Medicine – Scarred For Life

photo by Beatrix Zilinskas

We have always had the appetite for covers as B-sides, part of EPs, or as bonus tracks on albums but never quite as keen on complete albums just providing versions of other’s songs and don’t get us started on the merit of cover bands finding great success on the back of others songwriting talent but there is always an exception and the new album from LA based Medicine is one such captivation.

The brainchild of guitarist/multi-instrumentalist/producer Brad Laner, Medicine was one of the most potent bands to shape the emerging shoegaze/noise pop sound and scene in the nineties. After a hiatus of several years they have returned with Scarred For Life, as mentioned a collection of covers which take on new character with the touch of the band. Each song though does not feel like Medicine has deliberately dissected and rearranged them instead they feel like they have simply evolved through an organic and instinctive embrace of the band’s distinctive imagination. It brings potent diversity and rich fascination to the release alongside pleasure which is only escalated with the return of original vocalist Annette Zilinskas (also originally of The Bangles and later Blood On The Saddle, Weatherbell, and 3 Hole Punch).

With a line-up completed by guitarist Matt Devine and drummer Jim Goodall, he again one of the original Medicine members, the band opens up Scarred For Life with its title track and their take on the Slapp Happy song. Immediately a thick jangle of guitar descends as rhythms infectiously manipulate. Within the clamour a melodic breath lures with its temptation in full bloom as Zilinskas’ magnetic tones blossom within the muggy treat.

It is a compelling start to the release which Sentimental Lady more than reinforces. The Fleetwood Mac track similarly has a certain clamour which rises around the entrancing melodic invitation which initially preceded it. It is sonic smog as intense as it is ravening but with a composed trespass around the melodic sun which warmly beguiles before Dead Time Bummer Blues hugs and incites the senses with its luxuriant if raw breath and folkish swing. As all songs within the release there is nothing less than captivation on the agenda with the Judee Sill written track amongst the most irresistible.

Neil Young’s Expecting To Fly follows, resonating on the senses before melodic misting envelopes all and its romancing heart shares harmonic smouldering amidst bracing fuzziness. Enthralling from first to last breath but with increasing effect as keys, provided by Solo Goodspeed, weave their noble threads, the track becomes something truly individual to Medicine, the same easily said about both Absolutely Free and Listen To The Band straight after. The Mothers of Invention original is pure infection, its carnival-esque undercurrent bound in a cast of esurient enterprise and theatrical drama as the band develop the tracks original seeds into their own unpredictably creative parade. It is a glorious encounter followed by another which had the imagination bouncing. The more familiar second of the two is engraved on ears by The Monkees and Medicine simply emphasize its more feral aspects though when we say simply there is nothing less than instinctive adventure in every revisited note and syllable.

Through the rich almost suffocating and inescapably infectious pop fuzz of Sally Go Round The Roses, a hit originally for The Jaynetts, and the pure contagion of The Sweetest Girl, band and album only got further under the skin. The second of the two proved a definite favourite here, the Scritti Politti track bred here on an electronic shimmer with dub instincts cradling sheer captivation in the band’s vocals. It is aural romance, melodies and harmonies rapturous caresses within walls of sonic anxiety and scuzz fed anticipation.

The Green Country provides a canvas for the imagination next, it’s electronically bred instrumental wired by just as intimate and suggestive guitar quick food for thought and emotive interpretation while Pickup Song with its sepia lit keys and atmosphere is an evocative embrace of shadows and melancholic magnetism around and inspired by the slowcore droned air of the Codeine original.

Both tracks simply fascinated as the album moved into far darker corners which are further engaged in album closer, Black Satin. The Miles Davies composed track is a jungle of sound and textures, a heated and slightly imposing yet addictively virulent incitement of sound and enterprise on body and emotion.

It is a great end to a release which has increasingly had us absorbed and pleasured. As we hope new material is on the horizon from Medicine, Scarred For Life is a spellbinding return to be getting on with.

Scarred for Life is out now through Drawing Room Records; available @ https://bradlaner.bandcamp.com/album/scarred-for-life-4

https://www.facebook.com/medicinebandsfv/   https://twitter.com/BradLaner   https://bradlaner.bandcamp.com/

Pete RingMaster 31/10/2019

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Enamel Animal – Anymore

The last couple of years have seen UK hailing alternative rock band, Enamel Animal, on a kind of hiatus as members took a break for family and other commitments but now the quartet has returned with a magnet of a song in the shape of Anymore.

Emerging in 2012, the Liverpool based outfit has gone on to earn a potent reputation for their live presence, taking in shows with the likes of Bad Sign, Crazy Town, FOES, Exit_International, The Hyena Kill, and Rival Bones along the way, and earn rich increasing praise for their releases. 2017 debut album Unfaith especially drew eager attention and plaudits with subsequent singles, Damocles and Reviler, matching its success.

Anymore is the first of a new collection of tracks written by the band and its new line-up which sees Jon Lawton who produced Unfaith a full-time member alongside band founders, Philip Collier, Glen Ashworth, and Ryan Mallows. Quickly the new single reveals a new maturity in songwriting and sound, its calm yet volatile breath and touch seduction with a feral lining. As rhythms slowly but keenly stroll through ears guitar wires wind and sonic flames spark, each a flirtation across the song’s rising drama with the band’s emotively scented rock enterprise rich in intrigue and intimation.

Previously it was not easy to pin down the Enamel Animal sound and Anymore if anything ensures it is even more difficult as the band embraces hints of noise and punk rock to their predacious instincts and melodic prowess.

Anymore is a fascinating and richly enjoyable return by the band and easily incites real anticipation for want comes next.

Anymore is out now via Psycho Boy Recordings.

https://www.facebook.com/EnamelAnimal/    https://twitter.com/anenamelanimal

https://enamelanimal.bandcamp.com/album/unfaith

Pete RingMaster 22/10/2019

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Unhappy Fly – Self Titled

UK hailing Unhappy Fly is described as a post punk and no wave supergroup but trust us that description of their sound is like simply calling the sea blue and vegetation green. As their self-titled debut album quickly reveals, every song from the quartet is a tapestry of flavour and temptation as diverse and vast as the landscape of those previously mentioned features of planet earth.

Across its eleven tracks every second of the Unhappy Fly album is a theatre of sound and drama woven from everything around that post punk/new wave intimation to folk, jazz, baroque, indie and rock and still we are missing a plethora of other spices in its creative recipes. The resulting fusion is brought with unapologetic pop instinctiveness as Unhappy Fly share one of the most enthralling and captivating moments of this year indeed of many before it and no doubt to come.

Unhappy Fly is the compelling coming together of vocalist/guitarist/pianist Xentos Fray Bentos and drummer/percussionist Richard Dudanski with musician/electronic instrument builder/vocalist Sarah Washington and saxophonist/flutist John Glyn. Those familiar with the four and especially the first pair will know of the varied experiences and adventures in their extensive musical histories yet it gives no real clue to the uniqueness of the Unhappy Fly album.

There is a pop perfection to every song within the release, each bringing a manipulative bounce and catchiness upon ears and body whilst weaving proposals as rich in styles and textures as a dressmaker’s wardrobe.  Now Alasdair Owns Me opens up the album and swiftly unveils its character of imagination and craft and the virulent temptation which flows through the release. Its gentle entrance on rhythmic coaxing amidst melodic strands is pure delight as too the soft tones of Bentos which as quickly tempt away. The song was already under the skin before it then erupted in pure animated and thickly assorted contagion. Few albums this year have made such a magnetic start as Unhappy Fly’s yet it is just the beginning of the bold adventure to come.

Boneyard follows and as its rhythmic pulse teased ears it too soon buried itself deep especially through its guitar spun hook. Melodic entangling of appetite continued to spread from the catchy heart of the song, keys adding a crystalline glamour as Glyn’s sax teases with relish. Infectiousness soaks every note and syllable, its mellow aside as thick in imagination and temptation as the rousing swing of the tracks persistently encouraging body. Such the majesty of songs it is hard to pick a firm favourite but this has a firm hand on the decision though successor Superfifcial does its best to muddy the waters with its flirtatious teasing of sound and Bentos’ inimitable ever enticing vocals presence alongside Washington’s similarly beguiling tones. Everything about the track is simple yet skilfully conjured and offered for two and a half minutes of pure pop pleasure.

The cosmopolitan tango of Holocene provides a jazz scented enticement which is again nothing less than full seduction, its funky breath and jazz folk hues an infestation of the imagination alone before Feet of Clay embraces the listener in a theatre of musical intrigue and stringed drama. Shadows and whimsical mischief equip the track’s irresistibility, a mandolin and richness of vocal dexterity accentuating its power and beauty.

Latest single, Electric Light is next and immediately had ears greedy and the body bouncing through its exuberant almost voracious catchiness. It is a pop song though unafraid to twist and turn through jazz lined surprises and fresh shades to its instinctive creative ebullience for one of the best three minutes heard this year.

Country bred sighs welcome Angry In The Head, continuing to colour its catchy swagger and emotive plaintiveness while Singing Flame and Hit ‘n’ Miss after it only ignite further pleasure being side by side with the release. The first has a sixties pop croon to its tenacious shuffle, Bentos and Washington providing a seriously magnetic vocal union against the gorgeous rhythmic manipulation of drums and bass, it all within a weave of sound which becomes more varied in flavour and dexterity by the second. It’s equally enslaving successor similarly has that nostalgic breath yet is all fresh and innovative in its diversely bred pop ‘n’ roll stroll.

The final pair of Big Picture with its fifties inflamed, seventies glam tinted rock ‘n’ roll and the moment of undiluted rapture that is Golden ensure the album leaves as memorably and hypnotically as it began. Both are as individual in presence as they are united in fascination and the inimitable prowess of their creators.

The Unhappy Fly album is a wonder of beauteous melancholy and shadow enhanced beaut. It also proved, to use the word again, pure rapture upon these ears and it is hard to feel we will not be alone in finding a greed for its thrilling adventure.

The Unhappy Fly album is out now via Emotional Response Records; available @ https://emotional-response-recs.bandcamp.com/album/unhappy-fly

Pete RingMaster 15/10/2019

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Magnapop – The Circle Is Round

Magnapop records have always been a sizzling sunspot in the pop rock galaxy and with the band’s first release in nearly a decade nothing has changed. The Circle Is Round is an unapologetically charming proposition but one with a punk growl in its lining and instinctive volatility giving it even greater drama in sound and imagination.

Released via the ever magnetic label, HHBTM Records, The Circle Is Round is the 1989 formed Atlanta-based quartet’s sixth album and the successor to 2009’s Chase Park. Majorly fertile in sound, releases, and acclaim in the mid-90s, Magnapop have embraced a lower profile over the past years since ‘reuniting’ in order to play a benefit gig for local record store, Criminal Records. That laid the seeds for the desire to write and record new material now resulting in the captivation that is The Circle Is Round.

It is fair to say that attention and appetite was immediately gripped by the album’s opening breath, the hook carrying lure of Dog on the Door instant persuasion to ears and body. Vocalist Linda Hopper’s tones prove just as swiftly enticing as crisp rhythms match the tempting of the guitar’s punk jangle; Ruthie Morris’ bait effortlessly verging on the addictive. Keys and the latter’s backing tones only added to the eager temptation with the darker grumble of Shannon Mulvaney’s bass and the senses clipping swings of drummer David McNair a matching incitement.

With a slightly calmer but no less infectious bounce Change Your Hair follows and equally had little trouble getting under the skin especially with its Buzzcocks-esque hook and warm melodic smile while A Simple Plan straight after, explores an even mellower gait whilst accentuating its inherent catchiness across a fuzz borne landscape graced with the magnetism of keys. There is a great nagging quality to it with the vocals of Hopper and Morris, as in its predecessor, contagious caresses on ears.

Super Size Me bowls in throwing its creative weight around next, its punk nurtured vitality and pop woven tenacity another moment breeding addiction before Need to Change has hips swaying and pleasure boiling with a contagion something akin to B-52’s meets Weekend meets Throwing Muses. Both tracks simply had the spirit and passions bouncing and alongside the album’s opener shared favourite track moment between them.

The raunchier rock ‘n’ roll of What Can I Do gave further food for thought on that choice, echoing the strength and undiluted temptation on offer across The Circle Is Round. As with most tracks, the coarser growl and punk irritability of rhythms and chords align perfectly, almost seductively with the melodic adventure of voice and Bruce King’s keys not forgetting the weave of melodic temptation also escaping Morris’ guitar enterprise.

Through the enchanting balladry of Rain Rain, a song with another animated gait as manipulative as the song’s emotive croon is bewitching, and the similarly buoyant and reassuring Disabled, band and album piled on more temptation to be captivated by with Rip the Wreck capping indeed eclipsing their vibrant success with its own frisky escapade cast with feral riffs and aggressively agile rhythms. The track is a riveting slice of uproarious rock ‘n’ roll but again an incitement skilfully and imaginatively tempered by the melodic and harmonic instincts within Magnapop.

The Circle Is Round is completed by a pair of previously unheard demos recorded in 1992; Leo and Pretty Awful two glorious untamed punk fuelled treats of Magnapop in its heyday. As the new album proves though, that zenith is still lingering in the creativity of the band, its songs and character deviously addictive and deliciously individual.

 The Circle Is Round is out now digitally, on CD, and on vinyl via HHBTM Records with a white vinyl deluxe addition also available@ https://www.hhbtm.com/product/magnapop-the-circle-is-round/

http://www.magnapop.com   https://www.facebook.com/magnapopband/

Pete RingMaster 15/10/2019

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

The Domestics / Wolfhour Split 7” E.P.

With three slices of their inimitable sound each, Britain’s The Domestics and Wolfhour from Sweden join together upon a split 7″ E.P to equally ravage and ignite the senses. Both have a punk bred sound which is voraciously individual but as the rousing encounter proves they also have a common bond in uncompromising ferocity and raw discontent.

Suffolk hailing, The Domestics have never taken prisoners with their hardcore confrontation and a sound which has only become more irritable and striking by the release. The three songs on the new split prove the thought, each a ravenous slice of invasive antagonism and all a thick lure for punk ears.

A Cold, Raw System is first and immediately batters the senses in pugilistic rhythms and the vocal voracity of James Domestic. As swiftly rabid grooves and acerbic riffs surge the trespass bringing with them a host of hooks and incessancy which keenly arouses, the guitar of Ted Mint leading the insurgency alongside feral emotion sprung vocals. It is untamed magnetism from the first breath with a corrosive infectiousness just as ably unleashed by the following pair of Maximum Hell and Empty.

The first harasses as it floods the senses for a full minute, the rabid swings of drummer Simon Battery bitter pleasure alongside the equally rousing gurning of Rhodes’ bass while its successor bears an old school punk breeding to its hardcore severity. Both see Domestic spewing lyrical rancour with alluring venom as similarly toxic enterprise escapes the strings of Mint and each leave emotions inflamed and the spirit alive.

Gothenburg bred, 2013 formed, Wolfhour is a quartet which drew potent acclaim with the release of their debut album, Dead on Arrival, in 2015. Featuring members and ex-members of Anti-Cimex, Slakattack, Pi$$er and Driller Killer, Wolfhour propagate a form of Scandinavian d-beat/hardcore with its own character and antipathy. Their three scourges savaging the split’s B-side begin with Dead As Me, an unapologetic incursion of punk rock openly infectious and just as boldly quarrelsome whilst driven by rhythms which simply puncture the senses. The track easily hit the spot leaving a debilitating resonance taken up by the following and just as striking Anger Control, a track inflaming the passions with its initial psyche twisting baiting and as thoroughly by the strident holler that triggers.

Last Encore completes the release with a just as raucously barbed incitement of sound and dispute; an altercation of punk which left ears ringing in sonic tinnitus and the spirit roaring in mutual contestation.

We have a constant intrigue and appetite for the coming together of, on the surface, different bands but which share a creative common denominator. The Domestics and Wolfhour have united for one of the most thrilling in recent times, each openly unique and together the purveyors of the most striking hardcore.

With each side given its own unique artwork, The Domestics / Wolfhour Split 7” E.P. is released 18th October through Kibou Records (UK), Kangaroo Records (France), Amok Records (Germany), and Sick World Records (New Zealand). Pre-ordering available @ https://kibourecords.bigcartel.com/product/wolfhour-the-domestics-split-7 and https://kibourecords.bandcamp.com/album/the-domestics-wolfhour-split-2-song-preview

https://www.facebook.com/TheDomestics/

Pete RingMaster 11/10/2019

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Olymp – Self Titled EP

Raw almost primal, the sound of German metallers Olymp is as intriguing as it is rousing certainly within their new self-titled EP. With its Teutonic heavy metal breeding and hungrily driving riffery described as being traditional 80´s styled, it is a proposition which demands attention yet it only tells part of the sonic picture. There is rabidity and essence of its character which is pure punk rock and an additional multi-flavoured web of flavours and imagination which only gives richer texture to its breath. It all goes to make the EP an introduction to the band that refuses to be ignored.

Formed in 2018, the Augsburg quartet consists of Butschi (guitars, vocals), André (bass), Armin (guitars), and Dommi (drums). There is little more we can tell you about the band but it is all about their first EP and that quickly gripped ears and appetite with opener Lightning Eater. Its initial bass lure simply teased attention, the quickly joining wires of guitar just as enticing as the song rose to its threatening feet though its menace is as alluring as it is predatory. It is with Butschi’s grouchy vocals and the subsequent band hollers that that punk essence arises, a voracious scent which aligns potently with the classic metal teased skilfully woven web of grooves and riffs that fuel the excellent start to the EP.

Fire And Fury is next up and begins with its own dark, imposing invitation for ears and imagination, one proving easy to quickly devour and relish as it continues to darkly stain the weave of metal flames and sonic enterprise wrapping rhythmic agility. As with the first song, its body is perpetually galvanic and chorus anthemic cajoling as once again punk and metal unite in an almost garage bred styling of both flavours.

A Celtic hue lines the beginnings of the following Shut Down, the guitar proving a web of sonic intoxication as rhythms create a contagious shuffle. Dark shadows court both at the same time, brewing an invasive hue to the subsequent punk ‘n heavy metal dance. If you can imagine a hybrid sound from a union of the punk density of The Lurkers, the melodic endeavour of U.D.O, and the metal esurience of Destruction then maybe a hint of the song’s and Olymp’s sound becomes clearer.

The EP ends with The Messenger, it’s melodic beckoning straight away wrapping around welcoming ears before riffs and hooks collude to further and increasingly tempt. From within that potent draw a controlled thrash hued swing begins its own thick enticement. Admittedly by its close it was a track which could not quite find the impressive heights of its predecessors but had plenty to hold court in ears and appetite as imagination shaped its fascination inciting presence.

Olymp’s sound as rousing as it is feels like it is only at the beginning of its journey and evolution and a fine adventure it should be for all if they build on and push the highly enjoyable and impressive enterprise within their first release; we wait in eager anticipation.

The Olymp EP is out now with limited availability @ https://olympmetal.bandcamp.com/album/olymp-e-p

https://www.facebook.com/OlympMetal/

 Pete RingMaster 03/10/2019

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Earthbound – Desolate

With a reputation well on the rise, UK metallers Earthbound have just released their new EP, an encounter which is going to do their ascent up the metal ladder no harm at all. Four slabs of the band’s melodic death metal nurtured sound, Desolate swiftly grabbed attention and only proceeded to tighten its grip thereon in.

Hailing from Hitchin, Earthbound emerged in 2017 and soon lured interest with their debut EP, Endure a few months after. Originally a quartet, it was with the recruiting of guitarist John Stacy to stand alongside vocalist Tom Watson, guitarist/vocalist Louie Penfold, bassist Chris Stroud, and drummer Richard Shearing that something “clicked” within the band. An acclaimed appearance at Bloodstock Open Air Festival and playing support to Doyle and Countless Skies followed to enhance the word on the band and a sound which within Desolate devours the senses and ignites the imagination.

With the likes of Trivium, Iron Maiden, Arch Enemy, and Countless Skies declared as influences, Earthbound create a tempest borne out of death metal voracity meets melodic metalcore dexterity. It proves a compelling proposition within their new EP, each track adventurous in intent and accomplished in invention. It begins with Of Suffering, the track looming from the distance with open ferocity to quickly explode upon ears. Riffs and grooves invade as rhythms blitz the senses yet immediately there is an instinctive contagiousness which escalates the lure of attention. The raw throated squalls escaping Watson are just as potent a trespass as the sounds around them, the backing yells of Penfold as forcibly eager, but it is with the clean delivery of the former that the track truly ignites. Both sides to his presence provide strong quality but his melodic presence is especially striking. The song itself continues to harass and tempt as it too reveals an enterprise of varying flavours and textures across its dramatic landscape, the EP off to a powerful and impressive start.

Solitude follows with melodic enticement as its coaxing, its atmospheric breath soon welcoming another emotion rich clean delivery from Watson. Drama soon lines every note and the subsequent rally of rhythms before dark clouds intensify skies encroached by equally darkening sounds. From within more classic metal spiced threads of guitar emerge as keys float across the air of the song, its ground a motion of volatile endeavour. Toxic breath also infests the vocals as the track continues to expand and blossom, its landscape as unpredictable and imaginative and indeed magnetic as its predecessor’s.

Similarly Worlds Apart opens up with melodic radiance to the fore, vocals and guitars a warm invitation though shadows still lurk and eventually step forth as the mercurial climate of the track sparks with greater tempestuousness. Nevertheless, its melodic metal imagination fuels every twist and level of intensity before Remnants grips just as thick attention with its steely wires and invasive ruthlessness. It is a tempest of sound and craft which leaves no second void of persuasion and moment lacking the drama of enterprise. With a passage of atmospheric calm and emotive intimation like an irresistible oasis in an ever compelling storm, the track provides a powerful end to an equally striking release.

There are certainly moments and aspects which excite more than others within Desolate but from start to finish it only impressed, Earthbound living up to their reputation so far and laying seeds to a far greater level of plaudits ahead as they continue to grow and evolve.

Desolate is out now.

https://www.facebook.com/earthboundmusicuk   https://twitter.com/Earthbound_band

Pete RingMaster 15/10/2019

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

The Black Income Interview

Hello and thanks for taking time out to talk with us.

Can you first introduce the band and give us some background to how it all started and what brought you all together?

Hi, thank you for having us….. yes sure…we’re the Black Income a Stoner Grunge band from Denmark…

We started out late 2011, got the idea to change the world with groovy stoned fuzz-metal with melodic a melodic twist… so we got together starting writing song, and experiment with the music before we recorded our first album Noise Pollution

Had you been involved in other bands before? If so has that had any impact on what you are doing now, in maybe inspiring a change of style or direction?

Yes, we have played in a long line of bands, and sure the musically inspiration we have gotten from other bands, is sure with us to this day… but it wasn’t really what we wanted with Black Income… we wanted a more honest sounding more punky kind of band… we wanted to create something that took start and focused on the music, and not the industry.. meaning we create the music we love, and are not trying to create some certain kind of music, we go with the flow and that’s what music is all about if you ask us, and we think it’s much more fun for the fans to follow a real band, rather than following some studio project trying to fit in at a certain genre of music.

What inspired the band name?

Ohhh we get this a lot… haha

Well it started out as fun thing…it’s always been a part of the music business since the money is not that big for upcoming music… but as time went by our name got more a more relevant, as now a more expression of freedom.. meaning as the systems locks down on all of us, and deciding what you should do…. Black Income is really your only weapon against the system, so thinking off it…if all people stood together and stopped paying their taxes, we would have the power back… and that’s what our name Black Income is to us..

Was there any specific idea behind the forming of the band and also in what you wanted it and your sound to offer?

As we said before, we just wanted to play some honest music, and sure we got some inspiration from the Stoner and Fuzz scene, and sure we have elements of the Grunge era, but we try to do our own thing, and develop our own sound, that’s really what it’s all about for us.

Do the same things still drive the band when it was fresh-faced or have they evolved over time?

We think we still have the same goals really, but sure we developed as a band and go to new places with the music…. and listening to our 2 albums, we think unSOUND is a more mature sounding record than the first one.

Between those releases, how would you say your sound has evolved?

Well it’s hard to say really… we talked about the sound of modern Rock and Metal music today, and we came to the conclusion that we think the sound is too pumped these days, it ruins the experience for the listener, so on unSOUND we aimed to go with a more open and realistic sound, and we did create separate mixes to the Streaming and the Vinyl we released.

Has it been more of an organic movement of sound or more the band deliberately wanting to try new things?

We changed a bit in the line-up, we started out as a 3 piece band, and we’re back at that line-up again… we found that the trio setup is more tight, and the music lock’s in at another level… it’s easier for us to get the riffs packed and tight when we’re only a trio, and as this came to our attention the sound evolved with it… and that’s really where we stand today, with the new release.

Presumably across you all there is a wide range of inspirations; are there any in particular which have impacted not only on the band’s music but your personal approach and ideas to creating and playing music?

Sure we had a lot of influences along the line, but the honesty of the bands from the 90’s sure had a huge impact, not only in the music but also in the lyrics… but also bands like Queens Of The Stone Age with their more desert kind of sound and feel we listened a lot to but also we looked at elements from bands like Fu Manchu and mastodon ….that have a more Fuzz and Metal edge to it..

Is there a regular process to the band’s songwriting?

Usually it’s Henrik our vocalist that writes the basic ideas to the songs, and we normally take the ideas and jam on them, letting ideas flow until we have like a whole track. We tend to keep the basic idea, musicians tend to get bored with their own songs and keep developing them to the worse… we try to keep what got you hooked when you first did write the song, and keep that in mind all the way thru the process of writing.

Where do you, more often than not, draw the inspirations to the lyrical side of your songs?

Well we write about realism, and we get inspired by everyday people and feelings, we aim to write lyrics you can set yourself in center of as a listener, and not pointing thing out like other bands… it creates a more open lyrics universe for the listener, just like reading a book and creating your own pictures.

Please give us some background to your latest release.

unSOUND we started recording in 2017 in Medley Studio with Soren Andersen, and after that we recorded 5 Tracks in Tube IT Studio Denmark, and finished up the album there as well; we did mix and mastering ourselves, we wanted to have total control of things and not just lean back and let some producer take our music somewhere else… so this way we found our way of working in the future.

Give us some insight to the themes and premise behind it and its songs.

Well it’s kinda like we described, but on unSOUND  you will find a wide range of different songs, stretching from modern love songs like ‘The Sun’ to the more real songs like our single ‘Loaded Gun’ that tells a personal story to songs like ‘Somethings wrong’ that takes off at the world and the problems we’re facing today.

Are you a band which goes into the studio with songs pretty much in their final state or prefer to develop them as you record?

For us to be able to find the right elements of the songs, we work with the songs before entering the studio, but we leave space to develop things in the recording face as well….

Tell us about the live side to the band, presumably a majorly favourite aspect of the band?

We love playing live, that’s where our music comes to life… we are an energetic kind of live band, meaning we don’t give a F.ck, we are here to have a great time with the people who showed up.. so let’s F…ing Rock out…

It is not easy for any new band to make an impact regionally let alone nationally and further afield. How have you found it?

Well call us old fashion, but we believe that in the end good music will survive, it might take some time, but don’t give up…. We started out in our own country Denmark, and as time went by we found that with streaming and the internet, we gained a lot of love from other countries than Denmark… so with that in mind we decided to go where our fans are and not focus so much on our own country, so for us we get a lot of love from USA and the UK, but also Germany and Sweden. So with this new world, it’s more like don’t spend a lot of time pressing your music onto a certain land or community, go where people like your music instead.

How has the internet and social media impacted on the band to date?

Well social media has changed so much since it started out, when it first started out it was a great tool…today we’re not really sure what to expect from it, it seems like even though fans like your page, they don’t see the news your postings unless you pay for it… and what is it good for then? We think social media will fall back the next years, and streaming services like Spotify will take over that part, and gives more meaning to gather the information with your music.

So you see it as something destined to become a negative from a positive as the band grows and hopefully gets increasing success or is it more that bands struggling with it are lacking the knowledge and desire to keep it working to their advantage?

It’s really hard to say really… but it seems every bands are doing the same, so with all the music and videos coming out all the time, what would we expect from that, and how people react to it…what impacts the upcoming scene the most at the moment, is in our opinion that bigger established bands, don’t earn any money at record sales anymore, and with the streaming fee so low, they are not taking up place at all the venues because that’s where the money is, leaving the upcoming scene not being able to get anything from the gigs they play, it they can get any gigs… so that’s one of the more negative sides to the music business today.. so that leaves upcoming music to struggle with the internet and streaming, breaking thru the noise of bad music being published from every bedroom studio around the world.

Once again a big thanks for sharing time with us; anything you would like to add or reveal for the readers?

Thank you so much… yes just wanted to let you know that you can check out our brand new album on the links below, and we will see you in 2020.

Thank you…

Our brand new Video “Loaded Gun”

YouTube: https://youtu.be/KKNJd9Kg_aY

Shop: Http://shop.tubeit.eu

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Pete RingMaster 18/10/2019

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Watch Clark – Couch

photo by Christy Wiseman

The sound of Watch Clark is suggested as being akin to the Seattle indie goth/industrial scene of the early 2000’s but definitely there is also an eighties synth pop inspiration which richly flavours its imagination. It is a fusion which goes to make new album, Couch, one ear grabbing and imagination slab of contagion and very easy to recommend to all electronica embracing ears.

Watch Clark is the solo project of Seattle based musician Paul Furio, a former member of Static Engine and SMP. Founded in 2012, Watch Clark released debut album Perfect Imitation the following year with its well-received successor, First Week of Winter unveiled in 2017. Produced, mixed and mastered by Kasson Crooker (Freezepop, Symbion Project, ELYXR), Couch is the striking successor very easy to see pushing Watch Clark into a far bigger spotlight.

A collection of songs themed by a reflection on relationship, political, and life turmoil, Couch immediately had ears and appetite hooked with opener Misery. The blooming of keys and heavy pulse of rhythmic enticement openly wears a Depeche Mode influence but as swiftly the track reveals its own individual character around the magnetic tones of Furio. Industrial dissonance breaks upon the melodic landscape throughout to escalate the potency of drama within the unapologetically catchy and rousing affair.

The outstanding start to the release is matched by the infectious body and swing of the following Class Actress. Like a blend of B Movie romanticism with Kudzu post punk shadows within a Visage-esque croon, the track like its predecessor is pure contagiousness, its instinctive bounce manna to appetite and body before The Sound of Robots Pooping parades its industrial nurtured dance. As dystopian in breath as it is warmly infectious, the predominately instrumental track proved as much a spark for the imagination as an incitement for hips.

Diversity is a potent trait within Couch and potently shows its creative worth with next up Tansfläch, the track an electro industrial incitement bearing the Neue Deutsche Welle tempting of a D.A.F. alongside the cold wave theatre of a Kraftwerk, while The Darkest Place adds its own individual new wave lined proposal in the varied mix with contagious appetite and dexterity. In voice and sound, Furio lights up ears and speaker with a virulent touch which is hard to ignore in movement let alone pleasure.

The following Cross the Chasm has compelling darkness in its heart and touch which only accentuates its bold almost invasive yet haunting quality while The Act of Wanting offers a flirtatious slice of electro rock which again has energies and limbs hooked like a puppeteer across its purposeful stroll. Each again only adds further sides to the varied electronic prism of the album which Math Grenade emulates with its teutonic breath upon industrial dissonance. Again dystopian hues explore thoughts from within the dark infection and once more Watch Clark had attention glued before the equally arousing Get to Win added its particular electro punk grip on ears.

Featuring a vocal duet with Lark Remy in its haunting sigh, Weakness made for easy captivation. Though the sounds around them only hugged satisfaction it was the vocal prowess of Furio and Remy which most seduced and the way the production alternated between moments when each voice has slight dominance in their union.

Completed by the dark infested instrumental of The Cup of Bitter Fate and the melancholy soaked balladry of Choose, two tracks which lingered to haunt the imagination once sharing their final breaths, Couch is an album which provides a rousing fusion of nostalgia and new imagination which as mentioned earlier can only be suggested as a definite exploration for all with a taste for electronic pleasure.

Couch is out now; available @ https://watchclark.bandcamp.com/album/couch

https://www.facebook.com/WatchClarkMusic   https://twitter.com/WatchClarkBand

 Pete RingMaster 15/10/2019

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Caresses Amidst Punches with a handful of songs

With thanks to Shauna at Shameless PR our attention was pointed to a clutch of singles which may have been of interest. What they all proved to be was the source of increasing pleasure and each a teaser to bigger and bolder things.

Firstly as their debut album looms ever near, Los Angeles hailing psych rockers Tombstones in Their Eyes have released a rich temptation for it in the shape of new two track single Open Skies.

The band’s sound is a thick blend of psychedelic and shoegaze bred textures soaked in atmospheric density but offers a further array of flavours in its creative breath. The quartet has already unveiled its attention luring potency through earlier releases and only breeds greater anticipation for that first album, Maybe Someday, with their latest proposition.

Released through Somewherecold Records, Open Skies takes shape from within dark shadows, its fuzzy breath soon enveloping ears with an inviting trespass of sound and intimation. The lead vocals of guitarist/keyboardist John Treanor swiftly bring their magnetic resonance to the melodically cacophonous encounter as the rhythmic stroll of drummer Stephen Striegel and bassist Mike Mason provide a controlled yet tenacious incitement. It is a dense cloud of captivating enterprise, crawling over the senses with sonorous dexterity within a haze flooded soundscape skilfully shaped by the craft of guitarist Josh Drew side by side with Treanor.

The song comes with an alternative version of Dreams, the closing track on that forthcoming full-length. It too embroils ears in suggestive smog, one fuelled by caliginous light and seductive radiance. A siren of temptation the song prowls as it glides across the senses, wrapping the imagination in a post rock/psych rock ambience as physical as it is somnambulistic.

Together both tracks make anticipation of Tombstones in Their Eyes new album a touch on the keen side.

Another band with an eagerly awaited release ahead is Italian rock band Elizabeth The Second and they too have provided a rather tasty appetiser for it in the shape of a new single, the reason for that keen intrigue.

No One Cares is the Padova based trio’s debut single and comes from the Two Margaritas at The Fifty Five EP released this November. Formed in 2018, the band’s sound has already drawn references to the likes of Blur, The Libertines, The Strokes, The Clash, and Franz Ferdinand but as their first release reveals there is plenty of individuality involved in its contagious character.

From the first strum of Ben Moro’s guitar No One Cares has a rousing breath to its catchiness, its swing driven by the lively beats of Luca Gallato and the great moan of Michele Venturini’s bass. Moro’s vocals are soon adding to the infectious proposal on offer, the track’s garage rock toning across a punk ‘n’ roll bounce instinctively anthemic. Every subsequent riff, hook, and roar only accentuates its contagion, the song a striking and easy to devour introduction to Elizabeth The Second and spark for an already impatient wait for their first EP.

Another artist with an album poised to be unveiled is Sebastian Straw, an Italian based musician/songwriter creating a sound with a certain nineties Brit pop edge to its alternative rock breeding. My Friend is the latest single taken from Welcome Yesterday, a track which provides an infectious lure to artist and album.

Keys and guitar caress ears from the start, rhythms soon adding their moody touch before Straw’s distinctive tones spark the heart and more volatile instincts of the track. Already the song is a manipulative incitement with something akin to Richard Ashcroft meets Gaz Coombes to its songwriting and character while strings and keys only add to its contagion and fiery drama, emotion lining every moment.

Straw has been making music since a young age and if My Friend is a potent clue to the endeavours within his first album will be finding some sure attention coming his way.

Finally we have the song Dancing With Death to recommend. It comes from British outfit Noctorum, a duo comprised of guitarist/singer-songwriter Marty Willson-Piper (The Church, All About Eve, The Saints, Anekdoten) and producer Dare Mason. The pair was one of many who severely suffered through the bankruptcy of PledgeMusic with an estimated $15,000 through pledges owed to them. They still honoured all those pledges for the album, The Afterlife released earlier this year, out of their own pocket. Now the band, in order to recoup those funds, are releasing The Afterdeath EP through a GoFundMe campaign, a four track digital encounter with two new tracks and two covers exclusive to pledgers.

Dancing With Death is the teaser for the release, a treat of rock magnetism wrapped in gothic shadows. There is something of The Mission to the song, its quick ear grabbing dexterity fuelled by melodic enterprise and rich imagination. Guitars alone offer a drama which just got under the skin, their twists and turns fluid within that shadowed melodic rock landscape.

The track is superb and reason alone to treat yourself to The Afterdeath EP but potently backed by the other new track in The Mermaid and Noctorum’s covers of The Sound’s I Can’t Escape Myself and Buffalo Springfield’s Nowadays Clancy Can’t Even Sing.

 

Open Skies from Tombstones in Their Eyes is available now @ https://tombstonesswc.bandcamp.com/album/open-skies with Maybe Someday released through Somewherecold Records on November 15.

https://www.facebook.com/TombstonesInTheirEyes   https://twitter.com/tombsinthreyes

The Elizabeth The Second single No One Cares is out 15th October with the Two Margaritas at The Fifty Five EP released November 9th; available @ https://elizabeththesecond.bandcamp.com/album/two-margaritas-at-the-fifty-five

https://www.facebook.com/elizabeth.the.second.band   https://twitter.com/Elizabethe2nd

Sebastian Straw’s My Friend is out now with Welcome Yesterday released 18th October via Seahorse Recordings.

https://www.facebook.com/sebastianstrawofficial   https://twitter.com/SebastianStraw

The Afterdeath EP from Noctorum is available until October 31st @

https://www.gofundme.com/f/noctorum

https://noctorum.band/   https://www.facebook.com/Noctorum   https://twitter.com/noctorumband

Pete RingMaster 17/10/2019

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright