Arkdown – The Calling

Having already teased acclaim and attention with their debut EP a couple of years back, UK metallers Arkdown give them a real shove with its successor, The Calling. Unleashing five uncompromising, seriously predacious cuts of metalcore seeded hostility as stylish as they are rabid the new EP is the declaration of a band ready to take on all comers.

Cast in the steel of their hometown Sheffield hailing Arkdown has been on a steady ascent through the British metal ranks since emerging in 2015. The well received EP, Path, lit up the underground metal scene with its 2016 release whilst live the band’s reputation has only risen as alongside their own shows they have shared stages with the likes of Fit for an Autopsy, Oceans Ate Alaska, Martyr Defiled, Kingdom of Giants, A Night in Texas, and Shields. The Calling is their next bold and impressive step and challenge to the higher echelons of the British metal frontline and further afield.

Though metalcore based, the Arkdown sound is a rich union of flavours, death and melodic metal colluding with rapacious grooves and merciless aggression across that instinctive bed. It makes for tracks which even as they directly assault equally fester in the imagination all twisting and turning with imaginative adventure as quickly shown by EP opener, Wake Up. The initial calm of its intro is soon squashed under the following weight of riffs and rhythms from which vocalist Kyle Dawson enticingly scowls and the guitars of Mike Dyson and Mike Walker spin senses ensnaring webs of antipathy wired with fine melodic thread. Swiftly a diversity of sound and vocal attack mingle in the outstanding trespass leaving ears ringing and pleasure greedily rising.

The following It Calls Me instantly wraps the listener in spirals of contagiously intrusive grooving, the swinging beats of Alex Roberts taking skilled pot shots as again the throat raw variety coated assault of Dawson erupt in animosity and magnetism. With the eager yet brooding basslines of Ed Morley as potent as the invasive enterprise of the guitars, the track grabs best track honours as it further ignited the passions before Mirrors embraces the senses in its own infectious guitar wiring as winds of discontent and dark reflection ravage. As its predecessors, the track is a captivating roar of craft and enterprise built on an array of individual agility and as those before, another mighty reason to devour the Arkdown sound.

The closing pair of Five Years and Falling brings the EP to a rousing close. The first is a sonic wrath within a cauldron of melodic intensity, uncaging grooves and sonic rancor with an intrusive yet deft hand whilst its successor while being the calmest moment within The Calling, indeed a haunting seduction of imagination, it is also a tempest of conflict and venomous ideation as mercurial and volatile as it is tantalising.

Giving five tracks which increasingly fascinate as they corrode the senses, The Calling is a striking and increasingly irresistible encounter from a band surely poised to stir up real fuss with their dynamic, dramatic and deviously compelling sound.

The Calling is out Friday 2nd November.

 https://www.facebook.com/ArkdownOfficial/   https://www.instagram.com/arkdown.official/   https://twitter.com/ArkdownOfficial

Pete RingMaster 31/10/2018

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Siblings Of Us – Gargantua

Creating a maze of intrigue and diversity smothered in a web of unpredictable imagination UK outfit Siblings Of Us offer up their new release. Any sound and encounter which refuses to be pigeonholed provides an instinctive lure and without doubt the Bristol trio and their Gargantua EP defies any attempt to pin them down as essences from synth and progressive rock entangle with elements of indie, new wave, and plenty more. It makes for an ear enticing proposition which admittedly left us a little bewildered, slightly unsure occasionally and thoroughly pleasured.

Emerging in 2016, Siblings Of Us consists of Fonzy Armour (vocals, guitar, synth), Zack Reed (vocals, synth), and Ellie Daymond (drums). Since venturing forth, the band has released two EPs, a couple of singles and a threesome of videos, all luring greater attention and new waves of fans. Gargantua is sure to continue the trend, its four tracks all providing a rich kaleidoscope of adventure with the conspiracy of a puzzle.

Gargantua opens up with Pizza Liza where synths immediately create a spirally coaxing before swinging rhythms and melodic heat accompanies the song’s emerging muscular presence. There is a natural catchiness to the weight though, synths all the while creating a bubbling sea of melodic intimation and temptation and at times adding a scent of The Stranglers’ Dave Greenfield to the fun. We will admit that the falsetto vocals of the band, a proposition something akin to The Bee Gees woozy after having their unmentionables firmly squeezed, was the one element personal tastes laboured with but certainly they are no weakness in the band or its sound especially as they add a touch of organic energy and a great emotional ‘desperation’ to things.

The following Chicago Glass Twins similarly strolls in with its old rock ‘n’ roll inclinations to the fore, synths and vocals flirting with ears as they ride the intrusive rhythmic tide craftily led by Daymond. Detours and suggestive interludes accompany the track’s bold trail of enterprise, every moment adding to its captivation as it outshines its predecessor before Breed & Company repeats the success as it flows into a calm, reflective mood and melodic croon. It too carries an intensity which erupts with Muse meets Axis Mundi imagination, the song bursting with volatility to fine effect.

The EP closes up with A Gang Called Wonder, a slice of infection loaded synthwave with predatory instincts and just a shade of mania to its intent. The track epitomises the whole EP; a fascinating and thoroughly magnetic affair that just demands attention.

By the record, the Sibling Of Us sound has evolved with eager adventure, Gargantua another highly enjoyable twist in its journey; a pleasure ensuring their next offering is going to be highly anticipated.

Gargantua hits all outlets on 2nd November, via RetroSynth Records.

https://www.facebook.com/siblingsofus   https://www.instagram.com/siblingsofus/   https://twitter.com/siblingsofus

Pete RingMaster 30/10/2018

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Circling conflicts and distractions: talking Die So Fluid with Mr Drew

It was a decade ago when the release of their second album, Not Everybody Gets A Happy Ending had us at The RR enthralled and hooked on the inimitable musical adventure that is Die So Fluid. A greedy backward look took us back to its beginnings and a first album which added to an instinctive appetite which subsequently has kept a close ear ever since. Earlier this year the band released their fifth album in the deviously magnetic shape of One Bullet from Paradise. We have had the pleasure to since talk with one of the band’s founders and guitarist/keyboardist/songwriter Drew Richards; getting down to chat about the band, the latest album, the tragedy before it and much more…

Hello and thanks for taking time out to talk with us.

Can you first introduce the band to newcomers and give us some background its beginnings?

We’re Die So Fluid; a female fronted hard rock three-piece out of London and Los Angeles. Grog (Vocals and Bass) and I, Drew (Guitar), met through mutual musical friends over twenty years ago and have pursued truth, justice and power chords ever since. Our drummer is a moonlighting international man of mystery – Justin Bennett who also plays for Thrill Kill Kult and Skinny Puppy. One Bullet from Paradise is our fifth album.

I know the band is nearing the end of its second decade but is there a musical history for you before Die So Fluid?

Nothing I did before Die So Fluid really mattered and it all just inspired a desire to do something more truthful and authentic.

What inspired the band name?

Sadly a lot of beer… Drink driving is bad but drink band naming is worse. You get stuck with a trademark that made perfect sense when everyone is shouting at each other in a bar after 6 pints. Then you spend a lifetime explaining the result of that ‘discussion’ to people

Was there any specific idea behind the forming of the band and also in what you wanted it and your sound to offer?

No it just fulfilled the primal drive to be part of a gang and to create stuff that made you look cool so the opposite sex would want to sleep with you. At a certain point you realise you’re actually enjoying the music making and you want to create truly beautiful and original and poignant art. Once that bug bites you it’s hard to kick it.

And still the drive for the band even after so many creative years?

I kind of just answered that. The money is still shit though so count that out as motivation.

Since your early days, how would you say your sound has evolved?

It was definitely purer and rawer when we started. I’d like to do that again but I don’t know how you can lose sophistication gained from years of playing without things sounding contrived.

It has been a more organic movement of sound or the band going out to deliberately try new things would you say?

Both but I have to think everything new that can be recorded has been recorded by now. I think I really need to look at what the true core of Die So Fluid is and just perfect that.

Are there any specific inspirations which have impacted not only on the band’s sound but your own personal approach and ideas to creating and playing music?

We really like Rush. They were a three piece that really did not ever shy away from experimenting and managed on more than one occasion to marry a really catchy song with some really progressive music and arrangements.

Is there a process to the songwriting which generally guides the birth of songs?

For me music is very instinctive and the main lyric/title is too but the rest of the lyrics are tough. I have a lot of notebooks and I’ll put the music on my phone and walk all over the neighbourhood listening to it and chipping away at the words.

Where do you, more often than not, find the inspirations to the lyrical side of your songs?

Well there’s a lot going on in the world right now so there’s a lot to draw from. I may divert away from reality again in the future and try and be a bit more poetic and mythic. People need an escape.

Could you give us some background to your latest release, One Bullet From Paradise?

The most dramatic thing about this record is it is the first one on which the third founder-member of the band did not play on. He died a month before we were due to record the drums. So we took a while to decide whether to carry on with the band let alone this album. If Grog didn’t know Justin we probably would not have but he really pulled out some stops to get it back on track.

Give us some insight to the themes and premise behind it and its songs.

The title track is about religious dogma emboldening Isis soldiers in battle. There’s quite a lot on the album influenced by conflict in the world come to think of it so my favorite diversion is ‘Bittersweet’ which is a comic book heroine that will ‘only fight you on guitars’. I was going to put #guitarsnotguns at the end of the Tomorrow doesn’t always come video but it seemed cheesy and then the Parkland school shooting happened and I definitely didn’t want to look like I was using a tragedy to sell something. I’ll leave that to the mainstream media.

Are you a band which goes into the studio with songs pretty much in their final state or prefer to develop them as you record?

Totally sorted and demoed three times before we go near a studio. These days most stuff is recorded at home and we only need a studio for my elaborate string arrangements anyway.

Tell us about the live side to the band; presumably still a favourite aspect of the band?

It has been one of the best aspects of my life – traveling the world entertaining people but when you get older it is way too hard to continue to put the rest of your life on hold to tour. The pleasure of playing live has never faded since I first stepped on stage at sixteen.

It is not easy for any new band to make an impact regionally let alone nationally and further afield and far more difficult these days. How do you see it and feel its cage from when you guys started out?

Surely the opportunities are all in the ether of the world wide web now. I’ve seen people explode overnight just from getting on the right playlists and getting pushed by curators on the right platforms. Very gimmicky a lot of the new stuff that succeeds though; that’s how you stand out by doing some shit like Babymetal.

How has the internet and social media impacted on you as a band to date? Do you see it as something destined to become a negative from a positive as a band grows in regard to ease of streaming and illegal downloading or something which can continue to be a potent weapon?

Social media is a tool that some artists not only wield with great skill but they seem to actually revel in tweeting what they had for tea or what shape their turd was this morning. As you may already be able to tell I personally find social media narcissistic and boring but it is totally to the detriment of your band if you don’t get on it. The internet as a whole has at least put some power into the hands of creators if they want to be a DIY record company so there’s a positive.

Once again a big thanks for sharing time with us; anything you would like to add or reveal for the readers?

I am dizzy from your in depth interrogation. I feel like I have given two pints of blood. I need a cookie. But before I do that I should tell you about our special show coming up at the Lexington in London on November 11th. Only a few tickets left.  A new video is also about to be revealed. Check it all out and come see us in action!

One Bullet From Paradise is out now @ including https://diesofluid.bandcamp.com/

 For more links to the album and all things Die So Fluid explore the band @

https://diesofluid.net/    https://www.facebook.com/DieSoFluid/     https://twitter.com/diesofluid

Pete RingMaster 26/10/2018

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

The Dahmers – Down In The Basement

For any sporting or physically demanding endeavour it is advisable to go into some sort of training. With music it is not a requirement that is until you come up against the new album from Swedish rock ‘n’ horror fiends, The Dahmers. The band has just released Down In The Basement, a beast of a record bursting with eighteen tracks of rock ‘n’ roll fever as ferociously energetic as it is virally infectious. From its first heartbeat to its last the bands third full-length is an insatiable incitement keeping the body rigorously and eagerly bouncing.  It is relentless, exhausting, and pure pleasure from start to finish.

Bromölla hailing, the Dahmers has been no strangers to keen attention having released a pair of ear enticing albums in Demons (2015) and In the Dead of Night (2017). Each has shown and evolved a sound which is bred on a patchwork of numerous flavours ranging from garage and classic punk to vintage rock ’n’ roll, sixties pop and garage rock. Each of those releases certainly pleased ears but have now been imply blown out of the crypt by the simply irresistible and irrepressible Down In The Basement.

With a mass of tracks the size Down In The Basement offers you would expect a few fillers here and there but they are conspicuous by their absence; from the opening surge of Blood On My Hands the album a full-on meal of prime cuts. The first track bursts into life on a tide of voice and guitar bred persuasion, straight away twisting and turning like a dervish whilst unleashing a wave of catchy mischief. The vocals of Christoffer Karlsson lead the way in manipulation but more than matched by his and fellow guitarist Josef Underdal’s devious hooks and the rhythmic salaciousness of bassist Tobias Augustsson and drummer Karl-Oskar Hansson. Something akin to The Hives meets Asylums the track simply stomped into ears and the passions setting the album off on a mighty course.

The following Murder Ride is just as reckless and tenacious in its own punk infused charge, sending insistent grooves and rapacious hooks through ears with a fifties rock ‘n’ roll meets seventies punk irreverence before Street Of the Dead brings its garage rock/indie pop boisterous to the already devilish party. More reserved than its predecessors but just as equipped with ripe catchiness, the song had the body fully employed in no time.

Across the classic hard rock tinted antics of Down On My Knees and the corrupted boogie woogie nurtured devilment of The Ripper new flavours and rascality sweeps across Down In The Basement, The Dahmers already revealing their most diverse web of sound which Hit ‘N’ Run exploits for its contagion loaded adrenaline fuelled punk ‘n’ roll romp. All three tracks infested body and spirit with ease, the latter mercilessly before Howling merged the rock ‘n’ roll decades with its nefarious holler for a matching success.

As suggested the album is a perpetual rush of treats which simply continue with the revengeful punk ‘n’ roll of I Spit On Your Grave and the fiendish infestation of Demon Night. Both had the body twisting like a possessed soul, their pop seeded rascality pure manipulation and inescapable corruption in the outstanding second of the pair.

Classic rock gets a nudge within next up Creepiest Creep, another track with hooks and grooves which worm under the skin like invaders into a six foot buried offering while Reoccurring Dreams is just a punk rock scourge of temptation draped with surf molestation. Both make a play for best track honours though already the list is a fair size and only about to grow as Without a Face declares its option through a sixties pop ‘n’ rock spiced saunter abound with rousing vocals and rhythms heated with fiery melodic flames.

The cinematic breath of Kiss of Dario has the imagination as busy as ever, Man Obsessed straight after sparking grinning lips as it flirts with Blondie for its prime hook as it teases an already lustful appetite for the album. Even so both are outshone by the voracious rock ‘n’ roll rascality of No One and a quite glorious cover of the Devo masterpiece, Social Fools. Both tracks show The Dahmers at their most irresistible, the first a prize roar of their untamed imagination and boldness, its successor of their inimitable punk ‘n’ roll enterprise which did not improve on an existing gem but certainly re-energised its might.

The final pair of November with its deceptively calm sixties hued, pop coated calm and dark instrumental The End brings the album to a magnetic close. The last track is another moment of cinematic intimation, an industrial creased piece which replaced a bouncing body with an imagination conjuring suggestiveness to keenly intrigue.

Down In The Basement is a momentous offering from a band due bigger and broader attention; it is not just us saying that but a collection of tracks which demand your soul.

Down In The Basement is out now via Lövely Records across most online stores.

Upcoming Live Dates:

02/11 – Skövde In Rock Fest   Skövde, SWE

03/11 – Halloween Meltdown   Eskilstuna, SWE

04/11 – Kulsturkvarteret   Kristianstad, SWE

15/11 – Cinema   Aalst, BEL*

16/11 – Dusseldorf   Ratinger Hof, GER*

17/11 – Eindhoven   Helldorado, NL*

* Supporting The Dwarves

https://www.facebook.com/Dahmers/

Pete RingMaster 26/10/2018

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

New aspects and visions: chatting with Molly Grue

Earlier this year we chatted with Krista Acheson about her music as Krista D. As she continues the unveiling of her project, Molly Grue, with a new single ahead of her debut EP, The happy ending cannot come in the middle of the story, we had the pleasure of talking with the Canadian singer songwriter about her new adventure.

Can you talk to us a little about why you started this project?

I started Molly Grue so that I could have a separate project under which I could release some songs that I’d written which didn’t match the style of music I was releasing under my Krista D project.

How many bands, or rather projects, are you involved in?

At the moment, three… The Krista D project is for the material that is a blend of 50s and 60s musical elements, with some punk flavouring.

Molly Grue is where I’ll be releasing some soft, alternative, rock music and I also have another project called Hooha and the Peter Guns under which I plan to release some harder rock material. I felt it might be easier for people to know what to expect from me if my music was compartmentalized according to style.

What inspired the Molly Grue name?

It’s a character from an animated film called The Last Unicorn. I used to watch it a lot as a child. I still do from time to time. I was working on some art and thinking about starting to release music again, after about a 10 year hiatus, and the film was playing in the background; the part where Molly was angry with the unicorn came on and that’s when I decided on the name. I was like… that’s exactly how I’d react if I found success at music at this point in my life.

Do the same things still drive you as an artist from when you were fresh-faced or have they evolved over time?

When I started in music, in the mid 90’s, I was extremely naive. I started recording quite young and at the time I assumed that if someone had an inherent talent for something, they would just naturally find a place doing what they were organically suited for; as if somehow your skill-set preordained you to eventually become successful in a career.

As I grew up I realized that’s not how the music industry works. So, now the only thing that drives me is the desire to create and express myself.

Since those early days, how would you say your core sound and creativity has evolved?

It changes a little from song to song; sometimes I’ll toss in a new instrument or a weird audio sample, but overall I stick to the same pattern. I’m not sure if there’s been any true evolution, and if there has, I’m probably too close to my projects to hear it.

Has anything or anyone directed, or majorly inspired, your approach to creating music?

Not directly, no…A lot of my writing and composing is intuitive; it happens on a subconscious level. I think it’s basically a collage of a bunch of musical elements that I’ve picked up throughout my life – but I never consciously set out to sound like anyone in particular.

Do you have a particular process to your songwriting?

My songwriting process is: a melody and lyrics pops into my head…strings, piano, trumpets or other background elements accompany it. Then I try to communicate it, either with plotting it out using a keyboard to give to someone to transpose into sheet music, or, for rock oriented stuff, I either strum the chords, write out the chords or resort to humming them at a guitarist. It’s a very slow, strained process, to be honest. I don’t play many of the instruments I like to write for, so I’m trapped in my head a lot. I’m currently setting up a small studio space in my house so that I can plot out all the instruments digitally, by ear.

Where do you, more often than not, draw the inspirations for the lyrical side of your songs?

It’s all mostly based on personal experience. The Molly Grue project is a venting project… it’s actually a bit depressing, but I think sorrow serves a higher purpose when it’s converted into an art form.

Would you give us some background to your latest release? What is the newest single about?

My latest release is a single that I’ve called O Dymphna! with the alternate title ‘Stepped Over’. It’s dealing with sexual assault and I’d written it years ago, recorded it last year, and it’s due to be out on digital platforms next week. It’s actually the only song in my career that I’ve had to put an explicit lyrics warning on. The title O Dymphna! was meant like a supplication to an icon that represents multiple forms of suffering. I had read somewhere that she was the patron saint of assault, anxiety, mental illness, runaways and probably a few other things; sources seem to vary. I’m not Catholic, but I find the iconography interesting and chose the title to encompass various experiences, because no matter the specifics of an individuals’ story, we all share a very similar emotional aftermath that forever alters our reality.

Do you go into the studio with songs pretty much in their final state or develop them as you record?

I do what I can to best express what I want to hear on a rough demo, before it gets studio recorded, but things always evolve slightly depending on the musicians I’ve chosen to work with or hire.

How as the internet and social media impacted you to date? Do you see it as something destined to become a negative from a positive as the project grows and hopefully gets increasing success but also sees an increase of people trying to get your music for free etc.?

The biggest positive impact it’s had was when my single Land Mine received over 719,000 streams, in a month, through Pandora internet radio.

Aside from that, I’m probably one of the artists who struggle to use social media to their advantage. I’ve been mainly using my social media accounts as portfolios but rarely actively promote or market myself. I do realize how important social media is to people, though, so I do intend to try to work harder in that area; especially where Molly Grue is a new project starting from zero.

Our big thanks for sharing time with us: anything you like to add or reveal for the readers?

Thank you for the interview! For anyone wanting to follow my progress on either my visual art or the upcoming EPs, they are welcome to friend me on Facebook. I am most active on this account: https://www.facebook.com/krista.acheson   I also have links to all of my music at: http://www.trimorfik.com

https://www.facebook.com/MollyGrueMusic/

Pete RingMaster 26/10/2018

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Verni – Barricade

There is nothing better than a song which has you swinging from the rafters hollering and roaring. When you get ten in one ridiculously rousing collection it borders on bliss and that is exactly what the debut album from Verni uncages. The first offering from the solo project of Overkill founder and bass player DD Verni, Barricade is one unbridled raucous anthem sprung from individual hurricanes of rock ‘n’ roll incitement and easily one of the most pleasurable offerings of the year.

An ever prolific songwriter, Verni as a project arose from a growing collection of songs which did not fit either Overkill or DD’s side outfit The Bronx Casket Co. To add extra spicing to the mix, he proceeded to approach a host of musicians to guest on them resulting in the album featuring a plethora of guitarists including Jeff Loomis (Arch Enemy), Angus Clark (Trans Siberian Orchestra), Jeff Waters (Annihilator), Bruce Franklin (Trouble), Mike Romeo (Symphony X), Mike Orlando (Adrenaline Mob), Steve Leonard (Almost Queen) and Andre “Virus” Karkos (Dope) as well as former Overkill drummer Ron Lipnicki. Putting all those lures aside, Barricade is a cauldron of temptation in its own right whether it swings with rock tenacity, trespasses with metal nurtured ferocity or snarls with punk driven belligerence.

Immediately opener Fire Up opens its sonic jaws, attention was not just lured but gripped as grooves drive a rapacious onslaught of rock ‘n’ roll.  A tease of Verni’s thrash instincts unite with hard rock vivacity, riffs and rhythms colluding to create their own thick lure alongside the creative web of the guitars. DD’s vocals are a matching draw, it all stirring up quick involvement from body, voice, and neck muscles. No breath is spared as the song charges through ears spilling lust poking hooks and grooves as gang shouts holler and individual flare across the track ignites.

The following Miracle Drug is equally as virulent in its catchiness and energetic hard rock cast dynamics if taking things down a gear gait wise. But a single gear it is as the track still flies from the speakers with zeal and enterprise before Off My Leash has the body bouncing with its contagiously predacious animation. Punk and grunge infest its metal lined rock bred swagger, another collusion of flavours which seeds something truly fresh and viral. Unexpected twists only add to its relentless and unbridled tempting.

Like a wound up dervish, (We are) The Broken Ones strikes next with guitars scything across earthy rhythms as vocals inspire eager participation while Lost In The Underground embroils classic rock exploits in punk ‘n’ roll contagion to romp and stomp with the listener. Both tracks not only hit the spot but shatter it to incite a lustful union.

Through the darker thrash spun drama of The Party of No and the southern gothic drama of Night of the Swamp King the album only tightens its grip. The first has a definite Anthrax meets Dope feel to it while the second is atmospheric intimation and sonic theatre soaked in stoner intoxication; their successor, We Were Young, adding to the album’s blossoming variety with its classic rock balladry. The latter is a track we would not normally take to but courtesy of the devilish prowess of DD Verni we were firmly hooked.

The album closes up with firstly of Slow My Ride,​ a fervent entanglement of alternative metal and hard rock, and in turn the classic metal meets anthemic rock outing of Heaven Calling. It is probably fair to say neither lit the fires within as those before them but each escalated the undiluted enjoyment of Barricade, a pleasure which has only grown by the listen.

​We are sure we will not be alone in hoping DD Verni continues to write tracks which do not fit his main projects because as much as those projects fully satisfy another Verni encounter is already the subject of hungry anticipation.

Barricade is out now via Mighty Music on CD, digitally and on Ltd white vinyl.

http://www.ddverni.com/    https://www.facebook.com/ddverni/

 Pete RingMaster 17/10/2018

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

A Parade of Goodness

The past month going into the next has seen our friends at SaN PR send over a host of artists with new singles to tempt and rouse the senses. o we thought we would club the best together and give you the heads up on their striking propositions.

First up and coinciding with their next tour of the US, is British punksters Ghouls who have just uncaged their new single Be. An irrepressible slice of the raucously infectious and boisterous punk rock the Londoners are becoming keenly renowned for, the track just bounds through ears taking the spirit with it on a rousing stomp. Yet equally its heart and words reveal shadows and emotions to hook and captivate thoughts and imagination.

Formed in 2013, the quintet has earned a potent reputation and an increasingly growing and dedicated fan base through their songs and a praise wrapping live presence which has seen the band play numerous UK and international festivals and share stages with bands such as Less Than Jake, Slaves, The Skints, The Ataris, Sonic Boom Six, Random Hand, OPM, and ROAM. It is hard not to hear why the increasing attention on the band when hearing Be and also a handful of months back its predecessor, the similarly bold and compelling Internet Famous.

Be is an immediate blast of catchy sound driven by swinging rhythms and rapacious guitars. Just as swiftly though it is a bloom of imagination and unpredictability, calms and crescendos plus brass flames adding fun and adventure to its dynamic punk funk antics and though seemingly over before its time, the track is as arousing and manipulative as anything heard this year; simply a real gem of a song.

Next up is Dead Ground, an alternative rock trio from Exeter consisting of Ollie Harris, Edward Tucker, Jake Friese-Greene who has just released their new single, We All Feel The Same, another song rather hard to ignore.

Emerging in 2015, the British trio has earned plaudits through shows with the likes of Idles and Black Foxxes and are sure to again through their latest offering. It is a song which echoes inspirations which include Muse, Black Peaks, and Radiohead though it is the former which most comes to mind across the magnetic track. Even so, from its first breath and the strong lure of voice and guitar, We All Feel The Same shows the band’s music has its own unmistakable identity. The track is a calm yet eventful piece of melodic rock which never seems over busy or creates a tide of sound but is as rich in enterprise and aural intimation as a full on tempest.

With smart twists and little turns within its magnetic body, the track is another seriously enticing offering from Dead Ground and a potent invitation to newcomers.

The wait is over, British punks Eight Days have returned from their eighteen month hiatus and roared back with a major holler of a track.

Stray barracks and harries the senses like it is making up for lost time yet has an imagination in its creation which revels in the time taken to breed its angst bursting outcry. Equally is has a fresh breath to it which echoes the potency and character of the band’s very well-received 2016 EP More To Life but reveals a whole new thrust of energy, invention, and potential, maybe no surprise as Eight Days returns with new members offering new ideas and essences in creativity.

A fusion of punk, hardcore and alternative rock in varying degrees, the track immediately had ears on board as its opening lure of hook loaded riffs beckoned. It proved the prelude or rather lead into a tempest of ferocity and sonic tension but an emotion loaded storm ripe with swinging grooves, tenacious rhythms and subsequently unsettled calms and post hardcore-esque intimation.

The track is a fine return by the band and hopefully a hint of big things to come.

With their debut album of this year, Face Value, still luring new fans and plaudits, UK hardcore outfit Of Legions are poised to unleash their new single Vision Of Misery. A brand new track, it is a beast of a trespass, a cauldron of the band’s fusion of hardcore, punk, and metal which not so much warrants attention but orders it.

From Stoke, the quartet has steadily risen up the hardcore ranks since emerging in 2015. Embracing inspirations from artists such as Black Flag, Slipknot, and Parkway Drive, Of Legions has honed their individual sound across two EPs and that recently their highly praised album and earned a potent reputation for a live presence taking in shows with Silent Screams, Liferuiner, Martyr Defiled, Continents, Brokencyde, Sikth, and Loathe among many others.

Intimating a new wind of adventure in the band’s sound, Vision Of Misery prowls the senses initially, riffs a scowling predator against a rhythmic rumbling. A melodic tendril though lights its advance calming the intensity a touch before the shackles are off and the track invades. There is still somewhat of a restraint to its attack but that only accentuates its power and animosity.

Continuing to bawl and punish with its hardcore bred, metal infested confrontation, a contagious mix despite its punishing tempest, the track is a thick indisputable declaration of a band heading the way of major attention.

Be from Ghouls is out now.

https://www.facebook.com/ghoulsuk/    https://twitter.com/ghoulsuk

Dead Ground has We All Feel The Same on the loose now.

https://www.facebook.com/deadgroundmu/

Eight Days has Stray available now.

https://www.facebook.com/EightDaysUK/   https://twitter.com/eightdaysuk

Of Legions unleash Vision Of Misery November 9th.

https://www.facebook.com/OfLegions/     https://www.instagram.com/of_legions_uk/

Pete RingMaster 24/10/2018

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