Dead Hippies – Resister

®Mathieu_EZAN

Though music constantly sparks the passions whether through new proposals or simply going back to past adventures of pure joy there are some moments which ignite and excite the spirit and imagination like few others. For us one is the new album from Dead Hippies, a collection of tracks which voraciously burrowed under the skin as they inflamed an instinctive hunger for sound.

Dead Hippies is the creative project of Arnaud Fournier, the lead guitarist in The Hint and La Phaze. 2013 saw debut album, Kill Me Sweety, unveiled to a strong critical welcome. Whereas, it had a mainly instrumental landscape emerging from a fusion of rock and electronic enterprise its successor is a thickly bolder affair as noise, post rock, electro and dance-floor sounds collude in a rousing emprise of aural incitement. As with the first release, there is much more to each album’s body than the descriptions given, Resister a tempest of flavour and textures bound in a thrilling contagion soaked trespass further aroused by the diverse tones of Dylan Bendall (Lab°, Schoolbusdriver).

Live, Dead Hippies is unleashed through a quintet of guitars and it is that sonic abundance which fuels the intensity and exploits of Resister. The album opens with Drip Drip Drip, a track which admittedly took longer than the rest to get us hooked once exposed to all yet from its first melodic poking the song proved an itch which had to be scratched and often. Its rhythmic shuffle soon aligned to that initial electronic lure, vocals close behind again picking their shots before it all ignites in sonic dissonance as feral as it is caustic. Bendall switches between hip hop and noise punk dexterity within the repeating cycles of constantly fresh imagination, Fournier’s sounds equally esurient in their challenge and temptation as they evolve through a kaleidoscope of climates.

Get off the Boat follows, the track teasing ears with its opening electronic coaxing around a thick rhythmic pulsing. Melodic wires soon entangle those early seeds, Bendall’s tones moving from composed confrontation to a fiery insurgency as the surrounding enterprise follows suit. Like a mix of Girls In Synthesis and As A New Revolt, the track moves in a jarred shuffle throughout, its eruptions further manipulation of the senses and passions.

Featuring American rapper Mr J. Medeiros (The Procussions, Alltta, The Knives), the album’s title track is next up. It steps from an industrial lined electronic welcome into a prowling slice of Senser-esque rap rock where every second brings stringent observation amidst a consuming galvanic stride of sound. Though unleashed with a certain hand of control it is a ravenous encounter, electronic and punk ‘n’ roll dexterity amassing on a dance-floor bred rapacity.

That Senser like breath continues into the addictively rousing Feel so Freaky, a track which had the body feverishly bouncing like a puppeteer as its mania infested every note and syllable through to each magnetic twist and turn. Its dervish styled antics proved pure virulence from the first breath, a post punk hue only adding to its devilish magnificence before Laugh in Sadness flowered with crystalline elegance in ears. Guitars and keys blossom their intimation hand in hand, tears shared in its imposing shadows as the instrumental spreads and broadens its haunting tension and invasive drama. Compelling from first lure to last, the track eventually drifts back into the darkness for The Little Ones to unveil its corrosive radiance. A PiL tinted toning equips voice and sound as the song strides boldly and menacingly through ears, unrelenting rhythms on invasive manoeuvres as again Dead Hippies burrow deep into the psyche.

Across the swarthy climate of Anna Logue the Alien and the Morricone hued landscape of Tearing Us Apart with a Poisoned Dart addiction to Register only escalated. Once more ravenous electro-dubstep beats pummel as they incite across both tracks, the first of the two entangling that core bait with a web of guitar and electronic intimation as unscrupulous as it is dynamically persuasive, the vocals of Bendall equally as stirring. Its successor takes its time to build to that same rhythmic infestation, but once triggered brings a voracity of sonic turbulence and emotion before expanding both aspects in greater drama and tension.

The album finishes off with firstly the sonically rich ever evolving exploits of Flanger, a dance-floor bred instrumental at times as fearsome as it is incendiary to feet and body grooves and lastly the dystopian realm of Dramatic Control, a piece of music again which invades and provokes as potently as it draws the imagination into aligning its own darkest to that of the track.

Together they provide a compelling end to an album which simply consumed ears and attention not forgetting the passions from the first second and continues to do so which increasing success. There have been numerous striking releases across the year to date but Fournier with Register simply leaves so many of those in the shade.

Register is out now via Atypeek Music / Bruillance.

https://www.facebook.com/deadhippiesdead

Pete RingMaster 11/10/2019

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Fathom Farewell – Consume the Earth

Fathom Farewell is a band with a growing wind of praise behind them, one sure to be more vociferous with the release of new EP, Consume the Earth. The Boston quartet have emerged from within the melodic metalcore scene but as the six tracks within their latest offering shows, their sound is a far more adventurous and varied blend of metal and melodic rock enterprise.

Since emerging in 2014, Fathom Farewell has forged a potent reputation and fan base with their Decomposition EP in 2017 especially luring strong praise and attention. Live the band has equally impressed as they have shared stages with the likes of Issues, The Devil Wears Prada, Volumes, I Prevail, Currents and many more, supported Sevendust on their 20th anniversary tour, playing upon the Vans Warped Tour four times as well as making numerous appearances at other prestigious festivals. In the midst of their Raid Area 51 US Tour, the band is hungrily nudging far broader attention with Consume the Earth, a hinting which is hard to see not finding some real recognition such its impressive character of sound and craft.

EP opener, Six Feet Beneath, immediately drew keen ears with its initial rally of rhythms and stabbing riffs, melodic enticement swiftly joining that initial potent lure as the song quickly slips into its magnetic stride. Individual dexterity is just as openly and rapidly in evidence, the guitar of Gage Killion and bass of Steve Almona unveiling respectively sharply incisive and contagiously brooding imagination around the equally compelling rhythms of drummer Casey Albiero. Just as striking come the vocals of Alex Cohen, his variety and agility another major captivation to song and sound as the EP gets off to a stirring start.

Its title track follows and is soon showing the same strength of invention and contagious enterprise, its breath and flavouring arguably even more rapacious than within its predecessor as the song surges boisterously through ears. Again metal and rock textures align to be woven into a song thick in melodic prowess and unpredictable ideation whilst embracing more familiar hues to equally enjoyable success. A momentary calm only brings further and richer drama to the track, the same kind of emotively aflame quiet lining Cohen’s vocals ably backed by the harmonic tones of Almona.

As eagerly devoured as they were, Wide Awake took a far bigger swipe at our favourite track choice, its opening voracious tempting as feral as it is melodically seductive and urgently catchy. It is an infectious adroitness which continues to infest the magnetic landscape of the fiery encounter before Mutiny adds its claim to that personal choice honour and ultimately seizes it. A twirling thread of guitar introduces the immediately tempestuous climate and body of the song, its ferocious metalcore nurtured assault inspiring a similarly fierce and untamed eruption in the vocals. There is an instant infectiousness to the rabidity of the song, rhythms again as barbarous as they are a virulent incitement while Killion’s guitar spins another enticing web before melody and harmony momentarily flood the creative and emotive antipathy; subsequently breaking the turbulence again with similar magnetism in a storm of nothing but.

A far calmer but no less heated Cold Beginnings is next, its evocative and melodically lit body exposed to sonic flames and intense drama throughout before the release is concluded by Soul Within The Shadow. The final track is another with drama soaking every note and syllable, its tapestry of sound and imagination ablaze with melodic intensity and technical insurgency. Equally it has an underlying volatility which erupts with ferocious, masterful, and accomplished adventure.

It is a rousing end to a release which only impressed from start to finish with certain and numerous moments that just lit our fires. Welcome world to Fathom Farewell.

Consume the Earth is out now; available through http://www.fathomfarewell.com/store

http://www.fathomfarewell.com/   https://www.facebook.com/fathomfarewell   https://twitter.com/fathomfarewell

Pete RingMaster 27/09/2019

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Acid Reign – The Age of Entitlement

Formed in 1985, British thrashers Acid Reign went on to shares stages and tour with the likes of Nuclear Assault, Dark Angel, Exodus, Flotsam & Jetsam, Death Angel, and Candlemass as well as release mini album Moshkinstein in 1988 and subsequently full-length The Fear and Obnoxious. A final show at the London Marquee saw the band come to an end; that was until 24 years later when Acid Reign returned with a rebooted line-up. Now they have a new album ready to ignite the UK thrash scene, an incendiary device leaving most other offerings this year exposed to its rousing wake.

Like a great many we never had the pleasure of experiencing the band first time around but look set to devour its exploits this time around if The Age of Entitlement is just the beginning of things to come. Led by original vocalist Howard H Smith, Acid Reign thrust a fresh voracious breath upon the metal landscape through their new encounter. Instinctively, thrash metal and its protagonists share a core flavouring as seed to their individual exploits and Acid Reign are no different but they have embroiled it in a host of other rapacious flavours and imagination bred adventures which makes it easy to be greedy for more.

With a line-up completed by bassist Pete Dee, guitarists Paul Chanter and Cooky, and drummer Marc Jackson, Acid Reign quickly gripped attention with the drama of album opener T.A.O.E., a track pushing the senses with its war tempered wall of riffs bound in barbed acidic guitar wiring. With drums banging their own confrontational trespass and melodic flames further igniting its pure temptation, the inspiring instrumental leads to the ravenous jaws of The New Low. Immediately, the second track surges through ears, rhythms a punishing incitement as guitars and bass uncage their own ferocious catchiness. Wired hooks vein the tempest as Smith’s equally manipulative tones further inspire participation in a feral roar which had us quickly and fully locked in.

NewAgeNarcissist equally made brief work of recruiting neck muscles and fiercely flung limbs, Smith’s fierce tones and lyrics riding the insistence with similar dexterity. The swarm of grooves across the song devoured as they sparked the appetite, rhythms just as uncompromisingly fertile before the track unleashes a chorus only the deaf could ignore. Every moment within the ravening song though is pure virulence and creative prowess, qualities just as rampant within next up My Peace Of Hell, a track galloping through ears with nostrils flared and breath aflame. A punk ferocity adds to the theatre of persuasion as too the web of enterprise cast by the ever agile guitars with another galvanic chorus a viral topping to it all.

As mentioned there is plenty that is familiar to the thrash instincts of the band and its songs yet each merges them into a slab of individual confrontation and endeavour as shown yet again by both Blood Makes Noise and Sense Of Independence. The first springs a persistently infectious trespass of groove metal infused, punk dusted, rock ‘n’ roll; essences of bands like Suicidal Tendencies and Infectious Grooves adding to the song’s gloriously insatiable holler while its successor growls with a barbarous grin as more extreme textures infest thrash rapacity. Even so melodic intimation and felicity bare the evocative heart of the song within one tempestuous climate of sound.

The hungrily swung antagonism and contagious face-off of Hardship and the demonic consumption of Within The Woods as ravenous as the Evil Dead themselves simply escalated the grip and impressive presence of the album, the latter eight minutes plus of creative adventure and pleasure nagging sonic acumen while Ripped Apart with carnal intent ravaged and devoured senses defenceless to its almost arrogant catchiness.

The album departs with United Hates, a predacious thrash scourge erupting from a scene of melodic beauty to remorselessly consume and ignite the senses. A deviously crafted yet primal assault of viral thrash brutality, it brings The Age of Entitlement to a close as exhilarating as its beginnings and indeed whole body.

It feels like British thrash is sowing the seeds to another heyday with the strength of releases this year alone, something surely even more certain if others can aspire to the bullish magnificence of Acid Reign and The Age of Entitlement.

The Age of Entitlement is out now via Dissonance Productions; available @ https://acidreign1.bandcamp.com/

http://acidreign.co.uk/   https://facebook.com/acid.reign.thrash   https://twitter.com/AcidReignUKAC   https://instagram.com/acidreignukac/

Pete RingMaster 11/10/2019

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright