Chronic Xorn – For These Sins Who Must Die

As the metal year comes to a close, Indian outfit Chronic Xorn give it one final ravenous tempest of sound and craft in the shape of their new album For These Sins Who Must Die. 2017 has been a rather eventful affair with some majorly striking encounters along its way but has saved one of its finest moments until its last few breaths for a release which should thrust the Kolkata hailing quintet towards major awareness and attention.

Formed in 2007, Chronic Xorn has nurtured and become a portent presence within their national metal scene, previous releases in debut EP Death.Destruction.Sermon of 2010 and first album From Mercy two years later reinforcing the raw power and craft of their death metal/ deathcore blend and pushing their emerging stature. The time is ripe for the band to stir up broader recognition and it is hard to suggest or expect For These Sins Who Must Die will not to be the incendiary spark. Dedicated to the band’s deceased close friend Abhishek Bhattacharya who penned all the album’s lyrics, the band’s self-released proposition looks at the oppressed in life; vocalist Saptadip Chakrabarty explaining more with “History reveals that in every religion, community and caste, there has always been a major race of common people, those who suffer and rot under the reign of a corrupted helm. Unwillingly their blood spills as the ever deceitful leader smiles away to glory. This album speaks about all those commoners, who are helplessly handcuffed by societal pressure. Their voices choke under the smoke of fraudulence.”

The scene is set through the album’s intro, Doctrine Of Hate a beguiling melodic lure with thick shadows to its beauty and portentous clouds to its atmosphere. As ears, the imagination is drawn and consumed by its creative and suggestive drama, the track growing resourcefully into the album’s title track. For These Sins Who Must Die instantly grips the appetite, its nagging senses winding grooves and rapacious rhythms  instinctive incitement as the venomously toned vocal squalls of Chakrabarty, backed as potently by those of guitarist Suvam Moitra, crawl through the tempest. The guitars of Moitra and Biswarup Bardhan continue to manipulate the song’s evolving landscape with inventive dexterity, the song almost kaleidoscopic in its adventure and nature.

It is a tremendous start to the album which is only continued by the following Necropolis Iii. The crisp rhythmic bait of drummer Dipayan Chakraborty draws the listener into the waiting fire of sound and vocals, the bass of Soumyadeep Das providing a gnarly growl to the blaze as grooves twang and groan as melodies sear and entice. There are certainly familiar elements flaming away within the song and indeed album but all seared with a character and tone belonging to Chronic Xorn to add to the ingredients already individual to them.

Next up Justice By The Act Of Violence is a savage fury careering through ears with nostrils flared but just as adept at shifting through the gears and surrounding the senses in memorable enterprise. Saptadip Chakrabarty again simply magnetises with the similarly tempting cauldron of sound and imagination getting under the skin like a relentless itch. It is a one of the major qualities of Chronic Xorn’s music, a niggly attribute which you cannot avoid or ignore, nor want to, which constant scratching through listens only makes things more compelling.

Vox Populi is unsurprisingly no different, its traits and features an appetite harrying trespass within a bullish roar led by Saptadip Chakrabarty’s raw throat and emotion. Grooves cast a web of deceit, as invasive as they are deliciously seductive and more than backed by the rapier swings of Dipayan Chakraborty and Das’ deep bass trespasses. Moments of melodic calm and elegance only add to the temptation; eventful breakdowns and rapacious twists creating an imposing clamour as severely ferocious as it is inescapably captivating.

The track’s final sonic sigh is the trigger for the hellacious onslaught of closing track, The Last Stand. Tension seeps from every note and syllable spawned within four minutes of predacious intent, the band’s imagination with riffs, grooves, and rhythms stalking and hunting down the senses within a theatre of melodic endeavour. As individual and united flair scorches ears, band and song simply bully the body and ignite the imagination, encouraging a lust for much more by the album’s close.

As for us, For These Sins Who Must Die is likely to be an introduction to Chronic Xorn for a great and increasing many and hopefully the real awakening to one rather impressive proposition within the metal world.

For These Sins Who Must Die is available now @ https://chronicxorn.bandcamp.com/releases

https://www.facebook.com/chronicxorn/    https://www.instagram.com/chronicxorn/

Pete RingMaster 19/12/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

As A New Revolt – Speechless

Unleashing the turbulence and discontent fuelling the world today, As A New Revolt provides a potent voice for the masses and another truly fresh breath for a year with many momentous propositions within its roar. Speechless is a stunning introduction to the duo of Manu Barrero (vocals, machines) and Julien Lhuillier (drums), a four track EP reflecting the oppression around today and the increasing defiance to it but also a title pretty much summing up certainly our lost for words response to its impressive presence.

As A New Revolt create a sound spawned from the feral fusion of rapcore, punk, industrial, hip hop and much more. What emerges is a unique and ravenously rapacious affair driven by the dexterous tenacity of Lhuillier’s rhythms and infested with the sonic discord and vocal dissonance of Barrero. It is a greedily welcomed trespass of noise which swiftly gets under the skin and proceeds to manipulate body and spirit with its almost carnal infestation.

Speechless opens up with its title track, samples and corrosive noise colluding as tension springs an imposing swagger of noise and Barrero’s slightly psychotic tones. An underlying volatility only adds to the threat and lure, the track lumbering along with predacious intent as inspiring rhythms land with calculated intent. Essences akin to bands such as Rage Against The Machine, Pitchshifter, G.R.I.M., and Nine Inch Nails tease within the cauldron, all hues in the stirring and individual web of the French pair.

The following Riot Porn is even more urgent to invade the senses, its gait boisterous but happy to ebb and flow as Barrero fingers song and thoughts with his vocal stabs. As within its predecessor, electronic and melodic tendrils spiral across the encounter, their magnetic attraction and imagination as toxic as the barbarous winds sonically blowing around them. Lhuillier splinters it all with his own gripping rhythmic drama, every beat a shuddering yet anthemic coaxing inciting song and listener alike and managing to be even more manipulative and colossal in next up Now!, a track which steals the show for personal tastes.

With its eastern sonic lures and compelling beats, the track instantly seduces attention, its portentous air gripping the imagination as a tapestry of sound and enterprise aligns in a mutually riveting web. Though not in sound as such there is something of early Killing Joke to the song and band’s general sound, the same kind of rhythmic addictiveness and nagging ingenuity eating away at defences to inescapable success.

Perfect brings things to a close, the song ‘mellower’ in attack but tenebrous in tone and atmosphere as it challenges and incites second by second, note by note, noise by noise. Unsurprisingly after taking in the previous trio of tracks, there is a gloriously capricious character to the assault, a tempestuousness which builds and boils though it is content to menace through simmering provocation too as vocals and rhythms probe and inflame.

It is a superb end to a truly thrilling release which among many mouth-watering and momentous encounters across 2017 just might be the best of the lot.

Speechless is available now through Atypeek Diffusion / Sand Music across most online stores.

https://www.facebook.com/asanewrevolt     https://twitter.com/asanewrevolt

Pete RingMaster 19/12/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Frauds – With Morning Toast & Jam & Juice

It cannot be just coincidence that year on year December brings some of the relevant year’s best and often most dramatic releases. Maybe it is just that they generally come within a concentrated two week burst with the year’s final pair of weeks more likely to be party time for all so that it is more noticeable than in other equally productive months but there does seem to be a real gathering of striking encounters  as the year makes its departure. The debut album from UK duo Frauds simply adds to the evidence, With Morning Toast & Jam & Juice a glorious cacophony of noise bred rock ‘n’ roll infested with post punk and post hardcore rapacity.

Formed in late 2012, Croydon hailing Frauds consists of Chris Francombe (drum/vocals) and Mikey Alvarez (guitar/vocals), a musical partnership which seems to hail from well before their latest venture burst into life. Inspired by the likes of Nick Cave, Tom Waits, Sonic Youth, Fugazi, Mclusky, Hot Snakes, and Drive Like Jehu, the pair initially began jamming together again with the intent of only playing covers. Soon though their own imagination and creativity took over and new songs emerged. Since then the band has become a potent presence on the capital’s live scene sharing stages with the likes of Idles, Life, HMLTD, Tigercub, Demob Happy, Kagoule, USA Nails, Slaves, Blacklisters, Queen Kwong and site favs The St. Pierre Snake Invasion along the way. Fresh from tour dates alongside ex-Reuben front man Jamie Lenman, Frauds are poised to nag national attention with Morning Toast & Jam & Juice, a niggling hard to see failing such its raw majesty.

Let’s Find Out kicks things off, a riveting tendril of guitar winding around ears and soon joined by the thump of Francombe’s beats. Second by second the web expands, Alvarez’s guitar creating a clamorous jangle with post punk hues to its sharp spice. Vocals equally have a caustic edge, courting the repetitious magnetism of the encounter with punk attitude and ferocity. Sonic shimmers and distortions only add to the virulent nagging, the track as much an intro as a complete offering luring ears and instinctive attention into the waiting depths of the album.

Next up, Smooth instantly twists and turns around the senses, its post punk/alternative rock antics as invasive as they are seductive. Like the spawn of a union between The Three Johns, The Droppers Neck, and Mclusky, the song swings along drawing the listener deeper into its feral majesty before The Feeding Frenzy envelops ears with its noir clad atmospheric drama. Sonic smog devours as vocals provoke, the underlying volatility brewing a ravenous toxic drone as flirtatious as it is debilitating.

From its virulent inhospitality, the mischievous exploits of Sandwiches emerge, the song a rash of hooks and rhythms around brash vocals; all carrying a liquor of humour and captivating causticity. Again there is an eighties post punk discordance in allegiance with modern creative antipathy and again everything uniting in a corrosion of punk irritability which simply sparks ears and an instinctive appetite for noise rock. As it evolves with increasing imagination, the track feeds ears with a delicious groan of bassoon-esque guitar; its barracuda tone pure manna for these senses and matched in addictiveness by the duo’s vocal lures. There are numerous major moments within the album but this is the pinnacle with ease.

The psychotic rock ‘n’ roll of Just Come Of Age comes next to be a strong rival though, beats a kinetic psychosis matched by the wandering tendrils of guitar and vocal theatre. The Eighties Matchbox B-Line Disaster easily comes to mind as the song plays with the imagination, crawling over the senses with predacious glee and tenacity.

Suck Jobs keeps the thrills high with its senses scathing sonic enticements and vocal abrasions, the song mercurial in air and relentless in infectious dynamics while Doom prowls and seeps through the body with grievous intent. Its suffocating tones devour mood and thoughts, dragging attention by the throat into a finale which is pure punk ferocity. The track is one of the least easily accessible trespasses provided by the album but joining all in leaving pleasure brimming.

With Morning Toast & Jam & Juice concludes with firstly Could’ve, Should’ve, Would’ve, another carnally tart and compelling stroll with an Engerica hue to its visceral contagion, and finally through the transfixing saunter of Give In. Rhythmically hypnotic and melodically haunting with a just as appetising acrid edge, the song slowly entangles the senses, its own individual drone like bait viral persuasion becoming more chafing and disturbing second by second.

With a hidden scar of punk as its actual final breath, With Morning Toast & Jam & Juice leaves pleasure high and anticipation for their next move lustful. As earlier mentioned there have been numerous really stirring propositions this year yet it is hard to remember many as glorious as the debut from Frauds.

With Morning Toast & Jam & Juice is available now through Till Deaf Do Us Party Records and available @ https://fraudsfraudsfrauds.bandcamp.com/album/with-morning-toast-jam-juice

https://www.facebook.com/fraudsfraudsfrauds/

Pete RingMaster 19/12/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Astral Cloud Ashes – Dallas Knows the Reason

With the recent announcement of the release of second album Dear Absentee Creator early 2018, British alternative rock outfit Astral Cloud Ashes have provided a highly flavoursome teaser with new single Dallas Knows the Reason. The liveliest slice of rapacious rock ‘n’ roll from the band yet without losing the melodic enterprise and bold touches which has marked the band out as a very appetising prospect to date, the song grabs attention with ease, luring the body into similarly eager involvement.

Astral Cloud Ashes is the solo project of Jersey, Channel Islands hailing vocalist/songwriter/multi-instrumentalist Antony Walker, though he is someone unafraid to embrace other’s talents if needed, his forthcoming album proof in featuring James Elliott Field (Tubelord, Tall Ships) and Max Saidion on certain songs. Through singles and impressive debut album Too Close to the Noise Floor, the band stirred close attention and acclaim across 2016; a success, if Dallas Knows the Reason, backed by its just as magnetic predecessor Moonphase Bloom also taken from Dear Absentee Creator, is a sign of things to be soon discovered which could very well escalate.

Infused with lyrical content dealing with a gun-wielding girl from Texas, Dallas Knows the Reason instantly lures ears with vocal harmonies and lyrical suggestion, rhythms lurking with a firm hand as melodies meander just waiting to explode into life. That they do as the song quickly hits its tenacious stroll, rhythms now bounding through ears as the bass grumbles alongside the fiery exploits of the guitar. It is a highly infectious affair, its slight lulls intensifying the song’s swing once it erupts again.

Walker’s vocals are as distinct and warmly infectious as ever, leaping across the robust endeavours of the song with matching magnetism as feet and hips respond to the natural flirtation of the track’s rock ‘n’ roll. Increasingly more compelling with every listen, Dallas Knows the Reason sees Astral Cloud Ashes launching upon a new plateau of sound and imagination. Bands such as The Pixies, The Cure, Tubelord, and XTC are often referenced with Astral Cloud Ashes but song by song as shown here its sound is becoming more unique which makes the anticipation for Dear Absentee Creator all the keener.

Dallas Knows the Reason is available now @ https://astralcloudashes.bandcamp.com/track/dallas-knows-the-reason

https://www.facebook.com/astralcloudashes    https://twitter.com/AstralCloudAsh    https://www.instagram.com/astral_cloud_ashes/

Pete RingMaster 19/12/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Living Dead Girl – Still Life (Deluxe Edition)

Backing up the potent presence of their new single Still Life, British duo Living Dead Girl has just released a Deluxe Edition of the magnetically haunting encounter. Now a six track seduction, the single continues to captivate as richly as on its first introduction, showing itself one of those encounters which seems to reveal new shades and nuances in its emotion and character listen by listen.

Hailing from Guildford, Living Dead Girl consists of Jessica English (lead vocals, synth, piano, and programming) and Jonno Lloyd (guitar, bass, synth, programming, and backing vocals), the latter also guitarist for Ventenner who themselves have provided 2017 with some striking moments. The pair cast a dark electronic pop sound embracing inspirations of artists such as Massive Attack and Portishead but as the single alone shows, influences which are mere hues in the band’s own individual siren-esque explorations.

Instantly Still Life calls to the imagination, the collusion of wistful keys, skittish rhythms, and an upright bass like stroll gripping ears and attention before the elegant crystalline voice of English warmly wraps sound and senses. Note by note the song evolves and rises up, its atmospheric climate and haunting beauty fuelled by an infectiousness which swiftly gets under the skin. There is a synthpop breeze reminding of German outfit Propaganda to the song too as it glistens and melodically swarms over the senses with gentle but masterful intent. Noir lit drama lines every subsequent note and vocal kiss of a proposition which leaves the imagination basking and appetite hungry for more.

Killing Time provides that sustenance. The song is a beguiling gothic lit shroud of sound, its wrap as bright as it is shadowed. A darksome throb groans as agitated rhythms again court the serenade of English. It is a sombre pulse though which is as welcoming as it is portentous, Lloyd weaving an atmospheric theatre of suggestion with guitar and bass, the colour of the drama provided by the equally compelling portrayal of emotional espionage from keys and voice. With every venture into its obscure scenery the song escalates in intimation and flavours, bewitchment growing to fascination and ultimately lust.

The single is completed by a quartet of alternative versions. Still Life undergoes a Weebl Remix and subsequently PreCog Remix before closing up the release with its Quiet Version while among them there is the Little Death Machine Remix of Killing Time. Each song offers a fresh shade in their respective songs with the final track of the single managing to be even more haunting than its original with its minimalistic yet almost invasive supernatural breath.

An ethereal reflection grounded by a dark questioning within jazzy suggestiveness Still life is pure manna to ears and imagination, their awakening further stirred by the emotional examination brewed by Killing Time. Both tracks alone suggest that Living Dead Girl is a bright light within the British electronic scene which is only going to glow brighter and brighter.

Still Life (Deluxe Edition) is available now @ https://livingdeadgirl.bandcamp.com/album/still-life-deluxe-edition

https://www.facebook.com/pg/livingdeadgirlmusic     https://twitter.com/ldglive     https://www.instagram.com/livingdeadgirlband/

Pete RingMaster 14/12/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

Dirt, spices, and rock ‘n’ roll: getting a taste of The Sourheads

If you ever have thoughts that real rock ‘n roll is on the wane a quick listen to the new album from British rockers The Sourheads will soon make you think again. Care Plan For The Soul is a nine-track debut full-length, a skilfully and passionately woven roar of classic and fresh rock diversity which snarls as it seduces, thrills as it trespasses ears and imagination. Through our friend Garry at SaN, we had the chance to dig deeper into The Sourheads with guitarist MIK CRONE, exploring the band’s origins, digging into the heart of Care Plan For The Soul, The Sourheads live and more….

Hi Mik and big thanks for taking time to chat with us.

Can you, for those yet to be invaded by your rock ‘n’ roll, first introduce the band?

Jake on vocals, Mik on Guitar, Ben on Bass and Lamb on Drums.

We are The Sourheads and we come from Wakefield West Yorkshire. We are a rock band who take influence from the greats and add our own twist. We like to think of ourselves of somewhat multi-genre and we don’t want to be seen as just one specific style of music. A career band like The Stones or The Who dip into different things but still stay true to who they are…So yea we are a rock band who give it our all live.

The band is said to have emerged in 2016 but does its seeds go further back?

The version of The Sourheads now is the result of many years building. Like Oasis the original version was Jake [Coxon]our singer and his brother Sid who played guitar. They had a string of musicians throughout a short period of time. I first came into the picture as a producer for the band. I had been working with various bands and the early version of the band struck me as a very different but awesome set of musicians. I felt with direction the band could be massive.  Around this time I was asked to join as a second guitarist and a month later Sid left. So at this point we upped our game and decided to focus on a solid tight band and work on the debut album. The Sourheads you see now emerged in 2016.

Is The Sourheads your first ventures in a band or do you all bring various previous experiences and explored styles of music to the mix?

Everyone in The Sourheads has been in other bands before and we are all have different musical influences. This has proved a major asset in creating the sound and style of The Sourheads.. I had a small amount of success with a metal band I was in. Lamb [Chris Lambert] our drummer was in a relatively successful Indi band. Ben [Taylor] has a more Pearl Jam grunge influence and has played bass forever and grew up jamming with his brother Simon (Inme) and Jake has always been a creative person singing and painting and  as I, is more 70s inspired through bands such as The Doors, Alice Cooper, Deep Purple. The combination of these different influences creates the originality of our band. We are what we are.

What inspired the band name?

A Sourhead can be interpreted a number of ways. Bitter and twisted, hungover. There is no deep meaning behind the name.

Was there any specific idea behind the forming of the band and also in what you wanted it and your sound to offer?

As a band we feel that it is easy to be stereotyped into a genre. We don’t necessarily want that as we are all influenced by different styles of music. What we want to do is wear our hearts on our sleeves and be 100% true to what we are. Our image and sound isn’t contrived, it is pure. Our front man is a character and is like that 24/7.

As a band we have evolved over time and we are now as sharp as a razor. In the last few months we have really tweaked everything so that it is the best we can offer. Little things like changing guitar sounds or what bass amp we use. We are always trying to give the best live performances we can. Through time you learn how to fine tune every aspect of the band.

Since your early days, how would you say your sound has evolved?

Before I joined the band the sound was more indie influenced. When I joined we rocked it up considerably. The band used to jam and have beers and chill out more. Since we started writing the debut album and got the record deal we became more focused. It is important to be professional at rehearsals. As a result we worked on emphasising certain parts of songs, making them tighter and adding dynamics.

Has it been more of an organic movement of sound or more the band deliberately wanting to try new things?

We have always tried different styles of music when we write. Some songs sound like the Rolling Stones others sound like Black Sabbath. It depends on who comes up with the first ideas, riffs etc at some point we will bring the Synths and organ back out. Everything we do usually comes from a groove, guitar riff etc

You have just released your debut album, Care Plan For The Soul. From its first breath it shares a multi-flavoured, refreshingly dirty and just a little salacious roar of sound and intent; a mix which suggests a varied range of inspirations to the band and individual members. Who particularly stands out as having an impact on your approach to making music?

We take our inspiration from different places. Jake is a massive Doors fan, Lamb is into his classic British Indi music; Ben is also a fan of different styles of music. I look up to any band that has strong songs. Stone Temple Pilots are a massive influence for me. Deftones, Queens of the Stone Age, The Cult, Shed Seven, Oasis, Clutch. We use many colours to create our art.

How would you describe your sound to newcomers?

Iggy and the Stooges mixed with the Sex Pistols thrown into a blender with The Stereophonics and Nirvana.

Classic Rock with an edge.

It feels like it just follows its nose, always prepared to embrace fresh and unpredictable flavours. Is this something you deliberately set out to purposefully develop or a sound and direction which just grew and evolved organically?

We are what we are. People either get it or don’t. One review says we are original and have rewritten the rule book of what a rock band should be. The other will say they don’t get us. Why do we look like we do and why does the artwork not match the music. Well the answer is we are totally focussed and we are 100% us. Everything is totally focused and this is what we do, our sound and direction develop naturally. Luckily our label saw this and our friends like Red Spektor saw this. So it’s better to have a loyal friendship and business partnership and have loyal listeners than to be fake and try to jump on a scene.

How long was Care Plan For The Soul in the making?

We had a lot of time rehearsing and making sure we could play the songs. We could play without vocals, with vocals, without bass or without guitar and obviously all of us together…Probably 3 months of pre-production and a week to record.

It has an instinctive snarl to its air and open rawness to its energy; at times feeling like it may have been recorded live. How did you approach its creation in the studio?

We decided early on that the band has a live energy that needed to be captured so we decided to record live and then delete the guide vocal and do a main vocal later. I also overdubbed a second guitar rhythm track to fatten the overall mix. We also added congas and cello in the overdub stage.

Can you give us an insight into the trials and pleasing surprises you found when recording the album?

We worked with a wonderful producer called Matt Knee and we used an old 70’s BBC mixing desk, this gave us a warmth that we were pleasantly surprised by. We wanted initially to record full analogue but as we wanted to play live we decided it’s may be better to do it digitally but through old analogue gear. This was due to the fact that digital is instant and we knew we had to keep in budget for our business plan to be effective. We needed to make sure everyone was comfortable and the atmosphere was good. We had incense burning and lava lamps. Pretty laid back.

It was subsequently mastered by Pete Maher (The Rolling Stones, Depeche Mode, U2) and released through German Label Kozmik Artifactz. How did those link ups come about?

Pete Maher has worked with everyone and we liked the fact that he worked within multiple genres. Katy Perry, Pink Floyd, Linkin Park are a few of his varied clientele and he had just finished mastering the LA LA Land soundtrack. We knew that attracting a big name would gain us attention and Pete does great deals for up and coming bands. It seemed like a great idea and he did an amazing job. Around this time we became close friends with Red Spektor and their manager Simon. They were saying good things about us in interviews and we were starting to get noticed. I sent a private link of the album to a number of labels and pretty much instantly Kai at Kozmik Artifactz messaged back saying ‘We don’t usually release this style but we think you would fit our sister label Oak Island perfectly so we did the deal and we are honoured to be part of the Kozmik Artifactz Oak Island family. The label is having great success with bands like Church of the Cozmic Skull and of course our brothers Red Spektor.

Can you give us the inspiration for the album title and some of the themes within its body?

We felt that the title had to reflect the song content. Our drummer Lamb came up with it. The songs are pretty intense in parts and cover lots of topics such as Demonic Possession, Marriage Breakdowns, War veterans, soul stealing creatures. When you take this into consideration and then see the album cover is a lone figure stood in the middle of the beach with his dog it’s kind of like that is the care plan for his soul. He is escaping the turmoil.

Is there a particular songwriting process within the band?

Pretty much straight forward…Ben or me write a riff or two. Lamb plays a beat. We arrange the song, record it on a phone then Jake writes the lyrics.

Apart from obvious pride and satisfaction in Care Plan For The Soul is there a particular moment within it which gives you a specific personal flush of inner pleasure?

The whole thing is a major flush of inner pleasure. We set out with a goal and we achieved it on budget and we didn’t move away from our art and vision one bit. This is amazing to us. To have a vinyl copy of the album in my hands and look at the finished product gives me goosebumps. The fact that the digital streaming numbers are good too also feels good. We want to get out to as many people as possible. From the actual recording there are a few moments I like. I think some of the vocal delivery is the best Jake has ever been.  The rush created when he shouts I am the Lotus! That’s a fan favourite moment.

Give us an insight into the live side of the band?

We are told we are extremely good live. Jake is a bare chested beast of a frontman, live truly something that has to be seen and heard. We are very tight and play as close to the album as we can get. I like the idea that we are four individual characters and that as a member of the audience you can get what you are looking for from us. We put a lot into it. I’m swinging my arm in the air and running around; Jake is in the crowd or rolling around on the floor. Ben is grooving away and lam is bashing the living daylights out of the kit.  We are an old fashioned rock band. We put on a show.

Obviously the album is in its early days inviting attention but what is next on the horizon of The Sourheads?

We are hoping to tour throughout 2018 and play some festivals. Do a couple of music videos and keep writing. We have 3 songs written for the next album already. We have also experimented with slightly different sounds. Some old school style Stones vibe.

It is not easy for any new band to make an impact regionally let alone nationally and further afield. How have you found it your neck of the woods?

The most important thing to do is gig swap with other bands throughout the country. There are so many bands who are hometown heroes. That’s all very good if it is a hobby but not so if you want to leave a lasting impression and have your legacy respected. What we have found is the more we play the small festivals, the more the promoters share the information. There is a really healthy underground rock scene in the UK at the moment and everybody seems to be looking out for everybody else.

How has the internet and social media impacted on the band to date; is a battle which has to be waged or a constant weapon for success?

Social media is great if the people already know about you. In the last few years the pay to get hits and advertise your band has really hurt the artist. The idea that you pay £50 to get 300 likes in Indonesia isn’t helping anybody. We have had musical instrument companies say you need so many likes on Facebook for us to consider you. This along with people not actually going on bands websites anymore means companies like Facebook and Instagram pretty much have the Monopoly on online presence. Bandcamp seems to work and I would encourage other bands to check it out if they haven’t already. Webzines like yours also help a great deal. I would say use social media but don’t let it be the basis of promoting your band.

Again many thanks for sharing your time; any last words you would like to add?

Thank you for showing interest in the band. We truly appreciate every website, magazine radio station that helps us spread our message and music. We are fans of music and do this because we love playing and creating our art. People like you keep the musical torch burning bright. There is a buzz and new found enthusiasm for rock music and we want to embrace this whole heartedly.

Check out The Sourheads further @ https://www.thesourheads.com/    https://www.facebook.com/thesourheads    https://thesourheads2.bandcamp.com/

Pete RingMaster 13/12/2017

The RingMaster Review

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright

The Written Years – Lost In You Now

It has been a month or two short of four years since we checked out the self-titled debut album from Canadian band The Written Years.  It was a masterful persuasion of open and smouldering temptation cast from an original blend of post and alternative rock with folk and melodic inspirations, what the band called “Winter Music”. At the time we were very confidence that the world would be hearing a great deal of the band over coming years. Since then they have been conspicuous by their silence, literally in the case of one of their members. Now they are back with new single Lost In You Now, a song which shows the years have been well spent on further honing the band’s sound and its compelling melodic temptation.

After the acclaim luring release of their album, the Vancouver based quartet were soon working on new songs for its successor. It was a creative fire and eagerness though soon halted when vocalist/ guitarist and primary songwriter Wade Ouellet experienced a sudden and unexplained speech loss. It caused him “to refrain from speaking in near-isolation for months “ and the band to go on hold; a hiatus compounded by guitarist Alex Richardson and drummer Kane Enders both independently experiencing sudden and dramatic losses of immediate family members. As people and band recovered, a re-assessment of those already written tracks saw songs originally centred on “coming-of-age stories” became darker more intimate explorations of “suburbia, infatuation, and forbidden love.” The Written Years now have their second album poised for a Spring release in 2018 and you can anticipate that it will be richly hued with the trauma of the past years; indeed its opening two lines echo that time…”I wish I could find life inside the fire / I wish I could sing, though my voice has died.

New single Lost In You Now is a potent teaser for the album, the song as the full-length produced by Ryan Worsley (Dear Rouge, Said The Whale) with the band. It opens with the tender caress of a synth, its melancholic grace soon nurturing a melodic stroll with darker rhythms. Ouellet’s voice similarly has a low-spirited breath, his tones as impressive and potent as ever with harmonies just as elegant around his open heart. The song continues to saunter with an infectious energy and character, its air carrying a great eighties new wave/pop breeze which colludes sublimely with the track’s fresh indie enterprise cast by the imagination of the foursome.

It may have been a time which you can imagined seriously threatened the future of the band but The Written Years has come back, going by Lost In You Now, even stronger and with a new aspect to their creativity which makes it very easy to eagerly anticipate their forthcoming album.

Also keep your eyes peeled for a great video accompanying Lost In You Now featuring Kevin, a guy the band met at East Vancouver’s Waldorf Hotel after being captivated by the individual passion and energy in his dancing.

Lost In You Now is out now through all online retailers and streaming services and @ http://spoti.fi/2AZA7e9

https://www.facebook.com/writtenyears    https://twitter.com/writtenyears    https://writtenyears.bandcamp.com/

Pete RingMaster 13/12/2017

Copyright RingMaster: MyFreeCopyright