Loose Fit – Self Titled

If we had taken the time to contemplate a fusion of the essential juices of bands such as The Raincoats, Essential Logic, Au Pairs, and Noseholes we might have conjured up something not too far removed from the pleasure now brought to ears by Australian post punks Loose Fit. In saying that though, the Sydney quartet has an openly distinct voice in sound and enterprise, it all in thrilling evidence within a self-titled debut EP.

Formed by vocalist/saxophonist Anna Langdon and drummer Kaylene Milner, fashion school friends who had bonded over their mutual love of experimental music, Loose Fit soon found itself taking creative shape with the addition of guitarist Max Edgar and bassist Richard Martin. Across 2019, the band earned a rich reputation for their live presence as they captivated a growing mass of fans around the release of their first single, Pull The Lever, earlier this year. It was a track which only enticed eager acclaim and support and they can expect more of the same through their irresistible EP, a “moody critique of the absurd” taking on themes of frustration, disillusion, fear, love, and rage.

That first single opens up the EP, Pull The Lever instantly gipping attention through the hulking drawl of Martin’s bass. Within a breath it sparks the groove and swing of the track, beats skipping alongside to escalate the temptation as the guitar teases from behind, it becoming more vocal and manipulative as Langdon’s voice with a spicing of disdain to its lilt again increases the organic addictiveness of the track. The infectiousness of the song has a touch of The Mo-Dettes to it, a punky contagion eagerly aligning to the post punk virulence just as rapaciously inspiring body and inspiration.

Riot is next up, surrounding the senses in a sonic mist before again the bass leads a voracious dance for song and body to launch themselves upon. Langdon’s vocals again mix confrontation with eager catchiness; attitude soaking both as Milner’s rhythms spring their voracious swing and Edgar’s guitar infests it all with a sonic ravening while the synth of Jonathan Boulet adds its lure.

As the first song, it proves a seed in an inescapable addiction quickly brewing which is only further stoked by the following pair of Reflux and Black Water. The first saunters in on another gripping bassline, Langdon’s sax chirping away alongside before matching its groove with its own cunning stroll. It had us hook line and sinker within seconds, only tightening the hold as again Langdon with Milner flirtatiously taunt ears with their Delta 5-esque vocal union. The second is the band’s new single and it too was soon preying on a readily given submission to the EP’s manipulations. There is a whiff of The Slits to the outstanding encounter, a spicing which only accentuates its calm but feral majesty.

The EP is concluded by Delete, a track enticing ears with the caustic persuasion of guitar and the glowing discordance of the sax, that alone enough to spark a lusty attention only spiralling with the grungy gurning of Martin’s bass and Langdon’s persistently persuasive and alluring vocals.

The EP is superb, manna for our post punk appetites with plenty more in character and sound to feast upon. We are sure we will not be alone.

The Loose Fit EP is out now via FatCat Records: available @ https://loosefit.bandcamp.com/album/loose-fit

https://www.instagram.com/loose___fit/

Pete RingMaster 18/04/2020

Copyright RingMasterReview: MyFreeCopyright



Categories: EP, Music

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