Mammoth Temple – We’re Not Extinct

Having just been introduced to former Thirteen Shots frontman Johnny Rose’s new project in Blast Bomb we now have the new endeavour from its guitarist Lewis Manchip for you. That proposition is Mammoth Temple and they have just released their rather appetising debut EP, We’re Not Extinct. Echoing the band’s name in many ways, it is a lure of heavy boned rock ‘n’ roll worshipping the seduction of the groove and the growl of the riff, a fuzz rich proposal caked in the dirt of grunge and veined by stoner bred tendrils of melodic suggestion. It is also a potent introduction to the band and one which gets more compelling by the second.

Formed by Lewis and vocalist/bassist Dave, Midlands hailing Mammoth Temple is completed by the thunderous swings of drummer Ben. Initially taking their time to hone their sound, the trio have emerged with a live presence which is swiftly luring keen attention and plaudits, and now with a first release which is as thick in potential as it is already flourishing prowess and enterprise.

It opens up with Meat Promotion and instantly entangles ears in a flavoursome groove. With robust rhythms and throbbing bass that beginning is a sign of things to come in song and release. The blend of mellow vocals adds to a Queens Of The Stone Age like hue to the grunge meets heavy rock stroll of the track, the guitar continuing to cast wiry grooves and melodically sharp bait for ears and appetite to get hooked up on. It is a seriously infectious and captivating start which is more than matched by next up Wiping Out. Its psych rock kissed entrance is pure temptation, the skirting shadows intrigue against the vocal prowess of Dave and Lewis’ expressive melodies. With fiery flames igniting across its catchy gait and imaginative body, the song continues to blossom in imagination and craft. It might not be boldly unique but the song as the EP has a freshness and adventure to it which hints of such success ahead.

The mellower caress of Reflections is courted by the great dark shadowed throb of bass and volatility in Ben’s beats which never erupts but magnetically stalks the melancholic beauty of the song’s heart and touch. A song which just grows over time and listens, it brings another enticing aspect to the Mammoth Temple sound which only grows when the track does uncage its muscle.

The EP is concluded by firstly Promises, a distant rumble increasingly consuming ears as it looms closer and incites the imagination as blues rock ivy clings to its tenacious body and scuzzy skin. Another grower, it does not quite match up to those before it yet lingers in the memory with ease through its Jesus and Mary Chain meets Alice In Chains glaze alone.

How We Are completes the pleasure, it needing mere seconds to hook the appetite with its initial Soundgarden-esque melodic coaxing. From there, its simmering fire grows and intensifies with psych and stoner rock winds blowing across its rhythmic kindling and harmonic haze. As ever, there is a darker hue to its depths and emotion contrasting superbly with its brighter easily invited trespasses. The song is superb, a big end to a fine first union with Mammoth Temple.

It is early days but the signs are already hinting at a potent future for the band and rich adventures for us all alongside.

We’re Not Extinct is out now and available@ https://mammothtemple.bandcamp.com/album/were-not-extinct

https://www.facebook.com/MammothTemple/    https://twitter.com/MammothTemple

Pete RingMaster 05/12/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

The call of the unnatural: exploring The Time Framed

Hailing out of Clearwater, Florida, The Time Framed is a trio unafraid to push themselves, the limits of rock ‘n’ roll, and the listener with bold adventure and hungry imagination in their experimental rock sound. Recently they released their new EP Chrono Dementia, a collection of tracks which fascinate as they escape predictability and expectations. We grabbed the band for a few moments to explore more the new release, the band itself, the inspiration of tarot cards and more….

Hello and thanks for taking time out to talk with us.

Can you first introduce the band and give us some background to how it all started and what brought you all together?

The Time Framed formed due to Jeremy wanting to put his catalog of songs to use. Britt and Jeremy met in a different project and moved into The Time Framed together as Britt was learning bass guitar as music therapy for domestic violence. We met Brandon through another member that joined earlier this year. He was standing in on drums since the current drummer was learning how to play (Jeremy has a habit of teaching people to play instruments to fit best with the music). The other members left for other projects and we loved Brandon so much, and he already felt like part of the family, that we wanted him to stay. He’s a musical genius and gets how we want the music to go, not to mention he thoughts in amazing ideas, he’s a perfect fit for us and the band feels solid now.

Have you been involved in other bands before? If so has that had any impact on what you are doing now, in maybe inspiring a change of style or direction?

Britt was in an indie rock project called Clarity in Chaos as a vocalist. Sadly, they never got a chance to play a show due to several line-up changes. Jeremy joined on as a drummer about 6 months before the final split and that’s about when Britt first started to pick up the bass. Despite the fact that he considers himself more of a guitar player than a drummer, this is the first group that Jeremy has played with as a guitarist. He’s previously played in Say It Ain’t So, a Tampa based Pop Punk act, and currently drums for an alternative band called Hexproof. Brandon has been in several projects like The Mark Anthony Band, Ariose and Stratojet, the latter two not making it out of the garage. I think being in other bands has pushed us towards going away from mainstream and trying to get out of the generic box as much as possible.

What inspired the band name?

The reason we came up with The Time Framed is because music is art that is expressed through time. It’s our intent as a group to be both the artist when creating a song, and part of a masterpiece when performing it. Time is both the medium and product. We haven’t changed names although there is a group of our friends who want us to drop the word “The” off and just be “Time Framed” but if you search us on YouTube, you’ll find that three letter word to be quite helpful.

Was there any specific idea behind the forming of the band and also in what you wanted it and your sound to offer?

A lot of it just came from Jeremy wanting to put to use his catalog of songs he’d written over 15 years. Myself, Britt, and Brandon weren’t too interested in doing the “normal” sounding music, so we were drawn to doing music that pushed genre boundaries and stressed music theory. We’ve tended to take on the mantra that the weirder it sounds the better.

Do the same intentions still drive the band from when it was fresh-faced or have they evolved over time?

I would have to say it’s the same things. Our goal overall is to make music our careers. We don’t feel the need to be the most famous or anything like that; we just want to be able to have music as our career.

Since your early days, how would you say your sound has evolved?

Well, Jeremy has gotten a lot more pedals. We thrive on the idea of making the music sound strange, so with more pedals, we’re having a lot of fun making weird sounds and more of our songs are incorporating these weird sounds.

Always an organic movement of sound within the band or do you deliberately go out to try new things?

It was probably a more organic movement. We haven’t said definitively that we wanted to try something new. Again, with the addition of more guitar pedals, we wanted to incorporate the sounds into our songs, which in turn have a more experimental drive to them. So, with that in mind, we gradually get more and more experimental in sound.

Presumably across the band there is a wide range of inspirations; are there any in particular which have impacted not only on the band’s music but your personal approach and ideas to creating and playing music?

For me, personally, I’ve been really influenced by Tera Melos. I’m in awe with what they do with pedals and music theory that I keep pushing more songs that play with ideas like switching time signature and tempo multiple times. The guys are influenced by similar genres and have been on the same page when writing new music.

Is there a particular process to the songwriting within the band?

We have an interesting creative process of having jam sessions to grab ideas. Usually lyrics are floating around already, most likely due to tarot cards we have lying out, and then we just have jam sessions in which we try to get as weird as possible. When we practice, we record everything and pull out anything that we like to create new songs. I think overall our creative process involves the same ideas to use but we change which idea we use for different songs. It all just depends on how the mood feels at the time.

Where do you draw inspirations to the lyrical side of your songs?

We mostly draw on dreams we have, past experience, and tarot cards.

Would you give us some background to your latest release?

Our EP, Chrono Dementia, which is being released Nov. 4th, is just weird, and we mean that in the best way. We infused different genres of music and influence from theatrical music, classical music, and even video game music to create our EP. It’s just a lot of fun from start to finish with interesting sounds, driving rhythms, and guitar solos that tell stories. It pulls from the emotions and keeps you on your toes with an overall familiar theme to grasp but taking different points of view on that theme. We believe your readers will really enjoy how different it feels and how it brings experimental to the mainstream. Overall, it took several months to complete, and although stressful at times, it was a lot of fun to make and just opened our minds to even bigger and better sounds for the next EP.

Give us some insight to the themes and premise behind it and its songs.

In a weird way, we wanted to keep it as close to a concept album as we could. Each song has a relation to time and current events, hence the name Chrono Dementia. All of the songs were inspired by dreams Jeremy had, and each has a similar feel to it which felt right that they were together. Jeremy has already pre-planned the next five or so EPs and these songs just felt like they needed to be together as opposed to the others.

Are you a band which goes into the studio with songs pretty much in their final state or prefer to develop them as you record?

We have the general idea in mind on what we want to do. Most of the songs are in their final states but we are open to add a lot more, which is exactly what we ended up doing for Chrono Dementia. Having them in their final form keeps us on schedule, but having the ability to be flexible allows us to have a lot of fun with adding new sounds.

Tell us about the live side to the band.

It’s total weirdness! But in all seriousness, it’s totally normal for me to be walking around the venue while playing, our drummer dancing behind the kit, and our guitarist doing backbends and playing solos on the floor. Jeremy likes to mess with different effects pedals and make strange noises you wouldn’t expect to hear from a guitar and Brandon makes some of the best drummer faces! With it being just three of us we have a rather stripped down visual aesthetic, so we don’t use lights or fog machines (yet) but we try to make up for that by making the songs look as differently when we play them as they sound to us.

It is not easy for any new band to make an impact regionally let alone nationally and further afield. How have you found it your neck of the woods?

It’s been a bit rough since we’re experimental. In our area, metal and indie rock seems to be ideal of the local scene, and we tend to be too light to be metal but too heavy to be indie rock. So we’ve really had to reach out, especially to any band that leans towards experimental, to get our name out there. Lately, it seems like experimental is starting to make its name for itself, which is making it a little easier than before.

How has the internet and social media impacted on the band to date? Do you see it as something destined to become a negative from a positive as the band grows and hopefully gets increasing success or is it more that bands struggling with it are lacking the knowledge and desire to keep it working to their advantage?

I think social media is great to be a part of. It’s helped us stay in contact with bands, radio shows, promoters, bookers, etc… Considering that we sound a little different than the local scene, it’s been a great way for us to reach the audience we want to. I think overall, though, that bands shouldn’t solely rely on it. Don’t forget that people are still out in person and at venues. It’s still important to put up fliers, go out and see other bands, and network in person. Social media is just a great add on to the in-person connections.

Once again a big thanks for sharing time with us; anything you would like to add or reveal for the readers?

Considering our various levels of ADD, we couldn’t pick a general genre to stick to as we like all kinds of different music, playing and listening. We also wanted to avoid the notion of “sounding like band x” and try to find ways to stick out from the crowd. Using a lot of guitar effects, melodic bass, and progressive drumming, we wanted to go for a theatrical video game sound with music theory concepts and see how far we could push those boundaries.

Explore The Time Framed further @ https://www.facebook.com/thetimeframed/  and https://thetimeframed.com/

Pete RingMaster 06/12/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Exploring the lures of The Lunar Effect

Hailing from London in the UK, The Lunar Effect is a band making a potent impression on the Capital’s live scene and through their debut EP, Strange Lands released last year. We caught up with the band to find out more exploring origins, inspirations, the muse of “demon seductress soul stealing women” and more….

Hello and thanks for taking time out to talk with us.

Can you first introduce the band and give us some background to how it all started and what brought you all together?

We are Jon, Dan, Josh and Brett and we are The Lunar Effect. It all started with Jon messing around with some solo songs which then developed into a gigging band. Jon’s brother Dan joined, then after a few gigs with other musicians Brett came in on bass. Josh joined soon after that when he answered an advert we put out for a singer. Job done!

Have you been involved in other bands before? If so has that had any impact on what you are doing now, in maybe inspiring a change of style or direction?

Yeah, we have all been in different bands and played as solo artists. You learn from the mistakes you have made in previous bands and try to avoid doing the same thing. It is important finding band members you get along with on a personal level; being a good musician just isn’t enough if you’re also a prize bell-end. If you’re not getting along it can seep into the music you make, then you’ll find it influences the style and direction you take going forwards. That’s why when we put an advert out for a singer we specifically said no dickheads.

What inspired the band name?

A lot of people often think it is because Jon has a daughter named Luna, but the band came first and it’s spelt differently anyway so we can nip that one in the bud. It is actually inspired by the moon and all of the elements in life that its cycles and phases had been said to affect through time, whether true or not.

Was there any specific idea behind the forming of the band and also in what you wanted it and your sound to offer?

We all just wanted to be musicians and write music, so forming a band is obviously what you do. It has taken a while to find the right people, but now we hope we can offer something a bit different. Basically some really good songs as an alternative to a lot of the rubbish that’s out in the mainstream right now.

Do the same things still drive the band when it was fresh-faced or have they evolved over time?

The goal remains the same. It’s always been about making good music with good people and having a laugh along the way. If we can make money from doing this then that’s a bonus. As time goes on you learn to be more selective with things like which gigs to take and which to pass on. You also learn where the pitfalls and charlatans are and how to avoid dealing with them.

Since your early days, how would you say your sound has evolved?

When the band first started it was mainly songs that Jon had already written himself that we just tweaked. We had a more lo-fi, grungy sound. As we have settled and grown into the new line up we have pushed ourselves more and found a sound drawing on all our influences.

 Has it been more of an organic movement of sound or more the band deliberately wanting to try new things?

Originally it was more organic, with each of us bringing in new ideas and influences. It just started to flow over time until we felt we were happy with it. Now we try to build on our sound by trying new ideas and pushing the boundaries, experimenting with new styles and noise while still keeping that vintage sound that is our essence.

Presumably across the band there is a wide range of inspirations; are there any in particular which have impacted not only on the band’s music but your personal approach and ideas to creating and playing music?

We like all sorts, from 70’s bands like Black Sabbath and Pink Floyd to bands like Soundgarden and Silverchair. There are a load of great bands around at the moment that people may not necessarily have heard of, like The Heavy Eyes, Mars Red Sky, Kaleidobolt, etc. The list goes on.

Is there a process within the band which generally guides the writing of songs?

It varies from song to song, but our latest songs usually come out of refining a jam or a riff. Sometimes it takes us weeks to finish an idea, other times they’re finished quicker than it takes to play it through which is cool. We’re good at criticising each other too, bad ideas don’t last long.

 Where, more often than not, are inspirations to the lyrical side of your songs found?

As far as inspiration’s go we cover the classics; women, drugs, women on drugs, demon seductress soul stealing women, trivial existences, crippling pain and yeah, the classics.

Give us some background to your latest release.

Our last release was an EP called Strange Lands. It’s very much sci-fi themed, from the cover to the lyrics and everything in between. Our first full album should be out by the end of the year. It’s shaping up to be a bit of a belter. You can see us performing a song from it for Hunter Studios Live sessions here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aFrGNrBJXrU

 Are you a band which goes into the studio with songs pretty much in their final state or prefer to develop them as you record?

Generally we like to have the bones of the songs all rehearsed and gig tested. Then we can experiment with different techniques and add more layers to the track if we find something that fits and improves the song as a whole. We make sure we record more than we need, that way we can try out new ideas, see what works and what doesn’t and then cherry pick the best stuff.

Tell us about the live side to the band, presumably a favourite aspect of the band?

Well I wouldn’t say it’s necessarily our favourite part but obviously we do enjoy it. We also enjoy writing and recording in the studio.  We always have fun at live shows though, as hopefully do the people who come out to watch us.

It is not easy for any new band to make an impact regionally let alone nationally and further afield. How have you found it your neck of the woods?

No, it’s hard locally as most local venues keep closing and everyone just goes to Wetherspoons. In London it’s the complete opposite. There is an oversaturation of venues which makes it harder to promote, especially with all the high entry fees, though you do learn with experience as we said earlier on. Gigging in Europe is a good idea. The promotion and pay can be a lot better and it’s all generally better organised. They really look after you.

How has the internet and social media impacted on the band to date? Do you see it as something destined to become a negative from a positive as the band grows and hopefully gets increasing success or is it more that bands struggling with it are lacking the knowledge and desire to keep it working to their advantage?

The internet is good for self-promotion and getting stuff out there, though getting people to actually click and listen is still difficult. It would be interesting to know how many of the people that read this interview will then go on to actually check our stuff out. Again, it is a good thing if you have the money behind you to pay professionals to handle the social media side for you, but that goes against what it is meant to be in the first place.

Once again a big thanks for sharing time with us; anything you would like to add or reveal for the readers?

Just thanks for taking the time to read this and we hope that you do check us out on Facebook and all the other sites. You never know, we could be your next favourite band.

Check The Lunar Effect out further @ https://www.facebook.com/TheLunarEffect/  and https://thelunareffect.bandcamp.com

Pete RingMaster 06/12/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright