Infected Syren – Self Titled

Nudging broad attention virtually since they emerged in 2011 and certainly since the release of a demo the following year, Infected Syren are now demanding it with their self-titled debut album. With eleven tracks of rapacious metal infested punk ‘n’ roll, the Cyprus bred outfit grab body and appetite with mischievous intent, rousing energy, and a craft honed in the heart of rock ‘n’ roll.

Nicosia bred and now sharing their time between their country’s capital and London, Infected Syren is said to have come to “finally consider a more serious and dedicated approach towards writing their own material and developing their sound while doing what they love most – performing heavy alternative music!” Certainly you can hear the passion at its heart and the imagination in its character; a proposition which roars with the invasive funkiness of Infected Grooves, the uncompromising punk attitude of The Exploited, the thrash devilry of early Anthrax, and the psychobilly predation of a blend of Grumpynators and Batmobile. It is a stomping incitement embracing familiar traits but all twisted into the fiercely enjoyable individual antics of Infected Syren.

The album opens with the sinister, increasingly intimidating carnival of Infected Circus, a hook woven instrumental easily getting under the skin as guitars suggestively dance and rhythms devilishly swing. It sets the mood and rascality of the release perfectly, the following romp of The B.B.P. similarly manipulative with its hook lined grooves and teasing metal spawn riffs. Guitarists Constantinos Lyras and Louis Syrimis cast a net of infectious exploits within the song’s boisterous body; the latter’s vocals as bold and devious as the addictive textures making up the track.

Already, the release is a swagger of thrash and alternative metal hued rock ‘n’ roll, the band’s punk instincts brewing nicely and erupting more forcibly within UnNormal. From a southern nurtured hook, the track breaks into an inescapably catchy stroll, wiry grooves swiftly entwining the animated beats of Constantinos Syrimis and the lithe canter of Miguel Trapezaris’ bass. With devilment in song and the charismatic vocal deliver of Louis, the track bounds along with the listener taking in calm and volatile scenery with equal ease whilst taking over hips and body like a puppeteer.

It is fair to say that every track within the album is rich in virulent bait and scheming manoeuvres, next up Sick springing its dirty rock ‘n’ roll with frisky buoyancy, bobbing along with attitude and playfulness as punk irritability meets heavy rock intensity, both imposingly irresistible sides entangled in riotous high spirit. The album’s best track is closely rivalled by the punk ‘n’ roll discord coated virulence of Unwanted, the track poking the listener in the chest with its bad attitude whilst toying with them as if a marionette. Heavy metal spices add to thrash instincts within the temptation though again it is the psyche enslaving hooks and grooves which seal the slavery.

Through the psychobilly lined Boogie Stick and the devious ingenuity of The Torture Brothers, the album only tightens its grip on ears and appetite, the first with fevered energy as it stalks the senses spreading aural narcotics laced with Constantinos striking enterprise. Its successor with a similar gait and admittedly flavouring brings its own individual addiction, those hues evolving into an infestation of rock ‘n’ roll which is as toxic as it is a tonic for the spirit, the song laying its hands on a share of best track honours.

Both Divide and Rule and Death After the Melody pretty much match the leading pair, as all tracks come close to in all honesty, their respective defiant groove wired stomp and hungrily swinging trespass each melding metal, punk, and rockabilly textures into one unique carnival of sound and infectiousness. They snarl and tease the imagination, taunt and spark the body into zealous involvement with every note and twist but Infected Syren show themselves just as effective in grabbing the listener’s subservience with unbridled muscle clad, animosity fuelled punk ‘n’ roll, Toothless Tigers the unassailable evidence.

The album closes with Syrens in The Opera, another insatiable imagination stoking instrumental to bask in. It is a fine end to an album we truly cannot get enough of. If Infected Syren cannot stir up real attention and praise their way with this gem of a release something is seriously wrong.

The Infected Syren album is out now on CD and Digitally through most digital music stores and @ https://infectedsyren.bandcamp.com/album/infected-syren

http://infectedsyren.com/    https://www.facebook.com/infectedsyren

Pete RingMaster 16/01/2018

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Possessor – The Ripper

UK metallers Possessor have been a band fear and lust has equally and simultaneously been spawned for in the face of each release uncaged since they emerged within the death throes of 2013. The band’s doom nurtured, thrash fuelled sound is a crushing and violating experience but one which has enslaved body, imagination, and soul here with its virulent, invasive boogie. The London trio recently released new album The Ripper and we can tell you nothing has changed. Their third album is a cauldron of corrosive riffs and destructive rhythms honed into one of the rawest, insatiable, and thrilling trespasses you are likely to hear across this coming year and beyond.

As much grunge, stoner, and alternative metal as those earlier mentioned hues, Possessor’s sound is pure predatory confrontation often as demonic and lewd as the horror soaked premises it spawns. The band’s 2014 debut album, Electric Hell, was an unpolished gem of an introduction providing “a thrilling ticket to the start of their inevitable ascending ride.” It was a journey which has bruised and abused, gripped and thrilled across the following Stay Dead EP a year later and second full-length Dead By Dawn eighteen or so months on. The last album really thrust the band into new spotlights but it has to be said that all have been rousingly eclipsed and put in their place by the carnal majesty of The Ripper.

Instantly opener Conjure and Possess casts a sonic storm over the senses, its abrasive scouring the warm up and prelude to a ravenous stomp of riffs and rhythms bound in the most lustful of grooves. A temptation to rock the residents of a graveyard into life with the swinging beats of Matthew Radford as arousing as they are destructive, the track roars through ears bearing the raw dirty vocal tones of guitarist Graham Bywater with open devilment. The bass of Tom Fowler is just as devilish, its own grooved swing instinctive incitement in the multi-flavoured onslaught.

The following Guillotine is just as fevered in its attack, maybe more so but unafraid to slip into less intensive examinations of the listener as it conjures its own web of salacious grooves and rapacious enterprise. Bywater’s voice and riffs infest ears but even more so his grooves and sonic espionage manipulates body and appetite already caught by the primal claws of the rhythms.

Fowler’s bass finds an even more carnivorous voice for the following Wet Cemetery, its visceral gurning leading a wash of rasping riffs within which vocals spew causticity. Toxic melodies vein the relative calm which separates the song’s energetic lust, it all leading to moments of nefarious endeavour which itself is sheer magnetism. A mesh of essences which lure references to bands such as High On Fire, Cavalera Conspiracy, Electric Wizard, and Unsane, flavours rising throughout the album, the track emerges unique to Possessor and again a common factor to The Ripper echoed in The Slime immediately after and thereon in. The fourth track hits its crunchy stroll instantly, snarling riffs chewing sinew before grooves send liquor coated tendrils through ears, its varied metallic irritancy swiftly addictive as the psyche is increasingly possessed.

Through the grim viscera of Whitechapel Murders and the scalding tension of Lava, the scorching of the senses and unrestrained pleasure escalates, the first of the two bearing the early Therapy? scent our ears have always found and greedily consumed within the Possessor sound. Every part of the band’s unholy trinity is on the top of their game, a success applying across the whole release but at their hungriest or certainly most fervid here. Its successor is an inferno of threat and intrigue, less equipped with irresistible hooks and addiction sparking grooves than others around it but just as commanding in its escalating incessancy.

Notting Hell opens in a jungle of rhythmic machination, the piece a brief shamanic infestation of devilry setting up the blood strewn quarrel and sonic narcotic that is Hacksaw. The most barbarous exploit on the album, it is a bestial and concentrated blitz on the listener, manna for the beleaguered senses and primal rock ‘n’ roll instincts.

A pause as things take a breath simply marks the insatiable devouring sprung by closing instrumental Earth Shaker. It is a rampage driven by a horde of voracious riffs and fearsome rhythms with grooves and twists just as mercilessly toxic and though it does not quite hit the spot as fully as what came before, the track consumes attention and satisfaction with ease.

There are few bands which truly excite just from news of a new encounter with them but Possessor is among them and will continue to be so with hellish offerings like The Ripper.

The Ripper is available now through Graven Earth Records on cassette, Wicked Lester Records on CD, and digitally @ https://possessor.bandcamp.com/album/the-ripper

https://www.facebook.com/possessorband

 Pete RingMaster 10/01/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Secret Sight – Shared Loneliness

Back in 2014, we like so many others were impressed and hooked on the debut album from Secret Sight. It was a release which surprised having come out of the blue awareness wise and introduced us to the captivating dark post punk/gothic rock sound of the Italian band. Now the Ancona hailing outfit has repeated the feat with their second full-length, Shared Loneliness; a collection of songs as striking and captivating as their predecessors but with a maturity and enterprise which sets it apart.

Secret Sight emerged the same year as their Red Cat Records released debut album Day.Night.Life, though there is a 2013 self-titled EP under the name Coldwave before then. Recorded with Paolo Rossi (Soviet Soviet, Be Forest, Brothers In Law), Day.Night.Life swiftly sparked support and praise carrying attention, the band supporting its release with an extensive tour around Italy, Switzerland and Austria where the plaudits continued coming. A quartet at the time, the band has since slimmed to a trio with former vocalist Matteo Schipsi leaving, vocals being shared across guitarist/synth player Cristiano Poli and bassist/synth player Lucio Cristino. With its line-up completed by the dramatic rhythms of Enrico Bartolini, Secret Sight linked up with producer Alessandro Ovi Sportelli for Shared Loneliness, resulting in an album which has mellowed out in regard to the raw edged post punk tone of its predecessor but blossomed in its haunting melancholic drama and melodic suggestiveness.

As with their first album, the band’s sound harkens back to eighties post punk/new wave and their gothic companions but with a bolder identity and imagination belonging to Secret Shine. It opens with Lowest Point, the initial coaxing mist of synths soon joined by the atmospheric lures of guitar and bass, keys simultaneously thickening as melodies simmer and echo in the ears. The instrumental’s shadows carry over into the following Stage Lights where the mesmeric groan of the bass and aligning dark textures seduce the imagination ready for the song’s spirited stroll which erupts soon after. Like a fusion of Leitmotiv and The Sound the track dances on the senses, its rhythmic shuffle sculpting their own catchy charm to the temptation. Superb in voice and enterprise, the song swiftly grips attention, vocals as enticing as the sounds around them and with a great nagging essence to its tenacious rhythms, infectious melodies, and tantalising hooks, the tone and heart for the album is set.

The following Blindmind matches its success with its own compelling design and creative intimacy. As in the last song Cristino’s bass makes an addictive proposal, moody and melancholic in its bold exploits with the same traits fuelling the adventure and intimation of Poli’s guitar which beguiles the imagination in its own right. To be honest all three musicians seize attention with their individual prowess but uniting perfectly to create an even greater temptation, that aforementioned maturity lining every twist and turn.

There is also a breath and tone to the song which reminds of The Cure around their second album, a thick shadow draped air which is as open in songs like next up Fallen and its successor Flowers if to lesser degrees. The first of the two similarly bounds through ears, emotively conjured melodies webbing its rhythmic canter as a China Crisis like catchiness brews while the second with a calmer energy has something of a Modern English to it. Though neither song quite matches up to those before them each leaves pleasure high and attention glued before Swan’s Smile envelops the senses and drives the spirit with its sprightly canter. With a scent of The Danse Society cast, the track simply made an already keen appetite hungrier for more, a want quickly satisfied by the rampant dynamics of Over led by the skilful endeavour of Bartolini. A fusion of post punk with gothic and synth pop, it is a rousingly infectious affair with theatre in its veins and emotional drama in its voice.

The pair of Surprising Lord and Sometimes completes the album in compelling style, the first a pulsating and again relentlessly catchy incitement on body and pleasure as dark and imposing as it is hopeful and anthemic. The evocative balladry of the final track ensures the pleasure listening to Shared Loneliness is relentless even if the song does not quite meet the lofty heights of many of its companions such their might. Epitomising the release in its emotional depth and musical enterprise, it is a fine end to another mouth-watering outing with Secret Sight.

We suggest focusing on the CD edition of the album as it carries a quite excellent cover of The Sound song The Fire as a bonus track, Secret Sight not detouring too far from the original but giving it all the energy and passion it and that great band deserves; just a shame it is not on all versions.

Shared Loneliness is available now through Manic Depression Records for its vinyl edition, Unknown Pleasures Records for the CD, and digitally @ https://secretsight.bandcamp.com

https://www.facebook.com/secretsight

Pete RingMaster 16/01/2018

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright