The Ghost Next Door – A Feast For The Sixth Sense

Eager anticipation and high expectations often go hand in hand when facing the successor to a release which lit the fires of true pleasure and both were eager participants going into the first listen of the new album from US metallers for The Ghost Next Door. A Feast For The Sixth Sense is the successor to the band’s acclaimed self-titled debut of four years back and very quickly more than lived up to hopes, intrigue, and expectancy the news of its impending arrival inspired.

Hailing from Berkeley, California, The Ghost Next Door was founded by vocalist/guitarist Gary Wendt (ex-Skinlab, Sacrilege B.C.) and spent its early years playing around California whilst nurturing a sound marrying “the dark melancholy of 80’s and 90’s alternative with the aggression and drive of Bay Area metal.” It was when the outfit disbanded though that perversely things shifted and the band found a place within a broader wealth of appetites. In that period Wendt continued to work on recordings already underway with that first album emerging via Mausoleum Records to great responses and praise which in turn led to the band reforming. Since then they have shared stages with the likes of DRI, SpiralArms, Dr. Know, and Comes with the Fall amongst many while working on the successor to that well-received debut. Now we have A Feast For The Sixth Sense and it is easy to say that it leaves that previous treat well behind in its creative wake.

The band’s sound is not so hard to tag but equally not easy to really pin down. It is labelled alternative metal for the main but embraces a host of flavours within the metal/rock landscape as quickly shown by album opener Deadworld. Dark shadows immediately loom over the senses, their atmospheric flight as portentous as it is inviting before an ear gripping bassline from Noah Whitfield ventures into ears and imagination. It carries alluring drama which is swiftly embraced too by the guitars of Wendt and Aaron Asghari as all the while the dangerously flirtatious beats of Sebastien Castelain bounce along. Bordering on the claustrophobic, those heavy shadows continue to lurk as the song relaxes into its almost swinging stroll, they and the sound itself crowding the senses as Wendt’s potent tones join the emerging doom infested temptation. Already a web of styles and flavours converge on the song and imagination, a mix only enticing with greater craft and adventure as the track continues.

It is a thickly seductive and threateningly magnetic start to the album quickly matched in power and invention by Fodder for the Meat Grinder. A far more energetic proposition as grooves link up with spirited boisterousness, the song still openly shares a matching enterprise and imagination to its predecessor. The agility of Castelain’s beats collude eagerly with the brooding throat of Whitfield’s bass as all the while infectious grooves entangle the thrust of hungry riffs, the only thing restraining their voracity being the melodic passages and calms which also only add to the highly infectious song’s impressive landscape.

Doubt follows and swiftly instils its own contagious character in ears and appetite. Though not an aggressive onslaught there is a predacious edge to its breath and enterprise which alone grips attention; a hue just as potent within Wendt’s mix of melodic and growling vocals. As similarly melodic wires sprung from a web of metal diversity and sonic radiance bred further flames of such flair, the song just enthralled before making way for the darker cosmic drama of Event Horizon. Again bold rhythms make for an irresistible coaxing into the inescapable eye of the tempest intimated in sound and the lyrical prowess and observation which fuels the roar of A Feast For The Sixth Sense as predatory animation soaks all.

Through the southern lined creative confrontation of American Nightmare and the ravening prowl and subsequent trespass of Behind the Mask, the album only firmed its grip on enjoyment while LCD proved itself a temptress with ire in her voice and devious temptation in her movement. The song has as many post punk and alternative rock traits as it does melodic and nu metal attributes and all going to create one of the album’s compelling pinnacles.

Exclusive to the digital and CD release of the album, the pair of I Am Become Death and The Sacrifice Person brings their own fresh aspects to the nature of the release. The first is spun from a mix of melodic and alternative metal with grunge and progressive rock fibres and swiftly captured the imagination with the second seeded in a similar composition but blossoming its own unique melodic fascination. As much as the urge here is always towards listening to great releases on vinyl there is no way either of these delicious offerings should be missed.

The album ends with Stop Here On Red; another song which certainly at first is embroiled in the great gothic/post punk sounds of the eighties, early Killing Joke coming to mind throughout the outstanding close to an equally riveting and thrilling release. Winding itself around the senses in sheer sonic temptation, the track equally showed itself adept at new wave-esque twists and melodic suggestiveness ensuring that the only urge on its departure was to explore over again.

As much as we enjoyed the first album from The Ghost Next Door that pleasure is replaced by a lustier passion for A Feast For The Sixth Sense and the thought that it is high time that the band is stalked by major attention.

A Feast For The Sixth Sense is out now via Ripple Music across most stores and @ https://ripplemusic.bandcamp.com/album/a-feast-for-the-sixth-sense

https://theghostnextdoorband.com/    https://www.facebook.com/theghostnextdoor/   https://twitter.com/gh0stnextdoor

Pete RingMaster 14/03/2019

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Sober Truth – Psychosis

Less than a handful of months in and 2019 is already looking like it could go down as a major year for startling releases. Adding to the growing reasons why we are suggesting that possibility is the new album from German metallers Sober Truth. It is a snarling, writhing tempest of the band’s already individual progressive groove metal but has breached a whole new expanse of varied sound driven by an imagination living a up to its title; in short Psychosis is one dramatically thrilling engagement.

Formed in 2007, Siegburg hailing Sober Truth has established themselves as one of Europe’s most intriguing propositions across a trio of previous albums starting with Riven in 2009. The quartet has grown and nurtured their presence and reputation release by release but fair to say major spotlights and recognition are set to be stirred given the required opportunity with Psychosis. The successor to their previous well-received full-length Locust ▼  Lunatic Asylum, there is no escaping a new maturity and bolder imagination to the band’s songwriting and sound within Psychosis or the richer fusion of flavours making up its boisterous canvas.

The release opens with Solitude, the song initially brewing its attack in the background before crowding ears in a rapacious but controlled swirl of riffs and rhythms. A potent coaxing, it in turn soon centres its trespass and drives across the senses as eager grooves align with hungry riffs, the vocal antagonism of guitarist Torsten Schramm soon in league with the ferocious incitement. Instantly contagious and increasingly unpredictable as melodic strands and invention entangle in the fury while variety enhances the magnetism of vocals, the song just blossoms by the second. Already hints of different styles and spicing are at play, stronger in some moments than others but all adding to the track’s potent imagination and character.

It is a stirring rousing start easily backed by the sonic tapestry that is Akardos. Classic metal lined progressive wiring initiates the temptation, a great slim but rich prowling gait emerging before those early hues inflame the melodic enterprise of Schramm and lead guitarist Aaron Vogelsberg. Darker, heavier shadows soon infest the contagion, the esurient beats of Sam Baw uniting with the magnetic pulsation and lure of Jules RoCkwell’s bass. New threads of sound and styles continue to be keenly woven into the magnetic web before Dark Valley takes over the enslaving of ears and appetite. There is a bedlamic edge to Schramm’s vocals which quickly captured the imagination, one which only escalates across the song as musically too it nurtures an anarchic pandemonium within its skilfully bred infestation; the result which is maybe something akin to Dog Fashion Disco and Mudvayne meets The New Jacobin Club but is truly unique to Sober Truth.

The brief atmospheric ally portentous instrument of Ode To Reality leads to the authoritative bait of Riven which subsequently embraces thrash metal bred enticement and blackened shadows to its creative breast. As all tracks though, it evolves and spreads into a diversity of flavours and endeavour, the song as the band’s sound, wonderfully difficult to truly pin down though there is something of a Fear Factory tint to it.

The progressively flamed, death metal flushed Horizon and the nu/groove metal webbing of Utopia only cement the album’s potency and temptation; both unforgettable escapades forged in the diverse furore of sound and imaginative craft from across the whole band before Sober (ReArranged) reveals a whole new side and character to a song previously found on the last album. As catchy in temperament and intent as the original, the song flourishes in the fresh creative winds which race through the band’s growth in sound.

Dying Dreams follows bringing tenebrific clouds over melodic and harmonic intimation before the album’s title track seduced ears with its enthralling mesh of voracious metal and gothic rock equipped with almost malevolent grooves and post punk starkness. At times the song sparks thoughts of The Mission and Sisters Of Mercy, in other moments erupts in an insatiable squall of dissonance and instability. The track is superb, and one of the album’s biggest highlights.

The album concludes with an Unplugged rendition of Collapse, it too a song first introduced on Locust ▼ Lunatic Asylum. Whether intended as a mere bonus slice of Sober Truth goodness or not it provides a wonderful conclusion to Psychosis which is very easy to be greedy over.

Sober Truth may have still been an unnoticed proposition to many but surely that will change thanks to Psychosis. Quite simply the album is a real pleasure of originality and heterogeneity which deserves all the attention and plaudits it will hopefully get.

Psychosis is available now @ https://sobertruth.bandcamp.com/album/psychosis

http://sober-truth.com/    https://www.facebook.com/sobertruthband    https://twitter.com/sobertruthband

Pete RingMaster 14/03/2019

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright