Visceral examinations: getting deep into Crejuvent with founder Freddy Spera

There are no pretensions with Crejuvent, a British project roaring out from with the Liverpool metal scene, just the “simple goal, to write some badass metal music.” Using his multi-flavoured and textured sounds as evidence, Federico ‘Freddy’ Spera is certainly on course and living up to his aim in fine style; so with thanks to our friend Andrew at Stencil PR it was about time we found out more. Throwing questions at Freddy we explored his latest project, his creative brain, his brand new EP and plenty more…

Hello and thanks for taking time out to talk with us.

Heyo – no problem, thanks for giving me something entertaining to do to break my monotonous work routine!

Can you first introduce Crejuvent and give us some background to how it all started?

My name is Freddy and I’m the brains behind the one man project Crejuvent. It all began from when I first started writing songs, and eventually I decided to release some of them on my own, having a band would just hold me back (dun dun DUUUUUN).

As for what brought me all together, you can thank a series of extremely unfortunate evolutionary chains that catalysed my parents banging and resulted in the fleshy sponge of a man that sits here before you.

Have you been involved in other projects before? If so how has that impacted on what you are doing now, maybe in thought or direction?

Oh yeah, I’ve been playing in bands for years and years. It definitely inspired the way I’m doing a lot of the behind the scenes stuff, as I’ve had the chance to see which things work for me and which don’t. I’ve studied music at university and I’m sort of now starting to apply what I learned there business wise to my various projects in some form, and this is no exception. The main advantage in running a project like this on your own is that I don’t have to answer to anybody so I can do whatever I want. I like to take risks, so I can do that with Crejuvent and see what works and what doesn’t. Whatever does end up working I’ll probably do again with my other projects at some point.

What inspired the band name?

Adolescent hormones…

Was there any specific idea behind the creation of Crejuvent and what you wanted it and your sound to offer?

I suppose initially I was more into doing a specific thing, I really wanted to sound ‘trvlly brootal’ and be ‘the most metal thing ever’. Now however it’s more like ‘eh, I’ll write whatever I think sounds good’ and the rest of the world can eat a dick. It ends up sounding a lot more genuine and the release I get from not having to confine myself to any genre rules is fantastic.

Do the same things emotionally still drive the project or have they evolved over time?

Well, I’m angrier and more existentially confused now than I ever was, so yeah I suppose it’s still driven by the same train of thought. I’m more motivated and invested in it now that I have something to release, that’s for sure.

How would you say your sound has evolved over that time too?

I’d say it used to sound like a bottle of WKD: it was sweet, naive, and only teenagers liked it. Now it has aged and matured like fine wine: it’s classier, more refined, and you’ll probably end up crying in the corner when you’re done with it.

Has it been more of an organic movement of sound or more you deliberately wanting to try new things?

A bit of column A and a bit of column B…I enjoy pushing myself and constantly try new things, and the way I write songs with Crejuvent is a bit more constructed and mediated. But I can’t write very well if I’m not naturally motivated and inspired. Especially with this upcoming Time EP, I really didn’t want to force a fart out and end up shitting everywhere, so I took my time in writing the songs and made sure that it the actual actualisation of the songs was organic and fresh. But the actual song writing process is a bit more thought out and can be somewhat methodical at times.

Tell us about that songwriting process?

Generally speaking, the songs will be driven by a main riff or melodic motif. I’ll usually dick around with my guitar and when I accidentally play a riff that I think sounds fantastic, I’ll record it and write a song around it, coming up with parts as I go along, and eventually it turns into a whole song. That’s GENERALLY how I write songs for Crejuvent, but every song is different in some way.

Presumably you embrace a wide range of inspirations; are there any in particular which have impacted not only on the music but your personal approach and ideas to creating and playing music?

Sort of…Having studied music at university, I was introduced to an awful lot of songwriters and musicians obviously, and if there’s one thing I learned is that everybody has a different way of writing and coming up with ideas. I’ve heard of every way imaginable to write songs, but ultimately it all boils down to whatever comes naturally to you. That’s what I strive for when approaching ideas; it’s finding a way to develop and process these musical ideas in the more comfortable way for me and can represent whatever it is I have to say. I remember watching Devin Townsend once do a live stream showing how he puts songs together and creates demos; he’s got tons of videos online showing his process. I’ve written a few songs here or there following a similar process to his as some sort of song writing exercise, but nothing I would use for Crejuvent.

Where do the inspirations to the lyrical side of your songs more often come from?

Whatever it is that’s bothering me the most at the time. It’ll usually be driven by some sort of complex state of confusion that I’m experiencing, some internal crisis. I enjoy singing about the things that I can’t talk about, things that I need to process internally before continuing with my day. This could be a state of depression, an awareness issue, or farts, or anything in between.

Give us some background to your latest release.

Crejuvent’s debut Time EP will be coming out on the 1st of July! It’s ultimately a culmination of everything that’s right in the world. I started writing the songs that ended up on it a while back, probably sometime around 2015. The whole writing process was very on and off, hence why it took so long. Every song is a bit different and was written with a slightly different approach. There’s no reoccurring theme or whatever, but the themes are generally quite bleak. I took care of every aspect of the release myself, from artwork to production. Recording started around late September and I finished mixing and mastering everything around March this year. That’s pretty much it!

Can you give a closer insight to those themes?

Well, generally speaking I struggle to properly articulate my thoughts verbally. I often word vomit everywhere, I stutter sometimes, and I usually can’t quite find the right ways to say what it is I think and feel. So when it when I wrote the Time EP, it was very important to me that I manage to correctly articulate my thoughts into the music. I had to feel completely uninhibited from everything and try my best to feel some sort of detachment to myself to feel like I could properly purge my thoughts into the EP. As a result, the main themes sort of revolve around the feeling of helplessness throughout day to day life. The opener, Fuck This Shit, is probably the one song I wrote with the most direct lyrics, I was just feeling pissed off and churned that bad boy out in like 10 minutes. Code Orange is a bit of a story, it’s about a man who’s forced into some sort of rehab against his will – the lyrics vaguely reflect the theme from A Clockwork Orange, it’s about how to be human and to be free consists of the freedom to screw up your life…sort of. Malicious Clouds is a bit of an anomaly, I just sort of pulled the lyrics out of my ass – the words felt right to sing so I sung them. I guess you could claim it’s about a dark cloud of depression lording over oneself and those around, I dunno. Time is feeling helpless against the never-ending and tyrannical construct that is time. Word Vomit is a bit more personal, it’s about my unwillingness to be open towards myself and others, and the vulnerabilities that come with it.

Do you enter the studio with songs pretty much in their final state or prefer to develop them as you record?

I usually write the songs as demos, I’ll record bits as I write them until it looks like a full song, then I write and record all the other parts until I have a complete demo. Then I properly re-record everything from scratch and those will end up being the final masters. I’ll add or remove things here or there during the actual recording process, but for the most part I head in with a demo so I know EXACTLY what I need to do. Not only does it come out sounding better in my opinion, but it saves time (and LOADS of money) in the studio.

Tell us about the live side to the band, your favourite aspect of being a musician?

I absolutely love playing live; it’s the best thing ever. It’s quite fun for this project as well because I get on stage on my own, playing bass and singing to backing tracks. With nobody to fuck with me on stage I can just do whatever the hell I want, be it chug beers on stage, fart in microphones, whatever! I hate going to shows and seeing the band just stand there like a bunch of lemons. Especially in this genre, I mean its metal, ya’ll are supposed to go nuts and shit! Unless it’s something super proggy or technical that you need to play meticulously, you have no excuse. When I go on stage, I know that I need to entertain the audience, so I like to give them something to write home about.

It is not easy for any new band to make an impact regionally let alone nationally and further afield. How have you found it your neck of the woods? Are there the opportunities to make a mark if the drive is there for new artists?

I thoroughly believe that where there’s a will there’s a way. But you REALLY gotta have an awful lot of will. A lot of musicians keep bitching about how things are different and it’s harder to make a living and all that crap, but if you REALLY want to do it then you’ll find a way. And if you can’t do it, it just means you didn’t want it badly enough AND THAT’S TOTALLY FINE! It’s definitely not easy to make it nowadays, you have to sacrifice an awful lot to get even remotely close and you gotta put in so many hours it is ridiculous, and that’s simply not for everybody. With that said, if you don’t try then you’ll never make it.

The opportunities are out there, but they are few and far between. You gotta have the right team of people working together towards the same goal for a band to get anywhere, you need to put yourself out there and meet people, you even have to kiss some asses along the way unfortunately. It’s tough, but you have to make the opportunities come to you, otherwise it’s basically impossible. New bands should also keep in mind what it means to make in impact and have success. Things are different now than they were, just because you’re making a big impact in your region, nationally, or even worldwide, you’re probably still not going to make a living off this stuff. So you have to consider what ‘making it’ means to you.

How has the internet and social media impacted on the project to date? Do you see it as something destined to become a negative from a positive as the band grows and hopefully gets increasing success or is it more that bands struggling with it are lacking the knowledge and desire to keep it working to their advantage?

When I get asked this I always refer to the fact that before music was being recorded and sold as records, it was being sold as music sheets. People would go out and buy the scores so they could actually play the music themselves. Then records came along and the music sheet industry tried to fight it with no success, and records were the way people absorbed music. This is no different. I think people just need to re-evaluate how people take in music and adapt accordingly, why they already are. The entire industry is struggling because of the internet but the internet is not going anywhere, so maybe it’s time for the industry to adapt (which it already is!). The bands that struggle are probably the same ones who complain that ‘music isn’t what it used to be’ or whatever, bands whose mentality is still stuck in the 80s. I like to think that stems from a lack of knowledge, but a lot of them are just stubborn. I started Crejuvent during this whole internet and social media thing, and whilst I don’t have a perfect command of it I try my best to adapt, to change my PR campaigns accordingly, to do what I can to make it work for me…Which isn’t too hard to do because I don’t really have anything else to compare it to.

Once again a big thanks for sharing time with us; anything you would like to add or reveal for the readers?

Yeah man thanks for featuring me! If anybody is insane enough to have read this whole thing and make it this far down then I applaud you and award you with my gratitude. And you should also know that Crejuvent’s debut TIME EP is COMING OUT ON THE 1ST OF JULY SO BUY IT FOR YOUR GIRLFRIENDS OR WHATEVER!!! Keep an eye out on Crejuvent’s Facebook page for new releases and videos and all that jazz!

Check Crejuvent out further @ https://www.facebook.com/Crejuvent/   and go buy the Time EP @ https://crejuvent.bandcamp.com/album/time-ep

Pete RingMaster 21/07/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Stripped down and bouncing: venturing into the lively world of Cinders

Exploding on the Salt Lake City music scene in 2015, Cinders has been a bundle of great sounds and fun luring fresh waves of new fans year by year, song by song. Their diverse indie-pop/alternative rock sound has been acclaimed by those fans as “rowdy acoustic pop”, a tag which perfectly fits their releases to date and a live presence which leaves a venue smiling breathlessly. We took the chance to find out more about the sextet with both hands, chatting with the band about beginnings, music, the lure of their live shows and plenty more…

Hello all and thanks for taking time out to talk with us.

Can you first introduce the band and give us some background to how it all started?

Chelsey: Well- we have Adrian our ’emo punk’ that studies jazz, Jordan ‘the one who never grew up’, Montana our ‘spikeball extraordinaire’, Austin ‘the one with the dad jokes’, Brad ‘the sex appeal’ and me…. band mom. We are just a bunch of geeks that like music.

I would say the vision of Cinders came from Montana and Jordan. As to how we all came together, some members of the band are long time high school friends, work friends, others met later in life while living in Tennessee, and even social media has played a large part in the formation of Cinders.

Have you all been involved in other bands before? If so how has that possibly shaped what you are doing now?

Austin: Everyone has had experience in bands prior to Cinders, even if that experience was jazz band, wind symphony, or marching band… Jordan, Montana, Adrian, and Brad all played in “cool” high school bands. Adrian and Chelsey both studied jazz in college so between the 6 of us we have a lot of experience in many different styles of music.”

What inspired the band name?

Montana: It was the title of a terrible song we wrote in high school, and we thought the name was super cool and deserved more than just that terrible song. It was also the very first song Jordan and Montana ever played together about 7 years ago.

Was there any specific idea behind the forming of the band and also in what you wanted it and your sound to offer?

Jordan: None of us have really ever had a backup plan in life ha-ha. We found what we wanted to do and we are going after it! Music is everything to us and when you find 6 people who all have the same goal in mind, work just tends to get done. We are all pretty happy and positive people and think that the world could use a bit of a more hopeful sound. So although not all of our songs have the happiest lyrics, we try to keep in that hopeful tone to spread the feeling that everything will be okay and life is good.

And that still primarily drives the band or have they evolved over time?

Montana: I think we can all agree that of course the love for music drives us, but nothing drives as like crowd interaction at shows. Seeing them dance to the rhythms and hearing them scream the lyrics is the most rewarding feeling on earth.

Since your early days, how would you say your sound has evolved and has it been more of an organic movement or more the band deliberately trying new things?

Jordan: The band started off a bit more calm and chill until we performed live. We would be jumping, screaming, and stomping on stage to acoustic songs sans drums and it was awesome! It helped us realize more that people want to see a show and they want to see a band loving what they do for a living. I think we have all been to those shows where the band looks sad and stands still the whole time. After the show is over I’ll sometimes hear them saying “that was the funnest night of my life.” you can do those same things at a funeral (though at the end of the day they probably wouldn’t say it was the funnest day ever). We wanted to start creating music that fit our live performance better, so we did, and we still are. We want to whole heartedly say each night “This was the funnest night of our life.” Our fans come to have a great night, so that is what we work to give them.

You touched on it earlier, across the band there is a wide range of inspirations; are there any in particular which have impacted not only on the band’s music but your personal approaches and ideas to creating and playing music?

Jordan: We definitely come from very different musical backgrounds, but that is something we root ourselves in and take pride in. Music is not one sound or genre so we don’t want to be that either. We want to sound like who each of us are. Every Cinders song is like a cake. The cake isn’t all good, big and pretty until all the ingredients and frosting are added. We are each an important ingredient (Chelsey and Austin are the couple on top of the cake). So I guess the inspiration comes from trying to see outside of the box. Yes it has definitely helped us to look at music in a more open way!

Is there a regular process to the band’s songwriting?

Brad: So the songs at the beginning generally come from Jordan’s or Montana’s mind. With a few ideas, a riff, or some lyrics. Once we get something tangible to work with, I’ll usually record some drums for them. And then bit by bit we each add ideas and mess with it. Montana works his pro-tools magic and next thing you know we’ve got a solid demo, or a song.

Where do the prime inspirations to the lyrical side of your songs come from?

Jordan: Personal experience, words with friends, rhyming dictionaries, childhood books ha-ha. It comes from everywhere. I feel like all of us writers have very strange minds. They are like caves full of thoughts waiting to come out, it is just a matter of searching hard enough to find them. That search can be very tough but super fulfilling.

Would you give us some background to your latest release and some insight to the themes and premise behind it and its songs?

Brad: Our latest release is our acoustics vol. 1. We love to rock out, but we also love the chill feel of stripping everything away and revealing the songs as they are by themselves. We call it vol. 1 because we plan on doing an acoustic vol. 2 of course. Not for a while though! 😉

Are you a band which goes into the studio with songs pretty much in their final state or prefer to develop them as you record?

Adrian: For our first record we had the mentality of the final state is what we were recording. And then we would only slightly modify what we had. But that has definitely changed. We are now working on demos and having a group production phase to our songs.

Tell us more about the live side to the band, presumably the favourite aspect of the band and as many bands will attest to, it is not easy for any new band to make an impact regionally let alone nationally and further afield, how have you found it your neck of the woods?

Adrian: Our fans are definitely our favorite part. We wouldn’t be a band if it wasn’t for them. And as for the opportunities out here in Utah they are great. Utah has a great sense of community in live and local music.

How has the internet and social media impacted on the band to date?

Jordan: Social media is awesome! It has created a way for artists and fans to communicate and connect in ways they never could have 20 years ago. We really owe it all to our friends and fans who have shared our music all over social media to help us get to where we are! Wherever our fans are, we want to be there as well. So we have loved being able to keep them updated with photos and videos of each show. We have even started a Patreon so that they can be a part of the writing of our new album! The music industry is changing and I think social media is a huge part of it and I think it is very positive.

Once again a big thanks for sharing time with us; anything you would like to add or reveal for the readers?

Thanks again for having us, we really appreciate it. To those reading, we love you and are so grateful for all of the support you have shown us! Thank you for everything and look forward to #album2 coming soon!

Check out more about and from Cinders @ https://www.facebook.com/cindersmusic/ and http://www.cindersmusic.com/

Pete RingMaster 19/07/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Serenading webs and trapping harmonies: introducing Tali Dennerstein

Tali Dennerstein is a British rock singer, songwriter, and producer who is beginning to lure eager attention with her unique mix of Pop/Folk Rock, Gothic Rock, Grunge and Dark Ambient Music. It is a kaleidoscope of flavours embraced by imagination and invention as evidenced by her latest release and videos. We seized on the chance to find out more by talking to the lady herself, exploring her creative beginnings, her solo project, new EP and more besides…

Hello Tali and thanks for taking time out to talk with us.

Can you first give us some background to yourself?

I’m an alternative rock singer, songwriter and producer. I’ve always been very passionate about music and from a very early age, I grew up listening to a lot of 80’s and 90’s Gothic and Grunge Rock music, which really inspired me to want to start my own musical journey. I’ve always enjoyed writing lyrics and after being in a few different bands, I decided to become a solo artist, mainly because I liked having control of the direction my music was taking.

You mentioned previous bands. How have those experiences impacted on your own musical explorations?

I’ve been in a few different bands in the past. My first band was a more electronic /trip hop style band and my last band was a heavy rock/grunge band and I think it definitely helped me to decide the style and direction that I most enjoyed working with. I’ve also collaborated with a couple of artists online and recently I’ve also started a synthwave side project, which has been really fun to work on because I love the 80’s electronic sound and it’s been fun to do something so completely different.

Many solo projects decide to go under a created moniker; you?

As a solo artist I decided to use my own name, although I did consider having a band name but I just couldn’t think of anything that was good enough.

Was there any specific idea behind the direction you wanted your work and sound to offer?

I had a lot of song material, which I’d written over many years that I hadn’t really had a chance to do anything with for a long time and I really wanted to get as much of it completed and out there, as possible for people to hear. That was my main reason for starting my solo music. I also really wanted to try and create my own sound by merging both gothic and grunge rock styles together, as those were my two favourite genres of music styles, when I was growing up. I like folk and electronic music too, so I also tried to add some of these influences into my sound as well.

Are you driven by the same creative things and intent from being a fresh-faced musician or have they evolved over time?

As a solo artist, I’ve only really just begun so it’s relatively new for me but I think the same thing drives me as a songwriter and that’s always been to create meaningful music, that people can enjoy and relate to and that helps them in some way.

Since your early days as a songwriter how would you say your sound has evolved?

My sound has evolved quite a bit. I started with a very 90’s indie pop and folk rock and ambient electronic sound but my next album will be much heavier and a lot darker, both lyrically and musically.

Has it been more of an organic movement of sound or more you deliberately wanting to try new things?

I do like to experiment with different ideas and sounds, so I try new things to hear how they might add to a song but with regard to changing the direction of my music to a heavier sound that was deliberate because it’s how I felt the songs on my future album worked best and it just felt right. I do still like to write softer more folk rock and electronic tracks, as well but I tend to go with what feels right for each individual song, when it comes to creating the right sound.

Presumably a wide range of musical tastes you have an equal array of inspirations; are there any in particular which have impacted not only your music but your personal approach and ideas to creating and playing music?

I’m inspired by a lot of artists and bands but my biggest inspirations are Curve, Alice In Chains, Soundgarden, and Nick Drake. I love Curve’s Doppelgänger album and the way the guitars create just this huge wall of distorted sound. I also loved the way they used a lot of electronic elements, which merged in with the guitars. It made the tracks sound quite industrial, even though they were considered a shoegaze band. They had a very interesting and unique sound. I’ve also been very inspired by how grunge bands wrote their lyrics. They were often really deep and introspective and really made me think about what message they were trying to convey. I liked the fact that the lyrics weren’t straightforward and were hard to figure out and that everyone could find their own meaning in them.

Is there a particular process to your songwriting?

I always start by recording any melody ideas that come to my mind and I get a lot of ideas every day, so I like to keep my sound recorder next to me no matter what I’m doing. I tend to think of the subject matter usually after I’ve thought of the melody and that’s because I get an idea for the theme, usually based on the feel of the melody.

Where do you, more often than not, draw the inspirations to the lyrical side of your songs?

I’ve drawn a lot of my inspiration from some very tough situations I’ve had to face in my life, so my lyrics have sometimes reflected my hopes for things to improve, as well as my need to face the pain and fears I feel each day, due to my situation and to become stronger, despite the circumstances. I’ve also written lyrics based on things I’ve experienced in the past, such as heartbreak or bullying or about things that are happening in the world around me, that I feel strongly about such as war conflict and also about peace.

Could you give us some background to your latest release?

My latest release is a 7 track EP called Live For Tomorrow and I recorded the songs a while ago but I’ve only just recently released them.

Give us some insight to the themes and premise behind it and its songs.

The first song is called Summertime and it’s a very upbeat pop rock song, with a feel good Summer vibe. It’s about releasing and letting go of negative thoughts and instead embracing all of the small but meaningful and beautiful things that life has to offer, that we sometimes don’t always see, when we’re stuck in a cycle of depression. It’s also about keeping hope alive and just trying to stay optimistic. The second song is called Tonight and it’s a folk rock song. It’s about a girl being led on a journey, to find herself and unknowingly being guided by invisible forces in the right direction who are watching over her and protecting her. It’s lyrically written in a fairy tale style. The third song is called Live For Tomorrow and the track is an indie pop song, about a relationship that just isn’t working out and it’s about just accepting things and looking to the future and letting go of the past. The fourth track is called Hurt. It’s a slow electronic ambient song and is about unintentionally hurting someone you love and feeling guilty about it and how you miss them after they’ve gone. The fifth track is called See The Sun. This one is very 90’s Brit pop, in style and it’s about closing the door to the past and looking forward towards a brighter future. The sixth song is called Skyline and is about being there for someone who’s hurting and telling them you’ll always be there for them. The final track is called Far Away. That song is about imagining a better world, where hatred, greed and fear don’t exist.

Do you go into the studio with songs pretty much in their final state or prefer to develop them as you record?

I usually have some idea of how I think a song should sound and then I use that as a base to develop and add any ideas later on. I also work with a really great producer, and we work together until each song sounds right, so it’s a slow developmental process right up until a song is finalized.

Tell us about the live side to your music?

I love performing but at the moment, due to my circumstances I can’t perform, although I’d really love to. I’ve been concentrating on recording from home, as many songs as I can and I’m hoping sometime in the future, I’ll be able to perform them live.

It is not easy for any new artist to make an impact regionally let alone nationally and further afield. How have you found it?

I honestly don’t know because I usually use social media to get my music heard. I don’t think where I live, there’s much of a music scene.

So the internet and social media has been a potent impact on your music? Some see it as something destined to become a negative from a positive as things progress and grow. How do you see things?

I think social media is a great and very positive way for helping musician’s and bands to get their music heard. It can take time but it’s amazing to be able to connect directly with music lovers from all around the world. I think the only negative aspect is that there are a lot of musician’s and bands trying to promote themselves on social media and it can be hard to get people to click on music links as the market is saturated but it just takes determination and hard work and it is worth being on social media in the end.

Once again a big thanks for sharing time with us; anything you would like to add or reveal for the readers?

I’m giving away 3 free songs to whoever signs up to my mailing list, plus an extra free track off of my latest EP.

Explore the music of Tali Dennerstein further @ https://www.facebook.com/TaliDennerstein.music as well as https://talidennerstein.bandcamp.com/album/live-for-tomorrow-ep and https://twitter.com/talimusicartist

Pete RingMaster 13/07/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Baring souls: talking Exoaura

Fresh in presence and fresh in sound, US progressive/alternative metal duo Exoaura are beginning to create a stir. Drawing on an array flavours, it is a band with bold imagination and sounds. So with their debut release barely out of its wrapper, we took to exploring this exciting emerging outfit with great thanks to both Lindsey and Adam, delving into the band’s beginnings, musical instincts, that new release and much more…

Hello and thanks for taking time out to talk with us.

Can you first introduce the band and give us some background to how it all started?

We are Lindsey Church (vocals/piano/strings) and Adam Ingram (instrumentation/engineering). We’re a female fronted alternative-metal duo with a twist of soul, from Spokane WA, US.

Lindsey: We’ve been best friends for years and have been writing and performing music together since 2004. We have extremely different tastes in music. I like a lot of soul and R&B, while Adam listens to a lot more prog and rock, but we both have a common love for metal, so we decided to blend our styles and form Exoaura.

Have you been/are involved in other bands before? If so how have those experiences infused within Exoaura?

Lindsey: We were both in the nu-metal band Reflection. It had a wide spectrum of light and melodic, to heavy sounds that we both loved…and some progressive elements, so we brought a lot of that into Exoaura. Also writing and growing as musicians together for so many years, we’ve developed a great chemistry that, from what our fans tell us, can really be felt in what we write.

What inspired the band name?

Adam: We wanted our sounds and band name to represent a concept of being something bigger than the boundaries and limitations that people put on themselves…so, we came up with Exoaura, “exo” meaning outside and “aura” meaning one’s atmosphere.

Was there any specific idea behind the forming of the band and also in what you wanted it and your sound to offer?

Lindsey: Exoaura is a new project that we just formed summer of 2016, but the drive regardless of what band I’ve sung in, remains the same. It’s a need for raw self-expression and using that to connect on a deeper level with other people. It’s the freedom that you can only get from your art.

Where has your thoughts and personal direction in music evolved over time?

Lindsey: I think we should always be looking for ways to grow and evolve, so I’ve studied vocals for years. I take what I learn and apply it to my writing. When I increase my range, or learn different styles, it gives me the ability to get a more diverse sound. It’s like getting a new toy to play with and it’s always exciting lol.

Though you are still in your early days as Exoaura, how would you say your sound has evolved to date?

Adam: I’m a gear junkie. I love picking up and experimenting with new sounds, processes and effects. I’ve also been listening to a lot of progressive metal bands and have been incorporating more and more of these kinds of picking techniques in my guitar work.

Is there an organic flow to the movement and exploration of your sound or is it that you deliberately search out new things to try?

Adam: Our evolution has been organic. Whether it’s from finding new bands to listen to, or learning something different from training, our writing flows in new ways with each other from the inspiration we find.

Presumably across the band there is a wide range of those inspirations; are there any in particular which have impacted not only on the band’s music but your personal approach and ideas to creating and playing music?

Lindsey: Absolutely. TesseracT has been a huge influence. Dan Tompkins is an incredible vocalist and I’ve always been blown away by his impeccable technique and range. I had a chance to study with him and he helped me to realize the dynamics of my voice and how to unleash it. So, he’s had a huge impact on how I write.

Is there a particular process to your songwriting?

Adam: Usually, yeah. I’ll boot up one of my writing templates in Cubase, set a tempo then create a groove as a foundation for the mood and energy of the track. After I’ve recorded my instruments I’ll send Lindsey a draft mix where she adds her creative process with orchestral and vocal melodies. Once all the magic is captured I spend quite a bit of time getting a solid mix together then migrate to mastering, getting it spit polished for release.

Where do you generally draw the inspirations to the lyrical side of your songs from?

Lindsey: I’m fascinated by the polarity of love and hate in the world and the interconnectivity between all living things that people feel, but tend to ignore. So, a lot of my lyrics are about that seemingly eternal struggle to break free of that and see things for what they truly are.

Could you give us some background to your latest release?

Our debut self-titled EP will be released on June 30th, 2017. It’s a combination of thought provoking lyrics, melodic grooves, ethereal orchestration and passionate soul.

How about the themes and premise behind it and its songs.

Lindsey: The concept relates to the division in society today and that despite how much negativity and hate there is there are people who are strong enough to surpass that.

Are you a band which goes into the studio with songs pretty much in their final state or prefer to develop them as you record?

Adam: We tend to develop our songs in our studio: We’ll have basic ideas and outlines, but once we’re tracking and start to hear the composition come alive, it guides us in which direction the song should go.

Is there a live side to the band yet?

Lindsey: Exoaura is new, so we haven’t started touring yet. But with our past projects, for me it’s the combination of getting lost in the feeling our music, while connecting to the audience so that they can experience the intense emotion that went into writing it. That synergy is just unforgettable.

It is not easy for any new band to make an impact regionally let alone nationally and further afield. How have you found it? Are there the opportunities to make a mark if the drive is there for new bands?

Adam: Honestly, I think it is far easier now than it has ever been. Regionally speaking, metal is very much alive and kicking in the Pacific Northwest, and we are very fortunate of that. We’re from Spokane, not far from Seattle, one of the largest music scenes in the US and have proximity to a very active music community here. Nationally and further afield, bands have access to social media, digital discovery services and by leveraging analytics/demographics, any band in any genre can find and connect with their target audience. We’re a new band ourselves and even in the past few months we’ve been asked for tour dates from here in the US all the way to Brazil.

…And the internet and social media. How has that impacted on the band to date? Do you see it as something destined to become a negative from a positive as some artists seem to almost expect?

Adam: As a DIY artist, social media and digital streaming services are incredibly valuable, nearly mandatory resources. I happen to have a marketing background, which has certainly helped Exoaura’s online presence. The evolution of how music is accessed is something musicians just have to adopt. Each platform and strategy has its own learning curve, sure, but the reward of understanding these tools is far greater.

Once again guys; a big thanks for sharing time with us; anything you would like to add or reveal for the readers?

Lindsey: You’re so welcome! Yes, our official release date for our EP is June 30th, 2017. And of course, thank you to all our fans for your love and support! Find us https://www.exoaura.com/

Explore Exoaura further @ https://www.facebook.com/Exoauraband/    https://twitter.com/exoauraband

Pete RingMaster 07/07/2017

Ferocious velocity: exploring the creative fuel of Crypitus

Unafraid to mix a wealth of different styles into their already multi-flavoured metal, US trio Crypitus is a force on the rise. Rising up through the Vermont music scene, the threesome of Doug Friend, Zach Patch, and Peter Snee have become an attention grabbing, mosh pit inciting proposition. 2017 is already proving their biggest and most potent yet and with their first release imminent we got down to exploring the heart of Crypitus with thanks to the trio, talking origins, music, and making opportunities….

Hi guys, thanks for taking time out to talk with us.

Can you first introduce the band and give us some background to how you got together?

Doug: We are Crypitus “The HomeGrown Vermont Metal Band” which includes myself, Doug (guitarist/vocalist), Pete (guitarist), and Zach (percussionist). Crypitus was my first project with songs that I started as early as 2011. I had an old friend that I played with through high school but we ended up going separate ways. Me and Pete moved in together in early 2016 and he picked up some of my riffs. We couldn’t find a drummer until we came across Zach’s Facebook post that he was essentially looking for a band to play with so we kicked it into gear and I cannot believe how far we’ve gone!

Zach: Well I guess Facebook brought us together if you want to get technical, but I know that, in reality, it was fate. I was desperately searching the internet for local musicians to jam with and Pete and Doug were the first clowns to respond. The rest is history.

Pete: We are Crypitus! Doug and I jammed a bit when we were roommates and decided to find a drummer together. We met Zach on Facebook and Crypitus was born as it is today.

Have you been involved in other bands before? If so has that had any impact on what you are doing now?

Doug: Crypitus is my baby, my first and only band, but as the years goes by the speed picks up, the riffs get tighter and I watch my own personal experience shape my songs, it’s actually really cool to see.

Zach: Since I was like 15, if I wasn’t actively in a band, I was working my ass off to grow as a musician. Every musician I’ve played with has influenced me in one way or another, one even tried to kill me. I can say, after playing heavy metal for so many years, I was ready to play some more groovy tunes, but, alas-fate.

Pete: I was in a blues rock band before Crypitus and while it was fun, I wanted to play heavier music. I’ve jammed with plenty of musician friends over the years but this is the first band I’ve played shows with.

What inspired the band name?

Doug: The band’s name actually was thought of by one of my old teachers. We were learning about wilderness first aid one day and he comes up to me and exclaims “You know what would be a sick metal band name?! Crepitus; it’s the sound of bones breaking” Low and behold somehow I pulled a Dave Mustaine and now we are Crypitus!

Was there any specific idea behind the forming of the band and also in what you wanted it and your sound to offer?

Doug: The idea I had was basically an old school thrash revival with a new age kick and a good blend of other bits of my favorite sub genres, creating a rounded bone crunching sound!

Zach: I was just glad to find someone to rock out with. Doug already had those ideas, but as for me, I want my drumming to sound radical enough so that when people see Crypitus play, they’ll never forget it.

Pete: Doug had a bunch of songs already written but we’ve added our own personality to them. We all had pretty similar musical tastes so after jamming together for a bit it just clicked.

Do the same things and ideas still drive the band from when it was fresh-faced or have they evolved over time?

Doug: Both are true honestly, since the songs were constructed by me the drive is still the same but since we have been play together for about a year, it’s hard not to evolve as you grow accustom to each other as musicians.

Zach: I still have the same drive as I did day one- have a blast, be unforgettable, act professional so they beg you to come back.

Pete: From the beginning we’ve all been driven by wanting to share our music and jam out in front of an audience. That definitely still drives us today, especially when we write new songs and can’t wait to play them live.

Since your early days, how would you say your sound has grown and evolved?

Doug: We have definitely gained way more energy and speed!

Zach: Our music has gotten so freakin’ fast! You can hear just how much we’ve grown as a band for yourself.  Listen to one of our first live recordings on YouTube, then listen to a recent version of the same song. I did and I was like, woah!

Pete: We’ve sped up a bit but we’ve also evolved as musicians, both separately and together. When we write a new song and we’re each adding our own flavor, we build on what each other is playing as opposed to just playing our own parts.

Everything has been an organic movement, in sound etc. or more the band deliberately going out to try new things?

Doug: Definitely organic, I haven’t had anything to say about our sound besides just trying to get tighter!

Zach: our sound is 100% certified organic 😉

Pete: The new songs sound like a natural progression of the songs we played at first, I think. Crypitus sounds like, and always will, sound like Crypitus.

Presumably across the band there is a wide range of inspirations; are there any in particular which have impacted not only on the band’s music but your personal approach and ideas to creating and playing music?

Doug: I am heavily influenced by the songs of Megadeth and Death and a lot of the bands to come out of the New Wave of Thrash Metal.

Zach: Every show we play there’s a band or all the bands that absolutely blow us away. We watch and learn whenever and wherever we can.

Pete: I get bored listening to the same music over and over so I like to listen to a bit of everything. When I get stuck inspirationally, I like to listen to The Beatles or Pink Floyd…their really simplistic songs let my mind get back to the basics of chord progression and harmony.

Is there a particular process to your songwriting?

Doug: We have mostly have been catching up with a backlog of songs I’ve written in the past, although pretty soon there will be some sick new material!

Zach: I guess my process is wait ‘till they write something and then try every idea I have until I find the right one; it’s all trial and error.

Pete: Doug will come up with a riff and we’ll all play it together. After a while playing it and changing parts, we have a song. It’s a lot of in-the-moment songwriting; changing up a harmony this time we play it or how many measures we play a section that time.

Where do you, more often than not, draw the inspirations to the lyrical side of your songs?

Doug: I draw my lyrical inspiration from worldly turmoil and human misdeeds. Metal has always been about bringing light to the dark for me.

Please give us some backgrounds to your latest release.

Doug: Our first/next release is our demo! Exhibit 1: Prelude to the Dead World will feature some of our favorite/hit songs Breakdown, Tundra, and Thunder. Keep your eyes peeled! It’s going to be killer!

Pete: Our upcoming release is three songs we’ve been playing from the start: Breakdown, Tundra, and Thunder. We jammed to those when we played with Zach for the first time, so it’s only fitting it’s our first release.

Would you give us some insight to the themes and premise behind it and its songs.

Doug: Breakdown is a song I wrote to portray mental conflict and insanity. Tundra is a song that portrayed the idea of transcendentalism and isolation “Into the bitter abyss, can’t get better than this, tundra tundra let me have this!” And the final song Thunder is basically a warning to the world, if you don’t respect Mother Earth, she will bite back.

Are you a band which goes into the studio with songs pretty much in their final state or prefer to develop them as you record?

Doug: For this release we were very well prepared going in!

Zach: The songs are always finished when we record. Our shits gotta be tight.

Pete: We have all our parts pretty planned out when we record.

Tell us about the live side to the band, presumably the favourite aspect of the band?

Doug: Stage presence and energy is definitely what makes the show!

Zach: I think the favorite aspect of Crypitus live is the energy we bring. Doug’s running in circles around the crowd, starting the moshing, sometimes dressed as a taco. Myself, I prefer clown shenanigans.

Pete: My favorite part of playing live, besides the crowd, is watching Doug’s shenanigans. He’s always running around while playing, starting mosh pits.

It is not easy for any new band to make an impact regionally let alone nationally and further afield. How have you found it your neck of the woods? Are there the opportunities to make a mark if the drive is there for new bands?

Doug: In our neck of the woods there aren’t a whole lot of opportunities and for the most part none of the bars in our town are allowing heavy music. But more recently than not our local record store has opened its doors to live music, I can’t wait to see what Rick and Kats Howlin’ Mouse does for the local scene! But being from Vermont I was hell bent to play anywhere new to have new people turn their heads.

Zach: I think no matter where you are, nothing is going to happen unless you make it happen. No matter the scene in what neck of the woods, if you put your best effort in, it will pay off.

Pete: We’ve had some issues playing in our town in the past. Venues are few and far between and there aren’t too many promoters in our area. If you’re willing to drive out of state though, there are plenty of shows going on always looking for new bands to book. All it takes is some social media presence, at which Doug is a master.

How has the internet and social media impacted on the band to date?

Doug: Without social media it would have been a wicked challenge to be where we are now.

Zach: Social media is priceless. Way more effective than posting flyers, although we’ve done that recently. I also think, at least as far as promoting our band goes, social media will always be a priceless tool.

Pete: Besides a couple in-person hook ups, most of our shows are booked through social media. Having a Bandcamp or SoundCloud is very important, I think. Even if it’s just ripped from live videos, when I check out a band I like to be able to hear some of their songs.

Once again a big thanks for sharing time with us; anything you would like to add or reveal for the readers?

Doug: Follow us on Facebook to keep an eye out for the demo, I also plan on uploading it to Bandcamp as well! Thanks for the interview RingMaster!

https://www.facebook.com/crypitus/    https://crypitus.bandcamp.com/

The RingMaster Review 23/06/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Creative gunslingers and seductive melodies: exploring the world of Prime

Prime has been a rising incitement of attention and pleasure within the British underground rock scene since emerging in 2014 and it is fair to say that the Nottingham outfit is only just beginning to arouse a broader and richer following and support for their multi-flavoured melody rich sound. Following the recent release of their new single and ahead of an upcoming EP we had the pleasure of finding out more about Prime with vocalist Lee Heir exploring the outfit’s origins, sound, latest single and  much more…

Hello Lee and thanks for taking time out of your day to talk with us.

My Pleasure.

Can you first introduce the band and give us some background to how it all?

The band is currently myself on vocals, Kieran Hill on lead guitar, Daniel Ison on bass guitar, and Zero on drums. We’re looking to add a bad-ass guitar player over the summer so we shall see what happens.

Some of the band are recent recruits, has that had any impact on what you are doing now, in maybe inspiring a change of style or direction?

It has… I think we were about to get a bit soft before Kieran and Zero bought so high-impact, flamboyant playing to the table. Every song-ending now sounds like it’s veering off the end of a cliff! And Dan is looking for a certain level of intricacy in the music, he wants to build quiet and loud song structures and tell a 4-5 minute song through those theories.

What inspired the band name?

I wanted something big, a bit like T.REX, as Marc Bolan was a massive influence on me starting out. I got the name from the Lee Marvin film Prime Cut – it was in the TV guide one day when I was flicking through the film listings.

Was there any specific idea behind the forming of Prime and also in what you wanted it and your sound to offer?

There were no grand plans. It originally started off as a studio project, we recorded a studio album in 2014, but I suppose it was more like a solo project as most of the guys didn’t end up playing live with us, guys like Dan Ryland, who was a very creative drummer. The lads who played on the early recordings were all great, I just wasn’t happy with the mixes of the production at times.

Do the same things still drive the band when it was fresh-faced or have they evolved over time?

Well Kieran is still fresh-faced, he’s only just turned 20! I think the lads are all the same as me: I’m driven by more musical challenges, I just wanted to make pure rock music originally, which in a way, we still do, but there’s more subtlety there now and more interesting songs.

Since your early days, how would you say your sound has evolved?

Everything is better in my eyes. Zero instantly knows where he wants to take a song as a drummer, he has such an ear for which direction he sees our songwriting. Dan, for such a cocky bastard, doesn’t rate his own abilities as highly as he should: he is an excellent songwriter. The sound was more based in garage and punk, and although I love that stuff, with the exception of The Seeds or The Clash or Gang Of Four, they were never the most musical of genres.

Across Prime it sounds like there is a wide range of inspirations so as a particular process in the songwriting emerged to generally guide the writing of songs?

No particular process, it used to be jam out in the studio, so that’s why it was maybe more punky and frenetic and less subtle. Now most songs come from me or Kieran, or sometimes me and Dan, sitting down with a pint and thinking a bit more.

Where do you, more often than not, draw the inspirations to the lyrical side of your songs?

Everyday life, concepts, theories… Chris (Munton), our original bassist said to me “I try and write songs that give people direction and some meaning”, I suppose I do that to a degree, in more of a layered, subtle – or sometimes in your face! – way.

Could you give us some background to your latest release, out soon, the Bye Bye EP.

Well Bye Bye, our latest single and video are out now online on the usual places, so we’ve decided to enhance it with some tracks recorded live at the o2 Leicester and a remix by a really good electronic artist called Roger Portas who has previously remixed Donna Summer and has a project called Video Tape Machine. The track Bye Bye originally started off as a simple demo, it just sounds like pretty fuzzy rock with my vocal quite impassioned – or unlistenable I prefer to say! – I think I’ve improved on it a little bit since thank God!

What are the themes and premise behind Bye Bye?

It’s a very confused song about a broken relationship, and how people go round in circles until they just come to a dead end and realise that they are never going to be together.

Are you a band which goes into the studio with songs pretty much in their final state or prefer to develop them as you record?

We haven’t recorded in over a year, but it’s always best to go with the most complete song possible and put finishing touches to it, such as finish lyrics off, or add nice guitar overdubs and backing vocals, done by Shirena Ingram, who is a lovely girl and a really nice singer. We road test everything we record live, for many months before recording. If it doesn’t go down well live it’s pretty silly recording it; although Bye Bye was a rare exception to that rule.

You mentioned tracks live at the o2… tell us about Prime live?

We go out there to entertain first and foremost, if you come watch Prime anywhere in the country, you’ll never get the same show twice. I don’t think you get that with bands like Arctic Monkeys, from what I hear they’re pretty boring live.

It is not easy for any new band to make an impact regionally let alone nationally and further afield. How have you found it your neck of the woods? Are there the opportunities to make a mark if the drive is there for new bands?

We’ve had more interest and luck up North I would say, our sets have gone down a storm in venues like The Wardrobe in Leeds. Christian Carlisle on BBC Sheffield has played us and seems to like what we do, although certain stations in the East Midlands don’t seem to, they seem to be more interested in plucking fifteen-year-old girls from obscurity… that’s their prerogative. I’ve been a bit frustrated by certain venues when we have gone down clearly very well to bigger crowds, yet a lack of follow up is done – the system is definitely flawed at times, but we push on. Next stop is London.

How has the internet and social media impacted on the band to date? Do you see it as something destined to become a negative from a positive as the band grows and hopefully gets increasing success or is it more that bands struggling with it are lacking the knowledge and desire to keep it working to their advantage?

I don’t see apart from the very poor royalties on streaming sites – virtually non-existent from sites like Soundcloud and Spotify – that the internet can be a bad thing. People from around the world can find out about Prime. That’s a great thing. Main problem is the lack of quality control, there’s a lot of shit content and bad music – from the kinds of bands you just mentioned -getting in the way of people finding us too.

Once again a big thanks for sharing time with us; anything you would like to add or reveal for the readers?

I’ll just say thank you for your time and thank you to your readers for supporting new or unsigned music. Without your support, new bands can’t exist, so keep doing it!

https://www.facebook.com/ukprime/    http://www.thepublichousebrand.com/prime

The RingMaster Review 13/06/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Leaping to the front: exploring The Emergency Please with founder Karan Master

The Emergency Please is a Southampton based band which is making a real impact on the city’s live scene with their funk and neo-soul spiced alternative rock. As a greater landscape of attention is finding the band and its creatively energetic sound we had the chance to find out more with the band’s founder/vocalist/guitarist/songwriter Karan Master, finding out about its beginnings, inspirations, and other exploits…

Can you first introduce the band and give us some background to how it all started?

Hi my name’s Karan Master, I started The Emergency Please as a songwriting vehicle for music I’d been writing. Since then I’ve been working with a few drummers and bass player writing, recording, and gigging music for The Emergency Please. On the debut EP, Remember You, I worked with session players Sam West (drums) and Adam Porter (bass).

Have you been involved in other bands before? If so has that had any impact on what you are doing now?

I actually moved to Southampton with my old band, A Gentleman Film. We were a prog funk alt rock trio. There’s definitely a hint of that in The Emergency Please though the newer music I’ve been writing is more influenced by pop punk, which is what I grew up on.

What inspired the band name?

My old band when I was 14 was called Emergency Please. I always really liked the name so decided to stick with it since it wasn’t being used anymore.

Was there any specific idea behind the project and in what you wanted it to offer?

I really wanted to go back to my roots so to speak. I grew up on pop punk/emo bands like Funeral For A Friend, Paramore, and Fall Out Boy but also wanted to incorporate some of the other genres I love like, funk and Neo soul.

You are still inspired by the same things or have they evolved over time?

I think so, The Emergency Please is still relatively new but the drive is just to play music that we enjoy and get it out there the best we can.

Since your first days creating, how would you say your sound has evolved?

It’s got a bit more groove to it and a little more rawness.

Are any changes more of an organic movement or you deliberately wanting to try new things?

I’d say it’s been pretty organic.

Presumably for you and across the others involved in the band there is a wide range of inspirations; are there any in particular which have impacted not only on the music but your personal approach and ideas to creating and playing music?

Haha this could be a long list. My top three inspirations are Jimi Hendrix, John Mayer, and The Smashing Pumpkins. Honestly don’t know if I’d be doing this without them. There are a lot of others though such as Funeral For A Friend, D’Angelo, and Darwin Deez to name a few.

Is there a particular process to your songwriting?

I usually like to start with the guitar and lay down the music first before the vocals. Though I’ve had a few vocal ideas first that inspires me to write a song…they always seem to happen in the shower haha.

Where do you, more often than not, draw the inspirations to the lyrical side of your songs?

It’s mostly about personal experiences or topics that are important to me.

Would you give us some background to your latest release?

Remember You is our debut EP. It has 4 tracks each of which is unique in its own way but still carries our sound. It’s an introduction to The Emergency Please and shows the sound we plan to build on.

How about some insight to the themes and premise behind it and its songs?

The first song is the title track of the EP and is an upbeat pop punk song about running into an ex that you weren’t quite sure why it ended. The second track, I Can’t Stop is a more grooved based song; I especially enjoyed working with Sam and Adam on this one. The following track Lost is more slow and melancholy than the others. It’s a song I had written over a year ago about the toll personal issues and baggage can have relationships. The final song Clark Kent Syndrome is groove based emo track. It’s probably my favourite track on the EP (can’t decide between it and I Can’t Stop). It’s about how people can lose themselves when they become attached to the outcome of something they want and the irony of it.

Do you go into the studio with songs pretty much in their final state or prefer to develop them as you record?

We come to studio with everything written and rehearsed but also with an open mind. It’s great to have an external input and working with the right producers makes a real difference.

Tell us about the live side to the band, presumably the favourite aspect of the band?

We’re pretty hectic on stage. I think live shows are where you get the full experience of a band. We really like to get into it and give it as much energy as we can.

It is not easy for any new band to make an impact regionally let alone nationally and further afield. How have you found it in what seems from the outside, a vibrant musical city?

Southampton definitely has a thriving music scene though not what it used to be; there is still plenty of love for artists. It’s actually got a great scene for jam nights which is how we all met.

How about the internet and social media, how has that helped the band to date or not? Some see it as something destined to be a negative for bands.

Social media and the internet are great ways to get out there but because they’re so widely accessed it makes most bands a drop in the ocean. It’s definitely hard but it’s something we’re working on and plan to keep working on.

I don’t see it as negative; it’s just kind of become a part of the game we all have to play.

Once again Karan, a big thanks for sharing time with us; anything you would like to add or reveal for the readers?

Thanks for taking the time to talk to us! If anyone brings me a chocolate macaroon or any memorabilia of The Flash we will be best friends 4 lyf!

Find out more about The Emergency Please @ https://www.facebook.com/theemergencyplease/

Pete RingMaster 10/05/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright