Living in the flames of Vaya

“Her spirit is screaming and blowing on the stage. She is the drums and her soul rises up through the sacred fire of music.”

This is a line from the Vaya biography on social media which sums up the creative and instinctive roar of the Canadian singer and band, and reason enough to find out more which we recently did with great thanks to the trio…

Hello and thanks for taking time out to talk with us.

Can you first introduce the band and give us some background to how it all started?

Victoria VAYA: Actual VAYA’s members Raphael, Philippe and me have met through this project step by step. First I met “by hazard” Raphaël through a “next door” music shop, when I had just moved into this area. The people talked about him, he is a good drummer so I contacted him. And Philippe joined us when the album was recorded and when we need to build a team for the live shows. I think he just answered to the music call. It was written. Then we are managing the stage from one year sharing the same powerful feeling for the rock music and eclectic colours if it.

RAPHAEL: Hi RingMaster, Victoria VAYA learned that I played the drums from a music store in Gland (CH). One day, she called me to record the first drums of VAYA. I never left since!

Have you been or are involved in other bands? If so has that had any impact on what you are doing now, in maybe inspiring a change of style or direction?

Victoria VAYA: Yes I was. It was totally different. It was interesting but I was always feeling that is not my all expression in it. It was good experiences for the studio record part than the stage but I felt not complete. Now with VAYA, I really have so much pleasure to express all that animal and mystical energy through sounds and rhythms: it’s magic!

Philippe: Yes, actually I’m involved in 4 different bands: 1 funk, jazz, fusion band, 1 country blues folk band, of course Vaya and I’m starting a new jazz, salsa, samba band with another guitar player and we’re looking for other musicians too. 4 years ago, I played in a Celtic rock band and a blues rock band too. It’s very different than what I played in my former bands and in my actual bands but it’s interesting to combine those different styles and I always try to adapt myself in every situations.

RAPHAEL: I have been involved in many bands before. Now, I mainly focus on VAYA. Meeting other musicians with influences from all over the world has always been a positive and constructive impact on my drums’ play.

What inspired the band name?

Victoria VAYA:  AHAHAH I like this question. GOD? Or the Blow of it. As artists we just receive the flow of ideas around and translating it. So VAYA is the Legend of The White Wolf blowing on Earth. Ameridian people know more than us about the spirit of it but for sure it’s guiding and inspiring VAYA step by step. Something spiritual and for sure human.

Was there any specific idea behind the forming of the band and also in what you wanted it and your sound to offer?

Victoria VAYA: Specific Idea? I don’t know. We are guided between intuition, talent combined and lot of passion and work time. So our sound is colourful and the most important, authentic.

Do the same things still drive the band when it was fresh-faced and how would you say your sound has evolved over time?

Victoria VAYA: We are “Evolution” by defining human being. We are simply always bounded by sharing our musician souls everywhere in the world.

Philippe: Yes we evolved a lot, first we were more like a metal band, than we changed the style, we use more percussions and now we start by using keyboard and it brings a new sound of the band!

Victoria VAYA: OH VAYA has an interesting evolution and it’s probably why I’m stoked with it. 😀 The first step of the album was done with a French composer, then he has to quit and I have to continue. So arrived a Hungarian composer with a real good classical background and a good rocky spirit and he gave a lot of keys for the arrangements of VAYA tracks album. Then for the next step VAYA needed to find a powerful evolution to go on stage and it’s when VAYA met the volcanic Chilean blood of Sebastian, also with a real good academic background. So I mean VAYA is rich of differences and musicians souls

Philippe: When I was young, I was more inspired by hard-rock, heavy-metal, then I changed, I started listening, studying and playing jazz, after played more blues and now, I play so many kinds of music and I’m back to rock.

RAPHAEL: My drums are now stronger into the groove. I am happy about this, it is really for VAYA!

I have a nice memory of the recording of the first studio album. There was someone who directed the arrangements and told what I had to play. Sometimes, I had no idea what would be the final results! When I listened to this album, I was well surprised!

The live album is more representative of my own sound.

And that movement in sound and anything else has been more organic or deliberate?

Victoria VAYA: We still experienced things. No limits for music, it’s a big playground!

Philippe: Yeah, we always try to experiment new things, new sounds, new songs, new ideas, it depends in what mood we are!

Presumably across the band there is a wide range of inspirations; are there any in particular which have impacted not only on the band’s music but your personal approach and ideas to creating and playing music?

Victoria VAYA: Poetry of Jim Morrison, visionary as David Bowie, psyche as Jimmy Hendrix, sensitive as Bjork.

Philippe: I always try to adapt myself, to play and compose songs depending of the different styles I play in every band.

Is there a process which generally guides the writing of songs?

Victoria VAYA: So I am actually on the composing roots. Could be change never know, I always send ideas and people catch it for developing it, that’s the sharing part. No process. Sometimes it’s a drum that will be the first step, sometimes lyrics or a guitar riff or a keyboard song. I am receiving it and managing it to put all together.

Philippe: I think when someone has an idea for a new song, he or she brings it to the band, then we listen to it, we talk about it and then we try to play it together the best we can and everybody’s free to give his own opinion to change something, or to improve it.

Where do you, more often than not, draw the inspirations to the lyrical side of your songs?

Victoria VAYA: Everywhere.

Philippe: Sometimes when I’m home and I try to find something good, or when I’m outside, in the street, in the train or wherever, it can happen anytime in any places

Give us some background to your latest release.

Victoria VAYA: WOW, it will take too much time, just listen and discover our double album it will connect you to your deepest part.

How about some insight to the themes and premise behind it and its songs.

Victoria VAYA: Oh my Dear. So the biggest thing who’s giving to you power what is it? The law of Nature :)))))) Then second is: Human experiences/observations. And you do a bridge between them.

Are you a band which goes into the studio with songs pretty much in their final state or prefer to develop them as you record?

Victoria VAYA: Both of it. For sample Biscuit and Friends are born on studio record. The arrangement of My little curl too…So a mix of it.

Philippe: Actually, we went once to a studio to record altogether and now, we’re working on new songs for the next album, so right now if we have ideas for new songs, we record it on our own on the computer.

RAPHAEL: I’d rather prefer to go into the studio prepared to win some time (and some money). Sometimes it could be interesting to develop a song in the studio. The song BLOW is a nice example.

Tell us about the live side to the band, presumably a favourite aspect of the band?

Victoria VAYA: Absolutely: it’s being true and powerful for giving a real good travel to you guys! 😉

Philippe: The favourite aspect is when we’re on stage, with a good sound and with an enthusiastic audience, when we all have so much fun!

RAPHAEL: a live show that you will remember. The voice is so powerful, and without any light shows. I am always surprised that the audience is thankful and go back home with a smile.

It is not easy for any new band to make an impact regionally let alone nationally and further afield. How have you found?

Victoria VAYA: I am always surprised people liked our live show. First in Switzerland where we met each other; the public there is really difficult to “ seduce” with a new way of expressing music; but they liked the spirit of the sacred fire. And such a lovely warm welcome into our last East of Europe tour. It’s growing step by step but because public is really welcome and is clearly a part of our music, VAYA is continuing with them. I would like to take that opportunity to say again thank you for all your encouragements everywhere we have played.

Philippe: It’s really hard for every new band to get known! You have to keep playing as often as possible in many different places. And Yes everything can happen, if you work very hard, if you focus and believe in yourself and the band, great things can happen!

RAPHAEL: I have worked for years in order to meet the good people in the music business to get the trust in my projects. This is paying now.

How has the internet and social media impacted on the band to date? Do you see it ultimately as a negative or positive?

Victoria VAYA: So Raphael is probably the right person to answer to that question

Philippe: Sometimes things go right and sometimes wrong, it’s not easy!

RAPHAEL: One day, I put the band on Instagram and someone discovered us from Canada. Zolla Productions is now in charge of our booking in Canada. It takes a lot of time to manage the social media, but I think this is essential nowadays to show people the development of VAYA.

Once again our big thanks for sharing time with us; anything you would like to add or reveal for the readers?

Victoria VAYA: Come and share the sacred fire with us. VAYA VAYA.

Thank you Ringmaster!

Vaya are:

Victoria VAYA: songs writer, singer, drums and keyboard

Philippe: guitar and bass

Raphaël: Drums &Percussions

https://www.facebook.com/VAYA.Official/   https://www.vaya-official.com https://twitter.com/VAYA_official

Pete RingMaster 07/12/2018

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Parasitic Twins Interview

Having been more than taken with their the debut EP, ‘All That’s Left To Do Now Is Sleep With Each Other’, it is with pleasure we bring you a recent interview between its creators, British hardcore duo Parasitic Twins, and our guest and friend Elliot Leaver.

For those who may not know who you are, introduce yourselves quickly.

Dom Smith (drums): I’m Dom. Max (guitars, vocals) is the other one. He’s the talented. He’s too busy, and important. You can’t sit with him.

Describe your sound in as few words as possible.

DOOM.

Who are your three biggest influences as a band?

Bongripper. Death. Generic Questions

What’s the meaning behind your band name?

It’s a Dillinger Escape Plan song, and an accurate reflection on our relationship.

How did you approach this release (All That’s Left To Do Now, Is Sleep With Each Other EP) in terms of writing and recording?

We went in to Melrose Yard Studios in York, worked with another dude with exactly the same name as me. He’s way more talented than me also. It was a pleasure. We wanted a live feel, and that’s what we got. We put ourselves under pressure to come up with three songs, it was tough but if you like it, then we’re happy. Do you like it? If you want to know what the songs are about, do check out the lyrics on Bandcamp: https://theparasitictwins.bandcamp.com/

Max is influenced by people he meets, sees and despises, mostly.

Did you try anything differently this time around than with previous efforts?

We both loved being in Seep Away, but we realised that we have to much respect for each other’s completely pointless misery to separate when that band died a tragic, horrible, fiery death. We’re stuck together now, and there’s nothing we can do about it. So, the only thing we did differently this time was work with each other instead of two or three other musicians. It’s been DELIGHTFUL.

What was it like to record the EP?

We recorded it live, and that’s the way (uh-huh, uh-huh) we like it, for now.

Do you have any personal favourite songs on the release?

I like them all. I hope you do too! Wouldn’t it be weird if you published an interview with me saying I hated everything I’ve ever put drums on?

Explain the meaning behind the album title.

Those that know, know. But basically, me and Max have done everything else but sleep with each other, so that’s that. I mean, we’ve never done anything sexual, just to clarify. But, there’s still time, I suppose. He’s so miserable, but I do love him. He has nice pectoral muscles, FYI.

Do you have any dates lined up at present?

Not right now, I’m in a new relationship, not with Max though. Other than that, we play Oldham, Ashton-Under-Lyne, York, Hull and Stockport with our mates in The Carnival Rejects – it’s our first “tour”, and I say it like that, because it isn’t really a tour, but it’s a series of dates, and that’ll be lovely.

What are your favourite songs to perform live?

Massive’ and a bunch of new ones that we’ve not released yet. I’m excited to do those. There’s one called ‘Autopsy’, and it’s very cheery, as you might imagine.

What are the best and worst shows you’ve played to date?

Seep Away played a couple of shows with Hands Off Gretel, they were great. BUT, with this band, we’re looking forward to shows with Pat Butcher, and Carnival Rejects.

Worst shows? Our first band, not (Seep Away), played with a terrible goth band beginning with R and ending in hombus. One of that band’s members was a dick to my friend, and that’s not okay. Aside from that, it wasn’t our most triumphant show. Maybe because there was too much smoke. Goths love smoke.

If you could open for anyone, who would it be?

Code Orange, or Turnstile.

What’s the plan for the rest of 2018?

Celebrating the fact that this interview happened. Thank you for your attention.

https://www.facebook.com/ParasiticTwinsBand

Check out our review of ‘All That’s Left To Do Now Is Sleep With Each Other’ @ https://ringmasterreviewintroduces.wordpress.com/2018/10/17/parasitic-twins-all-thats-left-to-do-now-is-sleep-with-each-other/

Questions by Elliot Leaver

RingMaster Review 07/12/2018

Ringing the changes: 21 Taras Interview

21 Taras is a rock band from Littleton, Colorado which having sparked keen attention through previous releases has ventured into new directions in sound and adventure. This evolution is at the heart of their new album, Change. Wanting to now more we recently chatted with the band learning…

Can you first introduce the band and give us some background to how it all started?

4 out of the 5 of us went to school together. James and Alec shared some classes and started the band, then shortly after recruited Jimmy. James went up to the first person he saw; who just so happened to be Jimmy; and asked if he played bass. Austin was later introduced to the band in a similar fashion. I (Julian) moved to Colorado in 2014 and met James online on some band finder website. They sent me some songs to throw some vocals on and we played our first show just a couple weeks later.

Have you been or are involved in other bands? If so has that had any impact on what you are doing now, in maybe inspiring a change of style or direction?

We all have been playing music for a while now in one way or another, but this is pretty much our first real band. I had a project back when I lived in Alaska with one of my good friends Rio, but it was just the two of us. James and Alec had gone through a few other line-ups under a different band name, but as of late 2014 the line-up has been set and that is when the final name change to 21 Taras ensued.

What inspired the band name?

It comes from Buddhism. They have 21 different forms of Tara, all based around self-empowerment and self-enlightenment. The name stands for how we try to continually grow as not only musicians, but also as people through our music and songwriting.

Was there any specific idea behind the forming of the band and also in what you wanted it and your sound to offer?

We just want to continue evolving. Just about four years in, and we have changed so much already. I don’t think we ever try to plan for where things go; it just sort of happens. We’ve tried to dictate things before but that is a good way for things to end up forced.

Do the same things still drive the band from its first steps or have they evolved over time?

I think now having a full music studio at our disposal has greatly changed everything. It allows us to be more creative as we are working on our time. Our mentor/producer Jim Boyd deserves a lot of credit for our last record. With him opening up his studio to us, it really led to the growth of the songs and the overall freedom the album possesses.

Since your early days, how would you say your sound has evolved?

We started out with more of a hard rock and grunge presence, and it has evolved rather quickly to more of a 60s and 70s influenced sound. Things are getting more and more psychedelic influenced as we speak.

Has it been more of an organic movement of sound or more deliberately wanting to try new things?

A bit of both, I think everyone was starting to get a little burnt out and I think we just had a lack of direction. We were kind of floating in one area with no real progression occurring. We all had a big free flowing discussion back in February with the main message being about trying new things. Just taking more outside influences and putting them to use. It really has led to some very diverse songs for us.

Presumably across the band there is a wide range of inspirations; are there any in particular which have impacted not only on the band’s music but your personal approach and ideas to creating and playing music?

A big one for us is the Beatles. Right around Rubber Soul is when they really started to branch out and grow their sound. I just love how one band can have so many songs from different ends of the spectrum, from Honey Pie to Helter Skelter, they really changed the confines of a particular album mould. Other bands that do this are Queen and the Beach Boys. As a band we all share so many influences with each other. For James he brings a lot of the heavier side such as bands like Earthless and Red Fang, while Alec is more of a classic aficionado with bands like Deep Purple and Led Zeppelin. Austin and Jimmy probably have the most eclectic tastes, although we all tend to enjoy a bit of everything. It is a good problem to have as it leads to a diverse palette.

Is there a particular process to the songwriting?

Every song is different really, some songs are written by one or two guys while others we all sit and write together. Sometimes one guy will write a section and bring it to the group, while other songs may be more fleshed out by the time it reaches the rehearsal room.

Where do you, more often than not, draw the inspirations to the lyrical side of your songs?

I write the lyrics and more often than not it is usually dictated by the music itself. There have been times however where I will write the lyrics first and the music will follow.

Give us some background to your latest release.

Our latest release is called Change and the name is to be taken quite literal. It marks several big changes for us as a band, such as our sound but also our songwriting processes and just our overall growth as a group.

Give us some insight to the themes and premise behind it and its songs.

The album starts off rather straight forward musically, and by song two we go to a very new place, for both the listener and the band itself. Gettin’ Hungry (track two) is very jazz influenced number featuring a good friend Mia Klosterman on backing vocals. The song and much of the album takes you through some of the mental hardships I was going through at the time. I tried to have the bridge of the song represent what I was going through internally during a very distressed time in my life being away from a loved one.

Are you a band which goes into the studio with songs pretty much in their final state or prefer to develop them as you record?

With a studio at our disposal, it allows us to do both simultaneously. The songs are constantly being devolved and modified.

Tell us about the live side to the band, presumably the favourite aspect of the band?

Performing has changed so much for us with the growth of our songs. With the new album containing so much depth and there being just five of us in the band, it creates a fun challenge to reproduce the music. We are always looking at new ways to reinvent the songs and create more of a cohesive show that really tells a story. It really is theatrical in a way.

It is not easy for any new band to make an impact regionally let alone nationally and further afield. How have you found it?

If the drive is there, it is always possible. We are very driven and determined, but we also genuinely love doing it. So even the smallest of impacts are very satisfying for us. We just have to keep going.

How has the internet and social media impacted on the band to date? Do you see it as something destined to become a negative from a positive?

Times and technology change and the only option is to adapt to your surroundings whether you like it or not. Social media is part of our generation and there isn’t really a way around that. There are both negative and positive aspects to that but one really big positive is that it allows for bands to connect directly with their fans and have a whole new reach that would have never been possible before. Of course this leads to over saturation, which is a whole other discussion, but you have to always find the good in a bad situation no matter the circumstances. Speaking of, here’s a shameless plug of our website! https://www.21tarasband.com/

Once again a big thanks for sharing time with us; anything you would like to add or reveal for the readers?

We put a lot of time into our new album Change and our goal is to take you on a journey through some of our favorite periods in music. The album focuses heavily on the mid to late 60s, as well as 70s with a bit of early jazz influence as well. You can listen to the band’s new album Change here: https://21tarasband.bandcamp.com/album/change

https://www.facebook.com/21tarasband   https://twitter.com/21TarasBand

Pete RingMaster 07/12/2018

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

The Life Underfoot Interview

Hello and thanks for taking time out to talk with us.

Can you first introduce the band and give us some background to the band’s beginning?

We’re Life Underfoot from Owego New York. Our guitarist and vocalist Andre and bassist Emory went to school and graduated with each other so we’ve known each other awhile. James our drummer we met through local shows and just clicked!

Have you been in other bands before? If so has that had any impact on what you are doing now, in maybe inspiring a change of style or direction?

We all have different musical interest, James is more of a progressive kinda guy, Emory listens to a lot of underground and grunge music, Andre listen to a lot of music a lot of punk/emo stuff. We’ve all been in other bands as well. James is currently in this rad band called Tom Jolu; check them out.

What inspired the band name?

Our 10th grade bio teacher had a poster on the wall of a cut out section of the ground. On the side it said Life Underfoot and Andre always thought it was a sick name for a band.

Was there any specific idea behind the forming of the band and also in what you wanted it and your sound to offer?

We all just really wanted to be in a band where everyone is dedicated and wants to play shows and tour!!

Do the same things still drive the band from when it was fresh-faced?

We haven’t been a band very long so it’s still pretty fresh faced! But you do start to understand it is not as grand as it always seems!!

Since your early days, how would you say your sound has evolved?

Hard to say cause we’ve only been a band for going on 2 years, but we played with this awesome band called Vitamin K from Iowa, check them out cause we wouldn’t mind going that route eventually.

Are changes within the creativity of the band more organic or deliberate moves to try new things?

Everything is organic, Andre brings his ideas and demos to practice then we just kinda go from there. James has a lot of knowledge in music so he really helps shapes and perfects our songs.

Presumably across the band there is a wide range of inspirations; are there any in particular which have impacted not only on the band’s music but your personal approach and ideas to creating and playing music?

A lot of the Warped Tour band from like 2001-2006; we’re big fans of just timeless music that everyone loves and can sing along to. Bands like Taking Back Sunday and Brand New have songs that when they come on everyone sings and has a good time.

Is there a process to the songwriting which generally guides the creation of songs?

Typically Andre write the music, then Emory and Andre sit down to write the lyrics, then James gives pointer where to tweak and make the songs flow better. Really nice process that seems to work for us.

Where do you, more often than not, draw the inspirations to the lyrical side of your songs?

Well it could be anything; Emory and Andre tend to work on the lyrics together, one line could be from Andre’s life or Emory’s life. From a song either of us really likes. Or just something one of our friends wrote and thought it we’d like it!! Andre’s friends Orion and Connor have both written lyrics for some unreleased songs we’re still working on!

Give us some background to your latest release.

Peaks and Valleys EP…We recorded it at the Lumberyard in New Jersey. Really great EP and had a blast recording it. Wanted to go for an acoustic sombre emo vibe.

Give us some insight to the themes and premise behind it and its songs.

Andre wrote it as a story, not a love story but about any relationship ending in track 1, Our Swan Song, then the protagonist starts to talk about it in track 2, Clock Face, and finally with track 3, Chroma, the character moves on and realises that no matter how hard life hits ya don’t lose ya shade of color that makes you special, hence the line “through all the hardship and pain, that only stain black and grey, think all of that you can gain, just gotta look to the next day.

Are you a band which goes into the studio with songs pretty much in their final state or prefer to develop them as you record?

We like to have our idea for the song complete and ready before we hit the studio but are always still open to ideas, that’s how great songs are made! Everyone has something that can always bring and take away from parts of a song so never be afraid to at least try out suggestions.

Tell us about the live side to the band, presumably a favourite aspect of being in a band?

We just like to have a good time on stage and rock out! That’s our favorite part and biggest reason for being in a band! Just that feeling of being on stage and people watching is thrilling.

It is not easy for any new band to make an impact regionally let alone nationally and further afield. How have you found it?

Well where we’re from Emo and Punk music are the most popular. Mostly Country, Bluegrass, or cover bands. But Binghamton and Syracuse have always been great to us and the scenes are awesome. Same with New Jersey and Connecticut we’ve had more shows out in those states than Owego.

How has the internet and social media impacted on the band to date?

Social media is a great thing for musicians, bands, and artists!! Without that we wouldn’t have had as many of the opportunities we’ve gotten. We’ve gotten the chance to talk to and work with many of our idols because of things like Bandcamp and Facebook!

Once again a big thanks for sharing time with us; anything you would like to add or reveal for the readers?

Check us out on Bandcamp all our music is free on there!!

https://lifeunderfootny.bandcamp.com/  https://www.facebook.com/Lif3Underfoot/

Pete RingMaster 07/12/2018

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Various – It’s Brixmaaaaas

Never slow in bringing ears some great sounds, Brixton Hill Studios are adding to the festive feast of Christmas with new mini album, It’s Brixmaaaaas, featuring unique tracks united in individual reflections of different seasonal aspects from six of the finest bands on their label, Brixton Hillbilly. It all comes hand in hand with a great cause as all proceeds from its sale go to Brixton Soup Kitchen who has provided a much needed service in their local community for six years.

A Brixton based service looking out for and supporting the homeless and people in need, Brixton Soup Kitchen was officially launched January 1st 2013, though its founder, Solomon Smith, had been giving food to the homeless since the age of 12. Since then it has been a help and comfort to so many people and it is hard to think of a better way to celebrate its success and great music than with It’s Brixmaaaaas.

It is the brainchild of Stephen Gilchrist, the owner of Brixton Hill Studios, Hot Sauce Pony bassist, and seriously accomplished session drummer who has played with the likes of Graham Coxon and The Damned. Feeling it was time for local musicians to support the work of Brixton Soup Kitchen, he reflected when talking about the upcoming release, “Considering this is becoming one of the richest boroughs in the world,” Gilchrist said: “it’s very upsetting to think that we still need soup kitchens and food banks, Gilchrist enlisted Black Midi & Jerskin Fendrix, Ham Legion, Bad Parents, Scud FM, Alessi’s Ark and Hot Sauce Pony to come up with six unique songs. It is fair to say each heartfelt song finds that success, all nurturing a moment which pleasures ears, sparks the imagination, and evokes emotion as well as give a thick reason to go support a great charity.

Learn more about and donate to Brixton Soup Kitchen @ https://brixtonsoupkitchen.org/

It’s Brixmaaaaas is released on CD, Vinyl and as digital download on December 3rd on Brixton Hillbilly with pre-ordering available now @ https://brixtonhillbilly.bandcamp.com/album/its-briiiiiixmaaaaaas

It’s Brixmaaaaas tracklist:

Ice Cream – Black Fendrix Jersk Midi [6:36]

Winter’s Grace – Alessi’s Ark [3:19]

We’d Better Start Dinner – Ham Legion [2:41]

Christmas Present – Bad Parents [3:52]

Christmas Crime – Scud FM [4:56]

Christmas In Prison – Hot Sauce Pony [4:31]

Pete RingMaster 17/11/2018

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Roaring from the heart: talking with Wildheart

Uncaging melodic hardcore which commands attention, Wildheart is a band from Brisbane, Australia that is beginning to make a potent stir. The recent release of their new EP offers all the reasons why. With big thanks to the band we looked to discover more; talking beginnings, evolution, that latest encounter and more….

Can you first introduce the band and give us some background to how it all started?

We basically all came from other bands that had broken up or fizzled out, so us being the members who were still keen to create music came together and started writing music. We didn’t really have any particular genre in mind, we just wanting to create music that was heavy, melodic and powerful so we started writing and recording our first EP, A Thousand Days.

How has being involved in those other bands before had any impact on what you are doing now?

As mentioned before the band came together from other bands breaking up. The only thing we all wanted to begin with was the have more diversity in our music. So bigger choruses, more clean sections and really work on our songwriting and structuring.

What inspired the band name?

It was the first name we didn’t all hate ha-ha. The name was the last thing we did before releasing music and playing shows. There were plenty of words getting thrown around and ‘heart’ got said a lot and then someone came out with ‘Wildheart’ and kinda all agreed on it. It didn’t connote any particular genre which we liked; all our friends dug it so we just ran with it.

Was there any specific idea behind the forming of the band and also in what you wanted it and your sound to offer?

Not so much when we started. But I think now that we’ve been around awhile now we really focus on things that matter to us, so a lot of songs deal with personal issues such as anxiety and depression, issues of abuse or

So how has the driving intent of Wildheart evolved over time?

When we first started we were just super focused on playing as many shows as possible and just enjoying being in a band and playing live. I think now we are definitely doing everything with intent and looking at the pro’s and con’s and making sure we’re making the right decisions to keep us moving forward.

Since your early days, how would you say your sound has similarly evolved?

We’ve definitely gotten heavier and I guess…darker. But I’ve always strived to keep that core sound in there…Big choruses and lush clean parts.

Has it been more of an organic movement of sound or more the band deliberately wanting to try new things?

I’d say it’s more organic. Line-up changes have played a part and I’ve taken on the majority of writing duties so I definitely have a particular style but one thing I’ve been very focused on working on my songwriting and giving each song a distinctive flare and something that people will remember, not simply just throwing as much ‘cool sounding’ riffs into the mix.

Presumably across the band there is a wide range of inspirations; are there any in particular which have impacted not only on the band’s music but your personal approach and ideas to creating and playing music?

I don’t think I can pin point anything in particular. Sometimes I think of a riff at work, sometimes watching another band live can inspire me, not so much musically but it can push me to work harder and push myself harder. Sometimes I’ve even walked out of a movie with creative ideas.

You mentioned the songwriting earlier; do you have a particular way or process to your writing?

Usually it just starts with me hashing out ideas then I’ll move onto demoing the songs and sending them to the rest of the dudes to get their take on it and we just go back and forth then eventually we’ll start jamming them in the rehearsal space until we’re happy with how everything is coming together.

How about the lyrical side; where do you predominantly draw the inspirations?

I think just personal experiences. Real thoughts that have come from whatever the lyric writing is dealing with at the time, or if there has been a particular topic weighing on someone’s mind. Occasionally we have come up with a concept before any music or lyrics came together. Above/Below being a good example. We wanted to write two different songs one being more upbeat and melodic and one just being super dark and heavy and then we though to tie that into the experiences of someone dealing with bipolar disorder.

Give us some background to your latest release.

We Are is the best music we’ve created and released as a band. We knew we wanted to write darker and heavier songs whilst staying true to our original intentions of simple writing powerful melodic music and just building on top of that.

Could you give us some insight to the themes and premise behind it and its songs?

We knew we wanted to delve a little bit deeper, obviously the music itself is darker so the lyrics in turn go that way as well. Everything we wrote about all comes from personal experience or events that we’ve thought about or been subjected too. Songs such as Solitude are very much about dealing with anxiety and a lack of self-worth and uncertainty, Void is about substance abuse, Calloused is about trying to move on from heartbreak. Then as a comparison Grief is basically a f*!k you to anyone who has taken advantage of their position and made unwelcome advances or gone as far as to assault someone, be it in a band or within the workplace. Essentially Then you have the title track We Are which takes a more worldly and more exploitative approach looking at things happening around us such as the general sense of oppression that is occurring in modern society, be it because of one’s race, gender or gender identity or more closely aligned with the lyrics “the top one percent” seeking to suck away any financial stability we might have, especially the younger generations.

Are you a band which goes into the studio with songs pretty much in their final state or prefer to develop them as you record?

Final state for sure, I’m generally a pretty relaxed dude but that’s one area I’m super OCD about. I like to leave room for some experimentation in the studio and sometimes something you thought worked doesn’t so you change it up, but the core song structures are always down pat before we go in.

Tell us about the live side to the band, presumably the favourite aspect of the band?

We’ve always been proud of the fact that we always give it our all live and don’t hold back, and blown a lot of money on gear. Good guitar tone is everything.

It is not easy for any new artist to make an impact regionally let alone nationally and further afield. How have you found it your neck of the woods? Are there the opportunities to make a mark if the drive is there for new bands?

100% you just have to work hard for it, and don’t expect everything to just fall into your lap. One thing that is super important is to “own our local” Play as much in your home town as you can as people will remember your name and people in the industry will take notice and actively look to seek your band out.

How has the internet and social media impacted on the band to date? Do you see it as something destined to become a negative from a positive as the band grows and hopefully gets increasing success if in a climate where people are not buying music or is it more that bands struggling with it are lacking the desire to keep it working to their advantage?

Social media marketing is a hard one, it’s always changing and evolving but it’s become an integral part of how we reach people these days. But at the end of the day I believe if you write good music, play tight live and put your self-out there you’ll see some headway eventually, it’s very easy to compare yourself to others within the realms of social media so always take a breather and remember to focus on your own journey.

Once again a big thanks for sharing time with us; anything you would like to add or reveal for the reader

If you haven’t already checked us out please do and if you have thank you so very much! Hit us up on Facebook and Instagram to stay up to date as we have plenty of rad stuff lined up for the next few months!

Check out Cinders further @ https://www.facebook.com/pg/wearewildheart/   https://wildheart.bandcamp.com/

Pete RingMaster 07/11/2018

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Unleashing a spring in the step: talking Cinders

So boisterous and tenacious, let alone infectious, that a bouncing body to its bait is inescapable, the Cinders sound is an infection in the waiting. All the evidence is there on the US band’s new album; a collection of indie pop tracks embracing a host of flavours as they romp in the ears.  We had the pleasure to find out more with big thanks to the band, examining the band’s beginnings, inspirations and of course Cinder’s latest album alongside much more…

Hello and thanks for taking time out to talk with us.

No problem at all! Thank you for having us.

Can you first introduce the band and give us some background to how it all?

Cinders is a rowdy-acoustic-pop band from Salt Lake City, UT.

Members

Adrian De La Cruz: Bass Guitar

Austin Harris: Keyboard / Multi-Instrumentalist

Brad Bennett: Drums

Chelsey Powell: Saxophone / Vocals

Jordan Zabriskie: Vocals / Guitar

Montana Smith: Vocals / Guitar

We were brought together by a love for music and a desire to make a career out of doing something that we actually love. We are all of the same mind-set that if someone has a passion, they should be able to be passionate about it and do everything they can to pursue it! And for the last 3 years that is what we have been doing.

Some of us met when we were teenagers. We jammed to a lot of the same music and rebelled in the same ways (we would wait until the 3rd time our mom asked us to clean our room to actually do it). Some met a little later in life when we had matured a bit, gone to school, and experienced life around different parts of the country. Within our search for self-discovery we would always come back to music. It is what we love most and what we will continue to do the rest of our lives.

Have you been or are involved in other bands? If so how has that had any impact on what you are doing now?

Yeah most of us have been in and out of other bands! Whether they were high school jazz bands, or metalcore bands, we have all come from a musical performance background. Each group/band taught us important lessons about working together and about what it takes to make a successful band.

I think we definitely pull aspects from each band we played in. It has played a big role in creating our genre and how we act on stage. We are very different from all of those projects though so we approach Cinders very differently. Our ultimate goal is to have fun and bring people together. So we try to write songs with that goal in mind.

What inspired the band name?

It felt like an appropriate name for a band of 6 people who have played music for years but never together. It is short and sweet and represents our music well…though because it is so simple, people often feel like it should be more complicated and add in “the” to the title. We are not The Cinders ha-ha. We are a huge fan of The Led Zeppelins though…

Was there any specific idea behind the forming of the band and also in what you wanted it and your sound to offer?

It was something we all wanted and needed. Music is what drives us. Playing in a band with people as motivated as yourself is awesome. We felt the sound we had to offer was familiar but unique. It is like when you meet someone for the first time and they are super cool, but you feel like you have known them for years. You wonder why you haven’t known it this whole time and from now on it becomes a part of you.

Do the same things still drive the band when it was fresh-faced or have they evolved over time?

When we first started, I feel like we had a smaller view of what we wanted the band to become and how we were going to get there. We have always wanted to be a touring band. We were definitely driven by hopes and our dreams and by each other and that has not changed.

But what has been added to the list is a compilation of all the successes, all the lives changed, all the support from fans, all of the small goals achieved, all of the trials conquered, all the lame part time jobs, and all of the fun experiences. With all of these things motivating us and driving us, we won’t stop until we get where we want to be.

Since your early days, how would you say your sound has evolved?

Short dumb answer would be “slowly”. We didn’t realize how much we loved yelling and hitting instruments super hard until we played live. Even the softest songs from our first record became much heavier live. So when we hit the studio again we had more of that mind-set of creating fun live songs that would appropriate to break our instruments to. We of course don’t break our instruments though… because, well, we need them to make music.

Has it been more of an organic movement of sound or more the band deliberately trying new things?

Tooooootally organic for sure… I don’t think we have had very many discussions on what sound we want and there hasn’t been any disagreements with what the songs turn into. I have seen band after band split up because they have different ideas of what they want the music to be. So many start their own solo projects; so many release EP after EP sounding like a new band every time.  But with Cinders, we all just kind of do our own thing and trust each other and build on our demos until a final song just sounds like Cinders.

Presumably across the band there is a wide range of inspirations; are there any in particular which have impacted not only on the band’s music but your personal approach and ideas to creating and playing music?

Twenty One Pilots, one of the biggest bands in the world right now has a heavy influence on our work ethics, our goals, and our expectations. Tyler and Josh are from Ohio and they started as nobodies. They worked hard, they released music, they toured, they did all those things that bands say “we will do that when we are a big band”. They are proof to us that any band from anywhere with whatever tools and connections they have or don’t have can make a career out of music touring the world. It has inspired us to go all out and make our live shows as crazy and fun as possible. We want people to say “that is the funniest concert I’ve been to” whether we played for 25 people or for 25,000 people.

Is there a particular process to the band’s songwriting?

Songs will typically start with an acoustic guitar and a vocal melody. There may or may not be lyrics written yet. The lyrics will usually come as the chord progressions are discovered. The song will form first as a rough acoustic demo, it won’t really take shape until each member has sat down with the demo to add in their flavor and make necessary changes. We often will sit down and jam with each other before we solidify a song idea.

Where do inspirations to that lyrical side come from?

Inspiration can come from literally anywhere. I remember being in the grocery store writing down the lyrics for 100 Foxes on my grocery list. Typically they will come from personal experience or feelings though. We really try to show what we are feeling lyrically rather than tell it. A story is much more interesting and meaningful than an explanation.

Would you give us some background to your latest release?

We are extremely stoked that our new album, Looking Forward to Looking Back, is finally out! It just came out on September 29th and it is our second full length album. This record is much heavier musically and lyrically. It is a matured sound for the band and really drives emotion. It has been a 2 year project and our proudest achievement to date!

Give us some insight to the themes and premise behind it and its songs.

We really wanted to make something that reflected us and the way we feel, and the way our fans feel. So the premise would be that we want everyone to know that no matter what you’re going through right now, there are always good things that are on the way. The album title, Looking Forward to Looking Back really encompasses the theme of the album. Each song is very reflective and forthcoming at the same time.

Are you a band which goes into the studio with songs pretty much in their final state or prefer to develop them as you record?

We are very fortunate to have been able to build our own studio. So we are in the studio almost every day. We are always recording new ideas that we have. Whether we have a full song or just a cool line, we want to have it recorded. We started out with just over 30 demos for Looking Forward to Looking Back. In the end we felt very strongly about the 11 we chose. We didn’t want to just settle on any tracks. We wanted to make sure that this album was the best that it possibly could be.

Tell us about the live side to the band, presumably the favourite aspect of the band?

The shows are the best part! The crowd energy is always insane! The fans are seriously the best part of it. To hear all those people screaming our songs right back at us is so cool. We may have some easy listening songs but we treat every performance like a punk show and go as hard as we can every night. We want to make sure that everyone who paid to see us gets the show they paid for!

It is not easy for any new band to make an impact regionally let alone nationally and further afield. How have you found it your neck of the woods?

The music scene in Salt Lake City, UT is awesome! There are a lot of college towns around us as well that have great venues and incredibly talented musicians. It is hard not to be a lover and supporter of music when the music scene you are in is so cool. We love touring nationally. There is nothing like coming home and playing a show for your town though. We are always the most excited for those shows!

How has the internet and social media impacted on the band to date? Do you see it as something destined to become a negative from a positive as the band grows and hopefully gets increasing success but in a climate where people are not buying music?

Social media has played a huge part in our success so it is hard to say too many negative things about it (other than it taking over all of our lives ha-ha). There are a lot of awesome YouTubers that have become great supporters and friends who have shared our music to their worldwide fan-base. We rely a lot on the reach of our social media and our online marketing to help reach fans across the world we wouldn’t have normally hit! We definitely look at it as a positive for our band.

Once again a big thanks for sharing time with us; anything you would like to add or reveal for the readers?

Thank you so much for having us! Looking Forward to Looking Back is out now! Make sure to follow on Spotify and Apple Music so you can hear it now!

Check out Cinders further @ http://www.cindersmusic.com/   https://www.facebook.com/cindersmusic/  https://twitter.com/cindersmusic

Pete RingMaster 07/11/2018

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright