https://www.facebook.com/ChokingonIllusions

RingMaster 26/03/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard on Reputation Radio @ http://reputationradio.yooco.org/

 

The Department – Alpha

1511091_570401379761622_246070644530475398_n

Like an A-Z of synth and electro pop bred in a parallel universe, the debut album from Swedish/British synthwave band The Department is one of those introductions which simply absorbs attention. A feisty mix of nostalgia and fresh imagination with a perpetually virulent infectiousness, Alpha blossoms with familiarity and new invention, embracing past decades whilst opening up new adventures. Two years in the making it is mostly though, one fascinating and exciting proposition leaving ears and pleasure with seriously greedy appetites.

The Department is the creative project of Londoner Rob Green (vocals / synth), who used to make progressive house records in the mid-nineties under several monikers, and Gothenburg musician Magnus Lindström (synth) who also plays in Swedish electro band called Mr. Jones Machine. United as The Department in 2012, the pair has since played with the likes of Naked Lunch, The Woodentops, Ekkoes, and Kids On Bridges, and at such venues as Romo Night club in Sweden, the 100 Club, Analogue Nights, The Hope & Anchor, and The Macbeth, all to increasing attention and acclaim. As mentioned they have spent the past two years working on Alpha, a release which in return immediately thrusts the duo into the full gaze and frontline of modern electro rock and pop.

From the first embrace of opener Don’t Give Up, the band’s album is a revolving kaleidoscope of recognisable sounds and flavours crafted into original and bracing exploits. Song one makes a slow and suggestive entrance as electronic percussive coaxing brings a slightly portentous feeling to the immersive and stark breeze of the synths. As their presence and melodic expression expands, so does a warmer underbelly to the emerging song, spreading and intensifying with every passing melody and hook. Not only musically but also through the Dave Gahan like vocals of Green, there is no escaping the Depeche Mode essences flirting from within the melancholic yet vibrant landscape the song. It is a transfixing spice embraced by the expressive and evocative imagination of The Department.

The potent start to the album is straight away reinforced by both Take My Hand and Glass Houses, the first of the two opening with chilled synthesiser minimalism reminding of The Normal. Its industrial lilt leads to broader endeavour and a breath of early Human League to tempt the imagination, and if you had to pick any general if loose reference to describe Alpha, the late seventies era of the Sheffield band alongside Fad Gadget would be our choices. The song itself is a wonderfully small yet again busily lively encounter, sparking in ears and the imagination with its gentle revelry whilst its successor provides a more anthemic pulsing and melodic catchiness which offers hints of the synth pop days of Al Jourgensen and Ministry. It too remains a restrained and reserved romp of energy yet has plenty to urge feet into action, and at barely two and a half minutes long, is one sublime slice of synth pop.

16470_584444331690660_2953593570011598044_n  Come Inside has a great steely twang to its opening rhythms and opening hook, their union making for a compelling lead into another minimalist terrain as pungent and provocative as any full-blooded sonic rampage. Infection loaded, a given with every track upon Alpha, the song has a swing to its body and energy to its melodies which is almost Heaven 17 like, a whisper backed by the equally catchy essence of Green’s vocals.

The album’s debut single As If Transformed comes next, a captivation of cyber drama driven by effect wrapped vocals, sonic niggling, and a fuzzy bluster of electro wind around an endearing weave of melodies. The repetitive nature of lyrics and sound only adds to the theatre and shadowed heart of the encounter, an emotional edge which definitely has a Frank Tovey like exploration to them. Its dark fascination is mesmeric but instantly outshone by the tenacious beauty and vibrancy of Days Of Liberty, a song on an addictive rhythmic march whilst draped in just as irresistible and vivacious melodic radiance. It is pure addiction with NEXT SINGLE all over it.

Through the cooler air and emotion of Not For You and the wonderfully sinister seduction of Skin Vultures, the album’s magnetism is only compounded. The first of the pair provides a mellower tone and smoother flow to its presence compared to the previous song, with synths gliding over the senses as the baser elements of the track pulsate with heavy emotion and suggestiveness matched by Green’s equally expressive tones. The second of the two is seeded with a Fad Gadget like provocative drama, every slither of electronic bait and melodic entangling of ears, offering new avenues of reflective and emotive exploration. It is a dark caress of a song but again magnetically loaded with bewitching echoes and touches of warmth and captivating light.

The enchanting beauty and shadowed emotion of Slow Down keep thoughts and emotions gripped next, its elegant sonic poetry followed by the just as finely textured and enthralling Let It Go. It too opens its heart with a merger of light and dark, continuing the personal and musical intimacy which veins the whole album and arguably finds the most dramatic and traumatic depths within The Waiting Room. There is a thick Martin Gore feel to the songwriting and voice of the song; it’s haunted dark tones a seemingly volatile yet firmly bound incitement within the inescapable threads of melodic temptation lighting the gripping encounter. The track is gorgeous, a croon come dark serenade earning its place as the pinnacle of the album and as the most immersive and incendiary proposal for ears and imagination.

Even The Sun offers a potent and pleasing encounter next, though after the last song it is a paler incitement through no real fault of its own. It still feeds appetite and satisfaction nicely before The Gothenburg Reprise Remix of As If Transformed brings the album to a close. Anticipation for Alpha from fans has been eager and no one has been left short in pleasure and enjoyment by the outstanding release. The Department had some big expectations to live up to but they surpassed those with ease whilst giving us all a very welcome dose of nostalgia.

Alpha is available from March 27th via Hard Cell Records, digitally and on CD @ https://hardcellrecords.bandcamp.com/releases

http://www.thedepartment-official.com/   https://www.facebook.com/pages/The-Department/248106308657799

RingMaster 26/03/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard on Reputation Radio @ http://reputationradio.yooco.org/

A.D.D. – Core

10525671_10152880875665159_1089009711330950948_n

It may be labelled as hard rock, but the roar of sound which escapes the craft and imagination of Chicago band A.D.D. is just as much metal and punk, and very often more so. It is a fiery and aggressive mix which makes the band’s second album Core, one of the most enjoyable slabs of voracious rock ‘n’ roll to be heard this year and most likely moving forward. It is a release which does not dramatically startle yet leaves ears and emotions seriously gripped and hungry. It is not an obvious classic encounter either yet can stand toe to toe with those which might be offered such label in creative tenacity and sheer pleasure. However you see and hear it though, Core is an encounter which does what all great rock albums do, leaves the listener breathless, adrenaline soaked, and highly excited.

Though still a young band A.D.D. (Analog Digital Disorder) are no strangers to attention and increasing acclaim. Their first album was been an eagerly devoured and purchased introduction on CD and download whilst live the quartet has only impressed and built a potent stature through shows with the likes of Korn, Chevelle, Halestorm, Sevendust, Alterbridge, and Buckcherry amongst many. Equally they have played and left events like Throttlefest, Summerfest, and WIIL Rockfest with success and praise soaking their wake. Now the band is ready to breach the broadest spotlights with Core, and such the impact on personal ears it is hard to see them losing any momentum in their ascent, indeed only accelerating it. Mixed by Tadpole (Disturbed, 3 Doors Down, Staind) and mastered by Grammy Award winner Trevor Sadler, the Pavement Entertainment released album hits the sweet spot straight away and never relinquishes its ultimate grip again.

I Regret sets things off in immense style, the track an instantly robust punch of rhythms and an aggressive snarl of riffs bound in spicy sonic tempting. There is grouchiness to its attitude, epitomised by the throaty growl of bass, and an instantly matching snarl to the voice and delivery of Matilda Moon (Margaret Young). Her vocals roar and soar with emotion and aggression across the song, simultaneously offering a warm and melodic vitriol which reminds of punk metallers Mongrel and their front lady Jessica Sierra, and indeed the song has a feel of their US compatriots but in openly individual ways. It is a mouth-watering opening to Core, melodies and harmonies as ripe and pungent as the more hostile elements of the outstanding encounter.

Print     The following Not My Way comes with a more even tempered but no less compelling presence. Moon and guitar embrace ears initially with expressive restraint before the track erupts with predatory riffs and heavy jabbing beats in a furious and highly flavoursome weave of sound. Part confrontation but more magnetic croon, the song captivates and tantalises with evolving adventure. The guitars of Dave Adams and Jeremy Sparta alone absorb an eager appetite but aligned to the pungent rhythms and Moon’s increasingly impressive tones, it is a mouth-watering trap for the imagination and passions.

Hear Me Now steps up next with muscles openly flexing in every swiping beat from Jason Delismon as aggression wraps every snarled syllable from Moon. Though it has a fuller melodic rock canvas to its thick bellow, there is still that metallic intensity and punkish roar at large, the track all the better for it, and something missing from Was My Life next. It should be noted not everyone will feel the same about the song, but for personal tastes it is one of two times where the album goes astray. Led by the vocals of Sparta, who right away we emphasize has an impressive voice and embraces the soft/hard rock balladry of the song with skill and inventive colour, the track simply breaks the flow and charge of the album with its soft hearted endeavour. It is a potent showing of another side to the band’s sound and songwriting but feels out of place in the surge of the release. It is a personal thing though and as the saying sort of goes, “it’s not them it’s me”.

Attention and emotions are flying and rigorously enthused again with the voracious Damn Thing, a rhythmic trap of a song with bracing and soaring melodies aligned to matching harmonies. Crossing a volatile landscape of ideation and aggressive sound, the guitars and Moon simply enthral across the song’s lively length. Their passion and invention helps build an anthemic incitement which is imposing and rewarding from start to finish whilst the closing snarl of the song just sends shivers and tingles down the spine, a reaction swiftly soothed by the melodic charm and warm caress of So The Pain. Vocally and lyrically emotive, and soaked in an angst lit aural embrace, the track blossoms a provocative web which brings whispers of one of the band’s influences, Heart, as well as more classic rock imagination through the guitars. The fade-out is disappointing but the song a fascinating and exciting encounter showing even more of the depths to A.D.D.

Nightmare is next and also explores a broader and calmer weave of melodic rock but comes littered with dramatic and inventive twists from guitars and vocals around a carnivorous spine of bass and drums, whilst its successor Nothing Left, sees the band turning back to the more recognisable hard and classic rock recipe but with a fiery and thrilling intent to its melody rich power ballad canvas. It also has a tempestuous air and agitated nature in riffs and rhythms which makes for an unpredictable and highly enjoyable proposal.

So Much is seeded from that classic bed of inspiration also but this time as with Was My Life, lies like a cuckoo in the cradle of the album despite also being a skilfully and impressively sculpted proposition. As the earlier song, others will devour it with greed and rightfully so, but for our tastes it finds barren ground and a want to dive into album closer Black to keep the exhilarating growl and tempest of Core in top gear. The closing song is a beast of a track, from vocals to riffs and rhythms to sonic toxicity, a predator of ears and emotions unafraid to add tangy spicily coated melodies and harmonies to its seduction. As it started, Core goes out on a pinnacle, finishing off nothing but lofty peaks to be honest, despite a couple of aberrations in our likes.

A.D.D. is a band poised to leap into the big time, if not with Core certainly sometime ahead, and with seriously thrilling albums like this already fuelling their rise, it would be stupid for anyone to wait.

Core is available now via Pavement Entertainment on CD @ http://official-a-d-d-store.myshopify.com/collections/frontpage/products/a-d-d-core-cd and digitally on most online stores.

A.D.D. has upcoming live shows at…

Fri. Mar. 27th – Mojoes – Joliet, IL – HEADLINE CD Release show

Sat. Apr. 4th – Crazy Coyote – Burlington, IA

Sat. Apr. 11th – Freakster’s Roadhouse – HEADLINE – Pontiac, IL

Thu. April 16th – Nevin’s – HEADLINE – Plainfield, IL

Fri. Apr. 24th – On the Rox w/ Wayland – Jacksonville, IL

Thu. May 7th – Mojoes w/ Black Stone Cherry – Joliet, IL

Sun. May 10th – High Noon Saloon w/ Y&T – Madison, WI

Sat. June 5th – Metal Grill – Milwaukee, WI

Fri. July 17th – Rockfest – Cadott, WI

https://www.facebook.com/Analog.Digital.Disorder

RingMaster 25/03/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard on Reputation Radio @ http://reputationradio.yooco.org/

Surf City – Jekyll Island

surfcity2015_web

There are times when it is easy to get lost in a realm of fantasy, moments in life and indeed music when physically and mentally you can escape the hum drum and explore new landscapes. One such escape is the sultry adventure of Jekyll Island, the new and third album from New Zealand psychgazers Surf City. Basking in a sultry surf rock seeded climate wrapped in the summery smile of shoegaze and the sonic beauty of psyche rock, the release is a mesmeric lure for ears and imagination.

The successor to their acclaimed album We Knew It Was Not Going To Be Like This of 2013, Jekyll Island is a fascinating flight of sound and emotion. Songs again come soaked in the warm magnetic fuzziness which the band is becoming renowned for but equally feel more precisely sculpted and resourcefully rounded propositions. It is open growth and evolution in the Surf City songwriting but an emerging potency which defuses none of the band’s already rich and tantalising qualities; basically a maturity of existing prowess exploring fresh and vivaciously new adventure. Simply songs and album offer pure pop presented in summery embraces of charm and beauty.

The album is also an imposing grower on ears and passions, its early touches engaging and magnetic but continual exposure leads to anything from lustful rapture to lingering seduction. The first track though is an immediate enslavement of ears and emotions on its first ever touch. From its opening exotic web of percussive and sonic enticement, Beat The Summer Heat has imagination and appetite hooked; especially as from that opening shuffle a rhythmic contagion unleashes irresistible bait. Jabbing with their own individual swing, beats forge an addictive lure at the heart of the track, taking ears and pleasure by the hand as guitars swarm over their enticement with vivid colours and a lively shimmer. Vocally too Davin Stoddard is a beacon of warmth and magnetism, riding the contagion with radiance. The track is glorious, almost alone worth the cost of your ticket for the album’s compelling ride.

Surf City - Jekyll Island   There is no major drift in quality and temptation as the following Spec City takes over, it a song with a bubbling electro underbelly and a radiating surface of melodic and harmonic splendour. The song is a courtship of the senses, a My Bloody Valentine like caress making an unrelenting seduction as a Yo La Tengo like vibrancy brings livelier action to the romance. It is a tempting swiftly backed and taken into new explorations by Jekyll Island and the Psycosphere and in turn Hollow Veins. The first of the two is a fascinating mix of eighties new wave bred pop and nineties inspired psychedelic enterprise, but also littered with post punk hooks and a Happy Monday’s like devilry. The song is pure mesmerism and perfectly contrasted and complimented in tone by the darker rockier revelry of its successor. It romps through ears like a meeting of The Horrors and House Of Love engaged in a vintage surf rock revival, its touch and breath raw yet overwhelmingly seductive.

The guitars of Stoddard and Jamie Kennedy weave an infectious web of fuzz induced rock pop next in One Too Many Things, its twang offering a country whisper whilst its catchy tenacity has a Brit pop lilt to its tempting, whilst its successor What They Need expands the already potent variety within the album again. It opens with a droning tang of a sound you might expect from the band’s part of the world, a scuzz lined whiny lure which persists invitingly around the additional minimalistic yet weighty hug of sound filling its persuasion.

That constant tweaking of flavours has Leave Your Worries unveiling an anthemic infectiousness which plays like a the offspring of a union between The Mighty Lemon Drop, The Lightning Seeds, and Kitchens of Distinction, but as in all songs it emerges as unique to Surf City.

The delicious heavy bass seducing and just as enticing beats offered by Mike Ellis and Andy Frost at its start makes Indian Summer straight after, irresistible all on their own but infused with the melodic lustre of the guitars and the resonating touch of Stoddard’s vocals, it only proceeds to steal attention and the passions further. It is a charmer from start to finish, one carrying the right amount of mischief and excitement but an incitement which ultimately places the listener in a fulfilling and richly satisfying calm. That is a description suiting the whole of Jekyll Island to be honest, and especially the gorgeous pop of Thumbs Up which romps with ears and emotions next. Whether it is possible to ever write the perfect song is debateable but it is possible to come close and this is certainly a serious contender. Melodies reek of innocence yet are inflammatory on the ear whilst harmonies and rhythms simply engage in lustful and infection breeding temptation.

The album is brought to a just as thrilling end by firstly the more sober, in comparison to its predecessor, but raucously energetic dance of The End and lastly through the meditative glamour and brilliance of Jesus Elvis Coca Cola. Sixties kissed and soaked in aural sunshine, the track is a majestic sea of expressive harmonies and poetic melodies soaked in a wash of psychedelic humidity.

It is a transfixing end to an increasingly mouth-watering encounter. There is a great familiarity to Jekyll Island but only as a rich spice in the unique ambience and masterful imagination of Surf City. Psyche/shoegaze pop has rarely sounded better.

Jekyll Island is available via Fire Records now and digitally, on CD, and on black vinyl @ https://surfcitymusic.bandcamp.com/track/hollow-veins

https://www.facebook.com/killsurfcity

RingMaster 25/03/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard on Reputation Radio @ http://reputationradio.yooco.org/

 

Unrest – Grindcore

unrest1

If there is one perfect example of something doing and providing what it says on the tin then it has to be the debut album from US aggressive fury Unrest. Called Grindcore, the twelve track ravishment is the genre in full voracious assault, a vicious and hostile incitement as raw and uncompromising as it is virulently compelling. It and the band has a sound which is stripped bare of all unnecessary deceits, a proposal revealing the raw heart of the songs and inspirations breeding their fury and voice. It is an incendiary persuasion embracing caustic vocals and a primal passion, and one of the year’s mightiest insatiable roars so far.

The album has been one long awaited and highly anticipated offering, its origins going back to 2006 when vocalist/guitarist Steve Jansson and drummer Chris Grigg unhappy at the demise of Nasum, decided to try writing their own grindcore thickly inspired by said band. They soon enlisted friend and bassist Brooks Wilson and produced a horde of songs, played numerous live shows, and recorded their debut album in 2011. It was an offering never released, the band deciding it would need to be heavily recorded at some point in the future. Other projects and opportunities came up for members in the meantime, Grigg continuing with black metal band Woe which he founded in 2007, whilst Jansson and Wilson went on to found TrenchRot, Crypt Sermon, and Infiltrator. Last year the original mixes to the album were re-discovered and found to be usable. New vocals were recorded that summer, followed by the album’s new mixing, and now via Unspeakable Axe Records, Grindcore sees the cold light of day, and in return gives us a merciless snarl.

unrest cover     As soon as opener We’re Calling You Out unleashes its rage and sonic ire, thoughts of Nasum, as intended, surge forward, as do hints of bands like Napalm Death, but equally and continuing over the rest of the release, there are plenty of new essences and blistering invention which makes it so much more than a homage to its inspiration. The first song slips in on a piercing sonic lance of pain, threatening and gripping attention ready for its subsequent forty seconds or so of grindcore toxicity. All three members bruise ears in their individual ways, rhythms a hellacious onslaught whilst the guitar singes the senses. The infernal raging led by Jansson’s vocal squall continues into You Take and beyond, the second song battering ears with a muscular rhythmic intent from its first breath, inviting a carnivorous bassline and tone within the next, and casting a rabid assignation between it and the psyche thereafter. The bass grooving is pure predation, equalled by the furious scourge of guitar enterprise and its own grooved tempting, but ultimately the track is a malicious conquest of senses and emotions.

The seriously brutal Inaction, as well as the following grievous violation posing as Quit raises the ante and intensity of sound and pleasure. The first is a riveting tsunami of spite and rancor which merges sheer unbridled savagery and slow venomous stalking into one addictive raging. Its inhospitable hardcore tendencies only add to the gripping persuasion whilst its successor is simply bestial in tone and aggression, carrying a rancor which makes the brutality of its predecessor almost lightweight in comparison. Once more the trio toy with gait and ideation within an intensive tsunami, never deviating too far from its core rampage but bringing plenty to challenge expectations and ignite the imagination. The track flows straight into Protest Culture, though it is no simple continuation but an individual torrent of musical bad blood bred from the same inventive and instinctive grudge.

Through the tangy and provocative, almost doomy terrain of Faith Is A Hearse, the thrash/death tirade of Anything To Shock, and the swaggering violence of Nothing (That’s All You Have To Give), band and album uncage further creative adventure, merging new stirring flavours and spilling thicker antipathy across the individual grudges. Each offers a new twist in sound and invention within the album too whilst still flourishing in that Nasum inspired base camp, and all leave ears and appetite greedier, a hunger Identity In The Internet Age and Consumption feed with their respective blackened hardcore ravaging and thrash fuelled rabidity. Both are also virulently contagious as they bruise and scar the senses with their ruinous appetites.

The album comes to a formidable close via firstly the exhausting and sonically scalding False Brotherhood and lastly with the rhythmically addictive and antagonistically crabby Drown, and though neither quite matches what came before, both bring a fine slab of delicious nastiness to create a thoroughly enjoyable close.

There are some tracks upon Grindcore which hit the sweet spot more than others but all impress and prove the long wait for the album, indeed a release from Unrest, was really worth waiting for. Hopefully the band can remain an on-going provocation hereon in with more sounds bred in thrilling and pungent toxicity.

Grindcore is released on CD March 24th via Unspeakable Axe Records @  http://www.unspeakableaxerecords.com/purchase/index.php?main_page=product_info&cPath=66&products_id=240

https://www.facebook.com/unrestgrind

RingMaster 24/03/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard on Reputation Radio @ http://reputationradio.yooco.org/

Siriun – In Chaos We Trust

Siriun 2

It might have the title In Chaos We Trust but there is nothing random and bedlamic about the debut album from Brazilian progressive metallers Siriun. Certainly the release is a furious and blistering merging of varied creative winds within extreme metal but comes entwined in a superbly imaginative and inventive technical prowess across songwriting and sound. Recognisable essences and established flavours consort with fresh and invigorating ideation, the result one thrilling and thoroughly gripping proposition.

Siriun is the brainchild of Rio De Janeiro guitarist/vocalist Alexandre Castellan, a project formed in 2014 to give an avenue to his musical ideas and creative tenacity. It was a proposal he intended would also be enriched with the strongest creative heart and invention possible, an intent which led to the band line-up of long-time friend and bassist Hugo Machado, and the rhythmic tour-de-force that is drummer Kevin Talley (Six Feet Under, Daath, Feared, Suffocation, Devil Driver, BattleCross) alongside its creator. The subsequent outcome of the union is the hellacious and fascinating In Chaos We Trust, an album bringing the metal world another intensively striking and ferocious proposal from Brazil.

The album first embraces and ignites ears with Mass Control, a track swiftly luring strong attention through its opening wash of melodic endeavour and sonic enterprise alone. The guitar of Castellan virtually flirts with ears, coaxing and enticing before a consuming wall of rhythms pounce. The powerful beats of Talley bring intimidation and temptation whilst the snarling tones of Machado’s bass, though less intrusive, only adds to the emerging predatory nature of the track. It is an impressive start soon casting a just as magnetic storm of scarring riffs and rhythmic voracity. Castellan’s vocals bring their own caustic but also an alluring texture and enticing to the increasingly gripping encounter, their raw and pleasingly varied expression and colour immense within the expanding web of melodic and progressive exploration. At its and indeed the album’s heart, the encounter is a beast though, prowling and growling with almost malevolent aggression and emotion, but consistently baiting its animus with transfixing imagination alongside seriously skilful and anthemic enterprise.

Siriun Artwork 1    The following Infected is just as riveting and mighty, and again straight away holding ears and thoughts tight through the breath-taking craft of Talley courted by a potent acoustic caress of guitar. Of course skirting it all are shadows and a more hostile intent, one which is soon driving the great carnivorous tones of bass and the just as swiftly riled riffs. It is the contagious swings of Talley’s beats though forcibly leading the tempting, their devilry like a sinister and hostile carnival bringing Latin seeded percussive revelry into a courtship with hellish animosity. The track continues to twist and incite through every dramatic aspect, the fingers of Castellan manipulating strings for a fluid and enthralling tapestry of sonic and acoustic melodic captivation.

There is no dipping of adventure and craft, or in an already greedy appetite for the release, as both Spread of Hate and Cosmogenesis seize ears and the imagination. The first of the pair is a blistering fury of sound and attitude, but again reined a touch by the technical invention and skills of the trio, something you can attribute to all songs upon In Chaos We Trust. Ravenous and enthralling in equal measure, the song roars like a mix of Sepultura, Mudvayne, and Devildriver yet entwines its roar in a melodic exploration opening up a unique and mouth-watering adventure. Its successor is a brief instrumental, an acoustic flame within a cold and haunting ambience within which a seduction of electric guitar provides evocative light. It leads into the just as shadowed and initially emotionally imposing and portentous title track. Though that suggestive threat and darkness never leaves, the song soon explores a landscape of provocative melodies and imagination within that tempest in waiting. There is an increasing pressure though bred from bass and drums though, a weight which eventually breaks down resistance and explodes in an onslaught of thrash drawn riffery and death metal vitriol. Again though, it is a passing passage in a journey of a song, part of an evolution which never waits around too long in one train of thought and sound keeping ears and imagination enslaved.

Transmutation steps up next and another web is spun around senses and thoughts, another offering relishing the skills and invention of every band member. Talley has brought his most viciously creative endeavour to the release, perfectly supported by the rabid craft of Machado whilst Castellan vocally and especially in his guitar explorations, leads the listener through a roller coaster of enterprise and emotion with ideas which rarely leave ears less than engrossed even if in rare moments the fluidity of twists are not as polished as elsewhere. It is almost a clutching at straws though to try and temper the weight of the enthusiasm for the release, a ‘lust’ continuing through the emotive and physical turbulence of Transmutation. As uncompromising and venomous as it is engagingly colourful in exotic melodies, the song bellows with creative toxicity sparking once more a hunger for more.

It is a want immediately fed by the closing pair of Intent and Becoming Aware. Each explore yet new spices and exploratory endeavours in their ferocious bodies, the first brewing a waspish nagging in its riffery and a sultry climate around its winery of melodies and sonic intrusion. It all comes ruffled up by the muscular avalanche of Talley’s swings and the grouchiness of Machado’s bass whilst the closing track brings the album to a climactic end. Though it is arguably the least inventively inflammatory and breath-taking of all the tracks, it has ears ringing and thoughts contemplating ardour whilst hoping this union of three exceptional musicians is the first of many.

In Chaos We Trust is an exhilarating encounter, one managing to offer sounds and flavours which provide at times a very familiar canvas to leap upon but just as powerfully create a proposition that reeks of fresh invention and new adventure. Simply it is a mighty mix from a project with the potential to craft truly inspiring templates for progressive and extreme metal ahead.

In Chaos We Trust is available now via http://www.siriunband.com

https://www.facebook.com/siriunband

RingMaster 24/03/2015

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Listen to the best independent music and artists on The RingMaster Review Radio Show and The Bone Orchard on Reputation Radio @ http://reputationradio.yooco.org/