Bleeding Raven Interview

BLEEDING RAVEN is the aggrotech/dark tek project from Dean Mason of Gnostic Gorilla. Recently he released its debut album via Cleopatra Records. We had the pleasure to chat with Dean about the album, his latest project, a career and life changing set back and much more…  

Hello and thanks for taking time out to talk with us.

The pleasure is all mine man.

Can you first introduce the ‘project’ and give us some background to how it all started?

In a land…far far away…hahahahaha…Ok, but seriously… I first got the ‘itch’ to record music when I was a teen-ager in high school. Some buddies and I went into a little studio and recorded two songs for a single release. (Dark Hallway/Golgotha) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=p05YqqTOS_M  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=047Pk2GhPnY

Thanks to my lovely parents I released a vinyl 45 rpm as just “Dean Mason” with “Lonely Ghost Productions” as the name of the makeshift indie label. I got ‘itchy’ again in 2001 and began looking at music again, but did very little. In 2012, I got right into recording electronic music of a dark bent and scent and thus was born “Gnostic Gorilla” eventually. (I released stuff as The Lonely Ghost Project initially but changed the name to “Gnostic Gorilla”) In 2018, Cleopatra Records released “St. Basil’s Asylum”. (Gnostic Gorilla) In May of this past year, after releasing quite a few albums on different labels (KL Dark Records, Nowhere Now Records, Throne of Bael Records and LGP-ONE) I wanted to pursue something more ‘aggrotech’ in style. That’s when I initiated the “Bleeding Raven” project. Cleopatra released “Darkness Consumed” in October of this year.

How have those earlier impacted on what you are doing now, in maybe inspiring a change of style or direction?

As I mentioned earlier, I started off as just “Dean Mason” as a lad. In 2012, the Lonely Ghost Project was launched (so to speak) and then “Gnostic Gorilla” and from that evolved what we are talking about today…that is…the Bleeding Raven Project. My early music in these other projects was a mix of ‘Goth/Dark Wave/Dark Tek/Industrial’. I really wanted to do something more bizarre and almost literally more noisy and that’s when I initiated “Bleeding Raven”. It’s more aggrotech, but I also call it… “dungeon trash”…hahahahahahahahahaha I even have a shirt with that on it.   https://www.dizzyjam.com/products/157830/ 

The image or character of the ‘raven’ is common in First Nations lore and even spirituality. The raven can either be a trickster or mischievous little critter or it can be sort of a symbol of the soul preparing for death of being taken back to the Great Creator. Different nations/tribes have different ideas and stories about the raven. The ‘bleeding’ part more or less speaks of suffering, of hurt etc. So, like my lyrics however, even with the image, I allow people to have their own interpretations. That said, I think always…DAILY…of my many sisters and brothers in the First Nations communities who suffer immensely because of a racist attitude towards them. There are many…MANY young Native women/girls who have gone missing and the effort to find them hasn’t always been fervent. As well, the suicide rate among First Nation teens is extremely high.

Was there any specific idea behind the forming of Bleeding Raven and also in what you wanted it and your sound to offer?

Well, in the Spring of 2019, I had to be on the road a bit and for some long drives, I acquired on my iTunes a few albums of a more industrial bent. That includes a couple of compilations of various bands. I discovered acts like Die Sektor and Psyclon Nine and I felt very inspired to go in this direction. I sort of started to go in that direction as “Gnostic Gorilla” but I wanted a new project that was mostly aggrotech in style. I came up with the ‘dungeon trash’ (LOL) I released in October and I am very proud of it!

Do the same things still drive you when it was fresh-faced or have they evolved over time?

Definitely evolved over time. So, when I first started off, I was more into a Gothic sound or industrial. And I still love a lot of that stuff. Always will. St. Basil’s Asylum is a classic and I’m just so sad that it’s still not discovered by many yet. But anyway, yeah…things do evolve. That said, I don’t like the idea of being in a ‘genre house arrest’ and being narrow minded in your approach to music. But either way, it’s all over for me in music anyway so…I’ve done what I could.

Since your early days, how would you say your sound has evolved?

Well, from the really early days, that is from the days of the Dark Hallway release, things really evolved dramatically. First of all, that 45 was like a mish mash of metal/punk pre-grunge I guess. I was heavily influenced by Gary Numan and yet, try as I did my vocal style was markedly different than his. It’s later that I appreciated that. But, see…I love ALL sorts of music. I mean, sometimes I’m just knee deep  into The Doors and more psychedelic shit and other days I’m into Dio and Sabbath and Type O Negative and Ministry and Rammstein. Other days it’s The Cure or Smashing Pumpkins or of course, classic Numan and Japan or Bauhaus. So, a lot of what I do depends on where I’m at and I guess when it comes to music, I’m moody as hell. hahahahahaha

Do you find the changes have been more of an organic movement of sound or you deliberately wanting to try new things?

I’d say the latter, yeah.

Presumably , and you have touched on them already, there is a wide range of inspirations; are there any in particular which have impacted not only on your music but your personal approach and ideas to creating and playing music?

So, I make a distinction between that which has inspired and that which has influenced more directly my own style. The artists/bands that have been inspirations are many. Gary Numan, KISS, Type O Negative, Black Sabbath, Rammstein, Japan (David Sylvian) Ozzy, Manson, Korn, Smashing Pumpkins, The Cure, Bauhaus, Zardonic, Fear Incorporated, Frost Like Ashes, CRIX IIX and the list is endless. As for those who have been influences, while they include some of the names listed already, I’d say Ministry, Skinny Puppy, Psyclon Nine, Die Sektor. As I always do in any interview, the band that will forever be my absolute favourite is The Doors. The Doors and Gary Numan are both at the top of my own personal ‘chart’.

I also want to give a shout out to Tim Muddiman and NOT because of his connection to Gary Numan. Tim has ventured into more graphic arts in recent years and he is doing some amazing work. THAT very much inspires me…or better yet…I honour the man as an artist in every sense of the word…as a true artist.

Is there a process to your songwriting which generally guides the birth of songs?

Yeah, mostly I start off with a vague idea of want kind of song I want to do, Then I begin with beats and drum patterns and bass lines or even synth lines. (it depends) I get a general idea of the direction I want to go in before going far into the track. So, I begin to choose the different sounds and samples/loops that I want as well to give it a mood. More often than not, I manipulate these and distort or whatever to make them unique. Then as the song evolves, there’s the question of whether or not I want a traditional chorus (often not because that’s too pop) and I allow the track to sort of dictate to me where it’s going. Sort of like a First Nations wood carver who allows the ‘wood’ to speak to them as they say. Then when I have a rough demo, I begin writing lyrics and then record vocals. That’s the tough part for many reasons. Lots of hit and miss with that process. I’ve written an entire set of lyrics for a song only to discover that something else would work better and I have to (at times) chop out some of the lyrics. Hard to explain.  Also, sometimes I record the vocals and it sounds like shit. I mean, there is a need for a different ‘style’ all together. After all the vocals are recorded, I go back and add more …sometimes a sample here or an FX noise there or whatever. I’m quite ADD so if there are any sort of ‘blank stare’ moments in a song…that’s unacceptable. It has to be busy. I’m told my music is VERY busy. Then there is the final mix which is a real pain in the ass. Sometimes even at that stage you decide… “nah…this is total shit”! It’s a bit of a drag when that happens though man because you’ve come all the way to a full song and you realize it isn’t happening.

Where do you, more often than not, draw the inspirations to the lyrical side of your songs?

First off, good for you for asking that because lyrics are important for me… I realize it’s not what the listener first becomes aware of…but for me, the lyrics are important. Anyway, so…I don’t write any lyrics with any sort of ‘agenda’. In other words, I don’t preach or dictate anything. I like a very poetic approach to the lyrics with lots of imagery. Now, that said, there are certain subjects that inspire me. I often write about religious themes or philosophical themes and often touch upon injustice and hypocrisy and hate and injustice for example. But I do so in veiled/poetic language. I want the listener to decide for themselves what it could mean.

Give us some background to your latest release.

 “Darkness Consumed” touches upon a few subjects…again in veiled language. One of the tracks is called “Pontiff’s Nightmare” which is actually about St. Francis. He more or less spooked the Pope at the time with his authentically radical life style and that Pope had a dream about Francis. Francis challenged the corruption of the time by the way he lived. “Salem Vigil” is sort of… but not completely about the Salem witch trials. The song actually addresses the unfortunate phenomenon of ‘religious people’ oppressing and persecuting people who don’t fit their narrow definition of what it means to be ‘good’ or ‘decent’ and ‘righteous’.  In the end, these arrogant and often ignorant people of so called ‘faith’ are the ones who are truly evil because of the harm they inflict on many borne out of their hatred and unenlightened worldview.  

Give us some insight to the themes and premise behind it and its songs.

So, “Darkness Consumed”…that very title isn’t a nod to evil or the promotion of ‘darkness’. It’s actually about the fact that somehow, ‘TRUTH’ (light) will ‘consume the darkness’ and overcome it. That’s sort of the idea in brief. As I said, I want people to decide for themselves however what something can mean for them.

Do you go into the studio with songs pretty much in their final state or prefer to develop them as you record?

Going back to the very first single “Dark Hallway”…I had everything figured out (with lyrics) when I presented the tracks to the band. I wrote the lyrics in English class (Dark Hallway) while under the influence of benzodiazepines. Hahahahahahaha We were reading “Death of a Salesman” in that class and it was, to say the least, a rather dark story. hahahahahaha

Tell us about the live side to Bleeding Raven.

I have lost the hearing in the left ear completely and totally. It happened in October…Very traumatic actually. I have to protect the little hearing I have left in the right ear which is at half capacity. I want to be able to hear the voices of the ones I love and the more natural sounds in life. For all intents and purposes…I’m deaf. Music is no longer an option. Especially live music, even if I wanted to do something live with a band. Music has been such an important part of my life obviously…but that’s over. That’s the future.

It is not easy for any new artist/band to make an impact regionally let alone nationally and further afield. How have you found it your neck of the woods? Are there the opportunities to make a mark if the drive is there for new bands?

You’re correct. It’s very difficult to ‘break through’ in this day and age. There’s just too much out there. I mean, everyone and their cat is putting stuff out. There are so many genres today and so many…MANY indie folks (like me) who have stuff out there and are competing with the ‘big boys and gals’. You have to be creative to get known because sadly, younger people are not interested in new music aside from what they become aware of through video games or TV/Movies. I mean, I’m seriously over generalizing perhaps but it is true that, young people today don’t appreciate music the way people did in the past. They don’t grasp the concept of music as ‘art’ anymore. That’s not their fault. But because of the technology that we have today and with social media platforms…there is too much out there and for younger people, music is just “there for the taking” the way fruit on trees is there to pluck. So, you have to be creative in how you get people to notice you today. It’s not easy.

How has the internet and social media impacted on the band to date? Do you see it as something destined to become a negative from a positive as the band grows and hopefully gets increasing success or is it more that bands struggling with it are lacking the knowledge and desire to keep it working to their advantage?

So, this is sort of a continuation of the previous question. Here’s the thing, the internet and social media and digital music etc. is here and it’s here to stay. We are still trying to adapt to this I suppose. Now, you could lament and dream of the “good old days” but that’s all it will ever be…a ‘dream’. Musicians/artists have to adapt. In many ways, it has been a blessing. Many artists would have never been able to put their stuff out there so to speak were it not for the kind of technology we have today. See, I picked up music again in 2012 but only as a hobby. I then, almost jokingly put some of my stuff out there as an indie/unsigned act and I eventually got a label deal with Cleopatra Records, which for me is phenomenal. I will have three releases with Cleopatra Records by end of 2020. (the last one is another Gnostic Gorilla album) I also have releases with three other labels. So, none of that would have happened were it not for the technology we have at our disposal. I guess it’s sort of what you make of it, like anything else.

Once again a big thanks for sharing time with us; anything you would like to add or reveal for the readers?

Thanks again to you for the great (and extensive) interview. Reveal?

Ok…I’m  B A T M A N.  Hahahahahahaha  No but, seriously, I thank the many people who have been supportive of me in one way or another…be it family or friends and certainly Benny at Cleopatra Records. As I said earlier, because of the extreme hearing loss (actually deaf completely in one ear and the other is severely compromised) …I have to pack it in with regards to music. I will promote what I have and will have out soon (already recorded obviously) and perhaps a book of lyrics and that’s it. Cheers.

Dean

https://bleedingraven.bandcamp.com/   https://www.facebook.com/bleedingravenofficial/   http://www.bleedingraven.com

Pete RingMaster 17/01/2020

Copyright RingMasterReview: MyFreeCopyright

Ensnaring The Snarl: Dirty ol’ Crow Interview

Hi and thank you for sparing time to chat with us.

Filippo Monticelli (guitar): no problemo, thanks for having us.

Could you first introduce the band and tell us how it came to be?

We are a five piece hard rock band; we have Liud Carter on drums, Dom on bass, Michi and me on guitars and Vikki Totten on lead vocals. We formed in spring 2017 in London and we released our debut EP early this year.

How would you define not only your sound but the creative character of the band?

Raspy and direct. However, we do work quite a while on each song, until we are all pretty much happy on every part and on the overall feel and sound.

Are there any previous musical experiences for band members and how have they been embraced in what you do now?

Most of us where in various bands prior to this one. All the experience accumulated through the years now is at the service of Dirty ol’ Crow

Is there a particular process to the band’s songwriting?

Most of the times some of us would present a complete or nearly finished song idea, after which we try to find the right arrangement for all the instruments and the right melodies for the vocals. Other times however songs were born just out of jam sessions in the rehearsal room… either way we try to take our time to refine every aspect of the song before we play it live.

Would you tell us about your latest release?

Our latest release is also our first. It’s a six song EP basically containing all our originals until that point. It’s raw and fast-paced, and it quite well reflects the identity of the band during our first year and a half together. The name “Strangers’ Nest” came from the realization that we all were a bunch of strangers to pretty much each other, and then we got together in the same band and also in the same house for a while.

What are the major inspirations to its heart and themes?

Musically, the inspirations are surely our influences, and how they shape our musicality. Lyrically, the themes revolve around life experiences and struggles, but the “have a good time” theme is also very prominent.

I am always intrigued as to how artists choose track order on albums and EP’s and whether in hindsight they would change that. What has been the deciding factor for you or do songs or the main do that organically?

Yeah, the track order on the EP has been topic of discussion, if you know what I mean. First we were thinking of copying the order of our live sets. However, we realized that it wasn’t necessarily the best option. We decided to open the EP with what was our newest song at the time (which live was usually towards the end of the set) as we recognized it had a great opening riff, catchy and driving. This was “Mistress of Sin”. Funny enough, our live set opener (“Johnny Boy”) became the second last song in our EP. The main idea was to start the EP powerful and catchy, keep it groovy with the second song (“Old Man’s Hatchet), go into the single/sing-along with “Sex Dictator”, then slow down the pace a tiny bit with the bluesy vibes of “Dirt Stained” and finishing off with two in-your-face tracks (“Johnny Boy” and “Queen of Rats”). In the end I think that’s a pretty effective track order.

DoC – Francesca Guidi Photo Studio

What do you find the most enjoyable part of being in a band and similarly the most cathartic?

Well for me is just being able to create new music and play it live to people. It’s always a thrill. Especially when you have a good day, the sound is great and you really get “in the zone”, it’s just an amazing feeling. Doesn’t matter if it’s in rehearsal or live when you really get those notes just right together with your band mates, it feels so good.

For anyone contemplating checking you out live give some teasers as to what they can expect.

Expect energy! You can never quite tell what’s gonna happen as things tend to get unpredictable at times, our singer might decide to half-strip, I might jump in the audience, you never know… But you can expect an energy-charged show.

What has been your most thrilling moment on stage to date?

Oh that’s a tough one. Sometimes it’s just thrilling to play a brand new song you know… But I can say that when we played our biggest stage yet (The Dome, in London UK) that was pretty thrilling. But the same when we played a smaller venue for our EP launch party: the place was so packed and the audience responded so good to our music; that was a thrilling experience too. I guess the next step I’m looking forward too is playing an outdoor festival stage!

What else can we expect in the near future?

We have a few gigs before the year is over (you can stay up to date by following us on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/dirtyolcrow/ ), after which we will focus on finishing off the demos for our first full length album and getting into a studio to record them properly. We plan to release to album at some point next year. Also we are planning to do some dates abroad next year; Germany and Italy are definitely on the radar.

What are the major inspirations to you sound wise and as a musician?

Personally speaking, my strongest guitar influences are probably Slash and Zakk Wylde. However I find inspiration in many different styles, such as blues, country, flamenco, folk music (just to mention a few).

And finally what song or release would you say was the spark to your passion for music?

Well, for me it all kinda started with Michael Jackson, I would say the albums “Bad” and “Dangerous” really hit me deep.

Many thanks once again; anything else you would like to add?

Thank you very much for having us. Keep on rocking, people. The world needs it.

https://www.dirtyolcrow.com/   https://twitter.com/dirtyolcrow

Pete RingMaster

The RingMaster Review 14/12/2019

Intimacy and the Roar: talking with Jack And Sally

Hi and thank you for sparing time to chat with us.

Could you first introduce yourself/the band and tell us how it came to be?

Prav-Like Fez from That 70s Show, I was given the name Prav by the band and yes, like Fez I am also an International student. I moved to London to play Rock ‘n Roll and met Ben and Josh in the winter of 2018. We formed the band shortly after.

Josh -I’m Josh, I’m play guitar for the band. I was originally going to join Ben’s old band but before I could, they fell apart! I went ahead and met Ben anyway, and we eventually found Prav from the musicians network group and as they say, the rest is history.

How would you define not only your sound but the creative character of the band?

Prav -The sound is probably best described as Green Day meets Rise Against. If the band had an alter ego, it would be a boy/girl in their early 20s who are at a critical point in their life. He/she would be experiencing feelings of love and loss, discovering how messed up and complex the modern world is and also finding their own passion for the good and genuine things in life.

Ben –Like Prav said, our song writing revolves around issues in real-life that regular people deal with on a regular basis –and just like everyone else, we do too.

Josh -Creatively I think we draw from a lot of disparate places but it blends well. I listen to a lot of harder stuff and I bring that into the songs we write. Ben’s vocals are mainstream sounding but he writes them into punk riffs, and Prav brings in his influences from grunge and hard rock into the drums.

You touched on previous musical experiences for band members, would you elaborate and suggest how have they been embraced in what you do now?

Prav -I used to play in a Funk Rock band back in India and played with another Hard Rock act in London for just over a year. I would definitely say that those experiences shaped what I play now for Jack and Sally.

Ben –I’ve played in bands in college. I was in a band in 2009 that was called Aisle Riot –we played one gig but my time in that band had a major influence on my life and showed me that I could be in a band –that I could actually do it.

Josh -I’ve been in bands since school but my last serious band was at university -Chance Encounter. We tracked a few songs, it was a pretty fun experience especially it was my first few times ever playing live in the U.K.

Is there a particular process to the band’s songwriting?

Prav-Ben or I write a song and bring it to the studio where we then fiddle around with our parts and start adding in ideas. Slowly but surely, the song starts taking shape as each of our styles pour in. Once we feel confident that this is how we want our audiences to listen to the song, we make a demo.

Ben -I write lyrics first, based on ideas I have in my head. The idea for our second single Macy came to me when I was on a train in Finland -from a graffiti image sprayed on a wall. It actually took me 6 years to write Tomorrow’s Revolution! Based on my influences in life, I’ve carried a lot of anger –and all of that inspired me write about a whole new world -that world is called ‘Nevernia’ –it’s what the EP is based around. Once I have finished writing the lyrics to a song, I’ll put some basic chords around it and then take it to the studio to work on, like Prav said.

Josh -We continually fiddle with our songs as well to improve it for live situations –Tomorrow’s Revolution for example sounds much different today than when we originally played it live, and it’s much better (in my opinion at least!)

Would you tell us about your latest release?

Ben –Our latest release is our EP, Who We Become!

Josh -It’s out everywhere to stream and buy from 11th November. We’ve also released two music videos for the singles on it, so check it out!

What are the major inspirations to its heart and themes?

Ben –Our EP is based on a concept, which follows the life of its protagonist ‘Macy’ who has grown up into a world plagued by issues like racism, corporate greed, austerity and oppression. It deals with how Macy stands up to these issues of modern day society.

I am always intrigued as to how artists choose track order on albums and EP’s and whether in hindsight they would change that. What has been the deciding factor for you?

Prav -The EP’s track order follows Macy’s journey. Superstar is her Father’s message to her that she doesn’t have to try too hard to make the world see that she is good. Nevernia is essentially a metaphor to describe the messed up world we live in and how Macy tries to traverse it. Tomorrow’s Revolution is about Macy’s rebellion after she realises that she needs to take drastic measures to bring about change. Long Way Home is about her feeling homesick and how she longs to go back to the people she loves. Macy is ultimately the story of how Macy’s loved ones mourn her loss.

What do you find the most enjoyable part of being in a band and similarly the most cathartic?

Prav -playing original songs that we made from the ground up on stage, touring and when people come and tell you that they had a sick time watching us play.

Ben –Being able to play our songs to people that they sing back at us is one of the most underrated achievements anyone could ever have. It’s beautiful, and seeing people believe in words that I wrote in my bedroom is truly unreal.

Josh -I’ll never get used to hearing people say they like our songs, but it’s definitely one of the best things about being in a band. Playing shows live as well -the adrenaline rush is unreal.

For anyone contemplating checking you out live give some teasers as to what they can expect.

Prav-thumping grooves, sick riffs and yes, be ready to sing with us!

Ben –We are loud, yes we are Pop Rock to the core, but you will hear Metal, you will hear Punk Rock and you will also want to dance to our tracks.

Josh -Riffs, solos, and some meaningful lyrics.

What has been your most thrilling moment on stage to date?

Prav -Probably at The Cavern, Exeter a few weeks ago. The place seemed so packed all of a sudden when we played All The Small Things. We couldn’t believe our eyes!

Josh -Yeah I’d agree with Prav -the Cavern show was mental.

Do you have live dates coming up?

Ben –We do, yes. We are booking our tour for April 2020, and some shows have already been confirmed.

What else can we expect in the near future?

Prav -More releases, probably some collaborations with other artists as well.

Ben –Definitely new music, but for now we’re focussing on our debut EP and getting a tour or two together.

What are the major inspirations to you sound wise and as a musician?

Prav -Green Day’s American Idiot, Audioslave, Velvet Revolver and Switchfoot.

Ben –Green Day is my favourite band, Linkin Park and Nirvana.

Josh -Soundwise -Blink-182, Paramore. Musician wise -Metallica, Enter Shikari.

And finally what song or release would you say was the spark to your passion for music?

Prav -Superunknown (Soundgarden)

Ben –Jesus of Suburbia (Green Day)

Josh -Master of Puppets (Metallica)

Many thanks guys once again!

Check out the review of Who We Become @ https://ringmasterreviewintroduces.wordpress.com/2019/10/09/jack-sally-who-we-become/

 

https://www.jackandsally.co.uk/   https://www.facebook.com/jackandsallyuk   https://twitter.com/jackandsallyuk

Pete RingMaster

The RingMaster Review 12/12/2019

Copyright RingMasterReview: MyFreeCopyright

Aren Drift Interview

For those who may not know who you are, introduce yourselves quickly.

Radka Nemcova – Vocals, Rhythm Guitar

Matt Plumley – Lead Guitar

Dominic Cahillane – Drums

Theo Corcoran – Bass

Describe your sound in as few words as possible.

RN: Progressive rock, international vibes, heavy melodic riffs, contralto vocals, cinematic sound.

DC: Vibrations

MP: Female fronted prog rock

TC: I’d say our sound is best described as heavy progressive rock with international influences, I’ve heard the word melodic chucked around a bit as well.

Who are your three biggest influences as a band?

RN: It’s hard to name just three bands as there are many bands we love but I would definitely mention Perfect Circle, In This Moment, Queen of the Damned soundtracks. (The first choice I would choose for the technical side and second two choices I love for the production side.)

What’s the meaning behind your band name?

RN: AREN is made of my initials (‘RN’ = phonetically ‘aren’) I used Aren D. as my artistic / musical pseudonym as no one was able to remember or pronounce my name haha. I chose the second word ‘drift’ because I like to drift and our music should make you drift too.

We came up with lots of different names but everyone liked Aren Drift so we kept it as a band name.

How did you approach our latest release in terms of writing and recording?

RN: Writing is my favourite part so it was just a fun bit for me. I love it. Recording was good but mixing was the difficult part of the whole process.

I am very creative person and I have very strong visions in music and art and I imagine things how they look and sound before they are actually written or filmed. Mixing itself is very creative process and we struggled to get the sound we wanted. However, it was a great learning curve and I’m already excited to apply everything we learnt into our next recordings.

MP: In terms of the recording, we were on a budget, four days in total for five songs, some unreleased at this moment in time. We pretty much had the parts written before we recorded, but somehow ended up re-recording most of the guitar parts at my home studio. When you are on the clock you don’t have time to mull that sound over and try different amps, settings, different guitars, you literally stick a mic in front of your amp and off you go. So that meant we weren’t quite happy with the sound we had. It was a big learning curve for us; we have plans to do things differently next time.

Do you have any personal favourite songs on the release?

RN: Snow Queen. I think the song determines Aren Drift’s unique style.

DC: Light Hole

MP: Sun Goes Down for me.

TC: I’d say my favourite song of the new EP is light hole, it’s one of my favourites to play live as well, but I do also really like “snow queen”.

Explain the meaning behind the album title.

RN: ‘Beneath The Surface’ – We want the listener to go deeper at all the levels while listening our music. Some of the reviews we received say that you need to listen the songs a few times until it fully reveals their potential. I was actually very glad to read that because that’s what I love about music.

The artwork represents what’s beneath your skin, inside of the Earth’s core, inside of you.

Tell us about the video for Snow Queen and its concept.

RN: Snow Queen music video was partly filmed in Czech mountains and partly in England. I wanted to produce something powerful and arty. A music video which captures a story as well as the feelings.

Sun Goes Down music video is solely my arty outlet.

I don’t want to say anything else. Just watch it J

Do they tie in with the themes around the song? If yes, why? If not, why not?

RN: It does. I don’t want to reveal everything. Let’s say you need to listen to the lyrics and watch the video.

Were they fun to shoot or proved to be quite a challenge?

RN: When we were shooting Snow Queen, I was two days in the mountains in -20°C wearing a dress. It was snowing and I thought my hands and nose will fall off so yeah… it was fun haha.

I believe everyone enjoys shooting the music videos. But post production is proper hard work. I believe the devil is in the details and I have very strong visions so I usually spend long time working on the post productions. I produced both videos myself in co-production with Ollie Dolling. It was great working with him. I’m already excited to work on our future videos.

MP: Definitely one of my bands highlights and the results were way beyond what I expected.

Do you have any live shows lined up at present?

RN: Follow us on Facebook. We are planning 2020 UK tour! All the dates will be there.

We were also booked at Concorde 2 in Brighton in June 2020 which will be an epic show.

In regards to the closer dates I would recommend you a gig at Black Heart in Camden, London on 20th September. We are supporting Esoterica. But if you want a ticket, be quick as the show might be sold out soon 😉

What are your favourite songs to perform live?

MP: Our new song Sirens, I love it and the response we had to it at the EP launch which was the first time we played it live, was very moving, loved it.

RN: I really enjoy playing Sirens. It is our new song and by my opinion it is musically the best piece which I’m very proud of. At the moment I’m playing with a thought to write trilogy for Sirens. I have whole concept in my head + the ideas for the video so let’s see if we can do something about that.

DC: Porcelain Dolls has a nice few changes where I can bring a few different styles in the song. For all out energy, Passion Kills is always the track I’m scanning the set list for.

TC: As I said, light hole is one of my favourite songs to play live, as well as one of our new songs called Delirious.

What are the best and worst shows you’ve played to date?

DC: I think it varies for each of us; I’ll leave it down to the fans

TC: I’d say the worst show I’ve played with Aren Drift was my first one with the band, I was slightly nervous, which is odd for me, and I just didn’t quite gel with the music! But our best show in my opinion was our EP release, the sound was great, the crowd was amazing and we were all playing at the top of our game!

If you could open for anyone, who would it be?

DC: Tool would be immense

RN: Deftones, Korn, Marilyn Manson, Perfect Circle, Alice in Chains, In This Moment

MP: Wolf Alice, lead singer is a girl and they rock, great live band from what I can tell on YouTube, I’d then get a chance to watch them in the flesh every night J

Oh yeah and Faith No More, they are still rocking, check out SuperHero from the Radio 1 sessions on YouTube.

Any comical stories from your time as a band you can share with us?

DC: Now that would be telling, shame on you. 🙂

Any closing comments?

Thank you for your support. We appreciate every single person who goes to the live gigs and support the local music in general. Thank you.

Check Aren Drift out further @…

https://www.arendrift.com/    https://www.facebook.com/arendrift/    https://www.instagram.com/aren_drift/

RingMaster Review 06/11/2019

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Crepuscular calm: the Dark Serenity Interview

Introducing hard rock trio Dark Serenity

Hello and thanks for taking time out to talk with us.

Can you first introduce the band and give us some background to how it all started?

We are Dark Serenity, composed of members Zach Barnes (bass), Kate Emrich (guitar and vocals), and Mike Bergamo (drums). We started writing music in Kate’s basement back in high school, which is where we met each other. We were brought together by a similar level of ambition in addition to the obvious shared interest in being in a band and creating music.

Had you been in other bands before?

We haven’t been involved in other bands before, but we went through a few line-up changes until we discovered which members would stick. I’m sure it led to a change in style and direction, because we are a group that values the insight of each individual member.

What inspired the band name?

The band name means that there is light in the dark, and more specifically that the motivation for life and light lies within the reality that death and darkness are inevitable.

Was there any specific idea behind the forming of the band and also in what you wanted it and your sound to offer?

We didn’t approach the formation of the band with the intention of sounding a certain way. We wanted to create a sound that sounded like us, one where each one of us used our respective influences to make our own sound.

And that instinct still primarily drives the band now it is more experienced or has new aspects evolved over time?

I would say the same things still drive us. Those things being the intent to succeed in our field and inspire others to do the same, as well as to live our own lives the way we want to.

Since your early days, how would you say your sound has evolved?

I would say our sound has matured, basically, as we have as musicians. We write in different song structures and utilize our instrument’s capabilities more fully. We can write parts that complement the other instrumentals more effectively, and more clearly communicate our messages.

Has it been more of an organic movement of sound or more the band deliberately wanting to try new things?

It’s both. When you deliberately try new things you tend to find a more of an organic movement and vice versa.

Presumably across the band there is a wide range of inspirations; are there any in particular which have impacted not only on the band’s music but your personal approach and ideas to creating and playing music?

We are inspired by the creations of many of the greats, such as Led Zeppelin, Deep Purple, Black Sabbath, the Jimi Hendrix Experience and the Who. That being said we’ve never deliberately practiced their songwriting approaches.

Is there a particular process to the band’s songwriting?

Yes, typically we write by picking a key and a time signature, then doing an improv session within those specifications. The body of the song usually comes first, with the bass and drums; then the guitar, and then the vocals are written last.

Where do you, more often than not, draw the inspirations to the lyrical side of your songs?

More often than not our lyrics cover subjects that include and challenge societal norms. We have songs about deviating from said norms.

Could you give us some background to your latest release?

Our latest release is our debut album that we released last year. It’s called ‘Memento Mori’ and is eight tracks. It was a live tracked album, which we did on purpose to emulate the experience of a live performance.

Give us some insight to the themes and premise behind it and its songs

The themes we mentioned discussing our commonly used lyrical themes are the themes we applied to the tracks on this album.

Are you a band which goes into the studio with songs pretty much in their final state or prefer to develop them as you record?

We go into the studio with our songs completed. We don’t like bringing unfinished material because there’s no guarantee you will come out with something you’re happy with. When a song is complete there’s not really a question as to whether or not it will turn out like you had hoped.

Tell us about the live side to the band, obviously a favourite aspect of being in the band?

Live we deliver an animated and authentic performance. We’ve been told that our passion for what we do is obvious and felt throughout the room. We want to deliver the best version of ourselves.

It is not easy for any new band to make an impact regionally let alone nationally and further afield. How have you found it?

We have found it difficult yet worthwhile. We are lucky to have been brought up as musicians in the metro Detroit area where there are a lot of music fans and a decent number of live venues. It’s arguably harder to get your foot in the door when there are several other groups going for the same goals as you. However, in addition to that difficulty, you also find the most support from the other musicians. You have to work hard, break a sweat, then gain respect…But the respect that you gain is worth it.

How has the internet and social media impacted on the band to date? Do you see it as something positive within a realm flooded with artists and a short attention society or more of a necessary trial?

Bands nowadays need to utilize social media to their advantage, just like any other form of entrepreneur. You’re selling yourself as the product, basically, and in today’s market, you need to unapologetically market yourself with the tools everybody else is using to have a shot at mainstream success. So yeah, not being able to properly use social media can hurt your career, but most likely, will stunt your growth overall. There are obviously always exceptions to a rule, though.

Once again a big thanks for sharing time with us; anything you would like to add or reveal for the readers?

Thank you for having us! We just want to add that you can find our music on every streaming platform, and that you can find us on Facebook or Instagram. Please show us your support!

https://www.darkserenityofficial.com   https://www.facebook.com/pg/darkserenityband   https://www.instagram.com/darkserenityband  https://twitter.com/Dark__Serenity

Pete RingMaster 06/11/019

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Stirring the senses: Vital Noise Interview

Meet Vital Noise

Hello and thanks for taking time out to talk with us.

Thanks so much for having us!

Can you first introduce the band and give us some background to Vital Noise?

Our band consists of Andrew Wilmot, lead vocals/ guitar; Preston Wilmot, bass; and Reid Campbell, drums. Andrew and Preston are brothers and have been playing together since a very young age.  We met Reid in 2018, and have been playing with him ever since.

Is Vital Noise the first project it for you all and if not has previous ventures had a direct effect on the band?

We have all been involved in several different bands/ musical projects throughout the years.  Being in those bands has definitely inspired a change in direction as none of us had been in projects in the genre that we play (hard rock/ metal), and definitely made us want to build a band around that.

What inspired the band name?

To be completely honest, we came up with it when we were very young and thought it sounded cool, and it has just sort of stuck with us since.

Was there any specific idea behind the forming of the band and also in what you wanted it and your sound to offer?

All of us really were in to heavier music at the time and wanted to make a band that played that kind of music, so that drove us to come together and actually make it happen.

Do the same things still drive the band when it was fresh-faced or have they evolved over time?

Things have definitely evolved over time; we have all gotten much older and matured a lot since we first formed the band which has played a big part in that.

Since your early days, how would you say your sound has particularly evolved?

Definitely… At first we just wanted to play straight up metal, but now we are much more into writing music that tends to be more radio friendly, but still heavy of course.

And that has been more of an organic change or deliberate?

It is been more organic.  It has just naturally seemed to happen as all of us have matured.

Presumably across the band there is a wide range of inspirations; are there any in particular which have impacted not only on the band’s music but your personal approach and ideas to creating and playing music?

Bring Me The Horizon has probably had the biggest impact on the band and our writing style, as we have drawn tremendous inspiration from them.

Is there a process to the songwriting which generally guides the writing of songs?

Every song is a little bit different, but generally speaking, one of us will come in with a riff or some sort of musical idea, and then will kinda jam around it until a full song starts to form. Then our singer, Andrew will put lyrics over it.

Where do you, more often than not, draw the inspirations to the lyrical side of the band’s songs?

We draw inspiration from what we happen to be going through in everyday life.  Whether we be happy about something, sad about something, going through relationship issues, etc., we find a way to write about it.

Give us some background to your latest release.

We most recently released two singles entitled “The Ones” and “Famous”, they were both written during the summer of 2017 and we consider them to be some of our best work to date.

Please give us some insight to the themes behind them.

“The Ones” is about people fighting against societal norms and embracing individuality, it was meant to go out to people struggling with those issues and meant to show that it’s ok to be different, and it’s ok to be an individual.  “Famous” on the other hand is about people letting materialistic things and unimportant things in life take precedence over things that are actually important like friends and family. This happens way too often in today’s society, so we decided to write a song about it.

Are you a band which goes into the studio with songs pretty much in their final state or prefer to develop them as you record?

We tend to get into the studio with songs in their final state, even though we do very often make little tweaks here and there.

We try to make our show as energetic as possible.  We try our best to get the crowd as into it as we possibly can, as we feed off of the energy that they give us.

It is not easy for any new band to make an impact regionally let alone nationally and further afield. How have you found it your neck of the woods?

We are from Los Angeles.  Because of this, the scene is very overpopulated, so it is definitely hard to get a ton of recognition, but nonetheless we are trying our best.

How have you found the impact of the internet and social media on the band to date? Flooded with bands and artists, do you see it as something primarily positive or more of a negative on the band’s progress so far?

The internet and social media has definitely helped us in getting gigs and reaching an audience we otherwise wouldn’t have.  However, it is definitely hard to get to that next level, but we know we will get there eventually!

Once again a big thanks for sharing time with us; anything you would like to add for the readers?

Thanks so much for having us.  Be sure to check out our website and social media (links below) and to listen to our music on Spotify and all other digital streaming platforms!

Check Vital Noise out further @…

https://www.vitalnoise.com   https://www.facebook.com/VitalNoise/   https://www.instagram.com/vitalnoise/   https://twitter.com/vitalnoiseband

Pete RingMaster 06/11/019

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

The Black Income Interview

Hello and thanks for taking time out to talk with us.

Can you first introduce the band and give us some background to how it all started and what brought you all together?

Hi, thank you for having us….. yes sure…we’re the Black Income a Stoner Grunge band from Denmark…

We started out late 2011, got the idea to change the world with groovy stoned fuzz-metal with melodic a melodic twist… so we got together starting writing song, and experiment with the music before we recorded our first album Noise Pollution

Had you been involved in other bands before? If so has that had any impact on what you are doing now, in maybe inspiring a change of style or direction?

Yes, we have played in a long line of bands, and sure the musically inspiration we have gotten from other bands, is sure with us to this day… but it wasn’t really what we wanted with Black Income… we wanted a more honest sounding more punky kind of band… we wanted to create something that took start and focused on the music, and not the industry.. meaning we create the music we love, and are not trying to create some certain kind of music, we go with the flow and that’s what music is all about if you ask us, and we think it’s much more fun for the fans to follow a real band, rather than following some studio project trying to fit in at a certain genre of music.

What inspired the band name?

Ohhh we get this a lot… haha

Well it started out as fun thing…it’s always been a part of the music business since the money is not that big for upcoming music… but as time went by our name got more a more relevant, as now a more expression of freedom.. meaning as the systems locks down on all of us, and deciding what you should do…. Black Income is really your only weapon against the system, so thinking off it…if all people stood together and stopped paying their taxes, we would have the power back… and that’s what our name Black Income is to us..

Was there any specific idea behind the forming of the band and also in what you wanted it and your sound to offer?

As we said before, we just wanted to play some honest music, and sure we got some inspiration from the Stoner and Fuzz scene, and sure we have elements of the Grunge era, but we try to do our own thing, and develop our own sound, that’s really what it’s all about for us.

Do the same things still drive the band when it was fresh-faced or have they evolved over time?

We think we still have the same goals really, but sure we developed as a band and go to new places with the music…. and listening to our 2 albums, we think unSOUND is a more mature sounding record than the first one.

Between those releases, how would you say your sound has evolved?

Well it’s hard to say really… we talked about the sound of modern Rock and Metal music today, and we came to the conclusion that we think the sound is too pumped these days, it ruins the experience for the listener, so on unSOUND we aimed to go with a more open and realistic sound, and we did create separate mixes to the Streaming and the Vinyl we released.

Has it been more of an organic movement of sound or more the band deliberately wanting to try new things?

We changed a bit in the line-up, we started out as a 3 piece band, and we’re back at that line-up again… we found that the trio setup is more tight, and the music lock’s in at another level… it’s easier for us to get the riffs packed and tight when we’re only a trio, and as this came to our attention the sound evolved with it… and that’s really where we stand today, with the new release.

Presumably across you all there is a wide range of inspirations; are there any in particular which have impacted not only on the band’s music but your personal approach and ideas to creating and playing music?

Sure we had a lot of influences along the line, but the honesty of the bands from the 90’s sure had a huge impact, not only in the music but also in the lyrics… but also bands like Queens Of The Stone Age with their more desert kind of sound and feel we listened a lot to but also we looked at elements from bands like Fu Manchu and mastodon ….that have a more Fuzz and Metal edge to it..

Is there a regular process to the band’s songwriting?

Usually it’s Henrik our vocalist that writes the basic ideas to the songs, and we normally take the ideas and jam on them, letting ideas flow until we have like a whole track. We tend to keep the basic idea, musicians tend to get bored with their own songs and keep developing them to the worse… we try to keep what got you hooked when you first did write the song, and keep that in mind all the way thru the process of writing.

Where do you, more often than not, draw the inspirations to the lyrical side of your songs?

Well we write about realism, and we get inspired by everyday people and feelings, we aim to write lyrics you can set yourself in center of as a listener, and not pointing thing out like other bands… it creates a more open lyrics universe for the listener, just like reading a book and creating your own pictures.

Please give us some background to your latest release.

unSOUND we started recording in 2017 in Medley Studio with Soren Andersen, and after that we recorded 5 Tracks in Tube IT Studio Denmark, and finished up the album there as well; we did mix and mastering ourselves, we wanted to have total control of things and not just lean back and let some producer take our music somewhere else… so this way we found our way of working in the future.

Give us some insight to the themes and premise behind it and its songs.

Well it’s kinda like we described, but on unSOUND  you will find a wide range of different songs, stretching from modern love songs like ‘The Sun’ to the more real songs like our single ‘Loaded Gun’ that tells a personal story to songs like ‘Somethings wrong’ that takes off at the world and the problems we’re facing today.

Are you a band which goes into the studio with songs pretty much in their final state or prefer to develop them as you record?

For us to be able to find the right elements of the songs, we work with the songs before entering the studio, but we leave space to develop things in the recording face as well….

Tell us about the live side to the band, presumably a majorly favourite aspect of the band?

We love playing live, that’s where our music comes to life… we are an energetic kind of live band, meaning we don’t give a F.ck, we are here to have a great time with the people who showed up.. so let’s F…ing Rock out…

It is not easy for any new band to make an impact regionally let alone nationally and further afield. How have you found it?

Well call us old fashion, but we believe that in the end good music will survive, it might take some time, but don’t give up…. We started out in our own country Denmark, and as time went by we found that with streaming and the internet, we gained a lot of love from other countries than Denmark… so with that in mind we decided to go where our fans are and not focus so much on our own country, so for us we get a lot of love from USA and the UK, but also Germany and Sweden. So with this new world, it’s more like don’t spend a lot of time pressing your music onto a certain land or community, go where people like your music instead.

How has the internet and social media impacted on the band to date?

Well social media has changed so much since it started out, when it first started out it was a great tool…today we’re not really sure what to expect from it, it seems like even though fans like your page, they don’t see the news your postings unless you pay for it… and what is it good for then? We think social media will fall back the next years, and streaming services like Spotify will take over that part, and gives more meaning to gather the information with your music.

So you see it as something destined to become a negative from a positive as the band grows and hopefully gets increasing success or is it more that bands struggling with it are lacking the knowledge and desire to keep it working to their advantage?

It’s really hard to say really… but it seems every bands are doing the same, so with all the music and videos coming out all the time, what would we expect from that, and how people react to it…what impacts the upcoming scene the most at the moment, is in our opinion that bigger established bands, don’t earn any money at record sales anymore, and with the streaming fee so low, they are not taking up place at all the venues because that’s where the money is, leaving the upcoming scene not being able to get anything from the gigs they play, it they can get any gigs… so that’s one of the more negative sides to the music business today.. so that leaves upcoming music to struggle with the internet and streaming, breaking thru the noise of bad music being published from every bedroom studio around the world.

Once again a big thanks for sharing time with us; anything you would like to add or reveal for the readers?

Thank you so much… yes just wanted to let you know that you can check out our brand new album on the links below, and we will see you in 2020.

Thank you…

Our brand new Video “Loaded Gun”

YouTube: https://youtu.be/KKNJd9Kg_aY

Shop: Http://shop.tubeit.eu

Social Sites:

Website: http://www.blckincm.com

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/blackincome

Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/blackincome/

Twitter: https://twitter.com/blckincm

Spotify: https://open.spotify.com/artist/5XzUUfJH9hTfcvjInSUytt

Video: https://www.youtube.com/user/BlackIncome

Pete RingMaster 18/10/2019

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright