The Scaners – II

It is hard to believe that it has been over a year since the debut album from French cosmic punks The Scaners was unleashed; feeling like it was just yesterday mainly we guess because since its release it has barely taken more than a deep breath away from our speaks here at The RR. It was one of the major infestations of 2018 and is about to be joined by this year’s matching virus in the shape of the bands succinctly titled second full-length, II.

As with the first release, we are on board the intergalactic vessel Scaner with the Lyon based band, careering from planet to star, from stratospheric mystery to extra-terrestrial house party amidst a soundtrack bred on sonic hooks and scuzz punk antics. In many ways it is more of the same of that which made the first album so irresistible but within a few breaths there is no escaping a fresh wind of flavour, imagination, and creative devilment at play within the mischievously virulent II.

Recorded as the first full-length with Lo Spider and mastered by Jim Diamond the new adventurer in space instantly had the body bouncing and vocal chords hollering as first track, Please Abduct Me opened up its thrusters and declared its plea. Its first breath brings an eager surge of guitar amidst the swirling breeze of keys, boisterous rhythms in close company as the track flies through ears. The vocals of organist Pav are just as magnetic, backed by the equally tempting tones of the rest of the band. A slice of incorrigible power pop fuelled garage punk the track is superb, straight away putting album and listener in the keen frame of mind to go galaxy stomping.

Catch Up With A UFO follows, launching on a delicious rhythmic incitement from drummer BX which quickly leads to an adrenaline soaked stomp shaped by the guitar of DD and temptingly coloured by the dark shadows of Tama’s bass and the ever persuasive vocals of Pav and co. Navigating its flight through swinging gravitational debris, delinquent twists and turns further equip the inescapable greed casting bait of the song before the album lands at Random City 2099. A fuzzy slab of garage rock nurtured synth punk, the song is a magnetic shimmer of theremin and organ nurtured seduction across jangling guitar and rapacious beats and far too easy to devour to be good for one.

There was no running for cover as Mars Attacks descended on ears next, its aggressive bubblegum animation as feral as it is predatory with a Ramones meets Phenomenauts teasing sweeping the conflict while within the gamma ray hued Space X-Ploration, escape is a controlled but inexorable release of hips and greed within the song’s lunar contamination.

Through the sonic trajectory of Galactic Race the body became even more of a puppet to the band’s devious strings, so much so that an instinctive bounce did not relax even as it drifted off into the distance though that was as much down to the synth pop ‘n’ roll virulence of the following X-Ray Glasses as the teasing wake of its predecessor.

Then as Spin Like A Record brought an already breathless body to the boil with its insatiably anthemic punk ‘n’ roll clamour and Don’t Run, We’re Your Friends had it leaping around like a whirling dervish on hi-octane radiation, lust exploded from every pore.  Fair to say The Scaners was already a band we had bred ardour for but by this point it was bordering on the illicit and only intensified by the ear stalking almost primal threat of No Panic, No Stress and the communicable untamed catchiness of the glorious Pesticide Kids, both infiltrated by pestering hooks and scuzz dusted melodic temptation.

Completed by the event horizon that is Run DD Run, its gravitational pull a trap few would wish to escape or not give up inhibitions for. A final pandemic of the band’s unique infective rock ‘n’ roll; it is a blistering and thrilling end to a quite sensational album.

Ok we were already on the biased side going into The Scaners sophomore album but still not prepared for its extragalactic invasion. If there is life out there and it resembles The Scaners we are in!!

II is released 29th March via Dirty Water Records with pre-ordering available now @ https://thescaners.bandcamp.com/album/the-scaners-ii

Upcoming live dates include…

Mar 29 Meteoro, Barcelona, Spain

Mar 30 Fun House, Madrid, Spain

Apr 20 Attica Club, Ponferrada, Spain

May 31 Le Nadir / Friche Culturelle De L’antre-peaux, Bourges, France

 https://www.facebook.com/thescaners/

 Pete RingMaster 15/03/2019

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

The Setbacks – Meet Me At The Blue Bridge

A handful of weeks back saw the release of Meet Me At The Blue Bridge, the new album from Grand Rapids, MI based band, The Setbacks. It was a release born from a devastating moment in the bands creator’s world; a raw and honest encounter which bares its heart in emotion and rock ‘n’ roll.

The Setbacks was started by vocalist/guitarist Lucy Ernst who soon recruited Slumlord Radio vocalist/guitarist Tommy Erickson on bass and Brent Riva of The Holy Warheads on drums to complete her project. Their first offering is dedicated to Gym Young, Ernst’s long-time boyfriend, soul mate and musician partner who passed away and deals with loss and the recovery from it. Across its eights tracks, Meet Me At The Blue Bridge also uncages some feisty bordering on the gnarly rock ‘n’ roll; a potent force within songs which with their open emotions and contemplation suggests it all provided a truly cathartic release for its creators.

The album opens with Downfall and immediately flexes its muscle and groove as guitar and bass swing with the lively beats of Riva. Nagging hooks are just as freely offered around the vocal lure of Ernst, the song revelling in its dirty rock with a tint of punk character while all the time teasing and tempting as ears and attention were swiftly grabbed.

The following Slaughterhouse Orchid equally releases an appetite niggling hook from the off, Ernst’s guitar curving itself around the senses with devious intent as rhythms add their own infectious gait to the quickly enticing encounter. There is a great wonkiness to the song, an off-kilter edge recalling the days of old school UK punk which just as eagerly infests the vocals before it all makes way for the album’s title track. Sauntering with a certain swagger the song serenades with a roar in a reflecting voice as melodic flames rise around its blues lined hard rock wrapped thoughts. Though it does not quite match up to its predecessors, the song is a magnetic listen but soon eclipsed by the addictive antics of Closer to the Middle. Once more an infernal groove bred hook got under the skin with swift and keen relish as vocals and rhythms create their own eagerly catchy lures; together creating an impossible to ignore mixture which is just as crafty within the otherwise individual fiery rock ‘n’ roll of next up Watch it Burn.

Reflecting on those hooks and grooves springing from the guitar across the album there is something akin to Devo going post punk/noise rock with Starsha Lee in close attention about them and in full captivation within next up Broken Teeth. With an unscrupulous swing and flirty swagger to its gait, the track is a feral temptress which as the album just gets more inescapable by the listen.

A Pretenders like hue wraps Inside Out straight after, it a song which did not quite grab ears as those before but is a strongly intriguing proposal adding to the strength of the release before another highlight closes things up. One Kiss is the one song created by Ernst and Gym Young, an acoustic affair soaked in off-centre beauty as melodies share dissonant charm. The track is as compelling and cracked as an image in a shattered mirror and just as rich an incitement to the imagination with keys only adding to its haunting romance.

It is a glorious end to a release which just blossoms play by play. It might not fall as easily on the ears of some but for those with a hunger for disturbed melodies, aberrant but viral rock ‘n’ roll, and heart bred openness Meet Me at the Blue Bridge should be explored.

Meet Me at the Blue Bridge is out now; available @ https://thesetbacksgr.bandcamp.com/album/meet-me-at-the-blue-bridge

 

https://www.facebook.com/pg/thebluebridgegr

Pete RingMaster 15/03/2019

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright