Elephant Memoirs – No Pressure No Rush EP

Formed in 2013, British outfit Elephant Memoirs have honed an ear grabbing sound which has grown release by release. New EP, No Pressure No Rush continues that successful trend, offering up six of the band’s most potent and imaginative songs yet.

Hailing from Gateshead, the trio of vocalist/guitarist John Aspinall, bassist Carl Aspinall, and drummer Barry Drew create a thoughtful style of alternative rock which has seen them already compared to the likes of Manic Street Preachers, Biffy Clyro, Placebo, and Queens Of the Stone Age. As No Pressure No Rush suggests, it has not found its unique character yet but there is no denying that each song provides individual and imaginative adventure.

Recorded with Kyle Martin at The Garage Studios in South Shields, No Pressure No Rush opens with Homework. A vocal hush ignites an attention luring pulse of guitar which in turn sparks a composed stroll of swinging rhythms and alluring sonic causticity. The potent vocals of John nestle within the raw flames, the track continuing to almost lumber along. It is an intrigue provoking proposition which certainly had us firmly attentive and animated if not quite as excited as later in the release.

Pink is a vocal repetition of the EP’s title within a sonic trespass. Brief yet suggestive, it leads the imagination into the awaiting pop rock of A Little Metaphor. John is again a strong clean lure against the scuzzy exploits of his guitar, Carl and Barry creating thick rhythmic bait stirring song and appetite alike. As it swings along, it is easy to hear why those earlier mentioned comparisons arise; all adding to the infectious song’s strong appeal. There is muscle and depth to its catchy body though which easily engages the imagination, a richness of textures just as bold within its captivating successor Ether. With drama in every twist and enterprise in every turn, the song grabs best track honours, the fire in its body alone seriously compelling.

The release concludes with firstly Orange, a lead of sonic pulsation and melodic intimation luring ears into the infectious rock ‘n’ roll saunter of Complete Resonsibility. Though it lacks the spark of the preceding pair, the EP closer easily hooks keen attention with its tenacious and arousing character, sparking a bounce in the body to match its own.

It is a fine skilfully accomplished end to a release which is potential stocked and craft laden. Elephant Memoirs is still growing and brewing their sound whilst continuing to create highly pleasurable proposals such as No Pressure No Rush. It is a journey we for one are thoroughly enjoying.

The No Pressure No Rush EP is available now @ https://elephantmemoirs.bandcamp.com/album/no-pressure-no-rush

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Pete RingMaster 11/04/2018

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Five Mile Smile – The Truth About Dogs and Wolves

Five Mile Smile is a duo from Belfast in Northern Ireland, The Truth About Dogs and Wolves their new EP and highly infectious proof that the band creates some rather tasty blues lined rock ‘n’ roll.

Originally formed in 2000, Five Mile Smile split up three years later after a time playing extensively around Ireland and recording some well-received songs. Connecting again through Facebook, the band reformed as a trio in 2014, initially just for fun. In no time though they began writing new material and played a few small private gigs. Things have continued to grow, culminating in the release of The Truth About Dogs and Wolves; an encounter which mixes familiarity with fresh passion and mischievous adventure.

The EP opens with Brawlin in Belfast, a track “about local boxing, and small time boxers making it big.” From the announcement every boxing fan gets a tingle from, the track stomps into view with bold rhythms and a hungry tide of riffs. Quickly it slips into its rock ‘n’ roll stride, vocals roaring from the midst of the swiftly contagious proposal as fifties and sixties rock ‘n’ roll collude with fresher essences to wrap attention up in the song’s swinging antics. It is an excellent start to the release, a slice of almost feral infectiousness veined by ear enticing guitar and rhythmic craft.

Call to Arms comes next, the second track making an equally alluring start as vocals harmonically unite against the more aggressive but no less enticing jab of beats and the sonic glaze of guitar. There is a heavier gait and swing to the song compared to its predecessor and a darker air seemingly to its intent which only adds to its drama and though it does not quite match up to the heights of the first song it leaves a keen appetite for more which Beg Borrow or Steal with its dirty rock ‘n’ roll soon feeds. Again it is a song unafraid to embrace sixties inspirations, The Rolling Stones an obvious but invigorating hue in its highly enjoyable nagging infectious roar.

The lively almost salacious exploits of Working Man and the licentious deeds of Drinkin All Day keep the record rocking and body rolling; the first a raw and firmly catchy offering with highly flavoursome melodic flames licking at its virulent infectiousness. Its successor is sandwiched between a great burst of cigarette nostalgia, blazing away with blues rock passion and energy not forgetting creative enticement. Both tracks challenge the first for best song honours, the first swinging it.

The EP closes with Touch the Lightning, a song which hints at and promises more than maybe it delivers even with its eventful twists, never quite following through their boldness, but still does nothing less than please and add to the potency of a release which may not be obviously unique but has plenty to get into and more importantly really enjoy. Check out the band’s other new track This Is Not a Drill too on their Bandcamp page for more blues rock goodness.

The Truth About Dogs and Wolves is available now @  https://fivemilesmile.bandcamp.com/album/the-truth-about-dogs-and-wolves

https://www.facebook.com/Five-Mile-Smile-604400046245516/

Pete RingMaster 11/04/2018

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright