Fear Me December – Crystallized

Every music lover can share a song or release which sparked the fight and defiance in them against either the world’s injustices or issues of a more intimate experience; encounters which trigger a renewed strength in their resistance. Fear Me December offer a quartet of such incitements within new EP, Crystallized; tracks which tap into the issues and resolve many suffer across varying areas. They are also four songs which have the body and spirit bouncing to soulful and boisterously rousing roars announcing Fear Me December as one rather potent proposition.

Formed in 2012 by Argentinian born vocalist/bassist Victoria Cabanellas and lead guitarist Valentin Macagno, Fear Me December began as a trio with the addition of drummer Emiliano. The band released their well-received debut EP, Who Cares in 2014 before taking the decision to relocate to the UK that same year. Basing themselves in Manchester, the band soon hits the live scene, touring the UK and playing festivals to begin sparking the same level of support and attention they garnered in their homeland. The departure of Emiliano back to Argentina could not stop the remaining pair from writing and working on their first album, the Matt Ellis recorded Between Violence And Silence released in 2016 with Chris Inman providing drums. 2017 saw the band’s current and stable line-up in place with Tony Small swinging the sticks and Stuart Woolley bringing rhythm guitar into the mix, the foursome now providing a rich statement of intent with the seriously magnetic Crystallized.

A creative tempest of aggressively melodic metal and rapacious heavy rock, the EP starts with Fight Me, a song surging with defiance and a rigorous confrontation from its first breath and the opening forceful rally of Small’s beats. It is an insurgence which is soon joined by the sonic impetus of the guitars and the darker throated threat of bass; it all uniting in a tempestuous front bursting with swift enterprise and the contagious presence of Cabanellas’ voice. Inescapably infectious without losing its threatening snarl and predacious bite, the track is superb emerging as one of our favourites this year; the web of metal and rock ‘n’ roll skilfully manipulated and manipulative.

Not Wired the Same follows, its rise less imposing but just as insistent as guitars weave an alluring invitation within a tide of hungry riffs and a throaty bassline to swing upon. With Small’s beats again sparing no measure of aggression even in the song’s slightly less ferocious charge compared to its predecessor, the track just as easily got under the skin with its lyrical exploration showing an understanding to depression and the instincts of the suicidal.

Two tracks in and the EP has proven one of the year’s most enjoyable offerings and does not let that success slip as it shares its final pair of tracks in This Is Not Ok and its title track. The first has a calmer stance soaked in melancholy but is soon releasing an instinctive catchiness rippling with energy and soulful intimation especially in its insistently rousing chorus. Its ebb and flow captivates; the caress and surges of the guitars igniting further enticement to match that of voice and another potent rhythmic provocation.

Closing song, Crystallized, is a fiery proposition; rom the off its flames veined by wiry tendrils of guitar and driven by the almost predatory touch of bass and drums. Cabanellas is again a winning lure in the midst of the bold adventure, even with her distance siren calls in the song’s relatively mellower twists. Providing a last furor of emotion and enterprise to the EP, the track is another truly magnetic and highly memorable moment, a description applying to each song and the release as a whole.

With Crystallized, Fear Me December has declared themselves ready to burst right out of the UK metal/rock scene into rich attention; with more of the same ahead it is hard to see them failing.

The Crystallized EP is released September 7th through all platforms.

https://www.fearmedecember.net/   https://www.facebook.com/fmdband/   https://twitter.com/FearMeDec   https://www.instagram.com/fearmedecemberuk/

 Pete RingMaster 07/09/2018

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Masiro – Geodesics

Simultaneously teasing and engaging the imagination from start to finish, Geodesics is the new EP from British instrumental metallers Masiro. It offers up six tracks which take the listener on their own inspired journey through realms of creative intimation and magnetic craft; a collection of pieces which provide a straight line to pleasure but across a landscape of adventure which curves and fascinates like an aural kaleidoscope.

A trio hailing from Oxford, Masiro consists of original founders in guitarist Mike Bannard and drummer Chris Pethers, the band emerging as a duo in 2011, alongside bassist Chris Hutchinson Mogg formerly of ex-50ft Panda. Scented by the inspirations of artists such as Meshuggah, Primus, Mars Volta, Animals as Leaders, 65 Days of Static, Psyopus and many more, their music is a tapestry woven from strains of mathcore, progressive metal, and post rock though that only skirts over its varied richness. The band soon drew acclaim once releasing debut EP Technocologist Unknown in 2016, praise and recognition only thickened by their live presence which has seen them share stages with the likes of Poly Math, Core of IO, Iran Iran, and Kusanagi as well as festival appearances.

Geodesics is surely set to see Masiro lure even greater and broader recognition and plaudits their way, though strangely it is an encounter which with us depended on close attention to be really seduced and enthralled. As background support to whatever maybe needed to be done, it is a certainly fully enjoyable but a touch too easy to have distractions take charge but sit ears down with headphones and record and Masiro had us lost in its riveting web of craft and imagination whilst bouncing to its dynamics and suggestive incitement.

The EP swiftly entices with opener Andromeda Handshake, the track almost instantly a sonic chasm of turbulence but from within which tendrils of melody bred guitar wrap around ears and imagination The snarling almost bestial tone of the bass keeps the threat alive whilst rhythms pick their spots with rapacious intent. The tempest though breeds melodic radiance, it being swallowed once more but only to wait its moment to crystalize air and the rich temptation it ignites. Perpetually evolving, the track transfixes from start to finish with its mercurial flight.

The following K-Ursa is a far calmer proposition from its first breath. Featuring the saxophone prowess of Charlie Cruickshank, the song is a warm almost summery canter but with bold flames in its sultry climate. Again though there is a volatile instinct to the music, one which never fully ignites but brings a thought inspiring temper to the melodic beauty woven and eventually incites it all to come to a fiery head for its finale.

Both tracks also revel in an array of infection spreading hooks and twists, a creative agility just as potent within next up 21:15. With shadows courting its lining and depths, the track is a dark almost predatory controlled waltz, always intimating a portentous outcome even through its melodic elegance; a threat accentuated by the throaty growl and crawl of the bass and Pether’s agile swings. As all tracks it sends thoughts off on an exploration, espionage and danger courting their conjuring this time around.

The sonic displacement of Intermission: Graveyard Orbit with Lee Riley supplying drone dissonance intrigued if not much more and is soon forgotten as the outstanding End Permian emerges from its raw mists. Instantly a nagging groove had us hooked, its guitar lure increasing as the bass seduced as it prowled with slight irritability amidst a shimmering melodic glaze. Subsequently, as you can rightly assume, the piece gyrates with ideation and individual craft aligned to a united imagination, every slip into something new as fluid as it is expectantly unpredictable.

The release concludes with Grand Trine, another inescapable incitement of emotional and physical response. It is carnival of eager bordering rabid enterprise, the band’s mathcore instincts dancing like a dervish around relaxed moments of equally compelling melodic insinuation. As with all tracks, where it takes you will be as individual as the sounds provoking your imagination and as each we suspect leaving little else but pleasure especially the deeper you immerse in its creative emprise.

That is the same for Geodesics as a whole, give it your total time and attention and the rewards verge on the irresistible.

Geodesics is released September 7th, available @ https://masiro.bandcamp.com/

https://www.facebook.com/masiromusic   https://twitter.com/masiroband   https://www.instagram.com/masiro_band/

Pete RingMaster 07/09/2018

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright