Fatty Cakes And The Puff Pastries – Self Titled

Primed to have you eagerly bouncing with a massive grin on your face, the debut album from Fatty Cakes And The Puff Pastries is a romp of glorious mischief and mayhem. The self-titled introduction certainly has no reticence in challenging prejudices and the bigoted standards so many live by but does so with a rousingly unapologetic sense of devilish humour. In other moments it is quite simply delicious grrrl riot misbehaviour and throughout instinctive often disdainful fun which we quickly bred greedy lust for.

Consisting of Amber Fargano (lead vocals/ukulele), Vishinna Turner (bass/backing vocals), Audrey Johnson (drums), Victoria Crow (back vocals/glockenspiel) and Staci McDowell (back vocals/chord), FC&PP hail from Fresno, CA. It appears they have kicked off a bit of a stir with their inimitable sound back home and listening to their first full-length it is easy to see why and expect that to spread far further. As soon as opener Panic Attack launches the release, ears are fronted up with a proposal which dares you not to have fun or get heavily involved, a taunt impossible to take up. Senses harrying beats and dirt laded riffs are the first lure, Fargano’s vocal incitement the swift second before the band’s soon established melodic and harmonic revelry gets involved. Just as quickly, the band’s music sets out its inescapable individuality though there is plenty which reminds and hints at bands such as 4 Non Blondes and Lunachicks and even more so here and across the album British artists such as Girls At their Best, X-Ray Spex, The Modettes and in certain moments The Rezillos.

It is an outstanding start easily backed by next up Fat Grl Tears. It is a compelling blend of guitar scuzz and melodic enterprise fuelled by mischievous shenanigans. As proven time and time again across the album though, that devilment cannot hide the fact that the band writes and craft some striking pop punk songs unafraid to involve a host of varied flavours and merciless hooks.

Petty Petty Princess is quickly a case in point, its core lure a jangling hook around which vocals, individual and en masse, tease as rhythms tenaciously canter. The fact the song did not grip as greedily as those sandwiching it is down to their magnificence only especially that of the following Alien Babe. From the delicious throaty bait of bass to the fuzzy wash of guitar amidst vocal incitement, the track got under the skin. Again The Rezillos came to mind as too early Blondie but mouth-watering spices in a unique Fatty Cakes recipe of rousing commotion and pop disorder.

Across the likes of the equally irresistible BFF, a slice of pop seduction with a calm but truly manipulative swing, and the gang fronted punk rock sorcery of Witch, band and album only further their enthralment of ears and appetite while Antifa Cakes (Not My Puff Pastry) provides a melodic intoxication which has the body instinctively swaying before it all breaks into feral punk turbulence and attitude; ingredients as proud within the relatively calm but thickly defiant Grrrl Gang.

The vocal harmonics within the band, whether bold or understated, are just as magnetic as any other aspect and are the delicious fuel to Magic Grl, a superb song which firmly hints at those earlier mentioned UK references before Feminist Gold 2k uncaged its punk ‘n’ roll exploits on an increasingly greedy appetite. As with all songs, it adds another potent hue to the album’s varied but melodic punk palette, a web increasing again through the loudly irritable stomp of Minimum Rage.

The release is closed up by Internet Bitch, a track which stole favourite track honours at the last breath with its rhythmically rousing and vocally animated rascality. With more than a passing echo of the Au Pairs, the track was manna to our ears; its emotional dissonance echoed in sound and imagination whilst springing yet another deviously infectious indeed viral temptation. It is a sensational end to a similarly thrilling encounter from a band before which global attention and ardour is surely on the way.

The self-titled Fatty Cakes and the Puff Pastries album is out now through Emotional Response Records; available @ https://fattycakes.bandcamp.com/album/fatty-cakes-and-the-puff-pastries

 https://www.facebook.com/FattyCakesPuffPastries/

Pete RingMaster 8/01/2019

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Marshmallow Coast – Memory Girl

As warm and boisterous as an eager summer day yet but one lined with intimate shadows carrying their own magnetic melancholy, the new album from Marshmallow Coast is little short of pure captivation. Across near on thirty minutes and eight cheerfully swinging tracks, Memory Girl is a fresh electro pop rock lover very easy to take in the imaginative arms and boisterously dance with.

Hailing out of Athens, Georgia, Marshmallow Coast is the brainchild of Andy Gonzales (The Music Tapes, of Montreal, Mind Brains).With Sara Kirkpatrick, Jim Hix, and Steven Trimmer alongside the band has conjured a release which embraces the senses like the rising morning sun. It is rich in warmth and hope, suggestive in knowing intimacy and understanding yet as mentioned has that darker intimation which haunts everyday life and new experiences.

Memory Girl begins with Warm Bodies and immediately the song’s balmy air and comfy touch hugs the senses. Its buoyant stroll is boisterous yet has a restraint which has hips swaying rather than the body bouncing but movement as inescapable as it is eager. There is an eighties synth pop glow to the track, a bright and engaging hue spilling across the whole of the release as swiftly confirmed by next up Take You On. With a gentler urgency to its gait as firm beats pounce with metronome like insistency, the song is a hazier affair compared to its predecessor. Indeed keys bring an almost dirty breeze to their otherwise crystalline shimmer at times, Gonzales’s tones falsetto similarly kissed whilst providing a warmly affectionate proposition to song and listener within the embrace.

 Lover’s Leap follows, sauntering in with a bold funk nurtured swagger as guitars melodically tease around it. Again the body was manipulated into involvement as the resourcefully infectious track cheerfully strolled along though once again a raw mist of sonic intimation rears its suggestive head throughout the captivation before making way for the equally inviting K. Freeman Enslaved with its Orange Juice-esque jangle and that eighties synth pop exuberance which itself brings a further XTC like imagination.

 Through the electro pop exploits of Sinz Of My Father, a track which is something akin to a meeting of Thomas Dolby and Devo, and Shooting Star with its tantalising celestial glide, the album just accentuated its hold on ears and appetite with the first of the two emerging as a real favourite play by play. They are in turn matched in success by the funk pop waltz of the increasingly compelling Foxy Boy, a track which almost stalks the listener with an infectious smile on its face and a seductive tease in its movement.

The album’s title track brings things to a close and though it is a song which did not grip our ears as tightly and dramatically as its predecessors, it left a warm glow and a taste for more of its mellow, thoughtful, and sultry intimation.

It is a fine end to a release which just grew in presence and temptation by the play; its summery haze a real but knowing escape to the shadows of daily life.

Memory Girl is out now through Happy Happy Birthday To Me Records.

https://www.facebook.com/marshmallowcoast/

Pete RingMaster 8/01/2019

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Resonating intimation; exploring the sounds of Jeff II

Hello and thanks for taking time out to talk with us.

Can you first introduce yourself and give us some background to how you began making music?

Hey! I’m Jeff II an electro rock music producer and guitar player. I’ve been doing music for more than 10 years. I’ve been playing in bands since forever as a guitar player. I’m doing some session gigs and some live shows. This is really cool but at some point, I wanted to have my own project to play my own music. It all came up naturally, I had a lot of pre-written material, but I needed some time to bring everything to life and to find my sound as a solo artist.

How have the experiences of being in other bands previously impacted and guided what you are doing now, in maybe inspiring a change of style or direction?

Yeah I’ve been in bands since I started playing the guitar. Mostly rock and pop bands. I had a lot of fun but I started to gain an interest for music production and especially electronic music. I like working with bands but I enjoy being alone in my studio writing and producing new music. My style hasn’t changed that much, it’s still hard rock music but with an electronic production.

What inspired the band name?

My friends in France are into rap music a lot. I’m the only ‘rock dude’ around, so they started calling me ‘JE2F’ to make my name sounds more ‘Hip Hop’ *laughs* I just adjusted it to ‘Jeff II’ eventually. It all started with a private joke.

Was there any specific idea behind your solo venture, in what you wanted it and your sound to offer?

I wanted to do my own solo project for a long time. My idea was to make some music that sounds good live on stage, in a club or at home with the headphones on. It’s not always easy to find the right balance but eventually I worked hard on my sound and ideas to figure it all out.

Do the same thoughts still drive the band when it was fresh-faced or have they and your sound evolved over time?

I’m still driven by the same passion and desire to produce quality music. My mind-set hasn’t changed. The sound changed a little bit but it’s still in the same electro/rock vein. I’ve been in many bands before and it’s sometimes difficult to deal with 3, 4 or more different individuals. As it is a solo project, it’s much easier to manage and to know where I’m heading.

My sound has become more and more ‘produced’. I don’t see it as a bad thing; it’s a natural evolution for me. The more I’m practicing my skills in the studio, the more I want to apply my knowledge to my tracks. When I started I was just a guitar player I didn’t know anything about production, so it was mainly riffs, bass and drums. Now there’s more effects and synths.

Has it been more of an organic movement of sound or more you deliberately wanting to try new things?

Totally an organic movement, I didn’t even think about it. I didn’t go like ‘ I have to change my sound’. It just evolved naturally until now.

Presumably you have a wide range of inspirations and artists you admire; are there any in particular which have impacted not only on your music but your personal approach and ideas to creating it?

As a guitar player I’ve always been a fan of Hendrix, SRV, Satriani, Jimmy Page….I like classic rock in general. But when I started producing I was more into electronic bands such as The Prodigy or The Glitch Mob. At the end of the day my music sounds like both worlds. There’s a few punk and pop elements here and there but it’s not dominant.

Is there a particular process to your songwriting?

I usually start with a guitar riff or a melody. I’m recording a loop of it and eventually I build my track around it. Then I set the structure so I have a whole track. Then comes the production part, I add all the effects, the layers, the samples…. I’m trying to mix while I’m producing so my song sounds good right from the start.

…And any lyrical side to your songs?

My music is mostly instrumental, there’s no real lyrics. I use voice samples here and there but I’m not too concerned about the words, I’m all about the sound and the vibe. If I have a voice sample that fits right for a certain track, I’ll use it no matter what’s the lyrics in it.

Give us some background to your latest release.

My latest single ‘Laying low’ is a bit different than what I’m use to do. It has less guitar but more synths and drums. I was focused on the beat and the atmosphere of the song rather than the riff. The mood is a bit darker and less euphoric than songs like ‘Sleepless’. It’s an ‘introvert’ song kind of.

Could you give us an insight to the themes and premise behind the single and other songs?

Recently my songs are getting a bit more ‘serious’. My first tracks were really straight forward EDM/Rock. It’s the kind of music that entertains and makes you move. It’s all about that really, hedonism and escapism. But I wanted to add a little more subtlety in the new release. It’s cliché but I’ve through tough moments recently and I wasn’t feeling like doing ‘hard rocking party music’ kind of songs. So the latest tracks are more ‘laid back’.

Do you go into the studio with songs pretty much in their final state or prefer to develop them as you record?

I change my tracks all the time. When I’m in the studio I have no idea where the song is gonna go. That’s the cool part about recording everything at home, you don’t have a deadline or you don’t have to worry about time, you can change any parameter at any moment.

Tell us about the live side to Jeff II?

Being on stage is the main reason why I’m doing music. Even though I spend more and more time in the studio, the final goal is to play all that in front of people. My stage set up is a bit special; I’m DJ-ing and playing guitar at the same time. There’s a drummer and a bass player backing me up. It’s like a hybrid of a DJ set and a hard rock band. I wanted to keep the ‘rock n’ roll’ vibe by having a real band with me but it’s impossible to play all the different layers of sounds that my music contains without some electronic gear.

It is not easy for any new artist or band to make an impact regionally let alone nationally and further afield. How have you found it so far?

Well these days with the internet it’s much easier. You can reach so many people from different places with platforms like YouTube. Also my music being instrumental I’m not too concerned about the languages and the identity of the listeners. My sound isn’t ‘American’ or ‘European’ it can appeal to everybody. I’m based out of Los Angeles but my goal is to ultimately play worldwide.

How has the internet and social media impacted on the band to date? Do you see it as something destined to become a negative from a positive as the band grows and hopefully gets increasing success?

It’s a game changer. I won’t go into the debate whether or not it has ‘killed’ the sales income for musicians. But what I do know is that internet is the number one space for promotion. Maybe people won’t buy your albums but if they like your music they’ll still go to your shows. As a music producer who does everything by myself, social medias are a fantastic tool to use. These days you see 17 year old kids making hit songs on a laptop in their bedroom. And they’re able to eventually book big tours all around the globe. Thanks to the internet. On a negative note I will say that artists should get much more income from the streaming platforms.

Once again a big thanks for sharing time with us; anything you would like to add or reveal for the readers?

Thank you for your time and attention. Check me out on YouTube and Instagram (jeff2music). You can also learn a bit more about me and my background on my website (jeff2music.com).

https://www.jeff2music.com/   https://www.instagram.com/jeff2music/

Pete RingMaster 11/01/2019

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright