The Great Sabatini – Goodbye Audio

Pic by DAVE LEVITT

Four years on from their psyche ravaging third album, Dog Years, Canadian noise sludgers The Great Sabatini return with another maelstrom of noise bred dissonance which, to continue a trend set from their first releases, is their most irresistible trespass to date. Goodbye Audio is around thirty five minutes of sonic abrasion as unpredictable creatively as it is expectantly striking; an invasion of raw and toxic noise intent on caustic seduction.

The Montreal quartet of Steve, Sean , Rob, and Joey Sabatini have in many ways continued exploring the less destructive but deviously manipulative essences of its predecessor with Goodbye Audio but equally the new encounter again openly embraces the ravenously raw ferocity and bedlamic seeds of their sound exposed from day one. It makes for a release which tempts, seduces, and flirts with the senses and imagination as at the same time it marauds, pillages, and corrodes them.

The album opens up with recent single Still Life With Maggots, instantly descending on ears with a sonic and rhythmic harassment before taking a momentary breath and repeating the assault with the causticity of raw throated vocals enrolled. Melodic taunts and imposing tenacity also add to the short but evolving landscape of the song, that unpredictability swiftly fingering the imagination and igniting an admittedly already in place appetite for The Great Sabatini adventure set through previous escapades.

As next track, Dog Years quickly confirms this is a new psyche twisting caper with the band though but an exploration unafraid to hint at possible inspirations as the likes of Melvins, Unsane, and Sofy Major come to mind at certain moments across the whole of Goodbye Audio. The second song is an immediate bestial infringement, its carnal instincts fuelling sound and voice alongside intent as it crawls over the senses. Sludge metal and noise punk provide smog of irritability and raw tension but again if with less openness there is an underlying incalculable adventure which teases before exposing its majesty in the outstanding Strip Mall or, The Pursuit Of Crappiness Parts 1-4. The track is superb, from its initial hip manipulating flirtation breaking open a fissure of thick prowling malevolence veined with toxic grooving, that in turn twisting into corruptive punk ‘n’ roll rebellion before finding a quickly corrupted paradise.

You’re Gonna Die (Unsatisfied) stalks years and thoughts next, the guitar again inviting and taunting with its riffs as rhythms stroll and fly through the skulking throaty bass and swinging sticks. It is a maelstrom of threat and ferocity with the most frenetic prowl while Tax Season In Dreamland provides a feral punk tango exposing scars and lust with equal creative savagery. Its moments of emotionally hazed tranquillity are just as imposing stirring up emotive reflections as potent as the physical reactions its uproar provokes.

Through the shadow draped increasingly contaminated celestial breath of Brute Cortege and the intimidatingly mercurial fourteen minute emotional wilderness of Hand Of Unmaking, the album is brought to a mighty close; both tracks a provocation of body, spirit and thought with the latter a complete trial and adventure of its very own to hungrily immerse in.

We are not afraid to say that The Great Sabatini has been one of our favourite bands for a long time but even that usual readymade submission to their adventures was taken aback by the thrills and spills of Goodbye Audio. If noise annoys run for cover as the Canadians have it down to a fine raw art.

Goodbye Audio is out now on vinyl from No List Records, Ancient Temple Records and No Why Records with a cassette version featuring exclusive bonus track Drain The Swamp available from Pink Lemonade. Head over to https://thegreatsabatini.bandcamp.com/album/goodbye-audio for digital release and more…

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Pete RingMaster 01/12/2018

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Martyr Art – FearFaith Machines

Self-Dubbed as digital metal, the Martyr Art sound is a voracious mix of varied metal and industrial/electronic textures with more besides from an artist which embraces technology as eagerly as the cauldron of flavours woven into his bold recipe of enterprise. FearFaith Machines is the new and fifth album from the band, a release which for fans and newcomers can only make for one compelling adventure.

Martyr Art is the one man project of Joe Gagliardi III, an Orange County musician whose skills on the guitar are as captivating as the songwriting, vocal prowess, and imagination which equally escape his invention. The band is truly a solo project with Gagliardi playing every instrument before recording, mixing and mastering every second of adventure making up FearFaith Machines. Since emerging in 2004, Martyr Art has shared stages with the likes of Corey Glover, Doyle, KMFDM, Drowning Pool, Saul Williams, Full Devil Jacket, Brick By Brick, Dead Empires, and Moon Tooth whilst releasing a host of well-received singles and EPs as well as those previous four full-lengths. Up to this point Martyr Art had evaded our radar but FearFaith Machines has corrected that and will for a whole new tide of fans such its striking offerings.

The album starts with Motion, metallic electronic pulses and temptations luring ears before raw steely smog brings a rousing scourge of groove and alternative metal awash with industrial espionage. Quickly Gagliardi shows his vocal diversity as throat scarred and clean tones intermingle with the former heading the virulent contagion. Equally his craft on the guitar further ignites the tempest, shredding and picking multi-cultural sonic temptations.

The following cyclone of The Pleasure of Pain is just as invasively magnetic, its industrial inclinations steering the listener towards the waiting metal bred uproar. The cycle repeats with even greater heat and intensity, vocals again a great blend of attack and enterprise matching the adventurous emprise of sound. Like a maelstrom of Rabbit Junk, Squidhead, and Cynical Existence, the track is a captivating fury more than matched by next up Who Are You. The third song scowls as it plunders the senses, raging with punk dissonance as again a web of styles and flavours unite with voracity and imagination on the way to forging another major highlight within the release.

Across the sinister almost psychotic Just and the superb Constrict, the album simply expands its landscape of sound and captivation, the second of the two almost primal in its breath yet precise in its layers of boldly varied texture and spicing while their successor, Thundering, is a dark seduction with hues of bands like Type O Negative and Sisters Of Mercy to its irresistible gothic rock/post punk serenade.

Final track is Binary Slavery, a carnivorous slice of industrial metal gnawing at the senses yet soothing the wounds with melodic caresses though they too come with an edge of trespass to their infectious exploits. It is a rousing end to the album highlighting the craft, imagination, and bold fusions making up the heart of FearFaith Machines.

Gagliardi creates something that is nothing less than unique from the familiar styles and sounds he weaves with, indisputable evidence coming with one of the most fascinatingly individual and simply enjoyable encounters this year.

FearFaith Machines is out now; available @ https://martyrart.bandcamp.com/album/fearfaith-machines

http://martyrart.com/   https://www.facebook.com/martyrartofficial

Pete RingMaster 01/12/2018

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Parasitic Twins Interview

Having been more than taken with their the debut EP, ‘All That’s Left To Do Now Is Sleep With Each Other’, it is with pleasure we bring you a recent interview between its creators, British hardcore duo Parasitic Twins, and our guest and friend Elliot Leaver.

For those who may not know who you are, introduce yourselves quickly.

Dom Smith (drums): I’m Dom. Max (guitars, vocals) is the other one. He’s the talented. He’s too busy, and important. You can’t sit with him.

Describe your sound in as few words as possible.

DOOM.

Who are your three biggest influences as a band?

Bongripper. Death. Generic Questions

What’s the meaning behind your band name?

It’s a Dillinger Escape Plan song, and an accurate reflection on our relationship.

How did you approach this release (All That’s Left To Do Now, Is Sleep With Each Other EP) in terms of writing and recording?

We went in to Melrose Yard Studios in York, worked with another dude with exactly the same name as me. He’s way more talented than me also. It was a pleasure. We wanted a live feel, and that’s what we got. We put ourselves under pressure to come up with three songs, it was tough but if you like it, then we’re happy. Do you like it? If you want to know what the songs are about, do check out the lyrics on Bandcamp: https://theparasitictwins.bandcamp.com/

Max is influenced by people he meets, sees and despises, mostly.

Did you try anything differently this time around than with previous efforts?

We both loved being in Seep Away, but we realised that we have to much respect for each other’s completely pointless misery to separate when that band died a tragic, horrible, fiery death. We’re stuck together now, and there’s nothing we can do about it. So, the only thing we did differently this time was work with each other instead of two or three other musicians. It’s been DELIGHTFUL.

What was it like to record the EP?

We recorded it live, and that’s the way (uh-huh, uh-huh) we like it, for now.

Do you have any personal favourite songs on the release?

I like them all. I hope you do too! Wouldn’t it be weird if you published an interview with me saying I hated everything I’ve ever put drums on?

Explain the meaning behind the album title.

Those that know, know. But basically, me and Max have done everything else but sleep with each other, so that’s that. I mean, we’ve never done anything sexual, just to clarify. But, there’s still time, I suppose. He’s so miserable, but I do love him. He has nice pectoral muscles, FYI.

Do you have any dates lined up at present?

Not right now, I’m in a new relationship, not with Max though. Other than that, we play Oldham, Ashton-Under-Lyne, York, Hull and Stockport with our mates in The Carnival Rejects – it’s our first “tour”, and I say it like that, because it isn’t really a tour, but it’s a series of dates, and that’ll be lovely.

What are your favourite songs to perform live?

Massive’ and a bunch of new ones that we’ve not released yet. I’m excited to do those. There’s one called ‘Autopsy’, and it’s very cheery, as you might imagine.

What are the best and worst shows you’ve played to date?

Seep Away played a couple of shows with Hands Off Gretel, they were great. BUT, with this band, we’re looking forward to shows with Pat Butcher, and Carnival Rejects.

Worst shows? Our first band, not (Seep Away), played with a terrible goth band beginning with R and ending in hombus. One of that band’s members was a dick to my friend, and that’s not okay. Aside from that, it wasn’t our most triumphant show. Maybe because there was too much smoke. Goths love smoke.

If you could open for anyone, who would it be?

Code Orange, or Turnstile.

What’s the plan for the rest of 2018?

Celebrating the fact that this interview happened. Thank you for your attention.

https://www.facebook.com/ParasiticTwinsBand

Check out our review of ‘All That’s Left To Do Now Is Sleep With Each Other’ @ https://ringmasterreviewintroduces.wordpress.com/2018/10/17/parasitic-twins-all-thats-left-to-do-now-is-sleep-with-each-other/

Questions by Elliot Leaver

RingMaster Review 07/12/2018