Coilguns – Watchwinders

Pic laure gilardhucci

Always seeking proposals that challenge and ignite the senses whilst forging new invasive temptation, Swiss quartet, Coilguns, has always been a rewarding refuge and evolving adventure come trespass of noise and imagination. Unpredictability and creative intensity has as much shaped and fuelled their tracks, EPs and albums as physical intimation and intimidation and new album, Watchwinders is no exception; in fact it is the band’s most compelling, ravenous, and rousing slab of incitement yet.

With both debut album Commuters and its successor of last year, Millennials, we have come away wondering and in regard to the latter maybe doubting whether Coilguns could emulate let alone eclipse their feral majesty. We will not be allow that fruitless thought to arise with Watchwinders despite its magnificence but simply bask in its irresistible provocation and intrusive craft.

Released as all the band’s encounters via Hummus Records, the label founded by guitarist Jona Nido, Watchwinders was written and recorded during one intense month-long session, and as always with the band recorded live, and there is no escaping the instinctiveness of its breath and assault. There are moments when it is as if the band itself does not know what is coming next yet each song is a skilfully woven tapestry of sound, texture, and dissonance as fluid and earnest as it is unscrupulous verging on psychotic.

The album immediately lured unbridled attention with opener Shortcuts. For a minute and a half, Luc Hess manipulates with his galvanic senses poking beats, the vociferously presented tones of vocalist Louis Jucker just as potent in enslaving ears and appetite. In swift time the swipe of noise punk proved enslaving and only enforced its hold and drama before Subculture encryptors forced its thick and also quickly gripping body through speakers. As rhythms fall over themselves to invade, the guitars of Nido and Jucker create a sonic scourge; one only further bracing once embracing the great raw pestering of the latter’s vocals. From the abrasive flurry a just as devious calm emerges, rhythms and sonic threads a virulent nagging matched in prowess and magnetism by the vocals with the synth of Donatien Théivent carrying the same composed yet volatile enterprise, as the track revolves in rapacious noise and intent.

Big writer’s block erupts with its own contagious spite and captivation next, rhythms again at the core of its bold and vigorous creative coercion where punk and hardcore essences entangle in noise and sonic voracity. A breath taking cauldron of untamed and tense captivation it is followed by the album’s title track which eagerly uncages an esurient flood of urgency and compulsive tempestuousness in sound and emotion. The track is superb, managing to eclipse its mighty predecessors even by the brief time it takes its cyclone to slip into a bewitching oasis of magnetic voice and synth. Even so a current of rhythmic badgering escapes the agility of Hess, niggling and inviting as Jucker’s throat provides a similarly rich coaxing.

The prowling doomy presence of The Growing block view follows, the track skirting and courting the senses with its dark, heavy and evocative bait before Manicheans shares it’s twisting and turning, threat carrying drama. It is another drenched in discord bred thought and sound, a track fraught and agitated physically and emotionally with both songs effortlessly adding to the persuasive weight of the release.

Prioress is next up, an encounter haunting and staining the senses with its respective calm intimacy and drama bred turbulence. Locked away in its gripping, slightly suffocating dark defiled rapture, ears and appetite again found themselves defenceless to the band’s invention with eventual escape from the song’s creative confinement only the doorway into insatiable carnal tenacity courtesy of The Morning shower. A rapacious noise punk trespass as psychically catchy as it is emotionally disharmonious it joined its companions in easily luring us to stomp to its tune.

The unpolished, blemish embracing reflection of A Mirror bias beguiled with its singular but potent tenebrous breath with Urban reserves straight after unleashing a hardcore winded cyclone animated tempest to equally enthral and incite. With the keys of Théivent alone a portrait of fateful and predictive suggestion within the track’s tumultuous and unstable expulsion, the second of the two is the kind of infernal uproar that makes Coilguns and indeed Watchwinders so unique and addictive.

The album closes out with firstly the devouring hounding of Broken records and lastly the hypnotic seduction of Periscope. The first simply engulfs and consumes all in its path without suffocating its organic infectiousness while its successor arises upon a sonic line to draw and open up every predatory shadow and caliginous depth of false utopia and together they provide a fearsomely glorious conclusion to an outstandingly impressive release.

Once more Coilguns has left us open mouthed and lustfully devouring an album which leaves the world a better if more soiled place.

Watchwinders is out now via Hummus Records on CD and vinyl; available as a name your price download @ https://coilguns.bandcamp.com/

Full Coilguns tour dates w/ Yautja

08.11 – Paris (F) @ Espace b

09.11 – Sheffield (UK) @ Record Junkee

10.11 – Leeds (UK) @ Temple of Boom

11.11 – London (UK) @ The Macbeth Of Hoxton

12.11 – Glasgow (UK) @ Broadcast

13.11 – Manchester (UK) @ Satan’s Hollow

14.11 – Northampton (UK) @ TBA

15.11 – Utrecht (NL) @ TBA

17.11 – Gdansk (PL) @ Ziemia

18.11 – Warsaw (PL) @ Poglos

19.11 – Krakow (PL) @ Warsztat

20.11 – Wroclaw (PL) @ DK Luksus

21.11 – Berlin (D) @ Zukunft am Ostkreuz

22.11 – Stuttgart (D) @ Ju-Ha West

23.11 – Fribourg (CH) @ Hummus Fest / Fri-Son

24.11 – Lyon (F) @ La Marquise

26.11 – Clermont-Ferrand (F) @ Raymond Bar

27.11 – Angers (F) @ Jokers Pub

28.11 – Oss (NL) @ Lollipop

29.11 – Fontaine l’Evêque (B) @ MCP Apache

30.11 – Liège (B) @ La Zone

https://www.facebook.com/coilguns    https://twitter.com/COILGUNS

Pete RingMaster 04/11/2019

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Crepuscular calm: the Dark Serenity Interview

Introducing hard rock trio Dark Serenity

Hello and thanks for taking time out to talk with us.

Can you first introduce the band and give us some background to how it all started?

We are Dark Serenity, composed of members Zach Barnes (bass), Kate Emrich (guitar and vocals), and Mike Bergamo (drums). We started writing music in Kate’s basement back in high school, which is where we met each other. We were brought together by a similar level of ambition in addition to the obvious shared interest in being in a band and creating music.

Had you been in other bands before?

We haven’t been involved in other bands before, but we went through a few line-up changes until we discovered which members would stick. I’m sure it led to a change in style and direction, because we are a group that values the insight of each individual member.

What inspired the band name?

The band name means that there is light in the dark, and more specifically that the motivation for life and light lies within the reality that death and darkness are inevitable.

Was there any specific idea behind the forming of the band and also in what you wanted it and your sound to offer?

We didn’t approach the formation of the band with the intention of sounding a certain way. We wanted to create a sound that sounded like us, one where each one of us used our respective influences to make our own sound.

And that instinct still primarily drives the band now it is more experienced or has new aspects evolved over time?

I would say the same things still drive us. Those things being the intent to succeed in our field and inspire others to do the same, as well as to live our own lives the way we want to.

Since your early days, how would you say your sound has evolved?

I would say our sound has matured, basically, as we have as musicians. We write in different song structures and utilize our instrument’s capabilities more fully. We can write parts that complement the other instrumentals more effectively, and more clearly communicate our messages.

Has it been more of an organic movement of sound or more the band deliberately wanting to try new things?

It’s both. When you deliberately try new things you tend to find a more of an organic movement and vice versa.

Presumably across the band there is a wide range of inspirations; are there any in particular which have impacted not only on the band’s music but your personal approach and ideas to creating and playing music?

We are inspired by the creations of many of the greats, such as Led Zeppelin, Deep Purple, Black Sabbath, the Jimi Hendrix Experience and the Who. That being said we’ve never deliberately practiced their songwriting approaches.

Is there a particular process to the band’s songwriting?

Yes, typically we write by picking a key and a time signature, then doing an improv session within those specifications. The body of the song usually comes first, with the bass and drums; then the guitar, and then the vocals are written last.

Where do you, more often than not, draw the inspirations to the lyrical side of your songs?

More often than not our lyrics cover subjects that include and challenge societal norms. We have songs about deviating from said norms.

Could you give us some background to your latest release?

Our latest release is our debut album that we released last year. It’s called ‘Memento Mori’ and is eight tracks. It was a live tracked album, which we did on purpose to emulate the experience of a live performance.

Give us some insight to the themes and premise behind it and its songs

The themes we mentioned discussing our commonly used lyrical themes are the themes we applied to the tracks on this album.

Are you a band which goes into the studio with songs pretty much in their final state or prefer to develop them as you record?

We go into the studio with our songs completed. We don’t like bringing unfinished material because there’s no guarantee you will come out with something you’re happy with. When a song is complete there’s not really a question as to whether or not it will turn out like you had hoped.

Tell us about the live side to the band, obviously a favourite aspect of being in the band?

Live we deliver an animated and authentic performance. We’ve been told that our passion for what we do is obvious and felt throughout the room. We want to deliver the best version of ourselves.

It is not easy for any new band to make an impact regionally let alone nationally and further afield. How have you found it?

We have found it difficult yet worthwhile. We are lucky to have been brought up as musicians in the metro Detroit area where there are a lot of music fans and a decent number of live venues. It’s arguably harder to get your foot in the door when there are several other groups going for the same goals as you. However, in addition to that difficulty, you also find the most support from the other musicians. You have to work hard, break a sweat, then gain respect…But the respect that you gain is worth it.

How has the internet and social media impacted on the band to date? Do you see it as something positive within a realm flooded with artists and a short attention society or more of a necessary trial?

Bands nowadays need to utilize social media to their advantage, just like any other form of entrepreneur. You’re selling yourself as the product, basically, and in today’s market, you need to unapologetically market yourself with the tools everybody else is using to have a shot at mainstream success. So yeah, not being able to properly use social media can hurt your career, but most likely, will stunt your growth overall. There are obviously always exceptions to a rule, though.

Once again a big thanks for sharing time with us; anything you would like to add or reveal for the readers?

Thank you for having us! We just want to add that you can find our music on every streaming platform, and that you can find us on Facebook or Instagram. Please show us your support!

https://www.darkserenityofficial.com   https://www.facebook.com/pg/darkserenityband   https://www.instagram.com/darkserenityband  https://twitter.com/Dark__Serenity

Pete RingMaster 06/11/019

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Stirring the senses: Vital Noise Interview

Meet Vital Noise

Hello and thanks for taking time out to talk with us.

Thanks so much for having us!

Can you first introduce the band and give us some background to Vital Noise?

Our band consists of Andrew Wilmot, lead vocals/ guitar; Preston Wilmot, bass; and Reid Campbell, drums. Andrew and Preston are brothers and have been playing together since a very young age.  We met Reid in 2018, and have been playing with him ever since.

Is Vital Noise the first project it for you all and if not has previous ventures had a direct effect on the band?

We have all been involved in several different bands/ musical projects throughout the years.  Being in those bands has definitely inspired a change in direction as none of us had been in projects in the genre that we play (hard rock/ metal), and definitely made us want to build a band around that.

What inspired the band name?

To be completely honest, we came up with it when we were very young and thought it sounded cool, and it has just sort of stuck with us since.

Was there any specific idea behind the forming of the band and also in what you wanted it and your sound to offer?

All of us really were in to heavier music at the time and wanted to make a band that played that kind of music, so that drove us to come together and actually make it happen.

Do the same things still drive the band when it was fresh-faced or have they evolved over time?

Things have definitely evolved over time; we have all gotten much older and matured a lot since we first formed the band which has played a big part in that.

Since your early days, how would you say your sound has particularly evolved?

Definitely… At first we just wanted to play straight up metal, but now we are much more into writing music that tends to be more radio friendly, but still heavy of course.

And that has been more of an organic change or deliberate?

It is been more organic.  It has just naturally seemed to happen as all of us have matured.

Presumably across the band there is a wide range of inspirations; are there any in particular which have impacted not only on the band’s music but your personal approach and ideas to creating and playing music?

Bring Me The Horizon has probably had the biggest impact on the band and our writing style, as we have drawn tremendous inspiration from them.

Is there a process to the songwriting which generally guides the writing of songs?

Every song is a little bit different, but generally speaking, one of us will come in with a riff or some sort of musical idea, and then will kinda jam around it until a full song starts to form. Then our singer, Andrew will put lyrics over it.

Where do you, more often than not, draw the inspirations to the lyrical side of the band’s songs?

We draw inspiration from what we happen to be going through in everyday life.  Whether we be happy about something, sad about something, going through relationship issues, etc., we find a way to write about it.

Give us some background to your latest release.

We most recently released two singles entitled “The Ones” and “Famous”, they were both written during the summer of 2017 and we consider them to be some of our best work to date.

Please give us some insight to the themes behind them.

“The Ones” is about people fighting against societal norms and embracing individuality, it was meant to go out to people struggling with those issues and meant to show that it’s ok to be different, and it’s ok to be an individual.  “Famous” on the other hand is about people letting materialistic things and unimportant things in life take precedence over things that are actually important like friends and family. This happens way too often in today’s society, so we decided to write a song about it.

Are you a band which goes into the studio with songs pretty much in their final state or prefer to develop them as you record?

We tend to get into the studio with songs in their final state, even though we do very often make little tweaks here and there.

We try to make our show as energetic as possible.  We try our best to get the crowd as into it as we possibly can, as we feed off of the energy that they give us.

It is not easy for any new band to make an impact regionally let alone nationally and further afield. How have you found it your neck of the woods?

We are from Los Angeles.  Because of this, the scene is very overpopulated, so it is definitely hard to get a ton of recognition, but nonetheless we are trying our best.

How have you found the impact of the internet and social media on the band to date? Flooded with bands and artists, do you see it as something primarily positive or more of a negative on the band’s progress so far?

The internet and social media has definitely helped us in getting gigs and reaching an audience we otherwise wouldn’t have.  However, it is definitely hard to get to that next level, but we know we will get there eventually!

Once again a big thanks for sharing time with us; anything you would like to add for the readers?

Thanks so much for having us.  Be sure to check out our website and social media (links below) and to listen to our music on Spotify and all other digital streaming platforms!

Check Vital Noise out further @…

https://www.vitalnoise.com   https://www.facebook.com/VitalNoise/   https://www.instagram.com/vitalnoise/   https://twitter.com/vitalnoiseband

Pete RingMaster 06/11/019

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright