Model Depose – Damage Control

Bred from the seeds of eighties post punk and synth pop, the Model Depose sound has only nurtured and forged its own identity since the Netherland band’s first release back in 2013 and within new album, Damage Control, has cast its richest individuality and temptation yet.

The Groningen hailing outfit openly bear their inspirations on their creative sleeves with maybe a Depeche Mode influence the strongest yet they have increasingly been woven into the commanding imagination of the band. Damage Control though is most unique offering from the quartet yet. Certainly across its tapestry of flavours embracing dark and new wave, indie pop and post rock among many to that post punk/electro pop core certain shadow wrapped moments and electronic breaths sparked thoughts of the likes of Marc Almond, Editors, Modern English, Dead Register and the original Human League alongside Dave Gahan and co, yet every track rose to share its own rare presence of familiarity and uniqueness.

Damage Control opens up with Wights and quickly had attention secured as the rich vocals of Roeland van der Velde stepped forward within an electronic shimmering. An emotive lining to his tones are echoed in the synth shared melodies of Mariët Gast and the almost nagging jingle of Jobbe Holtes’ guitar, the song in no time an eager captivation. Their warm lures though are courted by dark shadows, bassist David Bos prowling their intimation as thicker and increasing drama marries every note and syllable. It is an enthralling almost haunting beginning to the album, its grip on the imagination already in place and only tightened thereon in.

Stranger follows and equally has melancholy for company as van der Velde again immediately impresses. There is a fire in the song’s dark belly though which without truly igniting gives it energy and intensity, the former ensnaring hips and the latter an emotive engagement. By its finale, its Depeche Mode-esque catchiness is in full swing yet without defusing its darkened breath.

The album’s title track follows and immediately had the body bouncing with its eager bold rhythms and the scything strikes of guitar behind again the rich invitation of vocals. The song is pure esurient contagion getting under the skin in no time and using body and spirit like a puppet as electronic and indie rock textures collude and roar in defiance. A definite favourite song contender it is quickly matched by the darkly lit virulence of Red Alert. There is a Muse like tint to the song, its evocative almost dissonant thoughts and breath united with instinctive rock ‘n’ roll catchiness which itself has something of She Wants Revenge to it.

Through the crepuscular but inflamed serenade of Blackstar and the light of magnetism that is Cold War, there was no loosening of the album’s hold on ear and pleasure. The second of the two features the guest vocals of Groningen-based singer/songwriter FENN and her duet with van der Velde is worth the admission fee alone while their successor, Drawing the Line, brings an electro rock incitement which again had body and imagination doing its contagious bidding. It is another which makes a firm claim for favourite album moment, the track sheer temptation from first to last second.

 #Dancelikenooneiswatching has an electro punk sneer to its synth pop calling, the track predominately a slice of rock dexterity smouldering with a host of other spices and quite addictive while the riveting Yesterday’s Gloom is a tenebrific croon with tempestuousness in its heart and intensity. Both tracks epitomise the diversity of sound within Damage Control but equally the unity of the Model Depose breath and craft to ear catching enterprise.

The album concludes with the pair of 03:00Am and bonus track Bombs Are Falling, the first an atmospherically evocative seduction within a sunless yet beguiling landscape and the second a gripping post-traumatic stress themed expression of power, intensity and magnetic craft.

Together they provide a potent end to a striking release, one which with its influences fits in with the eighties scene many of those inspirations come from but is firmly as fresh and adventurous as anything within the electronic /indie rock landscape Damage Control now lights up.

Damage Control is out now through Trisol Music Group across most stores.

http://www.modeldepose.com   https://www.facebook.com/modeldepose   https://www.instagram.com/modeldepose  https://www.darkmerch.com

Pete RingMaster 22/10/2019

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Impulsive Compulsions – SAMPLER 4

Another compelling issue of the In The Club Magazine from Perfect Pop Co-Op and another treat in word and sound had us basking in some of the very best independent goodness. The autumn 2019 edition of the online magazine from the label, issue 41 to be exact, comes with the fourth edition of their free sampler Impulsive Compulsions featuring artists and sounds from within the embrace of the Perfect Pop Co-Op family. It is fair to say that its three predecessors left us and an increasingly great many basking in a rich array of sounds and flavours but No 4 might be the most eclectic and irresistible mix yet meaning to ignore it would be an act of great stupidity.

Formed in 2011 by members of The Tuesday Club; Dave Worm, The Beautiful Wolf and Andreas Vanderbraindrain for the sole purpose of releasing their own music, Perfect Pop Co-Op has grown and stretched its reach to, as mentioned earlier, bring a great many other artists into the family; they regularly featured on The Andreas and The Wolf Radio Show, the in house monthly podcast, and teasing the imagination within the Impulsive Compulsions samplers.

The latest begins with Andreas and the Wolf and their track All I want is you. Its relatively calm entrance belies its pop punk instincts yet it is the melodic enterprise and drama from guitar and keys which enlists the imagination most firmly. The track is a ridiculously catchy affair, an aural romancing of ears and for us the most captivating offering from the band yet as the Sampler gets off to a potent start which continues with the mystic rock magnetism of Nashville hailing duo Hello Dearies. Like a shadow bound nursery rhyme All The Pretty Boys and Girls simply beguiled, its Wicker Man-esque spiced chant a tenebrific celebration and just delicious upon our musical palate.

Nine Day Decline is a newcomer to these ears but swiftly through their contribution to the sampler had us rushing to their social media profiles to learn more. With the likes of Altered States, Dead Heaven, Complicity, Christian Death, Counting the Mad, F.O.C., Section 3 and more in their histories, the British trio cast a goth clad post punk tempest as atmospheric as it is emotive. Decisions is a haunting slice of sonic dissonance, its raw melodic drone and impassioned breath akin to a mix of Play Dead, Sisters Of Mercy, and London After Midnight but openly unique to the London based outfit.

Inadequacy (day 197) is the track from sampler regular Reverse Family, an electro spattered piece of DIY enticement from the solo project of Dermot Illogical and a piece of soul searching reflection with its own sneaky swing while Dislocated Flowers immediately after wraps its psychedelic seduction around ears and imagination with Orange Roses and Yellow Tulips. Both tracks quickly and easily got under the skin being rapidly joined by The Scratch through their punk nurtured power pop rocker No two castles are the same. Taken from their excellent last album, Great Adventure, the song infested and resonated beyond its stay; always a sign of something rather tasty.

Equally flavoursome and a spark to greed is 50ft Woman and Psychic Hygiene. From its initial sonic squeal a devious swing erupts, the just as guileful tones of Minki riding its infectious pop punk ‘n’ roll sway. The track is another which leaves on-going tendrils of flirtation igniting continual companionship before She Made Me Do It ensured they get their chunk of the passions through their track, Fun and Games. The union of Shaheena Dax (Rachel Stamp) and Will Crewdson (Rachel Stamp, Adam Ant, Scant Regard) is one of our favourite propositions to erupt from speakers and their latest song is pure alt-pop manna, a virulent contagion defeating any ill wished cure.

One of the biggest traits of these samplers is that we have yet to come across anything which merely satisfied, no fillers ever on offer and the fourth is no different as it continues with GLUE from The Dodo, a keenly catchy post punk/punk rock stroll with a definite Swell Maps tinge and heart to it, and straight after Night of the Wild Mind courtesy of Suicide Tapes. A quartet from Ware in the UK, the band similarly has post punk instincts to a goth rock heart and upon a contagion of rhythms weave a magnet of a track which had us hungry for more. Originally formed in 1983, the band reformed a short while back and are raising a stir, no surprise with tracks like this Flesh For Lulu scented incitement.

The Tuesday Club and Venus Overload bring this particular treat to a close. The first gives us a live slice of fan favourite Lady Gargar, a track revelling in all the mischief, imagination, and uniqueness which fuels the band and its rare fusion of punk, indie and the creative devilment which shapes the best rock ‘n’ roll. The latter of the two provides Afghanistan Bananastand, a ravening dance of garage and psych rock intimation which had hips and feet as keenly engaged as ears and imagination.

That is Impulsive Compulsions 4, a release which had us basking in great sounds, fresh adventures, and new explorations of artists which like those before them deserve proper attention. The fun involved was just icing on the cake.

Check out the latest and past editions of In The Club Magazine @ https://perfectpopco-op.co.uk/magazine/  and further releases from within Perfect Pop Co-Op @ https://theperfectpopco-op.bandcamp.com/

Pete RingMaster 31/10/2019

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

King Salami & The Cumberland 3 – Kiss My Ring

There are few guarantees in life but having a raucously good time with King Salami & The Cumberland 3 is a given so it is no surprise that their new album had us bouncing around like a teenager in heat. Kiss My Ring offers thirteen slices of rhythm ‘n’ blues drenched garage rock to simplify its rich flavouring, a sound as ever inimitably unique and mischievous to the London based quartet infesting limbs and spirit with rock ‘n’ roll fever.

The successor to their acclaimed album Goin’ Back To Wurstville, though it is fair to say that to date every single and album has enticed keen support and praise, Kiss My Ring is a collection of originals and covers which have only one intent, to get the listener as animated and aroused as they are. In some ways there is little new to the album in the fact you know what you are going to get in flavour and character yet such their sound’s instinctive individuality and ever eager dexterity plus the release’s richer weaves of sound it is an encounter sharing refreshing endeavour and fresh rascality.

It takes mere seconds for the album to get into feet and appetite, its title track leaping from T. Bone Sanchez’s initial guitar chords with instant relish and energy. Eric Baconstrip’s beats eagerly drive the bursting incitement of sound, flames of sax joining his enticement as the bass of Kamikaze UT Vincent resonates with every pulled string. A full-blooded carousing of ears and spirit, King Salami centre of the band’s joint vocal hollering, the track had no difficulty pulling bodies to their feet and pushing inhibitions to the side.

Don’t Make Me Mad steps forward next, its dextrous shuffle again swiftly into limbs and feet with King Salami’s distinctly frisky tones leading the devilry. Hooks and rhythms provide encouragement throughout, each flirtatious in their enterprise with Vincent’s bass a throaty pleasure before similarly roaming The Pulpo Dance with a just as compelling swing. The song holds its energy in check compared to its predecessor but cannot hide its organic spirit and lively rock ‘n’ roll bred instincts.

A surf meets rockabilly breath escapes next up Who Do They Watch?, the immediately magnetic flavouring immersing in the song’s garage rock breeding. Everything about the track from esurient rhythm to heartily enthused voice got under the skin and had the body leaping like a puppeteer, a trait which is no newcomer when coming face to face with a King Salami & The Cumberland 3 offering it is fair to say as quickly proven by the cosmic exploits of Space Spy. With a touch of French outfit The Scaners to its predominately instrumental intrigue bound, hook wired saunter, the track too tunnelled into the nervous system to insist body and imagination do it’s biding.

Through the jangle equipped rocker, The Double Switch, and Oofty Goofty (Wild Man Of Borneo) with its anthemic call and agile rhythmic flexing, there was no escaping the band’s tenacious antics, they as ever escalated by the rhythmic and melodically hooked enterprise and vocal frolic which spring their escapades. Though we suggested at the beginning that in some ways the album was not a bundle of surprises it certainly holds an eclectic adventure of sound and flavouring which both tracks alone highlight as equally does the fifties rock ‘n’ roll hued instrumental Stormy straight after them.

Discumboober in turn turned up the bounce in album and listener, the spring in its step enough to get bums off the seat with sax and guitar philandering temptation further hooking ears and appetite while Bayou Fever turned up the heat another notch with its Cajun breath and nagging urgency. Open yet sneaky hooks and boisterous rhythms again unite in contagious enterprise and cunning for two delicious minutes plus of unapologetic high spirits.

Across the fervid garage rock shenanigans of Cut A Rug and the inflamed punk funk of (She Was An) Earthquake, a breathless body and delirious ardour was effortlessly induced with The Jellybutt Of Timbuktu only increasing both with its hip swinging, mischief casting musical manoeuvres. From start to finish Kiss My Ring is perpetual incitement on the passions but maybe no more hungrily than over this trio of unbridled goodness.

The album ends with Chaputa (part 2), a track which pretty much encapsulates everything about King Salami & The Cumberland 3 and a sound which is so rousing, refreshing, and irresistible. It brings to an end the best and most addictive outing with the band yet with plenty to suggest they are teasing even greater adventures and fun ahead.

Kiss My Ring is out now via Damaged Goods Records; also available @ https://folcrecords.bandcamp.com/album/folc115-king-salami-and-the-cumberland-three-kiss-my-ring-edici-n-espa-ola

https://www.facebook.com/KingSalamiandtheCumberland3/

Pete RingMaster 04/11/2019

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright