Naberus – Hollow

Around seven years after emerging upon the Australian Metal scene, Naberus released their debut album, The Lost Reveries. It was a well-received offering earning critical praise and confirming the Melbourne outfit’s potent presence within their national metal landscape. Now the quintet has unleashed its successor in the shape of the ravenously resourceful and compelling Hollow and it is fair to say the band has hit a whole new level.

The Lost Reveries was the band’s sound at the time at a pinnacle, one which was heavily influenced by melodic death and thrash metal, a mix honed over previous tracks and EPs since day one. Whilst Hollow also revels in those hues it reveals an embracing of a far broader template including essences of groove, nu, and technical metal. Everything about the new album is a growth from its predecessor, one which maybe will be a step too far for some original fans but will surely recruit a whole new tide of fresh appetites. At fourteen tracks it is a bulky proposal for sure which flirts with overstaying its time but one which pretty much constantly holds its strength and lure throughout before leaving with a bang.

Mixed by Henrik Udd (Bring Me the Horizon, Architects, A Breach of Silence) and mastered by Ermin Hamidovic (Architects, Periphery, Devin Townsend), Hollow launches at the listener with the outstanding Slaves. Immediately the guitars of Dan Ralph and Dante Thompson entangle ears with their sonic wires as the vocal snarl of James Ash harries ears. Djent spices infest the intensive blaze as other flavours collude in its rapacious web around the scything beats of Chris Sheppard and the predatory growl of Jordan Mitchell’s bass. Familiarity and individuality merge in its intensive roar, they all going to make a savagely raucous yet skilfully woven captivation.

The following Space To Breathe is just as swiftly imposing but inviting, taking a less invasive stance initially as its elements settle before uniting in its own ferocious trespass. Ash’s vocals again impress with their not vast but strong diversity within the emerging rich tapestry of sound. There are essences of bands like Spineshank and Static X to the track at times but equally it lusts after death and extreme metal textures with the same fervour and invention before the superb Split In Two uncages its own similarly but individually woven tempest. Harsh and melodic strains in both vocals and music make an easy union as the imagination in songwriting incites their drama, the track continuing the explosive success of the first pair ensuring that Hollow is already a riveting proposal.

Both Shadows and Webs nag the senses whilst seducing attention; the first a sonic harassment as adventurous as it is predatory with its successor, deceitfully calm at its start, a subsequent cauldron of fiercely simmering intensity with scalding eruptions and a persistently bubbling enterprise. True uniqueness could be said to be less potent within the two yet everything about them and all songs is as fresh and inventive as you could wish, the album’s title track further evidence. Its enmity is a harsh fury from the start, searing trespass and rhythmic lashing entangled in the sonic imagination of the guitars and the collage of vocal incitement. It makes for a dramatic and dynamic assault which just hits the spot like a sledge hammer.

Through the likes of the belligerently tenacious I Disappear, the corrosive reflection of The End and Seas Of Red with its almost feral tides and melodic fire, the album continues to delve into malice, aggression, and different degrees of variety in their individual characters. It is fair to say that the latter two of the three did not ignite the same energy of passion and acclaim as those previously within Hollow yet all easily enticed and pleasured before The Maze had ears lost to its creative course. Living up to its name, the thrilling song is a tangle of grooves and melodic vines within a formidable confrontation, each tunnelling through song and psyche alike.

My Favorite Memory similarly springs a spiralling union of endeavour within its dark catacomb but its mercurial exploration of emotion and sound quickly develops its own individual presence while Fading with far more savage jaws challenges and erupts upon the senses with enterprise and inventive dexterity, every member of the band creating a simultaneous threat and temptation within the track.

The album is closed up by firstly The Burrow and finally The Depths, both tracks leaving thick enticements in their wake for a swift return with the closing incitement within Hollow a labyrinth of irrepressible grooves and sonic wires through a lusty trespass of vocal and rhythmic animation. The track is another major moment within the release possibly its greatest following so many lofty peaks.

As a whole Hollow is a refreshing and rousing offering from a band deserving thick attention hereon in. Yes with so many tracks it might be a stretch in one go; a couple of times songs almost merging into each other in certain ways but each is an imagination and pleasure sparking assault in their own right and proving Naberus one exciting proposition.

Hollow is out now through Eclipse Records.

https://www.facebook.com/naberusband   https://twitter.com/NaberusOfficial

Pete RingMaster 10/07/2018

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Hell Night / Sweat Shoppe – Split

A new split on Encapsulated Records sees two of St. Louis, Missouri’s finest come together for one simply tremendous encounter. The release features five tracks shared between Hellnight and Sweat Shoppe, a quintet of tracks which all unerringly got under the skin.

Pic by David Torrance

Hell Night provides the first two tracks within the split. Formed in 2014 by guitarist Andy White, the band additionally consists of bassist Eric Eyster, drummer Adam Arseneau, and the distinctive tones of former Shadows Fall and Overcast vocalist Brian Fair. Their sound is a ferocious yet instinctively animated fusion of metal and punk and as emphasized by the duo of offerings here fraught with virulently incisive hooks and grooves.

Their first track is Unincorporated, a predacious nagging of enterprise which is part feral part manipulation from its first breath. Fair’s rasping roar is soon infesting the invasive contagion, that array of flavours a rapacious entanglement squirreling its lures in ears and psyche. The track is superb, not richly unique yet wholly individual to the quartet as too its companion Overburden. Heavier and slightly more intense in its gait and tone, the song also webs the senses in the niggling prowess of guitars and bass as Arseneau’s beats bite and arouse. Its melodic undercurrent is just as tempting, new wave hues lining its understated but potent tease within the more carnal trespass.

Hell Night’s outstanding duo of tracks as quickly matched by the trio uncaged by punksters Sweat Shoppe. Another foursome, the band emerged in 2015 and includes members of The Disappeared, Horror Section, and The Timer as well as Ultraman vocalist Tim Jamison, the full line-up completed by Justin Haltmar, Gabe Usery, and Andrew Brandmeyer.

Lost and Mean is the first of the band’s tracks and immediately barrages ears with its unfussy yet skilfully honed attitude and ferocity. Its old school tone is instantly addictive within the minute and a half of punk belligerence, riffs unleashed and hooks uniting for a catchy invasion which continues within the even briefer Circumstance. The track’s hooks and riffs are ravenously contagious within the darker tone and climate of the song, aiding its inescapable persuasion and addictive trespass whilst reminding a touch of British punk legends Angelic Upstarts.

The final track from them is Clawing Brain, another antagonistic scowl of sonic contagiousness and rhythmic contempt around the attitude loaded vocal release of Jamison. It completes five tracks which do the highly enjoyable business with raw passion, energy, and imagination as well as a bit of intimidation. If either Hell Night or Sweat Shoppe has yet to hit your radar, their coming together here is one unmissable introduction and you can enjoyable further songs from both outfits on the Quarter Hour Of Power compilation also from Encapsulated Records; each release available digitally and on 7” vinyl now @ https://www.encapsulatedrecords.com/collections/releases   https://encapsulatedrecords.bandcamp.com and other stores.

https://www.facebook.com/hellnightus/   https://www.facebook.com/sweatshoppemusic/

Pete RingMaster 10/07/2018

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright